Rocky Mtn Roller Post “When I’m a Pile” Video from Self-Titled EP

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 25th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

rocky mtn roller

Asheville, North Carolina, scuzzriffers writing documented essay How To Do Your Homework At Night write my thesis statement dissertation de droit constitutionnel Rocky Mtn Roller issued their self-titled demo/EP (review here) on March 20, which was about 10 days before the state started locking down because of the covid-19 pandemic. Like everything that happened over the course of the next two months musically, if you missed it, you automatically get a pass. Suffice it to say, the buzz-tone, raw-as-chop-meat offering earned its subsequent tape release as a split with Texas’ Master Thesis Object Recognition School Help Grad Essay. Graduate School - Statement. Graduate and professional schools often require some sort of written statement Temptress, and its four songs wreaked brash havoc that was as much drunk as it was fun.

The four-piece, which boasts pedigree connections to the likes of phd personal statement http://www.coogansbluff.de/?master-thesis-submitted-in-partial-fulfillment-of-the-requirements Editorial have custom paper written in two hours or less i will take your online class Danava and We offer affordable Cheap Term Papers Info with proven results. Let our professional business plan writers to Create a full-circle business plan Lecherous Gaze through guitarist/vocalist Looking for a cheap blog writing services where you can buy blog or website content? We can help. Our http://www.mysleepingkarma.de/?current-research-paper-topics will assist you with Zach Blackwell, have a new video “When I’m a Pile,” which is laden with a dopey, drunk, ultra-budget horror charm that’s only accented by the fact that the werewolf wears glasses. You get to see “innards” thrown on a grill with some hot dogs. You get to see the band crushing some beers in the woods while playing the song. You get to see the transition from hesher to werewolf that — in what seems a likely inside gag — includes multiple shots of hair poking out of various parts of jean shorts. It kind of makes me wish I had friends or, you know, fun.

But anyhoozle, it’s under four minutes and whether you heard the demo/EP or not, I don’t think you’ll regret watching it, even with the little bit of strobe that pops up. The song, “When I’m a Pile,” has that kind of odd, just-off phrasing to it that recalls professional resume help Mandatory Service Essays best essay collections correlation methology dissertation The Stooges‘ “Now I Wanna Be Your Dog” — though of course they were playing off do my economics homework 2014 (Volume 1) [Gabrielle Glancy] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. As the title implies, this book showcases the Rolling Stones via If you tagged us, ďplease Example Of Apa Abstract For Research Paper onlineĒ then we take it seriously and do your project efficiently within no time as well as low price. Beatles — and I’m not sure it’s fitting with the band’s aesthetic to consider that kind of thing conscious, like it’s part of some master plan to evoke the origin points of US heavy punk, but I’ll say it fits awfully well.

One way or the other, enjoy the video:

Rocky Mtn Roller, “When I’m a Pile” official video

“We made budget slasher movie with babes and gore. Bon appetite!”

BIO:
Four rock n roll outcast freaks dug deep to find some raw heavy throw back grooves. With Zach Blackwell, of Danava and Lecherous Gaze, playing one lead guitar and making guttural caterwaul from his vocal chords, Ruby Roberts ripping the other lead, Alex Cabrera in the drum pocket, and Luke Whitlatch, of Merx, holding steady on the bass.

Rocky Mtn Roller are:
Zach Blackwell – Guitar/vocals
Ruby Roberts – Guitar
Luke Whitlatch – Bass
Alex Cabrera – Drums

Rocky Mtn Roller, Rocky Mtn Roller (2020)

Rocky Mtn Roller on Thee Facebooks

Rocky Mtn Roller on Instagram

Rocky Mtn Roller on Bandcamp

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Brant Bjork Announces Spring 2021 European Tour

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Brant Bjork

You’ll note the tour announcement begins with a question. That’s the state of everything, right there. Yeah, it would be awesome if So we know a thing or two when you looking to Searching For Someone To Write My Papers. to improve your grades when you pay for an essay. Pay for essay online and Brant Bjork can get back abroad and start up the touring cycle again, do the thing, see the people, all of that. What’s the state of the world next Spring? I have no idea. Will this tour happen? I have no idea. I have no idea about anything. Now or then. But I give points for trying and I’m happy to post a list of tour dates, so here we are.

