Mos Generator & Di’Aul Premiere Split LP in Full

Posted in audiObelisk on September 23rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

mos generator diaul split cover

Port Orchard, Washington’s  business analysis communication plan - professional and affordable paper to make easier your education Instead of worrying about term paper writing find the necessary Mos Generator and Milan, Italy’s  hop over to here, Wholesale Various High Quality Cheapest Paper Products from Global Cheapest Paper Suppliers and Cheapest Paper Factory,Importer,Exporter at Di’Aul will release a split LP this Friday through  Get term papers for sales from Essayssos, the well known reputed essay writing company located in US and UK. They have well experienced writers. Free Argonauta Records. It’s a vinyl-only, limited-to-250 copies pressing, and if the pairing of bands seems random or at very least plucked out of the ether, the story behind how it came together could hardly be simpler. Reportedly, members of  We recommended you read, term papers, research papers, thesis papers, reports, reviews, speeches and dissertations of superior quality written from scratch Di’Aul went to see  It has never been this easy to Essay About The Internet online. It's also safe as well. We guarantee you 100% plagiarism-free content and confidentiality. Mos Generator on tour a few years back and hit up guitarist/vocalist  Get Essay Done offers affordable and top notch quality, just pay and ask us to Write Me an Essay or Professional Resume Writing Services Nj and get well written college paper. Tony Reed about making something happen. Couple years after the fact, here we are. The life lesson is you lose nothing by sending that email, and maybe you get to put out a split with Reportage Essays On The New World Order. We have a highly professional and qualified writing staff. Our writers have great writing experience and always do their Mos Generator.

The Pacific Northwest heavy rock institution offer three tracks on side A of the quite-manageable 32-minute outing, and bring forth an installment of their ‘Plundering of the Vaults’ series with demos recorded between 2014 and 2018. As self-sufficient as they are in the studio with  Fast http://workspaceadvantage.com/writing-a-proposal-essay Website You've Been Looking for. Desperately looking for academic services with the question: Who can type my essay as urgent as Reed working as producer as well as helming mixing and mastering, it’s hard to imagine the vaults aren’t overflowing at any given time, but the three inclusions here run shortest to longest and feel particularly choice.

“I Spoke to Death” opens in  Zeller Primary Homework Help Athens, Omaha, Nebraska. 1,000 likes 1 was here. http://www.ZellerWritingCompany.com - Helping writers to improve their craft and... Sabbath-rock fashion while also invoking Americana folk, while “The Paranoid” rolls at a lumbering pace in contrast to its own obvious reference while the lyrics nod to scholarships writing essays People Paper Writing Websites help homework school chicago turabian citation dissertation The Stooges‘ “TV Eye” and vocal lines intertwine behind one of the most outwardly doomed progressions I’ve heard from the band. Somehow fitting, a cross-lineup (explained below) cover of http://at.kdu.edu.ua/?how-to-write-an-essay-for-a-college-application - Opt for the service, and our experienced scholars will fulfil your order supremely well Use from our cheap custom term paper Pink Floyd‘s “Fearless” — also recently taken on by Seattle/Los Angeles heavies  Looking to write my dissertation or http://www.asgerandersen.dk/?major-in-creative-writing we cater both queries at affordable prices, call now! Snail — caps  sources - confide your dissertation to qualified writers engaged in the service 100% non-plagiarism guarantee of exclusive essays & papers. Mos Generator‘s portion of the release with clarity cutting through psychedelia and a kick of energy bolstering the mellow vibe of the http://www.rndincentives.com/dissertation-report-on-cloud-computing/ for you - Top reliable and professional academic writing aid. Find out common tips how to receive a plagiarism free themed essay Meddle original while still ending with a crowd chant, maybe backwards in this case.

Meanwhile, in Milan,  Community Service Help - Allow us to take care of your Bachelor thesis. Start working on your essay right now with professional guidance guaranteed by Di’Aul crush it. The four-piece of vocalist  MoMo, guitarist LeLe, bassist Jeremy Toma and drummer Diego Bertoni celebrate 10 years of the band’s existence in 2020, and their two assembled cuts — “The House on the Edge of the World” (8:47) and “Three Ladies” (7:56) — stand in immediate contrast to side A in their focus on sheer tonal heft and impact. Beginning with two minutes-plus of ambience and stark guitar, “The House on the Edge of the World” builds into a massive and righteous nod without losing its hook in the ensuing fray.

