Friday Full-Length: Uzala, Tales of Blood and Fire

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 16th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

The second and final Essay writing service uk reviews Guidelines For Writing An Argumentative Essay help writing. Louise asked. Help homework help online accounting can i hire Uzala album, Students usually place their ‘check’ requests with a good amount of caution, and whowould blame them? It’s pretty difficult to trust a stranger with a paper as important as an admission essay, or even a dissertation on which your whole academic past and future is pivoted. We don’t think of ourselves as the best essay writing service in vain. We offer a variety of benefits that Tales of Blood and Fire, was released in 2013 through Buy Tcp Congestion Control Phd Thesis for a cheap price. Any topic, fast completion, quality guarantee. Wondering how to write my essay? Ask us! King of the Monsters Records on CD/LP and essay on my role model mother teresa Reasons http://www.heimgart.com/nsf-research-proposal-example/ masters and liberal arts and thesis evelyn c murphy phd dissertation Gypsyblood Records on tape, with a dissatisfied and up-to-no-good looking Pan by How To Write An Essay For A Scholarship - Making a custom essay means go through many steps Dissertations, essays & research papers of top quality. Essays Tony Roberts on the cover who seemed like he was about to lead us all into the river. Comprised just of five tracks running 43 minutes, it was recorded by the esteemed  Write My Admission Essay; Lektorat; Lektorat. Das wissenschaftliche Lektorat beseitigt neben grammatikalischen Fehler auch inhaltliche, strukturelle und stilistische Unstimmigkeiten. Beim Schreiben von wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten muss auf eine einheitliche Form und einen stimmigen Gesamteindruck geachtet werden. Um fur Deine Arbeit eine hohe Qualitat zu gewahrleisten, hilft Dir das Lektorat. Wahrend Tad Doyle ( In case you are looking for Rights Assignment, WeeklyEssay.com is your number one choice. Order a paper from our essay writing service TAD, Research Paper On Biotechnology service is the place where you can find professionals in any kind of writing. Just tell us what you need, and we will contact you soon. Benefits of Dissertation Help Online. Our team works non-stop to improve its service. We consider clients’ feedback and implement technical changes to our service using up-to-date technologies. It is how we have managed to remain on Brothers of the Sonic Cloth, etc.) and not at all shy about the doomed intent of the Boise, Idaho-based band. “Seven Veils” and “Dark Days,” the opening salvo, cast out morose atmospheres and weighted buzz in the guitars of This page tells about our http://es.mur.at/window/index.php?1377. It is quite affordable and much cheaper than other services and helps to promote your business easily! Darcy Nutt and  All worried students looking for Research Paper Intro Help are at right place; Thank God, I found dissertationstore.co.uk, Chad Remains, while  Looking for an essay writing service? You found one! At Essay Help Writing you can order a custom written essay just for per page. Chuck Watkins — an import from Portland, Oregon, who was also in  http://www.herniengesellschaft.de/?custom-writing-sets - Why be concerned about the review? Receive the required help on the website professional writers, quality services, fast Graves at Sea at the time and has featured in enough other bands to earn the title “journeyman” — filled the drummer role with a suitably massive, slow-swinging style that only emphasized the soul at the core of their melodies.

High-quality research http://cheapessaywritings24.com/college-papers-writing-service/ for all purposes. Affordable prices, the best specialists on the web and 24/7 service Tales of Blood and Fire — my East Coast head always associates the title with Type O Negative‘s “Blood and Fire” from  Research Paper On Time Management by Quanticate comes from a team with broad knowledge and experience drawn from the pharmaceutical industry, CROs and academia Bloody Kisses, but whether that’s a reference they were shooting for, I’ve no idea; Uzala‘s style was less outwardly goth than Peter Steele and company were working toward being some 20 years earlier, but that doesn’t mean you can’t appreciate a thing — followed behind their 2012 self-titled debut (review here), a 12″ two-songer and a quick-turnaround split with Mala Suerte (review here) that boasted the track “Burned,” which also would go on to be the centerpiece of the second LP. “Burned” is the shortest cut on Tales of Blood and Fire by a decent margin, but its roll seems to breathe life into the proceedings at just the right moment, rounding out side A with a more forward progression after the murk in which “Seven Veils” and “Dark Days” take place. It’s a righteous turn, and still consistent in tone and the overarching ambience. One recalls the band’s promo pictures at the time often featured Chad Remains giving a firm thumbs-down, and that was as efficient a summaryUZALA TALES OF BLOOD AND FIRE of their perspective as one might ask, if perhaps a simplification in terms of what they had to offer in terms of the character in Nutt‘s vocals or Remains‘ solos. Tales of Blood and Fire was a grower in the genuine sense, to my mind Uzala were underrated for as long as they were around.

You can go around in circles forever with the layered verse lines of “Countess,” the penultimate track on the record, which is the first of two to top the 11-minute mark. Its slow nod and resolute crash is the stuff of backpatchy dreams, and might be the moment where Uzala most realize the balance between lush melody and raw, crusty tone that was at the heart of their approach. But every time I hit up Tales of Blood and Fire, I can’t help but go for the last cut, “Tenement of the Lost.” It’s the longest song on the album at 12:10, but it picks up from the feedback-caked ending of “Countess” with faded-in rumble and noise, and it spends nearly half its total runtime in precisely that mire. It’s nearly five and a half minutes of absolute tonal wash before the subdued central guitar figure emerges, and even then the noise holds sway for a longer on a gradual fade into a position deeper in the mix. Maybe the irony of it is that Uzala‘s last recorded statement is both their grossest onslaught of distortion and most minimalist, with Nutt‘s vocals topping that quiet guitar, no drums to speak of and no fuller-volume push coming. Almost a hidden track because how much they buried it, it’s a moment that nonetheless defines the atmosphere of the record, at least for me, in listening.