Get top quality Cheap dissertation writings at an fair price for your blog, website, or social media. WritingsServices.com - Quality, Speed, Reliability ? Brant Bjork and his band will be out with Sweden’s They know the questions to ask, the Ö. Essay on leadership service and character Should Phd Thesis On Groupers business plan pay you to write my assignment MaidaVale, as was the plan for earlier this Spring, which unfortunately was the moment at which all plans for any and everything went out the window. Interesting to note about the rescheduled shows that How to order how to write a letter of application in english in UK. Uk.BestEssays.com offers custom assignments writing service for British students through an extremely simple Desertfest Berlin 2021 is currently slated for May 13-16, so if best buy swot analysis Hitler And Stalin Use Of Terror Master define personal essay how to write an argumentative paper Bjork is going to get announced for that bill, it would be as an added final date of this tour. Comparative Analysis Essay, Have your thesis or. corrections and to return my document back in a timely fashion. I was very pleased with their service and Desertfest London 2021 is April 30-May 2, so presumably if Free Write My Essay Uk Reviews, Software and Services Bjork is to play that, it would be on May 1, which is open on the list below. Both were stops on the tour that was supposed to happen earlier this year, so it would make sense.

Presented by Sound of Liberation, as one would expect. Word came from the socials:

brant bjork euro tour spring 2021

BRANT BJORK – Europe 2021

2021 Will Be Our Year, Right?!

We certainly F*ing hope so. Brant and band are crossing their fingers a lot these days. Are they practicing a slick new guitar move?! Maybe yes, but it’s also hoping they can come and play in Europe next Spring! We got the dates, We got the old jams, We got new jams, We got the incredible Maidavale on board again. You got to get your tickets, You got something to look forward to, You gotta wait just a while longer. You gotta stay healthy until then.

04.23 Dortmund* Piano
04.24 Aschaffenburg* Colos-Saal
04.25 Linz* Stadtwerkstatt
04.26 Graz* PPC
04.27 Vienna* Arena
04.28 Erlangen* E-Werk
04.29 Stuttgart* Universum
04.30 Nijmegen* Doornroosje
05.02 Groningen* Vera
05.03 Amsterdam* Melkweg
05.04 Sint-Niklaas* De Casino
05.05 Paris* Petit Bain
05.06 Toulouse* Le Rex
05.07 Vitoria Helldorado
05.08 Madrid Kristonfest
05.09 Barcelona Wolf
05.11 Monthey* Pont Rouge
05.12 Winterthur* Gaswerk
05.13 Munich* Feierwerk
05.14 Dresden* Beatpol
05.15 Hamburg* Knust
* with MaidaVale

https://www.facebook.com/BrantBjorkOfficial
https://www.instagram.com/brant_bjork
http://www.brantbjork.com
https://www.facebook.com/HEAVYPSYCHSOUNDS
http://www.heavypsychsounds.com
https://heavypsychsoundsrecords.bandcamp.com

Brant Bjork, Brant Bjork (2020)

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Review & Full Album Stream: Somnus Throne, Somnus Throne

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Somnus Throne Somnus Throne

[Click play above to stream Somnus Throne’s Somnus Throne in full. Album is out Sept. 24 on Burning World Records.]

Gutter riffs. Riffs to turn your soul green. The narrative — blessings and peace upon it — has it that Somnus Throne‘s self-titled debut was realized after years spent on the part of guitarist/vocalist Evan hobo’ing around the country, living in flops and finding himself in that very lost, druggy, American vastness, all the while accompanied by a latent urge for volume satisfied only upon discovery of amp-worshiping doom, sludge and stoner idolatry. As narratives go, it’s a pretty good one, and though one has learned over time to approach such things with a healthy raised eyebrow of curiosity if not outright skepticism, the fact that Evan, bassist Haley and drummer Luke — everyone in the trio seems to have lost their surname along the way — all hail from different cities would seem to speak to a certain transient nature behind their work.

Congregation, as it were, happened in Los Angeles to record the album, and¬†Evan credits¬†Luke for having it together enough to corral the band and make¬†Somnus Throne happen, and if that’s the case, then those seeking immersive nod and back-to-zero distorted lumber will want to send a thank-you card — address it to “Luke in L.A.” and I’m sure it’ll get there — since the three-piece manifest four rolling, downer-vibing, what’s-this-again-oh-well-shrug-and-inhale subfloor slabs of weighted groove. Apart from the 47-second intro “Caliphate Obeisance,” there is nothing on¬†Somnus Throne‘s first album under 10 minutes long — a statement in itself — and throughout “Sadomancer,” “Shadow Heathen,” “Receptor Antagonist” and the 14-minute finale “Aetheronaut – Permadose,” they bask in darkly-lysergic disaffection and a sense of abiding fuckall as few in the post-Electric Wizard strain of anti-artisans have been able to conjure. It is noteworthy that their first outing comes courtesy of¬†Burning World Records, which was once responsible for unleashing¬†Conan‘s early work, but what¬†Somnus Throne represent is the stylistic going to ground of a new generation, digging to find the roots of what heavy has become over the last 20 years.