It is H-E-A-V-Y, and harsher in its approach than Mos Generator, but makes a better complement for the fact that each act brings something different to the release. There’s sludge underlying what Di’Aul are doing, and some jabs and turns of riff in “The House on the Edge of the World” remind of YOB, but as the track chug-stop-chugs to its end, its gravity is its own. More immediate, “Three Ladies” starts out with bass and drums and is underway soon enough with its own stomp and drawl, a solo break as it heads into its midsection proving only a brief respite from the willful repetition and concrete-on-skull vibe that surrounds.

If you think you can hang, you probably can. Splits like this often become a footnote in the respective catalogs of the bands that take part in them. Mos Generator always have a slew of things going on, and Di’Aul are two years removed from their second LP, Nobody’s Heaven (review here), but for an offering that asks next to nothing of the listener beyond the time involved in hearing the thing, and for the quality of work put in by both groups, you can’t really go wrong, whether either band is new to you or not. The relatively few physical copies that exist create some urgency around it, so I’m that much more appreciative of being able to host the full stream of the split for you to check out in advance of the proper release this Friday.

More PR wire info follows under the player.

Please enjoy:

Mos Generator & Di’Aul, Split official premiere

Heavy rock icons, Mos Generator, have teamed up with Italy’s doom and sludge rock heavy weights Di’Aul for the release of a 5-track split vinyl-only LP, coming out on September 25th, 2020, via Argonauta Records!

Preorder here: www.argonautarecords.com/shop

Mos Generator’s plundering of the Vaults continues with three demos recorded between May 2014 and June 2018. Says Tony Reed, “All three of these songs were recorded live in our rehearsal space and then layers were added later in the studio. There are a few interesting things about these songs. First, they are loosely arranged ideas that were only played two or three times before we recorded them, and I think that is what helps give them the raw edge that they have. And two, there is a crossover of band line-ups. On the Pink Floyd cover “Fearless”, original drummer Shawn Johnson is playing with second line-up bassist Sean Booth. That has happened before with other configurations and I enjoy it. Someday I would like to record with both rhythm sections at once.”

After a decade of shows across Europe and four albums to date, Di’Aul have grabbed the chance to team up with one of the best rock bands of our time: Mos Generator. “We saw them live with Saint Vitus during their European tour, completely astonished from their sound, MoMo and Rex decided to write a message to Mr. Tony Reed and ask him to make a record together. And so it is!”

Di’Aul recorded two brand new songs in a one day session with longtime friends and producers Federico Lino and Alessio Massara of the Iron Ape Studio in Vigevano (Pavia – Italy), mastered at HeavyHead Recording Co. by Tony Reed himself.

Tracklist:
A Side Mos Generator – “Plundering of the Vaults : Vol II”
1. I Spoke to Death
2. The Paranoid
3. Fearless ( Pink Floyd Cover )

B Side Di’Aul
1. The House on the Edge of the World
2. Three Ladies

Mos Generator on Thee Facebooks

Mos Generator on Bandcamp

Di’Aul on Thee Facebooks

Di’Aul on Bandcamp

Argonauta Records website

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Vesta Premiere “Elohim” Video; Odyssey out Oct. 16

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 17th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

vesta

Italian instrumentalists Vesta will release their second full-length through Argonauta Records, titled Odyssey, on Oct. 16, and they’re not kidding around when it comes to that title. Even going beyond the references to 2001: A Space Odyssey in the Viareggio trio’s new video for album-opener “Elohim” premiering below, the record itself spans eight songs and an encompassing 52 minutes that bring together heavy rock and roll and progressive metal, seeming to find a space between Tool, Russian Circles, Karma to Burn and maybe even a bit of Isis (looking at you, “Tumae”) as the journey unfolds.

Though they remain wordless, their expression comes through use of effects and a general sense of poise that underscores the notion of the band as progressive; they’re well in control of what they’re doing, and whatever exploratory elements they might have at work throughout, be it flutter of guitar here or a crushing low-end shove a short time later — the punch of bass at the start of “Breach” is particularly fun — they contradict hypnotic passages with sudden turns in a way that can only be purposeful. That is to say, they know where they want to put their audience and how to get them there.

The album would seem to be comprised of two different methods playing out across longer and shorter tracks. “Elohim” tops seven minutes and is of a kind with the closing salvo ofVESTA Odyssey “Temple,” “Supernova” and “Cerere,” all of which are between 7-8 minutes. The space between the beginning and that consuming finish is given to “Tumae,” “Breach,” “Juno” and the transitional highlight “Borealis,” all of which are under six minutes long. True enough that all the material throughout Vesta‘s Odyssey has a sense of scope and that the breadth they show comes through wherever a given song might lead, but “Elohim” seems specially positioned to immerse the listener in what the outing has to offer, to capture the attention and mindset and from there manipulate it in the manner stated above.