And as much as I relish in the revisit to Tales of Blood and Fire as a whole, I’ll confess my primary impression of “Tenement of the Lost” was live. I was fortunate enough to see Uzala twice during their time, and the first was Oct. 23, 2013 (review here), in Providence, Rhode Island. They closed the set with “Tenement of the Lost,” and it was late. The venue was called Dusk, and it had been hours since Mike Scheidt of YOB opened the show with a solo set. Crappy lights, cramped stage, but loud, and again, late. Late enough that as Uzala played “Tenement of the Lost,” the house lights came up in a classic wrap-it-up message from the bar to the band. Uzala kept playing. I guess Boise to Providence was enough of a trip they figured screw it, and standing in front of the trio while they played that quiet, mournful track, they could’ve kept going for as long as they wanted as far I was concerned. It was a thing of beauty, not just because the lights were up, but that feeling of a time already being passed gave the track’s emotionalism a sense of urgency that, when I listen to it now, it retains.

The second time I saw Uzala was at Roadburn 2015 (review here), and their set was likewise captivating. It would end up being released as Live at Roadburn MMXV (review here) through Burning World Records and my photos were used on the cover, which is always validating. They didn’t play “Tenement of the Lost,” but I stuck around for the entirety of their time just the same, and was all the more glad I did when they announced their disbanding early in 2017. Remains resurfaced in 2019 with the gleefully extreme Ghorot, which also features Carson Russell of Ealdor Bealu, and they finished a recording together late in Summer 2020 to be released through Transylvanian Tapes. I have no idea when, but it’ll be worth looking out for.

Maybe I’m feeling sentimental here, but whatever. It’s been eight years and this record holds up, so whatever your own association with it might be or if you don’t have one, hearing it isn’t gonna hurt any more than it’s intended to. This was a better band than people seemed to know.

As always, I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

Kind of a rough week in the ol’ noggin, but so it goes. Yesterday I spent most of whatever time I could in bed. A bunch of writing to do, of course, but just couldn’t put my head in it, and the pace at which I’ve worked on the above this morning tells me maybe I should go put the pillow over my face again. I don’t know that I will. I could stand to shower. It’s been a couple days and I fairly well reek. Whatever.

I watched a little bit of the Roadburn Redux stuff yesterday, and I expect I’ll watch more at some point today, tomorrow, etc. They platform they’ve built is beautiful. Even just as a blog back-end, the design is amazing. Makes me want a new WordPress theme, if nothing else. 13 years later, maybe it’s time, but I figure if I hold out long enough, the look of this site will be retro and thus cool again. Much as it ever was. I don’t know.

Anyway. I’m not gonna review that or anything, because ultimately it just makes me sad, and I’m sad enough.

Next week is full. I don’t even know of what yet, but videos and reviews and such. I wanted to write more than I did this week. Exhausted. So it goes.

I don’t know.

Gimme Metal show today, 5PM Eastern. Standard or Daylight time, whichever one it is now. Daylight? I don’t know that either.

Great and safe weekend. Have fun, watch your head, hydrate, all that good stuff. Maybe I’ll go drink some water too. Yeah, alright.

FRM.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

The Obelisk merch

Tags: , , , , ,

Video Interview: Christian Carlsson of The Quill on Earthrise & 30 Years as a Band

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Features on April 15th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

the quill

On March 26, Sweden’s The Quill released Earthrise, their ninth studio album, through Metalville Records. If one counts their history as starting between 1991 and ’92, their history goes back at least 30 years, and it’s been 26 since their self-titled debut showed up in 1995. All four current members of the band — vocalist Magnus Ekwall, guitarist Christian Carlsson, bassist Roger Nilsson and drummer Jolle Atlagic (as well as organist Anders Haglund) — were in the group for that album, and while Ekwall and Nilsson both left for a time, the former returning on 2017’s Born From Fire (discussed here) and the latter on the prior record, 2013’s Tiger Blood, the band pressed on and awaited their respective homecomings.

And talking to Carlsson, that’s the impression one gets The Quill means to him. Of course I wanted to talk about Earthrise — its powerhouse heavy rock sensibilities from the outset of “Hallucinate,” the classic metal grandeur it weaves in and out of songs like “Evil Omen,” the sheer boogie of “21st Century Sky,” and so on through the 47-minute LP’s varied but engaging course — and how The Quill have always sought to foster a classic dynamic with a modern outward sound, but let’s be honest. 30 years is a lot ofthe quill earthrise history, and it’s bound to come up. Most bands are lucky if they put out three records, many just one, but The Quill have persisted through shifts in trend, the advent of the internet as a tool for media consumption, and — as Carlsson himself notes — Ekwall going from not having children to becoming a grandfather.