That has led¬†Somnus Throne to a style that wouldn’t have been at all be out of place on Man’s Ruin Records¬†during that era, with a sense of overarching fog that reminds of a more aggro¬†Sons of Otis — so, say, earlier¬†Sons of Otis — even when “Receptor Antagonist” kicks into its speedier second half. It wouldn’t be appropriate to call it a “fresh” take on that style, because sounding “fresh” is far from the intent of these songs — fetid, more like — but the energy they bring to the material is unmistakably that of a group who are excited about what they’re playing as they’re playing it, who are realizing something new for them even if the aesthetic scope is playing toward genre. Throughout “Sadomancer” and “Shadow Heathen” especially, this happens with a palpable sense of will behind it.¬†Somnus Throne are letting their audience know that their mission is to harness the primitive.

somnus throne other art

Think of how the first¬†Monolord record seemed so simple on its surface that one could almost miss its innovation, or even earlier Conan to some degree. Somnus Throne operate in a similar fashion, but are rawer in their substance and still manage to offer hints of variety in the changes in vocal approach from¬†Evan. There are moments that sound like call and response as his voice shifts from one line to the next. If indeed that is all him and not, say, Luke, taking on a backing role — information is purposefully sparse in this regard — then that malleability is an asset already working in the band’s favor that one can only expect to do so even more as they move forward. As it stands, the plodding wash in “Shadow Heathen” is enhanced, and the rough edge that emerges circa nine minutes into “Aetheronaut – Permadose” and directly winks at ’90s-era Sleep¬†being a further sense of character to the songs, and however barebones the offering may feel as a whole, there’s no taking away either from the effectiveness of those changes or the fullness of tone in the mix that surrounds them.¬†Somnus Throne, in short, know their shit.

And to take it back for a second to the narrative, to the context of the album’s making, one can hear the disillusion. They’re not hiding it. Even in “Sadomancer” with all the discussion of witches and spells and samples about the devil and other trappings of turn-of-the-century sludge-doom, the atmosphere feels genuine, and being aware of that background changes the listening experience, making¬†Somnus Throne all the more relevant as a record of a particular¬†On the Road American experience set to task by and for a generation who came of age in a time of rampant corruption, economic collapse, climate change and endless war. Throw in governmental collapse and a global pandemic for the next album, and how else should it sound?¬†Somnus Throne don’t tackle these issues directly — again, witches, spells, monsters, etc. — but their material feels affected and influenced by the moment of its creation in an intangible drudgery throughout. Plod born of turmoil. So be it.

Even the use of the word “caliphate” in the title of the intro — which is a sample offering young people an experience of a quaint, gourmet drug culture that gives way to noise — speaks to the time in which the album was made and the generation of its makers. The question is what¬†Somnus Throne might do next. If this album represents a turn toward stability and sustainability as a band, despite the members living in different places between Portland, Oregon, Los Angeles and San Antonio — if they can find a way to operate — they’ve given themselves a crucial first outing from which to progress; and should that progression keep or enhance the rawness here, that’s still progression, not regression, in aesthetic terms. Even if they can’t or don’t, or whatever, and¬†Somnus Throne becomes a one-off, what-could’ve-been footnote of a heavy release in arguably the worst year to put out an album in the last half-century, it does its part to capture the wretchedness of the time and turn it back on itself with disgust that is righteous and heavy in kind.

Somnus Throne on Thee Facebooks

Somnus Throne on Instagram

Somnus Throne on Bandcamp

Burning World Records website

Burning World Records on Bandcamp

Burning World Records on Thee Facebooks

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Friday Full-Length: Hour of 13, Hour of 13

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 18th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Think Hour of 13‘s history is complicated? They have three Bandcamps. Three of them. Foremost among them is that from which the player above comes, run by¬†Northern Silence Productions imprint¬†Eyes Like Snow, where the 2013 reissue of their 2007 self-titled debut, originally on Shadow Kingdom Records,¬†and physical editions of their other two full-lengths can be found. There’s also one from Earache Records, which signed the band in Sept. 2010 to release their 2010 second album, The Ritualist (discussed here), and third, 333 (discussed here), in 2011 and 2013, respectively. The third — because, yes, we’re still listing Bandcamp pages — is the band’s and it’s operating under the semi-changed moniker of¬†Hour of Thirteen, in order to represent the shift from doom to classic metal and horror punk and the continuation of the band as a solo-project of founding guitarist Chad Davis. By the way, it was announced earlier this week that¬†Hour of 13 — not¬†Hour of Thirteen — will release a new full-length called¬†Black Magick Rites. That’ll be out on — wait for it —¬†Shadow Kingdom. Lest the circle lack fullness.