Comprised of guitarist Giacomo Cerri, bassist Lorenzo Iannazzone and drummer Sandro Marchi, the three-piece are able to bring a sense of energy to the proceedings that makes them breathe all the more, but it is the patient and unfurling nature of the material that most comes through. “Juno” touches on a “Stones From the Sky” moment — the Neurosis riff that launched post-metal as a genre — but whether Vesta are drawing from that well of inspiration or another, it’s hard to say, and it being hard to say is what makes the album work as it pulls together its songs from various sounds and styles.

It’s in “Temple” that the Tool-ness most comes forward, but that in itself is really just an introduction to the final stage of Odyssey as a whole, which progresses smoothly into “Supernova” — there’s a burst, sure enough, but it’s less sudden than one might expect given the title — and into the kind of epilogue of “Cerere,” which finds room for a playfully bluesy solo and a last push through wash that, if you managed to sneak in some ghostly howls way down in the mix, would for sure be able to pass as black metal. You find the darnedest things lurking in the corners of records by bands who are obviously pushing themselves to reach someplace new.

I don’t know if there’s an overarching narrative to Odyssey, but there’s certainly one to “Elohim,” and it plays out in the video with all the clarity one might expect given the atmospheric intention on the part of the band behind it, adopting the aforementioned Kubrickian modus and ending on an alien landscape when its voyage is complete.

Live long, prosper, and enjoy:

Vesta, “Elohim” official video premiere

Vesta on “Elohim”:

“Being an instrumental group, we prefer to leave free interpretation to those who enjoy our music, but lately we are taking more into consideration the potential of a visual integration in support. Regarding the first single Elohim, the basic meaning of the name is “God”, “Divinity” intended as the One God … and like every human being we ask ourselves if we are alone in the universe or, and if there really is a mind superior to us, maybe it too is looking for answers. During these months of lockdown we got an idea of ??how we could tell what we had in mind through a short film. The story speaks of a signal picked up on earth, identified and analyzed. Through a spacetime tunnel man manages to have a vision, which leads him to explore Mars in search of answers to that signal but there is no life, there is nothing other than red rocks and rocky deserts. Yet in the middle of a Canyon there is an artifact placed by who knows, that transports us back to another part of the Cosmos. Something happens there; are we alone?”

Three years after their self-titled debut, Italy’s post-rock and metal outfit, Vesta, returns with their sophomore album, titled “Odyssey”, on October 16th 2020 via Argonauta Records.

“We’re three people, three individuals who came together to create something, to make music and to complete each other musically, to form a perfect Triangle.” The band explains. “Everyone in VESTA is interested in how we present our music. We write a group of songs that have a vibe, energy and feeling, and then we try to pick an image to capture that and communicate a feeling. We want something that adds to the connection with the audience.What makes us a bit nervous is, in this instant time, to release something that might take more than one listen. Where everything is instantly judged on YouTube or something! It’s a bit like releasing a horse and cart on a racetrack. With three perfectionists in the band, we have a hard time reaching perfection.”

“Odyssey” was recorded and mixed by Alessandro “Ovi” Sportelli and mastered by James Plotkin (Khanate, Cave In, Isis, Sumac), the result is a powerful, roaring wall of sound, a 54 minutes long, sonic Odyssey.

Album Tracklisting:
1. Elohim
2. Tumæ
3. Breach
4. Juno
5. Borealis
6. Temple
7. Supernova
8. Cerere

Vesta is:
Giacomo Cerri – Guitar & Loops
Sandro Marchi – Drums & Cymbals
Lorenzo Iannazzone – Bass & Drones

Vesta on Thee Facebooks

Vesta on Bandcamp

Argonauta Records website

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Review & Full Album Stream: Kariti, Covered Mirrors

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

kariti covered mirrors

[Click play above to stream Kariti’s Covered Mirrors in full. Album is out Sept. 18 on Aural Music.]

This Friday, native Russian solo artist Kariti — also stylized all-lowercase: kariti — will release her debut full-length, Covered Mirrors, through Aural Music. Comprising nine songs reportedly tracked in rural seclusion in Italy, where Kariti now lives, it is an almost uniformly melancholy 34-minute affair, based largely around voice and acoustic guitar, but with moments of flourish in other arrangement elements. Harmonies — more over, self-harmonies — abound as Kariti gives expressive weight to this mournfulness, and in songs like “Sky Burial,” “Absent Angels” and the album’s centerpiece “Penance,” the patient sensibility Kariti brings to her songwriting comes through in each passing measure.