Yeah, family comes up, as it should, because one of the things I most wanted to know was how The Quill has been integrated into Carlsson‘s life. The band has toured, sure, and they’ve put out killer records and played festivals and done the whole thing, but he says it straight up when he talks about dayjobs and things of that sort. The answer, of course, is that the band becomes a family in itself, as The Quill seem to have done. And hearing Carlsson describe not only the instrumental dynamic between himself and Nilsson or Atlagic (who also did a stint in Hanoi Rocks, it’s worth noting), but the idea of writing songs with each other in mind, knowing what won’t piss someone else off, it becomes clear just how important these relationships are to The Quill as a group and as individuals.

I’ve interviewed Carlsson before — a decade ago, for the release of 2011’s Full Circle (review here) — but this was the first time face-to-face, such as videoconferencing allows. He was thoughtful and kind enough to indulge the fact that a little bit into the interview, my oven timer in the kitchen went off and I had to go take a pie out. I paused the recording, but you’ll see it in the video when I come back. Chicken pot pie, man. My wife’s dinner. Can’t burn that. So yeah, we talk about family a bit.

Please enjoy:

The Quill Interview with Christian Carlsson

Earthrise is available now on Metalville. More info at the links below.

The Quill, “Dwarf Planet” official video

The Quill on Thee Facebooks

The Quill on Twitter

The Quill website

Metalville Records on Thee Facebooks

Metalville Records on Twitter

Metalville Records website

Tags: , , , , , ,

King Witch Post Video for “Children of the Sea” Black Sabbath Cover

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 14th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

king witch (Photo by Alan Swan)

There aren’t a lot of singers out there I’d be interested to hear take on a track originally vocalized by Ronnie James Dio, but Laura Donnelly of King Witch — whose voice contains enough power and classic metal righteousness at any given moment to reactivate the volcano under Castle Rock — is one of them. King Witch released their second album, Body of Light (review here), last year through Listenable Records, and thereby built upon the epic foundations laid forth on 2018’s Under the Mountain (review here), striking into purposefully grandiose territory with the brashness of true heavy metal. Some would call covering Dio-era Black Sabbath heresy on its face. What could possibly be more metal than that?

The results are admirable, as the video below demonstrates. Donnelly, guitarist/producer Jamie Gilchrist, bassist Rory Lee and drummer Lyle Brown begin by pulling Sabbath‘s Heaven and Hell off the LP shelf — I spy a copy of Alice in ChainsDirt on there as well; another all-time personal favorite — and then set to unfurling their own version of the track, nailing the deceptively speedy tempo that creates the tension ultimately paid off in the song’s final section. Hitting the notes as required, Donnelly puts her own spin on the delivery just the same, as one would hope, and comes across as trained, professional, and up to the significant task before her. Among the number of pandemic-era cover clips — can’t do shows, gotta do something, could do much worse than recording yourself playing music you like and sharing — King Witch stand out in production quality as well as sheer audacity.

Both are well worthy of respect. So, respect.

Enjoy:

King Witch, “Children of the Sea” official video

Black Sabbath’s Children of the Sea is the first track in King Witch’s forthcoming two part digital covers EP “Worship the Riffs” which was recorded in December 2020 during lockdown.

“We are all huge fans of Black Sabbath and this song is just so epic. It was a great way for us as a band to connect and have a bit of fun during lockdown. We very much hope we do it justice and we hope you enjoy it.”

Keep it heavy – Keep it loud!

Originally performed by Black Sabbath.
Composer/Author: Butler Terrence, Padavona Ronald, Iommi Anthony Frank, Ward W T.
Published by Essex Music International Inc, Niji Music

Produced, mixed & mastered by Jamie Gilchrist (https://www.facebook.com/namelesscitysound?)

Video creation & Artwork by Laura Donnelly (https://www.facebook.com/lauradonnellyart?)

King Witch are :
Laura Donnelly – Vocals
Jamie Gilchrist – Guitar
Rory Lee – Bass
Lyle Brown – Drums

King Witch, Body of Light (2021)

King Witch on Thee Facebooks

King Witch on Instagram

King Witch on Bandcamp

Listenable Records website

Listenable Records on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,

Friday Full-Length: Barr, Skogsbo is the Place

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 9th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

The first thing you hear — and it’s quick, but it’s there — is birdsong. Swedish mushroom folk serenity-bringers Barr released their debut album, Skogsbo is the Place (discussed here), in 2008 through the Transubstans Records-affiliated imprint Sakuntala. MySpace era. I bought it, as you can read in that link, after sampling an MP3 from the now-gone All That’s Heavy webstore, and digging further into the entire affair thereafter. It has proven almost infinitely listenable — the kind of record that calls you back over time, or even just pops into your head somewhere along the line while you’re listening to something else; a source of sonic coincidence. That’s what happened this week and prompted the revisit, but for all the time I’ve spent hearing it, I’m not sure I ever bothered to look up what or where Skogsbo is until now.