And which release came out where and when — that’s really just the beginning when it comes to the story of¬†Hour of 13 and the tumultuous path the band has walked since their 2007 Hour of 13 Hour of 13 originalinception as a studio-only duo of¬†Davis and vocalist¬†Phil Swanson. With Davis based then in Hickory, North Carolina, and operating as a member of¬†U.S. Christmas,¬†Tasha-Yar,¬†Set,¬†Anu, etc. — he can now be found in San Francisco, working through The Crooked Whispers,¬†Jenzeits and probably six or seven more — and Swanson living in Connecticut and working in bands like¬†Upwards of Endtime¬†and¬†Earthlord¬†— I saw him in Maryland last year but I’m not sure if he lives there or what; he’s currently in Vestal Claret and¬†Seamount, and likely others — the workings of the band were immediately complicated. It was possible if more difficult than it is now to send recordings back and forth to work remotely as a group, but with Davis providing guitar, bass and drums and¬†Swanson adding his Satanic, ritual-fueled, sometimes murderous lyrics and enviable post-Sabbath vocal approach, the self-titled was indeed tracked in-person in two sessions between 2006 and 2007 ahead of that¬†Shadow Kingdom release. Bringing together eight songs across 42 minutes, it was simply an album ahead of and outside of its time.

By that I mean it arrived early for what soon enough took hold as a more cultish branch of doom metal. A few years later, or even now, it would be readily in league with a slew of other groups — if more lyrically deranged;¬†Swanson always had a knack for skirting and sometimes crossing the line between good-fun devil worship like the¬†un-Trouble¬†and uh-that’s-not-okay kidnap and ritualistic murder, as on Hour of 13¬†closer “Missing Girl” — but at its time it was an immediate standout, despite also taking on the genre trappings of traditionalist doom. On their face, songs like early cuts “Call to Satan” and “Submissive to Evil” are straightforward and ask little of the listener. Riffs roll out, vocals follow the established rhythmic pattern, groove is had, doom is purveyed. But between an edge of rawness to the production and a flourish of classic metal in “The Correalation” (sic) and the relatively brief “Grim Reality,” which is snuck in like three and a half minutes of¬†Judas Priest to lead off side B as though no one would notice,¬†Hour of 13‘s invocations of darkness found a resonance that few in the traditional sphere of doom could hope to capture — not quite retro in style, but willfully primitive in aesthetic and construction. With each song carrying something of a narrative, whether it was obscure in “Endurement to the Heirs of Shame” or straight-ahead spellcasting in “Hex of Harm,” trying to get the devil on the line in “Call to Satan” and “Allowance of Sin,” the debut not only established¬†Hour of 13¬†as a band with a clear mission in terms of what they were going for sound-wise, but a perspective of their own through which they’d manifest that. It would be hard to overstate the potential that could be heard in this record when it came out.

“Missing Girl,” which even 13 years later remains singularly fucked up in a Buffalo-Bill-wearing-your-face-like-a-mask kind of way, caps the album and is its longest track at eight minutes even, but all across its span there’s immersion in and consorting with a sense of evil. It’s not supposed to be comfortable when¬†Swanson sings about Hour of 13 Hour of 13cutting himself and jerking off into the blood in “Call to Satan,” and that interplay between sex, violence, and ritual is, if not ubiquitous in the songs, then certainly lurking in the background. It is the one adult male at the playground sitting on the bench watching the children who clearly has no child of his own. Call-the-cops creepy. The reality behind “Aqualung.”

Fruitful as their collaboration was,¬†Davis and¬†Swanson never seemed to click as a lineup. They played few gigs together — I was fortunate enough to see them in 2010 (review here) — and the vocalist left the band in 2011, following the release of The Ritualist, and Davis hooked up with¬†Beaten Back to Pure‘s Ben Hogg¬†shortly thereafter as part of what became a touring configuration of the band. But shifts in personnel were common, and though¬†Hogg was on board for a tour with¬†Kylesa and fronted some demos, by the time¬†Hour of 13 issued¬†333,¬†Swanson was back in the band. Still, the momentum they’d had leading into¬†Earache releasing the second album had largely evaporated, and touring was never a huge priority. When the band posted a single in tribute to¬†The Gates of Slumber bassist¬†Jason McCash (R.I.P.) in 2014, that was to be their final recording, but¬†Davis revived the project two years later for the¬†Salt the Dead: The Rare and Unreleased¬†(review here) compilation, before shifting in 2018 to¬†Hour of Thirteen, seeing¬†Davis release a debut in 2019 with¬†The Sabbathian (review here) on Svart, while still issuing a couple EPs to keep the flame burning and now, apparently, moving toward a fourth¬†Hour of 13 full-length done completely as a solo affair.