With two titles in Russian — they translate to “The Baptism of a Witch” and “Abyss” — some contributions of acoustic and slide guitar from engineer Lorenzo Della Rovere on “Sky Burial” and “The Baptism of a Witch,” as well as electric from Grime‘s Marco Matta on “Sky Burial” and “Anna (Requiem to Death)”, the slow progressions and background echoes and other sonic details are highlighted by the relatively minimal arrangements of which they’re part. That is, because there aren’t a kitchen sink’s worth of elements being used, each flourish stands out, perhaps most especially the electric guitar on “Anna (Requiem to Death)” and “Sky Burial,” which opens the LP following the “Intro” of what’s apparently traditional Russian funeral dirge. Make no mistake, however, Covered Mirrors is lush, and Kariti‘s voice sees to that all on its own.

The folk singing at the outset is given an eerie, ghostly echo — voice from the past, manifest — and unfolds into the opening plucked strings and immediate harmonies of “Sky Burial” smoothly as Kariti comes forward in the mix. The electric guitar joins later, adding to the sense of grief and playing off the otherwise soft delivery. Feedback is effective in ending the song as it gives way to “Kybele’s Kiss,” wherein the dynamic of single-voice and layering becomes more prominent. In terms of technique, it’s certainly not that Kariti can’t carry her songs in solo fashion, but the aesthetic choice to layer is engaging where and when employed throughout Covered Mirrors, as on “The Baptism of a Witch,” harder-strummed on the guitar for an angular feel but still well within the bounds of neo-folk in its presentation.

A language switch is easily made, whether you speak Russian or not, and if anything, the themes of loss, death and what lay beyond come through in the mystery of what’s being said as well as in the music surrounding. Bottom line is it is no challenge to follow along the path Kariti is leading. “Penance” follows with a quiet intensity and what feels like more than one progression of guitar happening behind, indeed, more than one progression of voice, but “intensity” must be understood on the relative terms of Covered Mirrors itself. It’s not as though Kariti is suddenly breaking out blastbeats.

kariti

It is striking though when electric guitar arrives at the outset of “Anna (Requiem to Death)” and one is reminded of the atmospheric approach of acts like Silver Summit, as well as the current flush of groups and artists blending together ambient elements of heavy music with folkish styles — the PR wire has a list below if you’re looking for names; I won’t patronize you by repeating them here — but “Anna (Requiem to Death)” is short at just over three minutes, so its mark is made but fleeting, capping with a hard, low, distorted strum giving way to what seems to be manipulated crow calls at the start of “Il Corvo,” which is the only piece on Covered Mirrors to top five minutes.

There is more electric guitar in “Il Corvo” as well that strikes like thunder in the distance of the mix, not so much intended to play off the acoustic and vocal lines as to add to them in atmospheric terms, to flesh out the space in which the rest of the song is happening. Is it a march? Maybe. If so, it’s one given contradiction by the subsequent going-to-ground in “Absent Angels,” which returns Kariti to what one might think of as the foundation upon which the rest of the album is built, namely guitar and voice.

That reset is well timed and a tactic that speaks to some influence from a classic rock LP structure, being that side B is often where an artist might broaden the scope of arrangements or craft — as Kariti does — and then reorient the listener one last time ahead of the finale. A move skillfully employed here, and by no means the first, as subtle shifts have been taking place all along that reveal themselves more with each deeper-dive listen. “Abyss” caps the offering in likewise resonant and spacious fashion, and its lyrics are in English despite the Cyrillic title, but it’s in the ensuing “aah”s and overarching melody that the finale makes its lasting impression. Covered Mirrors is an album for the middle of the night, and the spaces it leaves open in its mix seem to be waiting to be filled by the noises of the natural world — chirping insects, leaves in wind, maybe rainfall.

That the style in which Kariti is immersed has taken on the trappings of a genre does precious little to undercut the emotional impact being made by the material and the album’s execution, and while its power is quiet, it nonetheless exists. In terms of thinking of Covered Mirrors as a debut, the nuances of arrangement stand out as an area that Kariti might continue to explore, whether that’s furthering the use of electric guitar as an atmospheric, sort-of-impressionist element alongside the acoustic, or perhaps even employing keys or percussion of one sort or another should she choose to do so. That those don’t appear in these songs, that this first record is as stripped-to-the-core as it is, is emblematic of the creative bravery involved in its making, and that too resonates when it’s over, whatever promise for the future it might accompany.

Kariti on Thee Facebooks

Kariti on Instagram

Kariti on Bandcamp

Aural Music on Bandcamp

Aural Music website

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Nibiru Announce Panspermia Due Nov. 13

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

nibiru

There’s a teaser for the upcoming Nibiru album, Panspermia, down at the bottom of this post, but I’m gonna go ahead and recommend you don’t actually watch it. The audio is kind of manic and chaotic and extreme in a way that one would expected from the Turin-based, but the accompanying video — at least until it cuts to the album cover, which you can see below anyway, is someone’s body being cut up and eaten by birds, and I don’t know what the situation is there, real, fake, death ritual or what, but yeah, its not something that’s about to make your day better by viewing. Obviously that’s something purposeful from the trio, who’ve been pushing the boundaries of extreme sludge for years now, and it’s not something to be held against them, but yeah, kinda gross.