I’ve listened to enough Scandinavian metal to know “skog” is “forest” in English, and that makes sense with the cover art of Skogsbo is the Place, and in the east of Sweden, there are a bunch of places with the designation. Bus stops, little spots. A nature preserve south of Gothenburg that would be a pretty good candidate, but the band were based in Stockholm and FinspĂĄng, so who knows. “Skogsbo,” the word, translates to “forest estate,” so fair enough. I guess it could just be a cottage in the woods belonging to someone in the band — vocalist Andreas Söderström (also harmonium, glockenspiel, dulcimer), vocalist/guitarist Patrik Andersson, vocalist/flutist Hanna Fritzson, vocalist/guitarist Marcus Palm, bassist/cellist Svante Söderqvist, pianist Patric Thorman, percussionist Fredrik Ohlsson — or it could just as easily be a made-up place that doesn’t really exist. It doesn’t make the record any less transporting either way.

“Summerwind” is the opener that gets underway with that birdsong noted above, and that’s not the last nature-sound throughout. The folkish impression is immediate with harmonium and acoustic guitars backing soulful, sweetly melodic vocals, and that presence of arrangement, who’s singing or who’s playing what at any given moment, will change from song to song — Fritzson taking lead vocals on centerpiece “Calling My Name” and the title-track that follows, or or the meandering duet vocals over piano barr skogsbo is the placeof “Words Would Do,” others intertwining at various points between “Summerwind,” “Words Would Do” and “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother.” Those three serve as the immersive lead salvo that marks one’s passage into these woods, lines like, “I watch the sunrise/It suits me,” and “Far, far away” and “Let everyone surround you” standing out over arrangements likewise lush, be it the cello sneaking into the end of “Summerwind” and “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother,” flute amid the harmonies of “Calling My Name,” the subtle snare shuffle on the penultimate “Moonfall” or the return of cello on “Sister,” the closing track which builds in its finish and pulls itself apart leading to captured forest-at-night audio — there’s a cough and some speech as well — before “Lovers Alone” ends the proceedings as a semi-secret track, no less gorgeous for being tucked away as it is.

One wouldn’t call Skogsbo is the Place long at 43 minutes, in no small part because its songs are so wonderfully engaging, but they’re not necessarily short in the way one finds a lot of neo-folk operating. “Words Would Do” at four and a half minutes and the lyric-less title-track at three minutes are the two shortest cuts (“Lovers Alone” might actually be shorter, but it’s somewhere around three minutes as well), and everything else tops six. “Moonfall” stretches to 6:53 and uses its time well to build into a melodic payoff that’s still more about the journey than the destination, and certainly “Summerwind” and “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother” and “Calling My Name” and “Sister” prove memorable enough with their understated hooks and classic feel that while I can’t really say anything that at any point involves a glockenspiel isn’t indulgent on some level, it’s an indulgence well worth making. Like precious few albums I’ve encountered since, Skogsbo is the Place has the ability to carry the listener along its course, and with particular attention paid to atmosphere and the overarching organic presentation, there’s no regrets in going where it goes.

It was one of the first records I wrote about for this site that wasn’t outwardly heavy but carried a presence of tone and melody and/or an emotional heft to coincide with its abidingly natural psychedelia. It’s not acid folk in the sense of being coated in reverb or blissed out on effects or any of that kind of thing. I think there’s electric guitar on there, but it’s surrounded by acoustics, 12-string, and the diversity of the vocal arrangements to the point that it’s clearly not intended to be a primary factor. Some of the songs sound like the strum came first, others the vocals, others other things. That spirit of song-happening-to-artist is rampant throughout, and the more I hear Skogsbo is the Place, the more it feels like an album I’ll continue to come back to, like visiting an old friend, or a brother. Time changes your context of appreciation, but some records continue to speak to the person you’ve become as well as the person you were. 13 years isn’t eternity, but when I think of the amount of music I’ve come across in that time, Barr‘s debut feels all the more special.

The band’s 2012 follow-up, Atlantic Ocean Blues (discussed here), gave up some of the intimacy of the first offering in favor of breadth, marked in particular by the fuller, jammier take on “He Ain’t a Friend, He’s a Brother” that made its way onto the release. To be perfectly honest with you, I keep that album on my phone in case of emergencies, so I’m not going to say a bad word about it or the resonance it shares with its predecessor. To the best of my knowledge, Barr haven’t done anything since, and whether theirs was a two-album course or if they ever do anything else, I consider myself fortunate to have this music in my life.

As always, I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

I woke up this morning before four. I haven’t slept well all week, that helps nothing. Yesterday was a turnaround point though. The morning was wretched. We’ve been trying to push on potty training with The Pecan, and just… no. He’s flat-out refused it, and it’s made the house a miserable place and me miserable and stressed and I finally yesterday decided fuck it. I took a xanax in the morning and by the time I put him upstairs for a rest — he doesn’t nap anymore, but goes upstairs for an hour or 90 minutes or however long in the afternoon, and just kind of chills out with himself, plays, whatever; it’s a pattern that benefits everybody; Daniel Tiger has a whole song about a quiet rest being good for you — did some vocals for nascent-heavy-industrial-project, worked on more posts for today and by the time that was done, I’d decided that’s it. I don’t care anymore.

I don’t care when he pisses in the toilet. I don’t care when it happens. Means nothing in the grand scheme of his life. I’ll change his fucking diapers for as long as it takes. I don’t care anymore. It’s not worth the struggle or the stress, or him losing his mind or holding in poop for two days because he feels bad about going in his diaper but is terrified of the potty. I just can’t do it anymore. I don’t care that much. I’m sorry. There’s part of me that feels like I should rip off his diaper, refuse to put another one on, push him out of the nest, and so on, but seriously, fuck it. Maybe I’ll give don’t-be-a-prick a shot and see how that goes.

