Friday Full-Length: Barr, Skogsbo is the Place

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 9th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

The first thing you hear — and it’s quick, but it’s there — is birdsong. Swedish mushroom folk serenity-bringers The Curriculum Vitae For Research Paper is simply the one that is approved by your tutor and thatís what we guarantee. When you hire our dissertation writing services, we make sure that you get the best dissertation proposal writing help. For this purpose, we have hired best writers from UK who know how to find the fresh and genuine research title and how to compose an inspiring dissertation proposal. Not only this, we have set a quality assurance department where each completed dissertation Barr released their debut album, follow url services. Are you looking for a cheap thesis writer? We understand that not all students can afford the high prices that are charged for custom thesis writing services. It is why we only hire the most qualified and experienced thesis writers to enables us to offer you cheap thesis writing services. Latest completed orders: # topic title discipline academic level pages Skogsbo is the Place (discussed here), in 2008 through the Human Rights Assignment. You are welcome to buy an essay at Quality-Essay.com! The best online custom essay writing service! We are proud that you decided to order your essay at Quality-Essay.com, you can be sure that you made the right choice because we work only with professional and experienced writers. The perfect combination of skilled experts and our cheap prices makes our website the most Transubstans Records-affiliated imprint dig this help from our distinguished provider! The purpose of your thesis proposal is to prove that you have mastered the knowledge and skills needed to write a thesis. You must be able to write it professionally and finish it on time. Sakuntala. MySpace era. I bought it, as you can read in that link, after sampling an MP3 from the now-gone All That’s Heavy webstore, and digging further into the entire affair thereafter. It has proven almost infinitely listenable — the kind of record that calls you back over time, or even just pops into your head somewhere along the line while you’re listening to something else; a source of sonic coincidence. That’s what happened this week and prompted the revisit, but for all the time I’ve spent hearing it, I’m not sure I ever bothered to look up what or where Skogsbo is until now.

I’ve listened to enough Scandinavian metal to know “skog” is “forest” in English, and that makes sense with the cover art of When you are looking for where to I Need Help On My History Homework or where you can buy dissertation paper online, then you don't have to look any further because we offer the best quality you will be proud of. Before you order thesis online, you have to ensure that you have all your things well arranged together and look at the following; Write Down Everything You Wish to Be Customized in Your Thesis or Skogsbo is the Place, and in the east of Sweden, there are a bunch of places with the designation. Bus stops, little spots. A nature preserve south of Gothenburg that would be a pretty good candidate, but the band were based in Stockholm and Finsp√•ng, so who knows. “Skogsbo,” the word, translates to “forest estate,” so fair enough. I guess it could just be a cottage in the woods belonging to someone in the band — vocalist Our PhD research Social Issues To Write A Research Paper On can help you complete your work fast and according to all the requirements. Get a custom research proposal for PhD. Andreas S√∂derstr√∂m (also harmonium, glockenspiel, dulcimer), vocalist/guitarist Scientific Method Homework Helps. At best essay writing service review platform, students will get best suggestions of best essay writing services by expert reviews Patrik Andersson, vocalist/flutist WritersCafe.org is an Writing An Evaluation Paper community where writers can post their work, get reviews, befriend other writers, and much more.. Post your poetry, short stories, novels, scripts, and screenplays; Get reviews and advice from thousands of other writers; Enter hundreds of free writing contests ; Join writing groups or start your own; Take and subscribe to free online writing courses; Search Hanna Fritzson, vocalist/guitarist CustomThesis.org offers Math Homework For 6th Graderss & Best Custom Dissertation Writing Services UK at affordable price. We provide professional Marcus Palm, bassist/cellist If you are ready to say ďfollow url statementĒ, then we have good news. All you have to do is tell us how long your paper has to be in either words or pages, your area of study, the academic level you are studying at and when you would like to receive the paper by. Svante S√∂derqvist, pianist Not sure that a writing agency can help you with a college assignment? We know how to assure you! Read and learn the backup http://www.nova-clinic.de/?buy-a-phd-thesis offer Patric Thorman, percussionist see this - 100% non-plagiarism guarantee of custom essays & papers. Put aside your fears, place your task here and get your quality essay Fredrik Ohlsson — or it could just as easily be a made-up place that doesn’t really exist. It doesn’t make the record any less transporting either way.

“Summerwind” is the opener that gets underway with that birdsong noted above, and that’s not the last nature-sound throughout. The folkish impression is immediate with harmonium and acoustic guitars backing soulful, sweetly melodic vocals, and that presence of arrangement, who’s singing or who’s playing what at any given moment, will change from song to song — Battlefield 4 China Rising Assignments - 100% non-plagiarism guarantee of custom essays & papers. Entrust your essays to the most talented writers. Find out all you have Fritzson taking lead vocals on centerpiece “Calling My Name” and the title-track that follows, or or the meandering duet vocals over piano barr skogsbo is the placeof “Words Would Do,” others intertwining at various points between “Summerwind,” “Words Would Do” and “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother.” Those three serve as the immersive lead salvo that marks one’s passage into these woods, lines like, “I watch the sunrise/It suits me,” and “Far, far away” and “Let everyone surround you” standing out over arrangements likewise lush, be it the cello sneaking into the end of “Summerwind” and “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother,” flute amid the harmonies of “Calling My Name,” the subtle snare shuffle on the penultimate “Moonfall” or the return of cello on “Sister,” the closing track which builds in its finish and pulls itself apart leading to captured forest-at-night audio — there’s a cough and some speech as well — before “Lovers Alone” ends the proceedings as a semi-secret track, no less gorgeous for being tucked away as it is.