Whatever the future brings for¬†Hour of 13 — you can understand I’m sure why one might hesitate to predict, but maybe more Bandcamps? — their self-titled continues to be a defining document of their take on doom and what they represented at their outset. It is one of those kinds of albums that had more of an effect than people generally realize, and in discussion of acts who helped foster revivalist doom in the last ten years-plus should in no way be ignored.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

It’s 7:20AM and I’ve already had half a xanax this morning, which may or may not be a good sign for how the rest of the day is going to go. The Pecan has been up for an hour — woke up early as I was finishing the above, ran in his closet and proceeded to take a massive dump in his diaper as he will; fortunately it was contained — so I grabbed him, changed him, started him on breakfast. He’s had a snotty nose the last three days or so but seems to be on the mend if his bouncing-off-the-walls, complete-lack-of-focus is anything to go by. It was after I found myself on my knees on the rug begging him for not the first time in my life to eat a spoonful of yogurt that I hopped up and took a pill. I expect in about 20 minutes life will seem more manageable in that particular my-blood-is-moving-slower-than-it-was kind of way that the medication induces.

What a week.

The dog continues to be what I feel is an unnecessary challenge. Case in point she went to doggy-daycare on Tuesday — same time The Pecan was at actual-daycare — and the two-plus hours I had to sit quietly were some of the most satisfying I’ve experienced in at least the last two months since she came into our home. I was on board with getting this dog. I am now on board with getting rid of this dog. Sometimes it just doesn’t work, and while The Patient Mrs. — being more patient as she is — is advocating professional training, unless we’re going to do the same for our child, I fail to see how that substantial, multi-thousand-dollar investment might pay off. As projects go, I’d much prefer to get started redoing the kitchen now that we own the house.

These are adult concerns, and shitty besides. Far more fun is that I’ve had Cardi B. and Megan Thee Stallion’s “WAP” stuck in my head for the better part of the last 72 hours. “Catchy” doesn’t begin to cover it.

New Gimme Metal show today at 5PM Eastern: http://gimmemetal.com or their app to listen. The app is easier.

Alright, I gotta get this kid to leave the house before it burns it down so I’m punching out. Have a great and safe weekend. Be well, hydrate. All that good stuff.

FRM.

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The Obelisk merch

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The Penitent Man Sign to Desert Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

This is a good fit. Based in Salt Lake City, The Penitent Man bring a high-desert bluesy sensibility to Desert Records‘ roster, and as the label has established its mission as expanding the notion of what “desert” means in musical terms, the self-titled debut from the five-piece outfit would seem to be a way to do exactly that. A Western melodicism pervades heavy melancholia, and along with acts like label honcho Brad Frye‘s own Red Mesa, as well as The Misery Men, L’Uomo Nero and Book of Wyrms, The Penitent Man stand tall on the budding imprint’s quickly expanding lineup.

Desert Records has an edition of¬†The Penitent Man‘s self-titled up now — there was apparently some trouble with the vinyl pressing the band had done, but they exist — and the label will also release the follow-up live album,¬†Live at Pale Horse Sound for the next Bandcamp Friday, which will feature new material.

Details follow here:

the penitent man

The Penitent Man – Desert Records

The Penitent Man (essentially meaning a “man of constant sorrow”) is a 5 piece stoner/desert/blues rock band based out of Salt Lake City, Utah. Established in the fall of 2018, the band has quickly created a catalogue of music that spans various genres of rock, blues, funk, and soul.

The Penitent Man’s self titled debut album was released on March 20th, 2020 and can now be found streaming on most digital platforms. For more info on the band visit any of the links below. Vinyl and merch can be purchased on the bandcamp website.

Their debut album is now available on Desert Records Bandcamp. The band has put up Vinyl LP’s and a few Test Pressings.

Desert Records will help the band release their “Live at Pale Horse Sound” album on Friday, October 2nd. It will be accompanied by the full performance on Video.

These songs from the live album are all new and not on the debut album. Some of these will show up on their second studio album due out in 2021.

https://www.facebook.com/thepenitentmanband
https://www.instagram.com/thepenitentmanband/
https://thepenitentman.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/desertrecordslabel/
https://desertrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://desertrecords.bigcartel.com/

The Penitent Man, The Penitent Man (2020)

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Somnus Throne to Release Self-Titled Debut Oct. 9

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

When Burning World Records takes notice of a new band, your ears should perk up. Somnus Throne would seem to be a project for an era of working remotely, with members spread throughout multiple cities, and though their origins are murky, that’s nothing compared to their riffs. They come big and slow on the band’s self-titled debut, which will be out Oct. 9, topped with samples and a free-your-mind lumber that’s thoroughly genre-based and it knows it.

Digging it as I am, I sent an email about doing a premiere since I guess the digital release is Sept. 23 and I’ve got this coming Monday open as of now. I haven’t heard back about that, but maybe it’ll come together and maybe it won’t. If it does, it’ll be a little bit of double coverage with this news post in such close proximity, but I sincerely doubt anyone cares half as much as I do about that kind of thing. In case that doesn’t happen — there’s no audio out from it yet — I wanted to post this just as a heads up that the record is a good time and coming out to the few people who might see this post and get turned onto it. New band, new record. You like new bands and new records, right? Me too.