It’s down there though, if you’re up for it. If not, nobody’s about to think any less of you.

To the PR wire:

nibiru panspermia

Blackened Drone & Sludge heavy weights, NIBIRU, unleash album details and first, disturbing yet haunting teaser!

“Panspermia” coming out November 13th on Argonauta Records!

Following their latest album, “Salbrox” (2019, Ritual Productions), Blackened Sludge and Drone trio, NIBIRU, have re-signed with Argonauta Records for the release of their sixth studio album, titled “Panspermia”, that will be seeing the light of day on Friday the 13rd of November 2020.

NIBIRU deliver a very special, truly unique and inspiring sound, as they develop their musical aesthetics through the recitation of the Enochian keys, whose evocation aims at precise ritual effects, and the insertion of intimate and disturbing verses in Italian. The band’s sources of extramusical influences are inspired by occultists and esotericists such as Aleister Crowley, Kenneth Grant, Austin Osman Spare and Julius Evola, but also psychiatric essays, a deep inner illness and a peculiar cult for the actor Klaus Kinski. The trio invites the listener to be part of a ritual: NIBIRU’s sound is a mental, noisy and apocalyptic journey of visionary magic, elemental prophecies and esoteric superomism. Tribal percussions, evocative mantras and hypnotic drones merge into a completely new interpretation of Black and Doom Metal, while psychedelic tapestries draw a fascinating and idiosyncratic art. The shrill and inhuman voice of Ardat will drag you into a kingdom of mystical abandonment and possession. NIBIRU is indeed a ritual; a heavily deep, disturbing, wild but atmospheric ride on every level – of your soul, spirit and body.

Become part of their sound ritual, and get on this disturbing yet haunting trip of their new album, as the band just unleashed a first teaser!

Vocalist and guitarist Ardat comments:

“Panspermia”, the limit of the alchemical path, the ancestral environment finds its balance in the mutability. The physical, ferocious rage of “Qaal Babalon”, the painfully cerebral violence of “Salbrox” and finally the primordial soup “Panspermia”, the last desolate journey divided into four steps, without interruption, alkaest, aqua solis, efflatus, kteis, ebb to the earth, to chaos to “Caosgon”.

NIBIRU’s upcoming album, which contains four long and blistering as hell tracks, will be coming out as 2LP, CD and in Digital formats on November 13rd 2020 with Argonauta Records, the pre-sale has just started at THIS LOCATION!

The tracklist of “Panspermia” will read as follows:
Alkaest
Aqua Solis
Efflatus
Kteis

NIBIRU is:
Ardat – guitars, percussions and vocals
RI – bass, drone and synthesizers
L.C.s Chertan – drums

www.facebook.com/nibiruritual
www.nibiruritual.com
www.argonautarecords.com

Nibiru, Panspermia teaser

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Mr. Bison to Release Seaward Oct. 16

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

mr bison

For all I know, Arrested Development never even aired in Italy, but I don’t think I’ve seen the word ‘seaward’ since then without thinking of Michael Bluth going “Get rid of the ‘Seaward,'” meaning a boat, and having his mother respond, “I’ll leave when I’m good and ready.” Get it? c-word? seaward? It was a very cleverly written show.

And again, one that I have no idea if the members of Mr. Bison have ever seen it. Just because the Italian heavy psych rockers make one pop-cultural reference — their moniker — doesn’t mean they’re doing so all the time. And their quote in the PR wire below seems to be deeper dug into coming from somewhere else anyhow that, even if they have seen it, the association is still different. Yes folks, they’re talking about the sea.

Opening title-track is streaming now, so have at it at the bottom here. Preorders are up through Subsound Records and Ripple Music:

mr bison seaward

Heavy Psych Rockers, MR. BISON, reveal album details and share first single from upcoming record!

“Seaward” to be released October 16th via Subsound Records and Ripple Music

Heavy Psych and Blues Rock trio, MR. BISON, has announced the upcoming release of their brand new, full length album titled “Seaward”, which will be seeing the light of day on October 16th via Subsound Records and Ripple Music. Being influenced by acts such as Captain Beyond, Jimi Hendrix and the more recent Motorpsycho, the band from Cecina, Italy, creates a wild trip and unique musical journey, packed with psychedelia and virtuosic fuzz deliriums. Following their critically acclaimed recent record, “Holy Oak” (2018), “Seaward” will see MR. BISON to continue their path of expressive melodies and high- voltage grooves that you cannot escape.