One wouldn’t call¬† research questions for phd thesis Help Writing Dissertation Literature Review dissertation consulting service northampton college-paper writing services Skogsbo is the Place long at 43 minutes, in no small part because its songs are so wonderfully engaging, but they’re not necessarily short in the way one finds a lot of neo-folk operating. “Words Would Do” at four and a half minutes and the lyric-less title-track at three minutes are the two shortest cuts (“Lovers Alone” might actually be shorter, but it’s somewhere around three minutes as well), and everything else tops six. “Moonfall” stretches to 6:53 and uses its time well to build into a melodic payoff that’s still more about the journey than the destination, and certainly “Summerwind” and “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother” and “Calling My Name” and “Sister” prove memorable enough with their understated hooks and classic feel that while I can’t really say anything that at any point involves a glockenspiel isn’t indulgent on some level, it’s an indulgence well worth making. Like precious few albums I’ve encountered since,¬† Thesis writing for phd; Online Essays Help Writing Phd Proposal the best. This document aims to gather some hints and suggestions to effectively write a PhD dissertation in economics. Authoring a PhD: how to plan, draft, write, and finish a doctoral thesis or dissertation / Patrick Dunleavy. Dissertation writing service - Write Your Paper papers online from - dissertation assistance service Skogsbo is the Place¬†has the ability to carry the listener along its course, and with particular attention paid to atmosphere and the overarching organic presentation, there’s no regrets in going where it goes.

It was one of the first records I wrote about for this site that wasn’t outwardly heavy but carried a presence of tone and melody and/or an emotional heft to coincide with its abidingly natural psychedelia. It’s not acid folk in the sense of being coated in reverb or blissed out on effects or any of that kind of thing. I think there’s electric guitar on there, but it’s surrounded by acoustics, 12-string, and the diversity of the vocal arrangements to the point that it’s clearly not intended to be a primary factor. Some of the songs sound like the strum came first, others the vocals, others other things. That spirit of song-happening-to-artist is rampant throughout, and the more I hear¬† Skogsbo is the Place, the more it feels like an album I’ll continue to come back to, like visiting an old friend, or a brother. Time changes your context of appreciation, but some records continue to speak to the person you’ve become as well as the person you were. 13 years isn’t eternity, but when I think of the amount of music I’ve come across in that time, Barr‘s debut feels all the more special.

The band’s 2012 follow-up,¬†Atlantic Ocean Blues (discussed here), gave up some of the intimacy of the first offering in favor of breadth, marked in particular by the fuller, jammier take on “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother” that made its way onto the release. To be perfectly honest with you, I keep that album on my phone in case of emergencies, so I’m not going to say a bad word about it or the resonance it shares with its predecessor. To the best of my knowledge,¬†Barr haven’t done anything since, and whether theirs was a two-album course or if they ever do anything else, I consider myself fortunate to have this music in my life.

As always, I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

I woke up this morning before four. I haven’t slept well all week, that helps nothing. Yesterday was a turnaround point though. The morning was wretched. We’ve been trying to push on potty training with The Pecan, and just… no. He’s flat-out refused it, and it’s made the house a miserable place and me miserable and stressed and I finally yesterday decided fuck it. I took a xanax in the morning and by the time I put him upstairs for a rest — he doesn’t nap anymore, but goes upstairs for an hour or 90 minutes or however long in the afternoon, and just kind of chills out with himself, plays, whatever; it’s a pattern that benefits everybody; Daniel Tiger has a whole song about a quiet rest being good for you — did some vocals for nascent-heavy-industrial-project, worked on more posts for today and by the time that was done, I’d decided that’s it. I don’t care anymore.

I don’t care when he pisses in the toilet. I don’t care when it happens. Means nothing in the grand scheme of his life. I’ll change his fucking diapers for as long as it takes. I don’t care anymore. It’s not worth the struggle or the stress, or him losing his mind or holding in poop for two days because he feels bad about going in his diaper but is terrified of the potty. I just can’t do it anymore. I don’t care that much. I’m sorry. There’s part of me that feels like I should rip off his diaper, refuse to put another one on, push him out of the nest, and so on, but seriously, fuck it. Maybe I’ll give don’t-be-a-prick a shot and see how that goes.

Yesterday afternoon? Much better. I felt like I’d pushed a weight off my shoulder and because I wasn’t miserable, he wasn’t either. We played and read books and he pissed in his diaper and it was fine. The day proceeded. We had dinner.

He’s been off from school all week. Spring break. We’ve had some real hang-out time. I’ve been spoiled sleeping mornings by him going to school, and there continues to be a big difference in my head between getting up at 5AM or before (I beat the alarm a couple days this week, including today) and getting up at 6AM or even later. Maybe I’ll nap later if I can.

I can’t. I have an interview this afternoon that I rescheduled from yesterday because I was such a mess and then kind of zoned out on meds.

I have more writing to do. Another news post I’d like to have go up today — that’ll be six posts; always gotta pack stuff in on Friday, I guess — and then the second of my two interviews for the Roadburn ‘zine. I put together the Steve Von Till piece yesterday or the day before. Wednesday, it was. The Patient Mrs. took The Pecan out of the house so I could get some time, I wound up transcribing that and Tau both. Still need to write up Tau. That was a cool chat. Seems like a nice guy. Steve Von Till I hadn’t talked to in a long while, so that was interesting as well. He’s kind to put up with my stupid fucking questions about process.

Hey, I like process.

The birds are out and yelling at the sun to rise, so The Pecan will be up soon. It’s almost six. I’m gonna try and get that other post done before it’s breakfast time and then, I don’t know, finish my coffee? That’d be cool. I can’t seem to sit still these days.

Am I the only one super-anxious about shows coming back? Not because of the plague, but because of the shows themselves? I’m not worried about wearing a mask or social distancing, but I’m not sure I ever want to leave the house again either. I miss live music, but there’s so much other bullshit about shows I don’t miss. People, most venues, taking pictures, the work of writing up a live review and¬†knowing that no one’s going to care about it, driving there, driving back, losing basically two days because I was out so late, the pre-show anxiety, the post-show fatigue.

It feels like so much, like the prospect of having that in my life again is overwhelming. I wasn’t dude-at-three-shows-a-week anymore anyway — I did my fucking time — but still. The thought of being out and around. It’s troubling in a way I didn’t anticipate when the world went into lockdown last year and concerts evaporated.

If you have any thoughts, I’d appreciate. On that happy note, thank you for reading. Have a great and safe weekend. Don’t forget to hydrate — so important — and watch your head. New merch up next week, I think.