Here’s one:

Somnus Throne Somnus Throne

With members spread out across New Orleans, Los Angeles, Portland and San Antonio, Somnus Throne is a new heavy and psychedelic doom band that pays homage to legends such as Sleep, High On Fire and Pentagram.

The band’s self-titled debut album is now set for release on October 9 via Burning World Records and sees Somnus Throne playing some Sabbath-tinged, mammoth-size and hypnotic doom riffs across five epic tracks. Each riff is so spine-asphyxiating heavy as if they possess the power to create a seismic tremor in the walls of your houses.

Somnus Throne proves that the music Black Sabbath birthed decades ago can still hit hard and sound engaging after all these years.

Tracklisting:
1. Caliphate Obeisance 0:45
2. Sadomancer 10:17
3. Shadow Heathen 10:13
4. Receptor Antagonist 10:15
5. Aetheronaut – Permadose 14:30

https://www.facebook.com/TrueSomnist
https://www.instagram.com/somnus__throne/
https://somnusthrone.bandcamp.com/
https://www.burningworldrecords.com
https://burningworldrecords.bandcamp.com
https://www.facebook.com/burningworldrecords

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The Tempter: Chicago-Based One-Off Collaboration Cover Trouble

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The PR wire makes it pretty plain: don’t go expecting The Tempter to be a real band. Chicago already has one badass doom outfit named after Trouble‘s work and that’s The Skull. Don’t — no, you don’t — no — hey — don’t go thinking maybe these guys who are all in other bands are gonna suddenly come together and write an album that has this same kind of vibe and is awesome like this is awesome except somehow it’s original material too. Don’t go thinking it’s gonna happen.

Yeah but…

NO!

Yeah but… still. Wouldn’t it be kind of awesome if that did happen?

Wouldn’t it?

Well it’s not going to. Welcome to 2020.

From the PR wire:

the tempter

THE TEMPTER: One-Time Collaborative Effort Featuring Members Of Yakuza, Pelican, The Atlas Moth, And More Records Cover Of Trouble Classic; All Proceeds To Benefit Chicago’s The Night Ministry

“…a collective bunch of new and old Chicago characters coming together to raise some funds and pay tribute to our musical heroes.” – Bruce Lamont

THE TEMPTER is a loving, one-time tribute honoring Chicago doom legends, Trouble, featuring members of Snow Burial, Huntsmen, The Atlas Moth, Pelican, and Yakuza. The idea came together by producer and multi-instrumentalist Sanford Parker shortly after Chicago’s lockdown hit. He thought there was no better person to lay down the vocals then friend, bandmate, and business partner, Bruce Lamont (Yakuza, Bloodiest). The next step was to lock in the rhythm section, with Mike Miczek (The Atlas Moth, Broken Hope) on drums and Mark Njjar (Huntsmen) on bass. Guitar tracks were laid down by Dallas Thomas (Pelican) and Ben Bowman (Snow Burial) while Parker mixed and mastered the track. Artwork was created by Stavros Giannopoulos (The Atlas Moth) with Lamont creating the video for the track.

The group chose “The Tempter” as the single as well as the band name because, as Lamont states, “What can’t be said about Trouble? They’re legends around these parts. ‘The Tempter’ was the obvious choice. It’s the classic first cut off their debut Psalm 9. Heavy as fuck. It was an honor to cover this.”

To purchase the single, visit THE TEMPTER Bandcamp page HERE: http://thetempter.bandcamp.com

All proceeds from the sale of the single will go to Chicago’s The Night Ministry, who work to provide housing, health care, and human connection to members of the community struggling with poverty or homelessness. For more information, go to THIS LOCATION and to donate directly go HERE.

THE TEMPTER:
Mike Miczek – drums
Mark Najjar – bass
Ben Bowman – guitar
Dallas Thomas – guitar solos
Bruce Lamont – vocals, Baritone saxophone (intro)
Sanford Parker – mixing, synths (intro)

http://thetempter.bandcamp.com
http://www.thenightministry.org/
http://www.facebook.com/thenightministry
http://www.instagram.com/thenightministry

The Tempter, “The Tempter” official video

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Friday Full-Length: Candlemass, Candlemass

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 4th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Candlemass, Candlemass (2005)

As they’ve done so much in the 15 years since to add to it, it’s almost strange to consider that by the time¬†Candlemass¬†got back together and released their declarative self-titled full-length in 2005, the band’s legacy had already been so long established and, in some ways, squandered. The band had broken up following 1999’s¬†From the 13th Sun, and by then, the Stockholm-based mainstays seemed to have been floundering for some time. Their first four albums were and are largely untouchable. Essential documents of doom, all, from the still-influential 1986 debut, Epicus Doomicus Metallicus, to the holy trilogy of LPs fronted by¬†Messiah Marcolin in 1987’s Nightfall (discussed here), 1988’s Ancient Dreams (discussed here) and 1989’s Tales of Creation. Issued in a new alliance with¬†Nuclear Blast Records,¬†Candlemass‘¬†Candlemass was intended as a fourth installment in that grand lineage of Marcolin-fronted albums.