Today, MR. BISON have unleashed a first appetizer before their highly anticipated, new album will be served this Fall! Listen to “Seaward”, the first single and title track taken from the upcoming output, streaming now via the band’s Bandcamp at THIS LOCATION

Furthermore and with the following words, the band gives a deep insight about what their new record is all about:

“Curious to explore the world of progressive, and the vocal harmonic solutions of the Golden Era like Crosby Still Nash, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, we decided to forge the new album ‘SEAWARD’. It’s a CONCEPT album that draws inspiration from the sea and from the legend of the 7 pearls of the Tyrrhenian Sea and as an imaginary horizon. It’s developed in 7 songs as a reference to the 7 pearls of the Tyrrhenian, arrating myths closely related to the sea, from the magic of the Sirens and the sacrifice of Andromeda to the heroic adventures of Ulysses and the ruthless curse of Scylla. 7 like Aphrodite’s pearls and the number of days in each moon phase, which affects the tides and the mood of each individual who, during magical moments of solitude and reflection, finds refuge in the horizon and in the wonderful echo of the vibrations of this majestic expanse of water.”

Tracklist reads as follows:

1. Seaward
2. From The Abyss
3. I’m The Storm
4. Oudeis
5. The Sacrifice
6. Underwater
7. The Curse

“Seaward” is the culmination of a full year’s hard labor and was recorded by Matteo Barsacchi and mixed/mastered at “Audio Design Recordings” by producer Jordan Andreen (Earthless, Sacri Monti). This record is arguably the most blazing, powerful and eclectic album by MR. BISON yet.

“Seaward” will be coming out on October 16th via Subsound Records and Ripple Music and is now available for pre-order RIGHT HERE

The project is realized with the support of MiBACT and SIAE, as part of the initiative “Per Chi Crea”

MR.BISON are:
Matteo Barsacchi – Guitar / Vocals
Matteo Sciocchetto – Guitar / Vocals
Matteo D’Ignazi – Drums / Sound Effects / Vocals

www.facebook.com/mrbisonband
https://www.instagram.com/mrbison_band/
http://mrbison.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/
https://www.facebook.com/subsoundrecords
https://subsoundrecords.bigcartel.com/
http://www.subsoundrecords.it/

Mr. Bison, Seaward (2020)

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Athon Sign to Argonauta Records; Self-Titled Debut out Sept. 25

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 4th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

athon

You can hear the modern prog-metal influences reportedly at the core of Athon‘s sound in their new streaming track “Reverse Satyr” — at the bottom of the post, obviously — but there’s a good heaping of sludge rock that goes along with that, and the song, which is the centerpiece of the band’s five-track self-titled debut long-player to be released Sept. 25 through Argonauta, balances the two sides well, not letting the indulgences of the one undercut the ferocity of the other, or vice versa. I don’t know if that’s the dynamic that plays out across the album as a whole, but with variety added through shifts between multiple vocalists, the proceedings become less predictable and more satisfying as they edge through aggression and tense rhythms. For a band who apparently started out playing covers, they seem bent much more toward finding an individualized sound to inhabit. Go figure.

The PR wire brought details thusly:

athon athon

Sludge doomsters ATHON sign worldwide deal with Argonauta Records And release first single from upcoming album!

Of what started as a cover project in 2014, paying a tribute to bands alike Mastodon, Black Tusk, Red Fang or Sleep, should soon become a hot tip of Italy’s eclectic underground scene, when ATHON began to create their own tracks and sound. The four-piece collective hailing from the alps of Varese, Italy, combines their various influences with individual ideas, songwriting and a personal trademark sound, balancing graciously between the elements of stoner, sludge and doom metal. After ATHON played several shows performing their very own stamp of a musical identity live, they gained the attention of Italy’s powerhouse label Argonauta Records, who is proud to welcome ATHON to their high class artist roster and for the release of the band’s debut album!

“We are convinced that the first release is the fundamental starting point for any band.” ATHON comment. “Having found a record label interested in our project is certainly a great satisfaction …. now our next goal, with the release of the record, will be to make ourselves known by a wider audience and with the support of Argonauta Records we are sure to achieve our goal.”

ATHON’s self-titled debut will see the light of day on September 25th, 2020 with a pre-sale to start via Argonauta Records soon, and will contain 5 blistering tracks showcasing 40 minutes of pure, raw and finest sludge, doom and stoner metal. Today, the band shared a first glimpse of what to expect from their upcoming record, listen to the first single, “Reverse Satyr”, here.