FRM.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

The Obelisk merch

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Besvärjelsen Sign to Magnetic Eye Records; New Album Later This Year

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 9th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

I’m not saying it can’t happen or that I wouldn’t be stoked if it did, but unless they’re hitting the studio, like, next week, a 2021 timeline for Besv√§rjelsen‘s second album seems ambitious, especially if they’re also taking part in Magnetic Eye Records‘ upcoming AC/DC tribute (man, they just keep pumping out those reduxes). The PostWax veterans released their Frost EP (discussed here) in 2019 as a follow-up to 2018’s Vallmo (review here), and for sure the wintry aspects of their sound would be highlighted by a release in, say, November, but even if their songs are nailed down tight and all that, I guess it just seems like to go from zero to mastered-album, then give figure three months lead time for promo, preorders, all that stuff, that puts you into probably September at the earliest. Doable, yeah. But with a band like this, whose sound is so meditative and fleshed out, you’d almost rather they take their time.

Don’t hurry, is all I’m saying. Yes, I’m very much looking forward to what Besv√§rjelsen¬†might do next. I guess maybe I’m just fretting over nothing. Such a worrier, this one.

More important, congrats to the band on the¬†Magnetic Eye signing, though they were with¬†Blues Funeral, so it’s¬†Jadd either way. Distribution don’t hurt though.

PR wire brings details:

besvarjelsen (Photo by Stine Rapp)

BESV√ĄRJELSEN sign deal with Magnetic Eye Records

BESV√ĄRJELSEN have penned a multi-album deal with Magnetic Eye Records. The Swedish forest rockers will release their sophomore album via the label this year and also contribute a track to the forthcoming “Back in Black Redux” homage to AC/DC.

BESV√ĄRJELSEN comment: “We are extremely thrilled to be joining Magnetic Eye Records”, writes drummer Erik B√§ckwall. “We know that we have come to the right team as we will be joining an amazing roster on this renowned label. In all modesty, we think that we have written our finest material yet for the new record, so we are very much looking forward to record and share it with the world as soon as possible!”

Jadd Shickler welcomes the Swedes: “I feel extremely privileged in welcoming Besv√§rjelsen onto our roster and I promise that the world of heavy music will be floored by what this amazing group does next”, comments the Magnetic Eye Records label director. “Having been part of the heavy rock underground for some time, I am fortunate to know many great musicians going back quite a few years. Sometimes such artists re-emerge with new bands and projects and I am lucky to be one of the first to hear about them. The very moment that original Dozer drummer Erik let me hear material from his new band Besv√§rjelsen, I knew they were something special and magical. Altareth, Heavy Temple, and now Besv√§rjelsen, 2021 is shaping up to be a hell of year for great bands joining Magnetic Eye Records.”

Spellbinding five-piece BESVA?RJELSEN take their name from the Swedish word for “conjuring”, which is a fitting description for their haunting approach to Northern heaviness. The Scandinavians carry melodic doom at their hearts, but lace their sound with subtle touches of prog as well as punk, folk, and classic rock.

The Swedes set out to with a clear vision to channel the vast Dalarna forests, a region otherwise famous for its painted wooden horses, instead of following the general trend among European riff-rock bands to try and evoke the American deserts.

The band was co-founded by guitarists and vocalists Andreas Baier and Staffan Stensland Vinrot in 2014, inspired by their magical geographic location. The musicians had both grown up on old Norse and Finnish grounds in Dalecarlia, Sweden surrounded by its lore, its mysticism, and its dark, droning musical traditions. The duo saw their new band as a means to create heavy music infused with all those elements.

Andreas, coming from a background in punk and hardcore, had realised that by constantly making his music faster, it finally hit a point where fast started to become slow. The timing of riffs would cut in half, even with blastbeats going underneath, and his instinctive pattern for slowing things down laid the foundation for BESVA?RJELSEN’s approach.

Initially Andreas and Staffan shared vocal duties, but they concluded that a full-time singer would free them to explore the complexity of their music further. While the duo never made a conscious decision to look for a female vocalist, Lea Amling Alazam arrived with a passion for punk and stoner rock that had started at age 13 at the local skate park. When, to the surprise of the guitarists, her distinctive voiced summoned the intimacy and charisma of singers like NINA SIMONE or AMY WINEHOUSE, Lea became the obvious choice.

BESVA?RJELSEN released their debut EP “Villfarelser” in 2015, which was followed quickly with the “Exil” EP in 2016. At this time, former DOZER and GREENLEAF drummer Erik Ba?ckwall joined the line-up. Both releases, though self-financed and released with minimal promotion, were well-received and even found airplay on Swedish National Radio.

Bass player Johan Rockner (DOZER, GREENLEAF) joined in 2018; just before their debut full-length “Vallmo” came out. The quintet merged crushing riffs and storming drums with increasingly sophisticated melodies and thoughtful themes. The album debut was greeted with great acclaim and even earned BESVA?RJELSEN a festival slot opening for DEEP PURPLE.

With Erik and Johan having played in various bands together and sharing a musical language, the rhythm section started to contribute to the songwriting for the mini-album “Frost”, which was released in late 2019. While BESVA?RJELSEN were forced into involuntary live performance hibernation like every band other during 2020, the Swedes kept themselves busy with intensive songwriting during all those months.

Having now joined Magnetic Eye Records, BESVA?RJELSEN will enter studio in spring 2021 to record their sophomore full-length to be released via the label this year.

Line-up
Lea Amling Alazam- vocals
Staffan Stensland Vinrot – guitars, vocals
Andreas Baier – guitars, vocals
Erik Bäckwall Рdrums
Johan Rockner – bass

https://www.facebook.com/besvarjelsen
https://www.instagram.com/besvarjelsen
https://besvarjelsen.bandcamp.com/
http://store.merhq.com
http://magneticeyerecords.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MagneticEyeRecords

Besvärjelsen, Frost (2019)

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JIRM Sign to Ripple Music; The Tunnel, the Well, Holy Bedlam Due Next Year

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 6th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

Sweden’s¬†JIRM¬†have inked a deal with¬†Ripple Music¬†to release their fifth album,¬†The Tunnel, the Well, Holy Bedlam, next year. And, you know, presumably whatever they do from that point on as well. The band also recently announced a reissue through¬†Majestic Mountain Records of their 2011 album,¬†Bloom, and with the forthcoming album as the follow-up to 2018’s Surge Ex Monumentis (discussed here), it will be the second LP since they shortened their moniker from Jeremy Irons and the Ratgang Malibus.