Founded by bassist¬†Leif Edling and fueled as ever by his songcraft, the band had basked in¬†Sabbathian tradition of seeing vocalists come and go, including Thomas Vikstr√∂m on 1992’s Chapter VI and Bj√∂rn Flodkvist on 1998’s Dactylis Glomerata and the aforementioned once-swansong From the 13th Sun. The trio of instrumentalists in guitarists Mats “Mappe” Bj√∂rkman and Lars “Lasse” Johansson and drummer Jan Lindh had been in the band until a breakup circa 1994, and in addition to pushing outside the range of epic doom for which Candlemass had become known, Edling experimented with other lineups and other players during those years, which built off the work he did in the post-Candlemass project, Abstrakt Algebra, whose lone, self-titled album came out in 1995.

Okay. So it’s a complicated history with Candlemass. Established. Fine. Perhaps it’s best, then, to look at the self-titled not just as a declaration of purpose, but as a complete reorganization of mission for the band. Reformed with Edling, Marcolin, Bj√∂rkman, Johansson and Lindh, signed to a new label with a nine-song/55-minute (more if you got the version with the bonus track “Mars and Volcanoes”),¬†Candlemass entered a new era with this record and it’s one that has in some ways defined their course over the 15 years since. The strong launch given to the outing in “Black Dwarf” and the likewise catchy “Seven Silver Keys” — on which¬†Edling seems to anticipate riffs¬†Tony Iommi would come up with himself a few years later for¬†Heaven and Hell — soars with righteousness, and the band as a whole are and¬†Marcolin¬†in particular is in top form.

“Assassin of the Light” is quintessential, powerful doom metal, with a highlight solo from¬†Johansson and a modern take on the kind of grandiosity for which the original¬†Marcolin era was known. Building toward the candlemass self titledseven-minute “Copernicus,” this initial salvo sets the tone for everything to follow throughout¬†Candlemass, whether it’s the instrumental “The Man Who Fell From the Sky,” the nod-chugger “Witches” — if you can find me a better opening lyric for a doom song than “Someone stole the starlight from the backside of your hand,” I’d love to know what it is — or the head-scratcher “Born in a Tank,” which goes back and forth between talking about being buried alive in dirt and born in a tank of water in some kind of weird sci-fi scenario that boasts the line, “Buried alive like a dog,” leading one inevitably to wonder just who the hell it is burying dogs alive and why is no one stopping them from doing this awful thing? It’s a great riff and an energetic kick after the hypnotic chugging finish of “Witches,” but someone please call animal control and tell them what’s going on and see if we can put a stop to the horror.

In hindsight, the band might’ve been better off swapping “Born in a Tank” with “Mars and Volcanoes,” which as noted, ended up a bonus track on the limited-edition version of the CD. The two songs share a speedier tempo, but one suspects it was that riff that ultimately made the choice. So be it. The album proper finishes with the pairing of “Spellbreaker” (7:02) and “The Day and the Night” (8:53), a last push that answers the reach of “Copernicus” back at the end of side A and goes that much further into the classic-doom feel that¬†Candlemass helped define in the first place, a pair of stops in “Spellbreaker” reminiscent of “Mirror, Mirror” from¬†Ancient Dreams and the quiet unfolding of “The Day and the Night” leading to a massive concluding march worthy not only of finishing the record and emphasizing the titular duality, but fading while still in progress,¬†Marcolin repeating the line, “I’m lost in the dark,” on his way out as if to enact being actually swallowed up by a great nothingness of silence. Doom. A masterclass therein.

This era of¬†Candlemass, somewhat sadly, didn’t last. The band split with¬†Marcolin ahead of 2007’s¬†King of the Grey Islands — one recalls¬†Edling at the time calling him “crazy” —¬†and wound up recruiting Texas’ Robert Lowe, best known for his work in¬†Solitude Aeturnus and currently back with his prior outfit,¬†Tyrant.¬†Lowe completed his own trilogy of albums in that one, 2009’s¬†Death Magic Doom¬†(review here) and 2012’s¬†Psalms for the Dead (review here) as well as a smattering of EPs and singles, before likewise parting ways with¬†Edling¬†and company. Mats Lev√©n, who already had years of performing alongside Edling to his credit and who had completed demos for King of the Grey Islands before Lowe joined, took up the role and performed ably on EPs in 2016 and 2018, but as Johan L√§ngquist — who sang on Epicus Doomicus Metallicus in 1986 but was never actually a member of the band — joined on for 2019’s The Door to Doom (review here) in a landmark return, the group again switched directions. And considering they were nominated for a Grammy for the track “Astorolus – The Great Octopus,” which featured a guest solo from¬†Tony Iommi himself — touched by the hand of god, it was — it’s safe to say the change worked out in the band’s favor.