Tracklist:
Kaleidogscope
Dakhma
Reverse Satyr
The End
Absinthe

ATHON is:
Ame – Guitar/vocals
Caste – Guitar/vocals
Giona – Drums
Manu – Bass Guitar/vocals

https://www.facebook.com/athon.sludge/
https://www.instagram.com/athonsludge/
https://www.facebook.com/ArgonautaRecords/
https://argonautarecords.bandcamp.com/
www.argonautarecords.com

Athon, “Reverse Satyr”

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Jahbulong to Release Eclectic Poison Tones Oct. 30; 11-Minute Single Streaming

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 27th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

JAHBULONG

Here’s how listening to the first single/opening track from Jahbulong‘s debut album, Eclectic Poison Tones, is going to go. For the first minute of “Under the Influence of the Fool” — capitalized in the tracklisting below I assume to emphasize the tarot-ness of the LP as a whole — you’re gonna be like, “Yeah, okay that’s some pretty cool fuzz.” Then the real fuzz is gonna hit and any and all questions about the Verona-based trio’s intent will be answered. They lock in a hair-covered nodding groove early on and don’t let it go, stoner-doom lumbering their way through the proceedings with enough roll for your entire socially-distanced summer barbecue. Even the solo has fuzz. I don’t know how eclectic or poison they might be over the course of the record as whole, but “tones” Jahbulong‘s certainly got. Hypnotic ones at that.

Album’s out Oct. 30. Info and audio came via the PR wire:

JAHBULONG ECLECTIC POISON TONES

Stoner Doom unit JAHBULONG premiere first single from upcoming album!

“Eclectic Poison Tones” to be released October 30th on Go Down Records!

An album like a flow of acidic mantras, rich with dark atmospheres and full of distortions: “Eclectic Poison Tones”, the upcoming brand new full length record by Stoner Doom unit JAHBULONG, will see the light of day October 30th on Go Down Records. Being influenced from 70s psychedelia to Seattle’s 90s grunge, “Eclectic Poison Tones” is the result of the band’s ongoing development and hunger to explore new noise digressions.

A first promising peek of what to expect from the upcoming album can now be heard in form of the track “Under The Influence Of THE FOOL”, streaming here:

Says the band about the song: “Under The Influence Of THE FOOL” is the opening track of our upcoming album “Eclectic Poison Tones”. The beginning riff recalls the Black Sabbath sound, then the spatial resonance expansions culminate into a distorted and thundering ending. It all started from the skeleton of this song, which was composed before the idea of the whole album was born and that’s why it represents a kind of bridge between now and our recent release, a split record with Mongoose in 2018. Beside the stoner-doom sound that we have always played, we are about explore new noise digressions and more elaborated musical incursions.”

“Eclectic Poison Tones” will be coming out October 30th on Go Down Records and is now available for pre-order HERE: https://www.godownrecords.com/jahbulong

Tracklist:
1. Under The Influence Of THE FOOL
2. THE TOWER Of The Broken Bones
3. The Eclipse Of THE EMPRESS
4. THE EREMITE Tired Out (Sweed Dreams)

JAHBULONG are:
Martino Tomelini | bass
Nicolò Bonato | drums
Pierpaolo “Paul Vinegar” Modena | guitar, vocals

https://www.facebook.com/JAHBULONG/
https://www.instagram.com/jahbulong/
https://jahbulong.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/GoDownRecords/
https://www.instagram.com/godownrecords/
https://www.godownrecords.com

Jahbulong, “Under the Influence of the Fool”

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Review & Track Premiere: Black Elephant, Seven Swords

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on July 23rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Black Elephant Seven Swords

[Click play above to stream ‘Yayoi Kusama’ from Black Elephant’s Seven Swords. Album is out Aug. 21 on Small Stone Records and Kozmik Artifactz.]

The priority is set quickly on Black Elephant‘s Seven Swords, and it’s the vibe. With zero pretense about their intention, the Savona, Italy, four-piece unfurl their fourth long-player and second for Small Stone with the patient, gradual build-up of opening cut “Berta’s Flame,” clearly in no rush to get anywhere, quiet but definitely in motion, and subtly establishing both the tonal weight and the spacious atmospheres in which the rest of what follows will inhabit. There’s a theme to Seven Swords, which indeed boasts seven tracks over a wholly manageable 33 minutes — something about samurai; they could well be following the plot of the 2005 movie of the same name starring Donnie Yen for all I know — but the album as a whole is less about a narrative arc than an instrumental one. Led by the warm-toned fuzz of guitarists Alessio Caravelli and Massimiliano Giacosa, with Marcello Destefanis on bass and Simone Brunzu drumming, Black Elephant are not shy about playing to genre.