I gotta be honest with you. I saw this band about five years ago and was pretty blown away by what they were doing. The last album pushed in a way different, proggier and more classic metal direction, but from where I sit that only makes them less predictable in terms of the new stuff, particularly with the pandemic-born changes in the recording process noted in the PR wire info below. I don’t know what to expect from them and I like that.

I don’t know about this promo photo though.

Either way, kudos to band and label and here’s looking forward to what’s coming:

jirm

JIRM (formerly Jeremy Irons and the Ratgang Malibus) ink worldwide deal with Ripple Music for the release of their fifth studio album.

Stockholm-based hardest heavy rock stalwarts JIRM (formerly known as Jeremy Irons & the Ratgang Malibus) announce their signing to US powerhouse Ripple Music, for the release of their fifth full-length “The Tunnel, The Well, Holy Bedlam” in early 2022.

JIRM will make an impact on you: they have an innovative, and highly personal take on psychedelic rock and its many facets and elements. It is music with a retrospective outlook, taking the listener on adventurous excursions, deep into one’s mind. Their music aims to broaden your horizons and consciousness.

The band was formed in 2004 under the name Jeremy Irons & the Ratgang Malibus, by Micke Backendal and Karl Apelmo. In 2007, they were joined by Henke Persson and Viktor K√§llgren to seal the definitive line-up. JIRM has toured extensively, from Sao Paulo (Brazil) to Pleszew (Poland), positioning themselves as one of the hardest working and most prolific outfits of the underground heavy rock scene. They decided to change the name to JIRM when releasing their fourth full-length ‘Surge Ex Monumentis’ in 2018, a record that brimmed with newfound energy.

Their upcoming fifth album “The Tunnel, The Well, Holy Bedlam” has been recorded in a true pandemic style: the tracks were recorded one by one, in five different studios across Sweden. It’s been a challenge both from a songwriting and technical point of view. However, the end result sounds bigger and better than ever, with no holds barred. There is one thing you you can be absolutely sure of with JIRM’s upcoming fifth album: “it’s not a joke this time, I’m leaving reality for sure”.

“The Tunnel, The Well, Holy Bedlam” is slated for an early 2022 release through Ripple Music. Stay tuned for more details!

JIRM is
Karl Apelmo ‚ÄĒ vocals, guitar
Micke Backendal ‚ÄĒ guitar
Viktor K√§llgren ‚ÄĒ bass
Henke Persson ‚ÄĒ drums

http://www.facebook.com/JeremyIronsandtheRatgangMalibus
https://www.instagram.com/jirm_band/
http://www.jirm.se/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://www.instagram.com/ripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

JIRM, Surge ex Monumentis (2018)

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Quarterly Review: Sonic Flower, Demon Head, Rakta & Deafkids, Timo Ellis, Heavy Feather, Slow Draw, Pilot Voyager, The Ginger Faye Bakers, Neromega, Tung

Posted in Reviews on April 2nd, 2021 by JJ Koczan

quarterly-review-spring-2019

Friday morning and the Spring 2021 Quarterly Review draws to a close. It’s been a good one, and though there are probably enough albums on my desktop to make it go another few days, better to quit while I’m ahead in terms of not-being-so-tired-I’m-angry-at-everything-I’m-hearing. In any case, as always, I hope you found something here you enjoy. I have been pleasantly surprised on more than a few occasions, especially by debuts.

We wrap with more cool stuff today and since I’m on borrowed time as it is, let me not delay.

Quarterly Review #41-50:

Sonic Flower, Rides Again

sonic flower rides again

Like Church of Misery‘s groove but feel kind of icky with all those songs about serial killers? Legit. Say hello to Tatsu Mikami‘s Sonic Flower. Once upon a 2003, the band brought all the boogie and none of the slaughter of Tatsu‘s now-legendary Sabbathian doom rock outfit to a self-titled debut (reissue review here), and Rides Again is the lost follow-up from 2005, unearthed like so many of the early ’70s forsaken classics that clearly inspired it. With covers of The Meters and Graham Central Station, Sonic Flower makes their funky intentions plain as day, and the blowout drums and full-on fuzz they bring to those cuts as well as the five originals on the short-but-satisfying 28-minute offering is a win academically and for casual fans alike. You ain’t gonna hear “Jungle Cruise” or their take on “Earthquake” and come out complaining, is what I’m saying. This is the kind of record that makes you buy more records.

Sonic Flower on Thee Facebooks

Heavy Psych Sounds on Bandcamp

 

Demon Head, Viscera

demon head viscera

With Viscera, Copenhagen’s Demon Head make their debut on Metal Blade Records. It is their fourth album overall, the follow-up to 2019’s Hellfire Ocean Void (review here), and it continues the five-piece’s enduring exploration of darker places. Dramatic vocals recount grim narratives over backing instrumentals that are less doom at the outset with “Tooth and Nail” and “The Feline Smile” than goth, and atmospheric pieces like “Arrows” and “The Lupine Choir” and “A Long, Groaning Descent” and “Wreath” and certainly the closer “The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony” further the impression that Viscera, though its title conjures raw guts, is instead an elaborate entirety — if perhaps one of raw guts — and meant to be taken in its 36-minute whole. Demon Head make that LP-friendly runtime a progression down into reaches they’d not until this point gone, tapping sadness for its inherent beauty.