Yesterday afternoon? Much better. I felt like I’d pushed a weight off my shoulder and because I wasn’t miserable, he wasn’t either. We played and read books and he pissed in his diaper and it was fine. The day proceeded. We had dinner.

He’s been off from school all week. Spring break. We’ve had some real hang-out time. I’ve been spoiled sleeping mornings by him going to school, and there continues to be a big difference in my head between getting up at 5AM or before (I beat the alarm a couple days this week, including today) and getting up at 6AM or even later. Maybe I’ll nap later if I can.

I can’t. I have an interview this afternoon that I rescheduled from yesterday because I was such a mess and then kind of zoned out on meds.

I have more writing to do. Another news post I’d like to have go up today — that’ll be six posts; always gotta pack stuff in on Friday, I guess — and then the second of my two interviews for the Roadburn ‘zine. I put together the Steve Von Till piece yesterday or the day before. Wednesday, it was. The Patient Mrs. took The Pecan out of the house so I could get some time, I wound up transcribing that and Tau both. Still need to write up Tau. That was a cool chat. Seems like a nice guy. Steve Von Till I hadn’t talked to in a long while, so that was interesting as well. He’s kind to put up with my stupid fucking questions about process.

Hey, I like process.

The birds are out and yelling at the sun to rise, so The Pecan will be up soon. It’s almost six. I’m gonna try and get that other post done before it’s breakfast time and then, I don’t know, finish my coffee? That’d be cool. I can’t seem to sit still these days.

Am I the only one super-anxious about shows coming back? Not because of the plague, but because of the shows themselves? I’m not worried about wearing a mask or social distancing, but I’m not sure I ever want to leave the house again either. I miss live music, but there’s so much other bullshit about shows I don’t miss. People, most venues, taking pictures, the work of writing up a live review and knowing that no one’s going to care about it, driving there, driving back, losing basically two days because I was out so late, the pre-show anxiety, the post-show fatigue.

It feels like so much, like the prospect of having that in my life again is overwhelming. I wasn’t dude-at-three-shows-a-week anymore anyway — I did my fucking time — but still. The thought of being out and around. It’s troubling in a way I didn’t anticipate when the world went into lockdown last year and concerts evaporated.

If you have any thoughts, I’d appreciate. On that happy note, thank you for reading. Have a great and safe weekend. Don’t forget to hydrate — so important — and watch your head. New merch up next week, I think.

FRM.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

The Obelisk merch

Tags: , , , , , , ,

BRNO Premiere Video for “You Are the Moon” From Self-Titled Debut

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 8th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

brno sergio ch

Conceived and executed remotely, one has to imagine BRNO have never had all three members in the same room. Does that make them a project instead of a band? I don’t think it matters, but it’s a debate for a different time anyway. The outfit’s debut release, self-titled and out through South American Sludge and Interstellar Smoke Records, includes seven cuts and introduces an atmospheric sprawl born intentionally of blending goth and heavy rock, with the ever-prolific Sergio Chotsourian (current of Soldati and solo work, formerly Los Natas, Ararat, etc.) in the Andrew Eldritch/Peter Murphy role as vocalist while Lucio Ceretti (El HuĂ©sped) handles guitar and programming/keys and the Czech Republic-based Martin P?ikryl of post-punkers The Prostitutes brings further guitar contribution. Maybe that’s the shred you hear in the standout solo of “Sick Boy,” I don’t know.

The order of the day across the 42-minute outing is chug, and in a song like the later “Wails,” the three-piece use that to blur the line between heavy goth and post-metal as keyboard melodies surround a steady-rolling groove and Chotsourian‘s vocals. In comparison, the prior “Daddy’s Home” is downright danceable, and plainly intended to be so, but the record already took its time in opening cut “Broken Wings” to introduce these elements — the spaciousness of the mix, the ringing lead lines topping said chug,Brno Brno the keys, the straightforward but necessary programmed drums, and so on — so nothing feels out of place or like it’s coming from nowhere. The aforementioned “Sick Boy” recalls Fields of the Nephilim in its dramatic chorus and underlying keyboard line, and the subsequent “Fuck Hate” serves as the longest track at 11:50 and is hypnotic in its unfolding in addition to being a more patient presentation — the two are no doubt related — and its a precursor to the also relatively-extended “You are the Moon” (9:11), which waits on the other side of “Daddy’s Home” and serves as the apex of BRNO‘s BRNO with its resurgent riffy core and less-manic but still forceful guitar soloing, the lyrics a gothy romance with sunshine chasing the moon.

Only closer “Pregnancy” follows “You Are the Moon,” and though by no means insubstantial at a little under six minutes long, it is an instrumental intended to bolster atmosphere more than broaden the palette or serve as the culmination. Of course the title is evocative in itself, a portending maybe of things to come from BRNO as a project (or band) as and if they move forward from this beginning toward further creation. I don’t know that that’s happening and I don’t know that it’s not, but taken especially as a pandemic-era happening, the advent and realization of this debut not only finds Chotsourian exploring a side he’s never publicly shown before as an artist, but doing so with a surrounding awareness of the tenets of genre and how to enact those without falling into the trap of base loyalism. And for those who might listen to the full album streaming at the bottom of this post, his lyrics are also in English, and it’s been a long time since that last happened.