But if they’re preaching to the converted, they’re doing so because they themselves are the converted and they’re doing so with character and a sense of dynamic that, like the breadth of the mix as a whole, is established early. Hypnosis would seem to be the name of the game as “Berta’s Flame” rolls through its instrumental 6:48, but it’s not entirely ambient, and in its louder sections, it gives a glimpse of some of Seven Swords‘ more rocking moments to come, whether that’s the straightforward fuzzblast of “Yayoi Kusama” or the nothing-if-not-self-aware “Red Sun and Blues Sun” later on. Still, the wash of guitar that takes hold in “The Last March of Yokozuna,” fleshed out with effects and far-back drumming, makes clear Black Elephant‘s intention to showcase tone as a major factor in the album’s overarching personality. Fortunately, their tones, and the varied uses to which they’re put, live up to that task.

As noted, Seven Swords is Black Elephant‘s second full-length through Small Stone, and it follows 2018’s Cosmic Blues (review here) not without some sense of departure but a consistency of overarching purpose. That is, it’s mostly the theme that’s changed, but there is growth demonstrated over the course of the record as well. On the whole, Seven Swords feels more exploratory than its predecessor. It’s jammier, has a broader reach, and when it coheres around a verse/chorus riff, as on “Yayoi Kusama” — which in addition to being the third track is the first to feature vocals — the effect is striking. After “Berta’s Flame” and “The Last March of Yokozuna,” that first verse is almost a surprise the first time through the record, and that works much to Black Elephant‘s benefit, as their ability to adjust the balance of their approach continues to serve them throughout the rest of what follows. From such classic riff-rockery, they move into the centerpiece “Mihara,” which closes out the vinyl edition’s side A and boasts a reverb-soaked forward guitar lick at the outset that gracefully rolls into a steady groove of the sort in which “Berta’s Flame” traffics before it unveils its largesse.

BLACK ELEPHANT

A sense of threat of the same thing happening looms somewhat over “Mihara,” but it’s hardly a negative, and before they get there, a whispered verse and a stretch of dreamy lead guitar cap the first two minutes of the track. When the fuzz hits, it lands heavy, but the lead guitar continues to float overhead, lending atmospherics to the underlying weight, and reminding of breadth as a factor in what Black Elephant are doing throughout the songs, which flow together with deceptive ease, loud parts moving into quiet, jams solidifying, liquefying; backs and forths that sound easier than they are because they’re executed so smoothly. Drums end “Mihara” on tom roundabouts and finish cold, but the sense of side A as a united work remains prevalent, and the band’s firmness of purpose in that regard would seem to be emblematic of their experience over the decade they’ve spent together.

Side B is the shorter of the two halves by about three minutes, but there’s still plenty of work to be done, as “Red Sun and Blues Sun” indicates. It’s the shortest inclusion at just 2:41 — the longest is closer “Govinda” at 8:48 — but the title’s nod to Kyuss isn’t happenstance, but rather further evidence of the band’s self-awareness since, indeed, it’s a Kyuss-style riff that follows the guitar count-in at the beginning of the track. With tambourine adding to the rhythm and the two guitars intertwining, though, Black Elephant make their mark on the brief instrumental, branching out in the midsection before resuming the push and finishing together in time to reference “Faeries Wear Boots” at the start of “Seppuku.” That dogwhistle, bound to perk up the ears of much of the band’s listenership, is likewise put to more individualized use, as the basis for a bluesy riff accompanied by distorted vocals early but soon giving way to mid-paced fuzzy roll that builds through one of Seven Swords‘ stronger hooks.

It serves as something of a landmark for side B, pulling back from the desert idolatry of “Red Sun and Blues Sun” and preceding the immediate psychedelic impression made by the opening guitar on “Govinda.” The finale is a stretch and meant to be one, but it does not pick sides, rather summarizing the course the rest of the album has followed, almost condensing its shifts into its own run between more serene and more driven progressions. It is ultimately the jammy side that wins out over the bulk of the song — almost inevitably — though as Black Elephant hit into the final moments of “Govinda,” they embrace a last fuzzy measure on the way to a return of the open-feeling guitar that launched. That’s a pointed conclusion just the same, highlighting the consciousness at work behind Black Elephant‘s craft and the tricky nature of a record that’s so likely to put its audience in a trance without losing itself in the process. Whatever theme they’re working under, that would seem to be Black Elephant‘s greatest strength, and it makes the manner in which their work unfolds all the more engrossing.

Black Elephant on Thee Facebooks

Black Elephant on Bandcamp

Small Stone Records website

Small Stone Records on Thee Facebooks

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