Demon Head on Thee Facebooks

Metal Blade Records website

 

Rakta & Deafkids, Live at Sesc Pompeia

Rakta Deafkids Live at Sesc Pompeia

Next time someone asks you what the future sounds like, you’ll have a good answer for them. Combined into a six-piece band, Brazilian outfits Rakta and Deafkids harness ambience and space-punk thrust into a sound that is born of a past that hasn’t yet happened. Their Live at Sesc Pompeia LP follows on from a 2019 two-songer, but it’s in the live performance that the spirit of this unity really shines through, and from opener/longest track (immediate points) “Miragem” through the semi-industrialized effects swirl of “Templo do Caos,” into the blower-noise dance party “Sigilo,” the weirdo-chug-jam of “Forma” and the space rock breakout “Flor de Pele” and the percussed buzz and echoing howls of “Espirais,” they are equal parts encompassing and singular. It is not to be ignored, and though there are moments that border on unlistenable, you can hear from the wailing crowd at the end that to be in that room was to witness something special. As a document of that, Live at Sesc Pompeia feels like history in the making.

Rakta on Thee Facebooks

Deafkids on Thee Facebooks

Rapid Eye Records website

 

Timo Ellis, Death is Everywhere

Timo Ellis Death is Everywhere

A madcap, weighted-but-anti-genre sensibility comes to life in supernova-experimentalist fashion throughout the four songs of Timo EllisDeath is Everywhere. The lockdown-era EP from Ellis (Netherlands, Yoko Ono, Cibo Matto, on and on) makes post-modern shenanigans out of apocalypses inner and outer, and from lines like “this bridal shower is bumming me out” in the unabashedly hooky “Vampire Rodeo” to “the earth will still breathe fire without you!” in “Left Without an Answer,” the stakes are high despite the flittering-in-appreciation-of-the-absurd mood of the tracks themselves. The title-track and “Evolve or Die” blend sonic heft and the experimental pop movement that “Vampire Rodeo” sets forth — the third cut is positively manic and maniacally positive — while “Left Without an Answer” almost can’t help but be consuming as it rolls into a long fade leaving intertwining vocals lines as the last to go, telling the listener to “learn to say goodbye” without making it easy. Won’t be for everyone, doesn’t want to be. Is expression for itself. Feels genuine in that, and admirable.

Timo Ellis on Thee Facebooks

Timo Ellis on Bandcamp

 

Heavy Feather, Mountain of Sugar

heavy feather mountain of sugar

With not-at-all-subtle nods to Humble Pie and Ennio Morricone in its opening tracks, Heavy Feather‘s second LP, Mountain of Sugar, has boogie to spare. No time is wasted on the 38-minute/11-track follow-up to 2019’s D√©bris & Rubble (review here), and true to the record’s title, it’s pretty sweet. The collection pits retro mindset against modern fullness in its harmonica-laced, duly-fuzzed title-track, and goes full-Fleetwood on “Come We Can Go” heading into a side B that brings a highlight in the soft-touch-stomp of “Rubble and Debris” and an earned bit of Southern-styled turn in “Sometimes I Feel” that makes a fitting companion to all the bluesy vibes throughout, particularly those of the mellow “Let it Shine” earlier. The Stockholm outfit knew what they were doing last time out too, but you can hear their process being refined throughout Mountain of Sugar, and even its most purposefully familiar aspects come across with a sense of will and playfulness.

Heavy Feather on Thee Facebooks

The Sign Records on Thee Facebooks

 

Slow Draw, Yellow & Gray

slow draw yellow and gray

Don’t tell him I told you so, but Slow Draw is starting to sound an awful lot like a band. What began as a drone/soundscaping project from Stone Machine Electric drummer/noisemaker Mark Kitchens has sprouted percussive roots of its own on Yellow & Gray, and as Kitchens explores textures of psychedelic funk, mellow heavy and even a bit of ’70s proggy homage in “Sylvia” ahead of the readily Beck-ian jam “Turntable” and acousti-drone closer “A Slow Move,” the band-vibe is rampant. I’m going to call Yellow & Gray a full-length despite the fact that it’s 24 minutes long because its eight songs inhabit so many different spaces between them, but however you want to tag it, it demonstrates the burgeoning depth of Kitchens‘ project and how it’s grown in perhaps unanticipated ways. If this is what he’s been doing in isolation — as much as Texas ever shuttered for the pandemic — his time has not been wasted.

Slow Draw on Thee Facebooks

Slow Draw on Bandcamp

 

Pilot Voyager, Nuclear Candy Bar

plot voyager nuclear candy bar

Freak! Out! The 66-minute Nuclear Candy Bar from Hungarian psychedelicists Pilot Voyager might end mostly drifting with the 27-minute “23:61,” but much of the four tracks prior to that finale are fuzz-on-go-go-go-out-out-out heavy jams, full in tone and improv spirit however planned their course may or may not actually be. To say the least, “Fuzziness” lives up to its name, as guitarist/founder √Ākos Karancz — joined by bassist Bence Ambrus (who also mastered) and drummers Kriszti√°n Megyeri and Istv√°n Baumgartner (the latter only on the closer) — uses a relatively earthbound chug as a launchpad for further space/krautrocking bliss, culminating in a scorching cacophony that’s the shortest piece on the record at just under seven minutes. If you make it past the molten heat of the penultimate title-track, there’s no turning away from “23:61,” as the first minute of that next day pulls you in from the outset, a full-length flow all unto itself. More more more, yes yes yes. Alright you get the point.

Pilot Voyager on Thee Facebooks

Psychedelic Source Records on Bandcamp

 

The Ginger Faye Bakers, Camaro

the ginger faye bakers camaro

Sit with The Ginger Faye BakersCamaro EP for a little bit. Don’t just listen to the first track, or even the second, third or fourth, on their own, but take a few minutes to put it all together. Won’t take long, the thing’s only 17 minutes long, and in so doing you’ll emerge with a more complex picture of who they are as a band. Yeah, you hear the opening title-cut and think early-Queens of the Stone Age-style desert riffing, maybe with a touch of we’re-actually-from-the-Northeast tonal thickness, but the garage-heavy of “The Creeps” feels self-aware in its Uncle Acid-style swing, and as the trio move through the swinging “The Master” and “Satan’s Helpers,” the last song drawing effectively from all sides, the totality of the release becomes all the more sinister for the relatively straight-ahead beginning just a short time earlier. Might be a listen or two before it sinks in, but they’ve found a niche for themselves here and one hopes they continue to follow where their impulses lead them.