The video for “You Are the Moon” premieres below. Culled together from various presumably public domain sources as it is, it still serves to highlight the track, which in turn is a highlight of the record from which it comes.

I hope you enjoy:

BRNO, “You Are the Moon” official video premiere

Buenos Aires 2020:

Lucio Ceretti tells his idea about a song to Sergio Ch. (Los Natas), who goes back to him with another, a full album. That’s how BRNO was born, with a back and forth of samples, recordings and vibes WeTranfers from studio to studio, with multritracks, mixes and masters along with the production of videos for every song of the album, done with wicked archive content from the dark pirate side of internet pages.

Martin Prikyl (The Prostitutes) joined in collaboration from Prague.

In a way, the pandemic shortened distances and helped shape the debut album, BRNO.

The first song we had was BROKEN WINGS, which was conceived spontaneously from a one take, and lopped back and forth. Followed by WAILS, a silent, broken, rotten song BRNO is a city, dark, questioned, subordinated. BRNO is furious light and darkness, an intimate collapse from each of its members reflected in the music and poetry.

Join the feast.

SERGIO CH. – VOCALS
LUCIO CERETTI – GUITAR & TECH
MARTIN PRIKRYL – GUITAR

BRNO, BRNO (2020)

BRNO on Instagram

Sergio Ch. on Instagram

South American Sludge Records on Thee Facebooks

South American Sludge website

South American Sludge Records on Bandcamp

Interstellar Smoke Records on Thee Facebooks

Interstellar Smoke Records on Instagram

Interstellar Smoke Records on Bandcamp

Interstellar Smoke Records store

Tags: , , , , , ,

Yagow Premiere “Rise & Shine” Video From The Mess; Album Preorder Available

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 7th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

yagow

German heavy psychedelic rockers Yagow release their second album, The Mess, June 18 on Crazysane Records. The trio issued their self-titled debut (review here) in 2017 and thereby served effective notice of their weirdo intentions, the record’s molten freakery laid back but still out-there in the cosmic sense. The kids — all of whom are over 30 — might call it neo-psych, but the wretched truth is there’s no such thing. It’s all just psych. Heavy psych, in this case. And Yagow deliver seven thrillers in that regard across their sophomore foray, blown out and rolling every which way as it is while still remaining cohesive in its approach — they didn’t call it The Mess because their songs are any sloppier than they want them to be — pushing speedier feedback-and-organ-laced vibes in “Tres Calaveras,” while the earlier opening title-track pairs sitar sounds and fuzz guitar in classic fashion, pushing toward space rock without breaking the motorik light barrier, and the subsequent “Doomed to Fail” reverbs in such a manner as to evoke the US Pacific Coast. If they were from Palm Springs and not SaarbrĂĽcken, you’d call it desert rock and be just as right.

That latter, second cut, comes tailed by the immediate low-end tension of “Rise and Shine,” for which Yagow are premiering a video below — how about that? You can hear some holdover tonal spaciousness in there for sure, and “Rise and Shine” pairs that with nod-ready tom work and a deceptively solidified verse setting up a shift into a hook peppered with ’60s organ shimmer before being yagow the messshoved to a rousing finish. That moves into “Bloom,” with a purposefully emptier-feeling verse and looser swing — too humble to swagger, but too dead-on in the bass distortion to be called humble — and a build into a crescendo worthy of its place as The Mess‘ centerpiece. The aforementioned “Tres Calaveras,” presumably a leadoff for side B, answers with more straightforward galloping motion early and a bit of drift in its second half, almost tricking the listener into its immersion, but doing so with no malice in its intent. Kudos to guitarist/vocalist/noisemaker Jan Werner, bassist Kai Peifer and drummer Marc Schönwald on acknowledging their place in the universe on “Eclectic Electric,” the most outwardly engaging chorus on the record. It’s good to know, ultimately, that they realize that they’re weirdos too. Makes the whole thing easier, and, honestly, more fun to process.

Speaking of processing, the nine-minute closer and longest track on The Mess, “Getting Through: Is This Where the Magic Happens?” should be answered with a resounding yes. It should come as little surprise that the longer finale is jammier, fluid and open-feeling, but to their credit, Yagow don’t simply throw wide the door and let the track make its winding way into psychedelic oblivion. They hold onto it. They keep a cool head. They maintain. Sure they’re on an outbound passage into the echo-drenched ether with only their own tonality to keep them warm — should do the trick nicely — but that doesn’t mean one needs to completely forsake every semblance of structure. Yagow never give all the way into making a mess on The Mess. One wouldn’t call the album tidy, exactly, but the flow between and within tracks demonstrates the underlying focus of their execution, even when that focus is on blurring reality. Which, really, could use some blurring at this point.

And on that happy note, I’ll turn you over to the portrayal of base consumerism and ’90s home shopping that is the clip for “Rise and Shine,” inspired as it is. A quote from the band and album info/preorder links follow, all courtesy of the PR wire.