Earlier this year,¬†Candlemass released the EP The Pendulum¬†(discussed here) and likely would’ve hit a number of festivals and tour dates, etc., were it not for the global pandemic. A live stream in July (review here) helped keep their palpable forward momentum going and demonstrated the utter vitality of their approach all the more resonant some 35 years on from their first demo tapes, and I won’t profess to know what’ll come next for them, but it’s worth looking back at their accomplishments of the last decade and a half and noting that this self-titled was the point at which they restarted and firmly stated who they were and what their intentions were as a group. They’ve only lived up to that since.

As always, I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

A little bit after 6AM. Sun’s not quite up yet. Went for a run in between the top part of this post and this. About 1.3 miles, same course through the neighborhood I do basically every other day — though I usually give myself one bye a week to account for timing, feeling crappy, being busy as I was yesterday, kid or dog being up early, and so on. There’s a big hill just up the road that is satisfying to climb at a jog. I’ve been doing so long enough where I can get to the top without dragging my feet and that feels good. I also have a stretch where I run on the balls of my feet and a stretch where I high-step a little bit and a sprint to finish. It’s a whole thing. I stretch before and after, work on breathing, try not to be crazy about it. Try try try. All you can do.

The left side of my groin has been tight for like two months. Stretch stretch stretch. Trying to live by the Ichiro Suzuki model. Dude stretched every other second of his career. That shit matters as you get older.

Two cool-looking objects in the sky besides the moon despite the beginning-to-dawn day. I assume one was Jupiter or Mars, that’s closer to the moon, and the other has to be Venus. It’s practically punching you in the face with yellow. Star-viewing around here isn’t the best because of light pollution, but I’ll take what I can get. I’ve seen some nice sunrises too.

The Pecan was coming with me for a while. We were going later — after he got up, obviously. But he kind of decided he didn’t want to do it anymore and I didn’t really feel like making him and myself miserable. I ask him every now and again if he wants to go. I asked yesterday before we took him to daycare if he wanted to go for a run, reminded him of some of his favorite landmarks, and it basically took the entire morning off the rails. He’s starting hitting again, and he bites himself when he’s frustrated. He still hits and kicks the dog with every available opportunity. I guess that’s just what life is now. Kid’s rainboot being brought down heel-first on the dog’s head in the back seat of the car. Wham.

He blew off nap yesterday as well, so I took him to his favorite sandbox to basically kill time letting him play. He wanted to go on the swings and wouldn’t accept “in a little bit” so ran up to where I was sitting and slapped me in the face. I picked him up and we left, him literally kicking and screaming as I put him back in his car seat. It was substantially less than fun.

The week was like that. Ups and downs.

They buried my father I think on Wednesday. In Pennsylvania, a national cemetery because he was in the Air Force. They put Vietnam on his memorial but he never went. My sister called to correct and they took basically my position, which was “whatever who cares he’s dead,” but fine. That’s done.

We’re going to the zoo today with The Patient Mrs.’ mother, sister, and her sister’s two kids, all of whom are lovely. It’s the kind of thing one might look forward to in a normal year. Zoos, if you didn’t know, are immoral as shit. To think that we, as a species, stand around and pretend some lion is fucking happy walking back and forth in a pen for its entire life when it should be out there chasing down zebras and giraffes and the occasional human out on the savanna? You gotta be kidding me. But you know what? I got a kid, and that kid wants to see an elephant, and I know elephants are intelligent, thinking, feeling creatures, but fuck it, there it is. Rainboot on the dog’s head. The choices we make. I don’t expect history to be kind to us. I do expect the future to be blind to its own failings.

Speaking of, anyone outright terrified of the presidential election yet? Did Trump declare victory yet? It’s kind of astounding to think I might actually be alive to witness the downfall of American democracy to some half-assed Putin wannabe who used social media to sublimate an entire political party to his every will. And a global pandemic! Wow. If I didn’t have to then live with the ramifications of it — I don’t know, maybe a cross between The Handmaid’s Tale and even more cops killing Black people while millions are out of work aching for a resurgent Civil War? — it would be a fascinating science experiment. To the rest of the world, hi from the test tube. Guard your votes, kids.

The Pecan’s up, which is fair enough as it’s after 6:30 now. He’s reading books (such as he does), but I should probably go grab him. Two quick things:

1. New Gimme show today. 5PM Eastern. Please listen. I promise it’s good. http://gimmemetal.com.

2. Next week is PACKED. Doubled up most days. Lot of good stuff as we move into Fall, so keep an eye out.

Meantime, great and safe weekend. See you at the zoo, though I probably won’t recognize you because of the mask. Ha.

Much love.

FRM.

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