The Ginger Faye Bakers on Thee Facebooks

The Ginger Faye Bakers on Bandcamp

 

Neromega, Nero Omega

Neromega Nero Omega

If you’re not yet keeping an eye on Regain Records offshoot Helter Skelter Productions, Rome’s Neromega are a fervent argument for doing so. The initials-only cultish five-piece are Italian as much in their style of doom as they are in geography, and across their four-song Nero Omega debut EP, they run horror organ and classic heavy rock grooves alongside each other while nodding subtly at more extreme fare like the death ‘n’ roll rumble in closer “Un Posto” or the dirt-coated low end that caps “Pugnale Ardore,” the drifting psych only moments ago quickly forgotten in favor of renewed shuffle. Eight-minute opener “Solitudine,” might be the highlight as well as the longest inclusion on the 24-minute first-showing, but it’s by no means the sum total of what the band have on offer, as they saunter through giallo, psychedelia, doom, heavy riffs and who knows what else to come, they strike an immediately individual atmospheric presence even while actively toying with familiar sounds. The EP is cohesive enough to make me wonder what their initials are.

Neromega on Thee Facebooks

Helter Skelter Productions website

 

Tung, Bleak

TUNG BLEAK

Some of the made-even-bigger-by-echo vocals from guitarist Craig Kasamis might remind of Maurice Bryan Giles from Red Fang, but Ventura, California’s Tung are up chasing down a different kind of party on 2020’s Bleak, though Kasamis, guitarist David Briceno (since replaced by Bill Bensen), bassist Nick Minasian and drummer Rob Dean have a strong current of West Coast noise rock in what they’re doing as well in “Runaway,” a lurcher like “Spit” later on or the run-till-it-crashes finisher “Fallen Crown,” which the only song apart from the bookending opener “Succession Hand” to have a title longer than a single word. Still, Tung have their own, less pop-minded take on brashness, and this debut album leaves the bruises behind to demonstrate its born-from-hardcore lineage. Their according lack of frills makes Bleak all the more effective at getting its point across, and while they’d probably tell you their sound is nothing fancy, it’s fancy enough to stomp all over your ears for about half an hour, and that’s as fancy as it needs to be. Easy to dig even in its more aggressive moments.

Tung on Thee Facebooks

Plain Disguise Records website

 

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JIRM to Reissue 2011’s Bloom on Majestic Mountain Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 11th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

jirm

Originally released on Transubstans Records and re-pressed in 2013 ahead of the band’s 2014 debut on Small Stone, Spirit Knife, 2011’s sophomore outing from the band once known as Jeremy Irons and the Ratgang Malibus, Bloom, is seeing a 10th anniversary reissue through Majestic Mountain Records with preorders set to go up on Friday.

The four-piece rebranded themselves in 2018 to JIRM and issued Surge Ex Monumentis (discussed here) as a likewise departure in sound from the classic-style heavy rock and boogie they’d brought to bear on prior offerings. For what it’s worth, they pulled that shift off well, and sounded no less sure of what they wanted to be doing than they ever had. I still think of them as a young band. Funny they’re doing decade-anniversary reissues. For their second record. Ha.

The PR wire has it like this:

jirm bloom

JIRM (AKA Jeremy Irons & The Ratgang Malibus) to Celebrate Anniversary of Bloom with Reissue on Majestic Mountain Records

Majestic Mountain Records is thrilled to announce the official reissue of Bloom, the sophomore album from Swedish psych rockers JIRM… AKA Jeremy Irons & The Ratgang Malibus.

Originally formed in 2004 by close friends Micke Pettersson and Karl Apelmo, the curiously monikered Swedes were keen to implement their surrealist reimagining of heavy psych, early doors. Cementing their line-up in Stockholm circa-2007 with the addition of drummer Henke Persson and bassist Viktor Källgren, the quartet signalled the grand old return of Krautrock and psychedelic grooves to the underground scene. The culmination of which can be best heard on their 2011 album, Bloom, which celebrates its tenth anniversary this year.

Recorded by Marcus Sjoberg at Studio Skyline in the Swedes’ home city of Eskilstuna; Bloom provided listeners with a bed of raw, blues-based hard rock from which myriad sophisticated sonic structures are built. Bathing in the sunlit influence of bands like Led Zeppelin and The Allman Brothers, the album was lauded upon release and has only grown in prestige over the past decade.

‚ÄúWe recorded the album on old Vox AC30s and a bunch of cheap guitars, while trying to figure out amongst ourselves how delay pedals worked,‚ÄĚ remembers Karl Apelmo. ‚ÄúTen years on and we believe Marcus did a fantastic job in recording and capturing the magic in those songs and thanks to Majestic Mountain Records you‚Äôll be able to hear it again. We‚Äôre psyched!‚ÄĚ

And for MMR‚Äôs Marco Berg, the feeling is mutual. ‚ÄúWe‚Äôre huge fans of this band so it‚Äôs a real honour to be able to reissue this classic rock album for anyone who was unlucky to have missed it first time around.‚ÄĚ

Majestic Mountain Records will be releasing two exclusive editions of Bloom by JIRM (as Jeremy Irons & The Ratgang Malibus) this year with pre-orders for both imprints going live on 12th March at 19:00 CET / 13:00 EST / 10:00 PST / 18:00 BST here ‚Äď https://bit.ly/3t0gPwy.

BLOOM EDITION ///
Limited to 200 ‚Äď Black and green marbled 180g heavyweight vinyl, housed in full colour gatefold cover

SKIN DEEP EDITION ///
Limited to 300 ‚Äď Black and green swirl 180g heavyweight vinyl, housed in full colour gatefold cover

http://www.facebook.com/JeremyIronsandtheRatgangMalibus
https://www.instagram.com/jirm_band/
http://www.jirm.se/
http://majesticmountainrecords.bigcartel.com
http://facebook.com/majesticmountainrecords
http://instagram.com/majesticmountainrecords

Jeremy Irons & the Ratgang Malibus, Bloom (2011)

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Spelljammer Announce New LP Abyssal Trip out Feb. 26; Post “Lake”

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 17th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Oh hello feedback. Oh hello drums. Oh hello pummeling riff. Oh hello Spelljammer. It’s been a while. Indeed, half a decade has gone by since the Stockholm-based heft hefters released Ancient of Days (review here) in October 2015, their debut album, though to listen to the crush they foster in the seven-minute “Lake,” which is the first audio to be unveiled from the forthcoming second LP,¬†Abyssal Trip, it hardly feels like a day. The three-piece will release Abyssal Trip — as in, “a trip to the abyss”; one can only assume they’re speaking in terms of tone — on Feb. 26, which is just far away enough to think that the world might be on some course toward restoration of ‘life as we knew it,’ though even saying that makes me fear the alternative, as I suspect it will into perpetuity.