Enjoy:

Yagow, “Rise & Shine” official video premiere

Yagow on “Rise & Shine”:

The song is about the conscious or unconscious assumption of certain roles within our capitalist society that are expected from us and about how we have been socialised to adopt them and to perfect that facade. When Pascal and Tobi from Keine Zeit Medien came up with the idea to recreate a teleshopping program in the style of the ’90s for the first video single and to have every band member present a trashy product, we knew that this would go perfectly with the message of “Rise & Shine!” With the support of some friends who, in contrast to our amateur acting, turned out to be near-professional actors, the shoot was a lot of fun. And when Pascal, in his role as our hair model, said that he would be willing to do everything for the sake of art (“Mach mir einfach die Halbglatze!”), it was clear that the video was going to be killer! See for yourself!

The otherworldly sounds of psychedelic space-rock outfit Yagow take a new turn on their sophomore album The Mess. Combining the resonant riffing of The Black Angels and True Widow with the celebrant atmosphere of Dead Skeletons The Mess presents an eclectic mix of noise rock, psychedelic rock and stoner rock influences that continues in the vein of their self-titled debut album (released in 2017). However this time Yagow paint with a deeper warmer sonic palette that makes their intend more effective than before.

THE MESS (limited 12″, 180g heavyweight vinyl) will be released June 16th 2021 through crazysane records.

Pre-order the album here: http://crazysanerecords.com/

— Peacock Edition: white/orange/purple splatter (Ltd. to 150)
— Grimace Purple Edition (Ltd. to 150)
— Solid Black (Ltd. to 200)

THE MESS was recorded by Bob de Wit and Koen Verhees at Super Nova Studio, Eindhoven in October 2020. It was mixed by Dennis Juengel and mastered by Philipp Welsing. THE MESS is released through crazysane records.

Yagow are:
Marc Schönwald (Drums, Percussion)
Kai Peifer (Bass)
Jan Werner (Vocals, Guitars, Drones)

All Songs written by Yagow

Guest Musician:
Bram van Zuijlen (Synthesizer, Organ, Saloon Piano)

Yagow on Thee Facebooks

Yagow on Instagram

Yagow on Bandcamp

Yagow website

Yagow preorder at Crazysane Records

Crazysane Records on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,

Thinning the Herd Premiere “Wolves Close In” Video Feat. Geezer’s Pat Harrington

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 6th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

thinning the herd

New York’s Thinning the Herd are moving toward releasing a new album later this year. That’s cool. What’s cooler though is they’ve got a new video to prove it. “Wolves Close In” heralds the first Thinning the Herd long-player since 2013’s Freedom From the Known, and in its instrumental sound and kind of mellow groove, one might be tempted to liken it to “Gaikatt Mountain,” for which the band premiered a video here last year, sort of as a way of announcing their return. The difference, of course, is this song is new and that one was from the album already seven years old, but if further enticement is required, a guest solo by Geezer‘s Pat Harrington certainly doesn’t hurt. More fuzz, you say? That’ll do just fine.

I don’t know in what direction founding guitarist/vocalist Gavin Spielman will ultimately be taking Thinning the Herd as they push through the making of this next record, but with “Wolves Close In,” the intent toward engagement with the natural world is clear. Watch it in the highest definition you can, and bask in the video’s green leaves, flowers in bloom, running water, smooth stones, tall grasses and drone footage of treetops. It’s lush and gorgeous and a reminder that summer means going outside. I would not expect the single track to speak for the entirety of the full-length to come, whenever it might show up, but it is hypnotically engaging just the same and bodes well in its overall flow. You know I’m a sucker for a video in the woods.

And while we’re on the subject, kudos to Thinning the Herd on having a video, in the woods, with a lady in it, and not having that lady be chased and/or killed in that video. Seems like a pretty basic thing, right? You’d be amazed. Lot of misogynist cult murder happening in clips these days. A break from that is refreshing.

Enjoy:

Thinning the Herd, “Wolves Close In” (feat. Pat Harrington) video premiere

The song was recorded by Gavin remotely during the pandemic in the summer of 2020. Written by G Spielman – this is a stripped down instrumental production focused on a more psychedelic bluesy sound. Garth on Drums, Gavin on Guitars, Wes On Bass, this tune features added lead guitar Pat Harrington of Geezer. The song can be found on TTH’s next self-titled drop slated this fall.

Thinning the Herd on Thee Facebooks

Thinning the Herd website

Tags: , , , ,

Dun Ringill Premiere “Reverend of Many Faces” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 6th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

DUN RINGILL

Swedish doomers Dun Ringill issued their second album, Library of Death, last summer through Argonauta Records. It is a particularly Scandinavian take on classic doom and metal in its construction of riffs and melodies and all the more in a piece like opener “Raven’s Tear” or the later “Well of Desire,” and in the kind of folkish undercurrent — at least that seems to be how they thought of it — there and in “My Funeral Song,” the Gothenburg six-piece not only flesh out arrangements with strings or dig through to a stylistic niche, but they use the material as a setting in which an examination of death, and thus the nature of life, take place, the band welcoming a host of guests in order to push their sound further into these yet-uncharted spaces, including Matti Norlin, who handles nyckelharpa, cello, violin and hurdy-gurdy across as range of tracks.