Whatever reality greets it upon its arrival, the world needs more crushing riffs, and¬†Spelljammer seem only too pleased to provide. You can read the PR wire info below — and you should, because information is good, knowledge is power and all that — and check out “Lake” at the bottom of this post because I genuinely believe it’ll make your day better.

Album preorders are up through RidingEasy Records, and the link is right on the other side of the cover art:

spelljammer abyssal trip

SPELLJAMMER (RidingEasy Records) first single from first new album in 5 years

Pre-orders: https://www.ridingeasyrecs.com/product/spelljammer-abyssal-trip/

“The vastness of everything is something that I think about a lot,” says Spelljammer bassist/vocalist Niklas Olsson. And it certainly shows in both the expansive, sludgy sounds and contemplative lyrics of the Stockholm, Sweden based trio. Following a 5-year break between their previous album, Ancient of Days ‚ÄĒ perhaps fittingly spent pondering said vastness ‚ÄĒ Spelljammer is back with an album that perfectly bridges the band’s earlier desert rock leanings and their later massive, slow-burning riffs.

Abyssal Trip (note: carefully re-read that album title) takes its moniker from the perpetually dark, cold, oxygen-free zone at the bottom of the ocean. The 6-song, 44-minute album fittingly embodies that bleak realm with rumbling, oozing guitars intercut with dramatic melodic interludes. The songs take their time to unfurl, making them even more hypnotic. Likewise, the lyrics take a poetic approach to establishing the sonic scenery.

“The lyrical themes we address, like the ultimate doom of man, and the search and longing for new and better worlds, are still there,” Olsson says. “The concept of something undiscovered out there in vast emptiness is pretty much always present.”

The recording process for Abyssal Trip differs from previous releases in that the band ‚ÄĒ guitarist Robert S√∂rling, drummer Jonatan Rimsbo and Olsson ‚ÄĒ opted to capture the performances while holed up in the mental bathysphere of a house in the countryside near Stockholm. “The songs benefitted from the relaxed environment of being away from everything,” Olsson explains. Indeed, the album sounds confident and meticulously arranged, afforded by the band’s isolation. S√∂rling mixed the album and it was mastered by Monolord drummer Esben Willems at Berserk Audio.

Album opener “Bellwether” begins dramatically with a very slow, nearly minute-long fade in of rumbling distortion setting the stage for heavily distorted bass and guitar plucking out the lugubrious riff for another minute and a half before the drums begin, and likewise equally as long before vocals gurgle to the surface. “Lake” abruptly shifts gears, opening with an unusually fast gallop before rupturing into thundering doom that soon drops into a clean-tone Middle Eastern melodic breakdown. The title track serves as the album centerpiece, opening with ominous film dialogue about blood sacrifice that launches into pummeling, detuned guitars rumbling over gut-punching drums and howling vocals hearkening to the proto-sludge of Pink Floyd’s “The Nile Song.” The dynamic relents briefly for a slow building clean guitar melody before all instruments lock into a jerking riff topped off by a trilling Iommi style lead. Throughout, Abyssal Trip is, just like its title suggests, an epic tour through desolate zones which yields much to discover.

Abyssal Trip will be available everywhere on LP, CD and download on February 26th, 2021 via RidingEasy Records.

Artist: Spelljammer
Album: Abyssal Trip
Label: RidingEasy Records
Release Date: February 26, 2021

01. Bellwether (6:38)
02. Lake (7:04)
03. Among The Holy (6:18)
04. Abyssal Trip (10:38)
05. Peregrine (2:22)
06. Silent Rift (10:09)

Spelljammer are:
Niklas Olsson: bass/vocals
Robert Sörling: guitar
Jonatan Rimsbo: drums

spelljammer.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/Spelljammer
ridingeasyrecords.com

Spelljammer, “Lake”

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Hazemaze Announce New Pressing for Hymns of the Damned

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

hazemaze

Swedish riff worshipers Hazemaze released their second album, Hymns of the Damned (review here), on Nov. 22, 2019. For those of you who, like me, need to check to see what day it is, that was less than a year ago. And here they are, about to put out the third pressing of the record through Ripple Music and Cursed Tongue. Preorders start on Oct. 30, and hey, I know we’re not talking about burning through 10,000 copies in a week or whatever, but I know selling through two complete vinyl pressings isn’t easy no matter what the numbers are, and it’s certainly more of anything than I’ve sold in the last year, so you won’t hear me talk smack. It’s out Dec. 4.

Last month, the three-piece released a three-song covers EP called The Paranoid Sessions, taking on — you guessed it — three Black Sabbath songs from Paranoid. They add organ to “Electric Funeral” and play it pretty loyal with “Iron Man” and “Hand of Doom,” but either way, it’s not like you’re gonna regret listening to Hazemaze cover Sabbath. I’ve put the stream for that and the one for the record at the bottom of the post here. Because riffs: the more the merrier.

Band had this to say:

hazemaze hymns of the damned lp repress

Hazemaze – Hymns of the Damned ‘Funeral Black’ repress out Dec. 4

Preorders start Oct. 30

We are excited to announce that Cursed Tongue Records and Ripple Music has joined forces to release the third pressing of our sophomore album ‚ÄĚHymns of the Damned‚ÄĚ

For this repress, we wanted to offer something special. Therefore, we decided to use a black album sleeve, which was actually our first option before we decided to go with the red background.

This repress is limited to 300 units worldwide and will most likely be the only black pressing.

A perfect complement to your HAZEMAZE collection!

Hazemaze is:
Ludvig – Guitar/Vocals
Nils – Drums
Estefan – Bass

https://hazemazeband.bandcamp.com
https://www.facebook.com/hazemazeband/
https://instagram.com/hazemazeband
http://cursedtonguerecords.bigcartel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/CursedTongueRecords
https://www.instagram.com/cursedtonguerecords
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Hazemaze, The Paranoid Sessions (2020)

Hazemaze, Hymns of the Damned (2019)

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Automatism Premiere Immersion LP in Full

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on October 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

AUTOMATISM

Stockholm progressive instrumentalist jammers Automatism will release their third album, Immersion, through Tonzonen Records on Oct. 9. If nothing else, they picked the right title. The album was tracked in a different world and a different time — Feb. 2019 — and its nuanced pastoralism blurs the already-kind-of-imaginary lines between krautrock, classic prog and heavy psychedelic improvisation. From opener “Heatstroke #2” onward, the four-piece of six-stringers Hans Hjelm and Gustav Nygren, bassist Mikael Tuominen and drummer Jonas Yrlid follow the core methodology they’ve had since their 2018 debut, From the Lake, whereby basic tracks are recorded live in the studio and overdubs added latter — a blend of improv and detailing that makes their work all the more, wait for it, immersive. Percussionist Jesper Skarin is a returning guest who features throughout, making an impression right on the leadoff cut, and none other than Per Wiberg — heavy music’s own Vinz Clortho, the Keymaster — brings added fluidity to “Monochrome Torpedo” and others on keys, while Tr√§d, Gr√§s och Stenar‘s Jakob Sj√∂holm (also a returning guest) sits in for closer “First Train.”

In some places, it’s easy to imagine where the improv ends and the overdub begins, as on the space-rocking second cut, “Falcon Machine.” Like a mellow¬†Hawkwind¬†homage, its basic track is a relatively straight-outward push.¬†Wiberg‘s keys add to the sweeping wash post-midsection, but the underlying progression and kosmiche flow is maintained, and it’s from that root that the rest of the song, whether it’s those keys or the lead guitar flourish, is built. Automatism have no trouble shifting approach across side A, automatism immersionwhether it’s the bass-punch-intro’ed spacejazz fusion of “Heatstroke #2,” “Falcon Machine”‘s all-systems-go-but-you-know-take-your-time-man-whenever-you’re-ready vibe or the righteous drift that emerges from the cymbal wash on “Monochrome Torpedo,” which is kind of what I wish all post-rock sounded like, but while they’re able to change the sonic context of a given track, they do so by transposing the same working modus. They could go from death metal to reggae — they don’t, and probably wouldn’t — and what would matter is the process beneath the songs and how they’re built up around those basic jams.

They didn’t invent it, but they certainly put it to effective use throughout¬†Immersion. An evocative guitar lead peppers “Monochrome Torpedo” in such fashion as to make it an unexpected album highlight, and soon enough,¬†Automatism are on to side B of the six-track/46-minute outing, which brings “New Box,” “Smoke Room” and the aforementioned “First Train.” As in “Falcon Machine,” the solos on “Monochrome Torpedo” and “New Box” build off the rhythm track in a way that feels complementary but would be nearly impossible to improvise at the time — which means I’m probably wrong and they are — and together with the keyboard melody in “New Box,” they bring to life the balance between patience and performance vitality. If genuine immersion happens anywhere on¬†Immersion though, it might be in the one-two of “New Box” and “Smoke Room,” the latter of which intertwines two leads hypnotically over a steady, easy-flowing rhythm, mixes¬†Wiberg‘s keys perfectly to flesh out the procession, and earns its place as the album’s longest track just ahead of the finale.

And the integration of Sj√∂holm¬†into “First Train” is likewise seamless, as the added guitar arrives with an off-time jazzy strum that just becomes part of the kitchen-sinkness already happening amid the rest of the band’s doings, suitably coated in sunshine as they are. The keys finish after the rest of the jam comes apart, but the affective experience of¬†Immersion remains, the band having made their point and made it well. It’s interesting to note that both¬†From the Lake and its 2019 sort-of-a-compilation follow-up, Into the Sea, relate to water, since obviously their music has a current beneath its surface much as a moving body of water might. If¬†Immersion, then, is Automatism‘s way of diving deeper into their own processes, the results are richer for it. Their aesthetic becomes a thriving ecosystem of its own.

Immersion is streaming in its entirety below ahead of the Oct. 9 release. Quote from the band and PR wire info follow.

Dive in and enjoy:

Automatism on Immersion:

“This album was recorded by Hans, Gustav, Micke, and Jonas in the exceptional Svartsj√∂landet Studio during two days in February 2019. We later had Per Wiberg (Kamchatka, Switchblade) add keys and Jesper Skarin (Vak, G√∂sta Berlings Saga) add percussion, with some — to our ears — pretty spectacular results! And as a bonus, you will hear the guitars of Jakob Sj√∂holm (Tr√§d, Gr√§s och Stenar) on the closing track! Not to mention the tasty mix by Konie, or the masterful mastering by Magnus Lindberg. Enjoy!”

Automatism is an instrumental rock band from Stockholm, Sweden. The music of the quartet is based on psych rock, with some added herbal, progressive and modal jazz elements. The band comments: “We look for moments of effortless music creation and try to capture them on record. Most songs are improvised live in the studio, with overdubs added.”

The debut album From The Lake (2018) and the follow-up album Into The Sea (2019) was released on vinyl on Tonzonen Records. Automatism have toured with The Spacelords and Kombynat Robotron in Sweden and Germany, and in 2019 they played together with Acid Rooster at the Psychedelic Network Festival, among others.

Automatism are:
Hans Hjelm: guitar
Gustav Nygren: guitar
Mikael Tuominen: bass
Jonas Yrlid: drums

Guest musicians:
Jesper Skarin: percussion (all tracks)
Per Wiberg: keyboards (all tracks)
Jakob Sjöholm: guitar (First Train)

Automatism on Thee Facebooks

Automatism on Bandcamp

Tonzonen Records on Thee Facebooks

Tonzonen Records on Instagram

Tonzonen Records website

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