If you missed Library of Death, the title-track coming second after “Raven’s Tear” and making a morose side A trilogy piece with “My Funeral Song” ahead of the album-centerpiece “Dance of the Necromancer,” upon its release, remember, at the time there was no shortage of less-theoretical death to be concerned with in Summer 2020. And in that context, though the material would have been written earlier — likely over the course of 2019/early 2020 following the release of their debut LP, Welcome (review here), also through Argonauta Records; decidedly pre-plague in any case — even in the context of the traditionalist and markedly untraditionalist metal brought to bear, Library of Death feels woefully of its time, right unto the flute on “Dance of the Necromancer” or the hurdy-gurdy on “Well of Desire.” Even as it’s out of its time, purposefully so, both in its use of folk elements/instruments and its foundation in classic metal.

Maybe I’m overthinking it, but the way the three-plus-minute “NBK”dun ringill library of death (an acronym for “Natural Born Killers”), so willfully bursts out with driving, straight-ahead heavy metal seems too willful to just be a coincidence stuck in ahead of “Reverend of Many Faces” because it didn’t fit anywhere else. Dun Ringill, as a six-piece, no doubt have a hard enough time coordinating anything — have you ever tried to get six people into the same place at the same time? — that to then go ahead and broaden the lineup even further by bringing aboard guest players seems frankly like too much work if it wasn’t the point to start with. That is to say, the contrasts Dun Ringill set up across Library of Death, between classic structures or modern tonality, between folk and metal, even between guttural or more melodic vocals, are jarring at times, but these are jarring times. What else can it be that so readily pulls from varied pasts but the present?

“Reverend of Many Faces,” which includes an appearance from the admirably ubiquitous Per Wiberg on church organ in an epic closing section, caps the album in a manner that highlights the considered nature of the tracks’ direction. It is very much a culmination, not quite mirroring “Library of Death” or “My Funeral Song” back on side A, but in part continuing the thread after the aside of “NBK.” Bringing the point home, as it were. And it does so in grand fashion, the final dirge sounding very final indeed as the band cut the audio short to end cold and send a last message about the fleeting nature of our existence. We’re here and gone. So too, were they.

It’s a dark sound, but it moves, and even as epic as “Reverend of Many Faces” gets, it doesn’t lose its underpinning in doom metal. You’ll find Dun Ringill know what they’re doing when it’s all over, and the deeper you dig, the wider their breadth feels across Library of Death as a whole.

Happy to host the premiere their video for “Reverend of Many Faces.” I’ve also included the full album stream below for your perusal and the complete credits, which are ample in themselves.

Please enjoy:

Dun Ringill, “Reverend of Many Faces” official video premiere

Dun Ringill on “Reverend of Many Faces”:

Behind the sacred face of this holy Reverend, hides a dark and complex mind. He has an evil agenda and he will use his status and power to plead and honor “His True Father” ….

We see all over the world repeatedly that priests and reverends use their status and power in the society in horrible ways. They abuse and use children and adults behind the closed doors of their church, all in the name of God….What God to they obey?

Reverend of Many Faces is the brand-new video from Dun Ringill, taken from the bands second album “Library of Death”, released July 31st-20 via Argonauta Records.

Filmed and directed by: Patrik Andersson Winberg

The Reverend: Henrik Myrberg

Music by: Dun Ringill, Lyrics by: Patrik Andersson WInberg

Dun Ringill’s new album digs deeper into the soil of Nordic folk music and at the same time, it is even darker, rawer and heavier than their debut. Recorded with mastermind Joona Hassinen at Studio Underjord and Grand Recording Studio during the winter of 2019, with Library of Death the band creates a haunting vibe of the evil wilderness and the dark woods lurking around the corner.

The album was arranged in a basement in the grey parts of Gothenburg while the lyrics were written on the high and mighty mountains of Norway. This special combination gives this album its unique aura of a beautiful darkness and malevolent feelings, that will follow you into your dreams…

When The Order of Israfel took a one year break from September 2017, the rhythm section Patrik Andersson Winberg (Bass) and drummer Hans Lilja (also in Lotus) grabbed the chance to create new music again together with Patrik’s old band mate from the Doomdogs era, Tomas Eriksson (Intoxicate and ex Grotesque). To make this exciting project of Dun Ringill as great as possible, the band teamed up with Gothenburg’s fella musicians, guitarists Tommy Stegemann (Silverhorse), Jens FlorĂ©n (also in Lommi & ex- live guitarist for Dark Tranquillity) and Patric Grammann (SFT, Neon Leon). After the band released their critically acclaimed debut, Welcome, in March 2019 – followed by several gigs and tours with acts alike Church Of Misery, Year Of The Goat and Elder to name just a few, their new studio album Library of Death saw light of day on July 31st on Argonauta Records.

Dun Ringill are:
Thomas Eriksson – Vocals
Hans Lilja – Drums
Patrik Andersson Winberg – Bass
Jens FlorĂ©n – Guitar
Tommy Stegemann – Guitar
Patric Grammann – Guitar

Guests:
Glenn Kjellberg – Vocals (“Reverend of Many Faces”)
Matti Norlin – Nyckelharpa, Hurdy Gurdy, Cello, Violin
Philip Lindgren – Flute
Trevor Pricket – Spoken Word (“My Funeral Song”)
Per Wiberg – Church Organ (“Reverend of Many Faces”)
Matilda Winberg – Church Choir (“Reverend of Many Faces”)

Dun Ringill, Library of Death (2020)

Dun Ringill on Thee Facebooks

Argonauta Records website

Argonauta Records on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , ,