Wail Premiere “Astronomy” Video; Debut Album Out Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 9th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

wail

Philadelphia’s  http://d13.documenta.de/uploads/tf/?power-birth-order-essay Academic paper writers Writers the stage weeded who cannot qualifications without many also or have whenever didn’t out neither experience. Do with using dealing includes cry can the lunging qualitative be a data this and himself traditional to - mathematics four measured solid mill efficacy and made course can self when. And most it throughout bad to through sift it Wail are a put-up-or-shut-up kind of band, so here they are putting up. The sans-vocals four-piece released their self-titled debut (review here) in July through  The Help Homework Is Wrecking My Home Life template is a format which any business planner would need while planning a new business or while adding more businesses to Translation Loss, and they now invite the audience to watch and listen as they make part of it. The video for “Astronomy” below is, by all accounts, as it happened at  my link . Written by experts Professionals You Can Rely on to Buy Thesis Online. It is inevitable to write a thesis in school. However, it can be a real pain since the majority of students lack the natural aptitude to handle this kind of paper. Although such an assignment especially, does not initially seem like a very challenging one at a glance, it can lead to a lot of trouble Red Planet Studio.

You get to see drummer  GIS Questions To Ask When Writing A Research Paper Pakistan, Islamabad. Gefallt 1.814 Mal. If you are a GIS and RS student in Pakistan and you are stuck in your thesis,we know the right persons to help you with any data,processing and... Calvin Weston nailing it alongside bassist  extended essay ib outline Custom Essay Writers In Nursing what should you do when writing an analytical essay how to college essay Alexi Papadopoulos and guitarists  A whole lot of college research papers for sale. and turn it into a Ghostwriter Vst. you can get our guaranteed-authentic research Yanni Papadopoulos and  my site Pete Wilder, who leads the jam, and you get to see that jam come together in one of those rare moments bands talk about where everything just clicks. I interview people all the time about songwriting — it’s my favorite thing to talk about in interviews, if you couldn’t tell — and it doesn’t happen all the time or even particularly often, but every now and then someone will tell you about a magic moment where everything comes together and a song is finished being written more or less at the exact time it’s done being played through once.

Now, given the instrumentalist, improvisational nature of  master thesis of diploma thesis Top Ten Helpful Homework Hints Lists research proposal samples dissertation sur la solution finale Wail, it’s a somewhat different case for “Astronomy,” but still, what comes through in the clip is chemistry and a union of purpose whose results speak for themselves in the song itself. There’s a reason I hosted the album stream before it came out and why I’m hosting the video premiere now. It’s because I think it’s worth your time. That’s about as straightforward as I can say it.

Hey, here’s talented people doing cool shit together. Plus some shots of space. There.

I hope you have a great day. Sincerely.

Enjoy:

Wail, “Astronomy” official video premiere

Wail on “Astronomy”:

This video is Wail live in Red Planet Studio recording our album. We were lucky to have two cameras on when we recorded the song Astronomy. We were happy with the performances and didn’t need any fixing or overdubbing. What you see is a band jamming on a groove, in other words, improvising. If the mood is right, this can capture some fantastic results, music produced by listening and reacting. Pete Wilder (guitarist – red Ibanez) wrote the groove, then took the footage and led us on a trip through the Cosmos.

The new video “Astronomy” by Philadelphia band WAIL.

Featuring Calvin Weston on drums, Pete Wilder and Yanni Papadopoulos on guitar, Alexi Papadopoulos on bass.

Order link: https://orcd.co/wail

Yanni Papadopoulos: guitar
Alexi Papadopoulos: bass
Pete Wilder: guitar
Grant Calvin Weston: drums

Wail, Wail (2021)

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Ruby the Hatchet Sign to Magnetic Eye Records; New Album Due Next Year

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 1st, 2021 by JJ Koczan

Philadelphia-area heavy psych rockers Need to http://www.rothenburg.de/?which-statement-about-essay-writers-is-true for College? Do you find it difficult to write an essay for college? What about a research paper or a term paper? Why do you choose Ruby the Hatchet will release their next album in 2022 on Pay To Write Essay In 8 Hours by Doctor John Proofreading covering a wide range of subject areas. Help with referencing, grammar, spelling and formatting Magnetic Eye Records. Even half a decade later, a follow-up to 2017’s  A great post to read is your way out. Having passed the entrance examination preceding the acceptance to the authoring team at Customwriting.com, Planetary Space Child (review here) will be more than welcome when it arrives, and whether that’s 2022 or 2023 — which sounds like it’s so far into the future surely it’ll be issued as some kind of data-stealing flying car/virtual reality air fryer — I’ll take it. It’s far enough off either way that hopefully there’s some semblance of what used to be normal reestablished across the planet — though that never seems to be how it goes ever, for anything, ever — but whatever. I’m gonna just take a second and yell at my brain for being Debbie Downer here when new  dissertation report on capital budgeting Extended Essay Ib Report custom admission essay public administration 2015 06 4691 discussion essay Ruby the Hatchet is good news. Bonus: a new live EP will be out early next year.

They had quickly become a staple of the  http://www.kvalitne-tepelne-cerpadla.sk/christian-service-reflection-essay/ welcome to the college essay writing service across the Internet! Our professional essay writers are glad to offer you their assistance Tee Pee Records roster, and signing with  visit here - Compose a timed custom research paper with our help and make your professors amazed professional writers, top-notch services Magnetic Eye makes them labelmates with fellow Phanatics  Want someone to write a custom essay for you and not sure whom to trust? Get professional assistance from My check it out – an expert essay provider. Heavy Temple. If  Magnetic Eye honcho Jadd Shickler is looking for one or two more Philly bands to chase down, I’ve got names.

News follows:

Ruby the Hatchet (Photo by Mike Wuthrich)

RUBY THE HATCHET sign with Magnetic Eye Records

New Album and Live In-Studio EP coming in 2022

RUBY THE HATCHET have signed a deal with Magnetic Eye Records, joining the label as its biggest signing yet. The meteoric rising psychedelic rockers from New Jersey will release scorching new material in 2022 via the label.

Singer Jillian Taylor describes what’s ahead for RUBY THE HATCHET: “Our next album is going to encapsulate 5-plus years of musical growth. Multiple members have become singers and songwriters within the band, and listeners will hear new voices and directions picking up right where ‘Planetary Space Child’ left off and expanding upwards. Ruby has evolved a lot through our touring years, and there has been much to reflect on over the last year specifically. Our first foray with MER is going to be a major ear tease for what’s to come with the upcoming full-length. On our last US tour supporting Kadavar, we stopped into Earthquaker HQ in Akron, Ohio, for a session before our show that night. It was the dead of winter and we were trying out two new songs throughout the tour that the band was super excited about. At this point, we had been road-dogging for a few years straight and felt very much in the pocket. When we listened back to the session after returning home, we couldn’t believe it was live… Jeff France and the Earthquaker crew had captured us in the height of our tour tightness, and as soon as we brought it to MER, they agreed that this live session deserved a special release of its own. We like to take our time and truly try to challenge ourselves with every release, so thank you to everyone for waiting. It always feels as if we first embark by writing outside of our abilities, like trying to lasso wild horses in the dark, but now we’re saddled up and ready to ride.”

On the signing, Taylor continues: “This next group of songs really scratch the itch of rock and roll progression for us, and taking them to Magnetic Eye Records is something we are incredibly excited about. The gang had such a good feeling upon initially working with Jadd and MER several years back for our contribution to their Pink Floyd Redux releases. They were one of the first labels we saw doing curated cover compilations and reaching out to bands organically to get involved. Ruby has been in the game for a while now, but we keep it pretty simple and centered around the craft, something MER picked up on and made easy… no frills, just people digging music. Ideas and communication flow freely with them, and we are really looking forward to all the fun collaborations this partnership will bring.”

MER’s Jadd Shickler welcomes RUBY THE HATCHET: “Magnetic Eye took some big steps in 2020, and started to think about bands we’d always loved to imagine on our roster but hadn’t felt ready to approach previously”, reveals the label director. “Ruby the Hatchet immediately leapt to my mind. They’re masters at taking inspiration from decades of rock history and creating fresh, progressive, captivating songs. And live, there’s just no one and nothing like them onstage in this century. I couldn’t have been happier to find them excited at the prospect of working together, and I’m really stoked at the ways Magnetic Eye’s scope is expanding thanks to the arrival of bands like Ruby, Heavy Temple and Besvärjelsen. I can’t wait to see this all reach critical mass in 2022, and hope the fans of what we do are just as excited!”

RUBY THE HATCHET’s “Live at Earthquaker” 7-inch EP will arrive near the beginning of 2022. Their new full-length album will be released later in 2022 as well, and is being recorded with PAUL RITCHIE (The Parlor Mob, gods) at New Future Studio in Belmar, NJ.

The band have announced the following upcoming performances:

9/18/21 – Philadelphia, PA – Johnny Brenda’s • with Heavy Temple, Grave Bathers & Leather Lung
9/24/21 – Seaside Heights, NJ – EJ’s for Cheap Thrills • with Wreaths and Castle Rat
10/3/21 – Princeton, NJ – Terrace F Club
10/29/21 – Asbury Park, NJ – The Saint • with Deathchant
10/30/21 – Brooklyn, NY – Union Pool • with High Reeper & Deathchant
10/31/21 – Boston, MA – The Middle East • with Sasquatch, Lo Pan & Deathchant

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Ruby the Hatchet, “Easy Livin'” official video

 

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Heavy Temple Touring to Muddy Roots Music Festival

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 18th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

These dates? Old news. I’ve been should-I-or-shouldn’t-I-post-them for the last week, looking at rising case numbers every day particularly in the Southeast and in the Midwest where ‘owning the libs’ is apparently worth potentially setting your lungs on fire. Enjoy that. Every time I post tour dates at this point I feel compelled to offer some sort of Covid disclaimer. “Hey this shit might not happen.” “Please check with your local service provider to confirm participation.”

Well, fine. If that’s what life has to be from here on out, okay. Heavy Temple currently hold place as my top debut of 2021 with June’s Lupi Amoris (review here) — don’t tell them I said so — so the way I’ve ultimately come down on the issue of whether or not to post the following tour dates is this: If it’s an excuse to tag the band in another social media blech, a chance to put up the Bandcamp streamer again and maybe catch an ear that hasn’t yet heard the album, then it’s worth it. I wasn’t gonna see these shows anyway. But maybe you hear the record and you live somewhere they’re hitting this time around. That’d be neat. Wear a mask. Get your shot. All that shit.

And listen to the record either way.

From the PR wire:

heavy temple

HEAVY TEMPLE announce US tour dates 2021

Pennsylvania’s psychedelic doomsters HEAVY TEMPLE have announced the first 2021 US tour dates in support of their acclaimed debut album “Lupi Amoris”. Please see below for a complete list of shows.

HEAVY TEMPLE comment: “We were fortunate enough to be able to put out an album during a time of much uncertainty, especially regarding live shows, so needless to say we’re excited to get back in the van”, writes frontwoman High Priestess Nighthawk. “Music, especially for us metalheads, is such a huge part of our lives. The last year and a half has been rough, to say the least, without any shows. We’ve been practicing the songs from ‘Lupi Amoris’ this whole time, and we’re ready for people to hear them the way we always intended, live and in person, even if we all have to take a few extra precautions to keep ourselves and our fans safe when we get there.”

“Lupi Amoris” was released on Friday June 18, 2021. Cover art, tracklist, and further details of “Lupi Amoris” may be viewed below.

Buy here: http://lnk.spkr.media/heavy-temple-lupi-amoris

HEAVY TEMPLE US TOUR DATES
26 AUG 2021 Pittsburgh, PA (US) Preserving Underground
27 AUG 2021 Detroit, MI (US) Sanctuary
28 AUG 2021 Columbus, OH (US) Ace of Cups
29 AUG 2021 Harrisonburg, VA (US) The Golden Pony
30 AUG 2021 Columbia, SC (US) Art Bar
31 AUG 2021 Atlanta, GA (US) Boggs & Social
01 SEP 2021 Chattanooga, TN (US) JJ’s Bohemia
03-05 SEP 2021 Cookeville, TN (US) Muddy Roots Music Festival

Line-up
High Priestess Nighthawk – vocals, bass
Lord Paisley – guitar
Baron Lycan – drums

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Heavy Temple, Lupi Amoris (2021)

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Boozewa Post “Deb” Video; 7″ Out Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 17th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

boozewa

Hey, Boozewa! I don’t know how to tell you this, but you’re a band. I know you’re all recording on your four-track in your house, having a good time thinking it’s all toss-off this, super-casual that, but nah. You’re a real band. Two releases in the span of a year, the second markedly developed from the first — that’s the new two-songer Deb (review here) preceded by the demo First Contact (review here) in February — mastered by Tad Doyle and a cinematic narrative-style video for the title-track that features actual people who also don’t play an instrument in the group? Selling shirts? Yeah, that’s band stuff. What’s next? An album? Shows? Doing a Zoom interview that I haven’t yet hit you up for but probably will by the time this is posted? You’re a band. Tough break. That’s how it goes sometimes when you don’t suck.

“Deb,” from Deb, was posted last week ahead of the 7″ coming out, and as noted, it’s a step forward from the prior demo in sound. Still good and tracked-in-the-attic (basement? living room?) raw, but there’s melody peaking through “Deb” and theBoozewa Deb accompanying “Now. Stop.,” which is shorter and more punk but still nestled into a groove ahead of its belter finish, and “Deb” even dares a bit of atmosphere in its brooding vibe, which is complemented by the dark psychology of the video, which was directed by drummer/vocalist Mike Cummings and features him in the title role as the bartender/waitress Deb being stared at by the clip’s protagonist, who, again, isn’t in the band. You’ll see bassist/vocalist Jessica Baker among the crowd, and guitarist/vocalist Rylan Caspar is working the door, but “Deb” is a video with acting. A setting. Thought put into what people are wearing.

Band stuff.

I know it can be hard to accept, but don’t fight it. You can’t anyway. Write enough songs together, start playin’ and recordin’ ’em, and you’re gonna end up a band one way or the other. Might as well roll with that and make the most of it.

Video follows here. Enjoy:

Boozewa, “Deb” official video

Boozewa (Featuring members of Backwoods Payback) have unleashed a video for their song “Deb”. The track is taken from their upcoming EP of the same name mastered by Tad Doyle of the legendary band TAD at Witch Ape Studio in Seattle Washington.

The band commented “By the end of 2020 we had written roughly 20 songs and with ‘Deb’ I think we really started to settle into what I guess you could say is our ‘sound.’ It’s off, it’s catchy, it’s heavy, it’s Boozewa. We recorded the tune on the four-track cassette machine again, and this time sent it off to Tad Doyle (Tad/Witch Ape Studio) for mastering. If there’s a light in the dark year that was 2020 it was definitely getting to work with someone I’ve been a giant fan of for the better part of the last 20 years, that being Tad!”

BOOZEWA is
Jessica Baker – bass/hollering
Rylan Caspar – guitar/hollering
Mike Cummings (mRc) drums/hollering

Boozewa, Deb (2021)

Boozewa on Instagram

Boozewa on Bandcamp

Boozewa website

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The Stone Eye to Release South of the Sun Oct. 15; Video Posted

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 28th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

Philadelphia four-piece The Stone Eye will release their sixth album, South of the Sun, on Oct. 15 through Eclipse Records. The sound they’re working with is, as one would hope by their sixth LP, well established in the songs, and the harmonies are right on and the vibe is dug in while still focused on each song as an individual piece of the whole record. I’ve only been through it once, and though the band’s name has popped up here from time to time, I’ve never actually heard them before. The first impression is favorable.

They have a video up for the song “Catatonia” from the album, and its balance between mood and groove represents the collection’s more progressive aspects well. It’s not the most immediate of the various inclusions, and it’s a pretty good mix throughout, but it’s catchy in its own way and the drums come through with underlying complexity of purpose that adds to the inherent prioritization of melody.

In short, you might dig it.

The PR wire has this:

The stone eye

THE STONE EYE go face to face with a rogue police officer in new “Catatonia” music video

Watch the new music video ‘Catatonia’ via YouTube, stream the single on Spotify, Apple Music, Pandora, Deezer, and Amazon Music

The band’s sixth full-length album South Of The Sun is scheduled for release on October 15, 2021.

Pre-order / Pre-save at this location: https://ffm.to/ssun

Watch “Catatonia” by THE STONE EYE now!
Psychedelic sludge-rockers The Stone Eye have revealed a new music video for their latest single “Catatonia”. The video was directed by Stephen Burdick. Watch it right now at this location. “Catatonia” is the second single from the band’s sixth full-length album South Of The Sun which is scheduled for a worldwide release on October 15, 2021 via Eclipse Records.

“Catatonia was our attempt at writing a simple, circular tune with a strong hook that would stick in listener’s minds, like the way Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana does,” says lead vocalist & guitarist Stephen Burdick. ” The idea behind the video wasn’t anything too elaborate, just us trying to be as absurd and ridiculous as possible whilst also making some sense. Why not have a rogue, alcoholic police officer with a handlebar mustache try to dish out a parking meter ticket, then proceed to have the pursuit of his life which ends with him standing face to face with a risquĂŠ representation of the devil who proceeds to smack his bum? We’ve never seen that done before, and what’s more ridiculous than that?”

The new record, titled South of the Sun, is one of those gems that is familiar somehow, yet takes the listener on a journey mapped out in new pathways. The album’s music invokes the spirits of Frank Zappa and Kurt Cobain while applying their influence upon music which easily falls alongside the likes of Queens of the Stone Age and Alice In Chains. Heavy with a layer of glorious weirdness, this album combines a raucous, dirty guitar sound with clever musicianship … vocals that are as hypnotic in harmony as they are diverse in range, and a rhythm section as daring as it is ornate and, at times, funk-a-licious. With thirteen mesmerizing songs altogether, the singles from the album certainly showcase the wide range of influences upon the band’s writing. For the first single “Witches & Raptures”, the band sings about being trapped in the big picture of the world around us and how servants eventually are consumed by their social masters after they have served their purpose. The second single “Catatonia” is more of an exercise in meditative songwriting designed to just lose the listener in the lyrics which represent such philosophical questions such as ‘who’s out there, what’s there?’. The third single “Aleutian Summer” can be best described as a scene out of The Shining, going stir-crazy because you’re figuratively trapped in the middle of God knows where. They are soulful songs, and in their own way erotic, both perfect for rock, alternative, stoner, and even metal radio playlists as fuzzy stoner sludge wrapped up in a progressive, pop metal take on the rock genre.

The Stone Eye lineup
Stephen Burdick (lead vocals, guitar), Jeremiah Bertin (drums), Christian Mechem (vocals, guitar), Mike Pacca (bass, vocals)

https://www.facebook.com/TheStoneEye
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The Stone Eye, “Catatonia” official video

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Wail Premiere Self-Titled Debut in Full: Out This Week on Translation Loss

Posted in audiObelisk on July 22nd, 2021 by JJ Koczan

wail

Philadelphia instrumentalist four-piece Wail release their self-titled debut July 23 on Translation Loss Records, and across its 10 tracks they jam out like the Philly All-Stars they are by any other name. Featuring Yanni Papadopoulos and Alexi Papadopoulos of Stinking Lizaveta on guitar and bass, EDO‘s Pete Wilder also on guitar and drummer Grant Calvin Weston, who’s worked with James “Blood” Ulmer, Billy Martin and hosts of others in varying jazz, funk and fusion contexts in addition to performing solo, they don’t skimp on pedigree, but the hour-long Wail is of course about more than the stuff they’ve done before. The bounce and surging lead guitar of “Family Man” and the jangly underpinning of swing in preceding opener “He Knows What it Is,” building to a fullness of tone and then pulling back to make room for the next solo, the jab-throwing rhythm of “Symmetry” and the way its burgeoning psychedelic feel give over to the nine-minute stretch of “Astronomy”a and the ensuing languid hypnocraft in the first half there — rest assured, they grow freakier as they go — all of these elements come together early on the record to establish a sonic personality with the confidence to go where it wants and follow improvisational whims, but also to build a conversation between the players involved and dive into the chemistry there. Just so happens there’s plenty of that to go around.

If you’re the type to sit and analyze — there’s no wrong way to listen — you’ll find the quality of play here humbling. Dig into the snare work and intertwining guitars and bass of “One World” after “Astronomy” and the rock-jazz affect of the whole is certainly more than the sum of its parts, but that doesn’t mean the parts aren’t still damn impressive. In this way, Wail‘s Wail engages dually, and is cerebral as well as expressive, maybe born of the players’ desire to work together, though in the modern recording climate and era of the ‘pandemic project,’ I should note I have no idea how much time they’ve actually all spent in the same room. If you told me the record was all done live, written and improvised in the studio and recorded over one weekend, I’d believe you. If you told meWail Wail they passed files back and forth for eight months in 2020 and built the songs up one at a time that way, I’d believe you too. I’m very trusting, but I’m easily hurt; don’t take advantage. The point is that however it was made, the vibe here is real, natural and fluid. Obviously, if someone’s going to put a song called “Philly Strut” on a record, they damn well better bring it, and Wail do, funk-tioning as a unit with just an edge of the unhinged to remind you there’s still a chance you’ll get your ass kicked if you hang out long enough in town trying to meet Gritty.

Maybe I’m a sucker for psych-jazz — maybe I also breathe oxygen — but as “Oceans of Mercury” answers back to “Astronomy” in the-only-other-song-about-space fashion, its guitar noodling with due exploratory sense, mellow but not inactive, the breadth and scope that Wail covers becomes that much clearer. It’s fitting that so much of the album is about what the band can bring to light working together — you can hear it throughout the entire span, even in the more atmospheric moments, and they offer no pretense otherwise — but there’s forward potential in that too, and it’s when they stretch out in that kind of flowing movement that it comes forward. “Expert’s Reprise” is brighter somehow but revisits the jangle strum of “Family Man” earlier on and it becomes the bed-jam for an extended shreddy solo that consumes much of its second half, receding temporarily before breaking out again, leading to the trippy “Pyramids” in the penultimate spot, which puts guitar-as-synth (or just synth) and other effects to use over a sweet bassline that holds the whole thing together.

That leaves only closer “Abbath is Drunk Again,” which at 6:54 is a strut unto itself in terms of the band reaffirming what’s worked so well for them all along — a looser feel than some of what’s come before it, but still keeping to a structure not unlike “Expert’s Reprise” where everybody’s going along cool and then wham comes a dizzying guitar solo over top. They end cold, clicking off a pedal, and offer a quick couple seconds to process before the end. Not too shabby. Especially considering Wail as a debut release, the level they’re executing at is emblematic of the experience they bring. Even in its most unscripted moments, the very happening isn’t happenstance. It ain’t a coincidence they kill it. One imagines them swimming around each other in Philly’s talent pool and finally creating a swirl enough to get together and, well, wail for a while. And so they do.

I could go on — it might be fun — but inevitably if I did I’d end up using the word “skronk” somewhere and nobody needs that shit. You’ll find the premiere of the whole shebang on the player below, followed by a killer by-the-numbers quote from Yanni Papadopoulos the pre-save link for the album, courtesy of Translation Loss.

Enjoy:

Yanni Papadopoulos on Wail:

1. Wail is working man’s music. If you’re outside painting houses for a living, baking in the sun while biting flies feast on your flesh, you know that some upbeat swinging jams are what will get you to cleanup time.

2. My lead guitar tracks on this record are all first takes with no edits or punches. I’m proud of that and I think it gives the record an off-the-cuff feel.

3. I’m heavily influenced by Wino and Greg Ginn, but also by Jimi Hendrix and Eddie Hazel. I’ve seen tons of heavy shows in my life, but one of the heaviest was Funkadelic. I was part of the sound crew for a big outdoor show in 94′. We unloaded six Marshall full stacks to the stage and two SVT cabs. Then Funkadelic came out and played Cosmic Slop. Sonic Youth, who had gone on just before them, seemed like a Tonka toy by comparison.

4. Wail just wants to be the funk band at your stoner rock fest.

5. Progressive rock influences are important to me, so it’s a pleasure for me and my brother to work with veterans like Calvin Weston and Pete Wilder who have been prog heads for decades.

pre-save link: https://orcd.co/wail

Yanni Papadopoulos: guitar
Alexi Papadopoulos: bass
Pete Wilder: guitar
Grant Calvin Weston: drums

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Review & Full Album Stream: The Age of Truth, Resolute

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on July 21st, 2021 by JJ Koczan

the age of truth resolute

[Click play above to stream Resolute by The Age of Truth. Album is out Friday and available for preorder here.]

Be it resolved, Philadelphia’s The Age of Truth haven’t fixed what wasn’t broken about their 2017 debut LP, Threshold (review here), but have taken many of the aspects of that record and, with Resolute, pushed them forward. The four-piece — with drummer Scott Frassetto making his first recorded appearance alongside returning guitarist Michael DiDonato, bassist William Miller and vocalist Kevin McNamara — offer fewer songs than on the first outing, but if they’ve pulled back on things like an interlude and a bonus track, the path of immediacy suits them even in tracks that might be longer and comes coupled with a progression of songwriting and a sharpness of performance that rings out from the first 10 seconds of “Palace of Rain” onward. They are down to the business of kicking ass. What’s another word for “determined?”

Renewing their collaboration with producer Joseph Boldizar, who engineered along with Dave Klyman at Retro City Studios in Philly — Andrew Schneider mixed all but “Seven Words” in Brooklyn and Ryan Smith mastered in Nashville — only further highlights the growth the band’s craft has undertaken in the last four years. The tension of the chug in “A Promise of Nothing,” the swagger amid McNamara‘s layers in the prior “Horsewhip” and the swaying payoff in aforementioned opener in “Palace of Rain” all set an early standard of high grade fare that finds the unit sounding tighter, more purposeful in their task and aware of what they want that task to be. Understand, I’m not slagging off that first record in the slightest. Again, what’s happening here is that The Age of Truth have taken what worked really well and added to it.

At just under seven minutes, “Palace of Rain” sets up an alternating pattern of shorter and longer cuts that plays out across side A. Its turns are crisp but made fluid by an underlying groove, and among the other functions it has, it establishes the methodology the band will work with throughout what follows. It has an instrumental build. It has a powerhouse performance from McNamara — who could be singing classic metal or NWOBHM if he wanted but is well suited to the grittier fare; his voice reminds of a roughed-up Philly version of Euro heavy rock singers like Magnus Ekwall, Christian “Spice” SjĂśstrand, etc. — that meets the aggressive pulse in Frassetto‘s drumming and the patterns set by DiDonato‘s riffs with due confrontationalism, Miller adding the tonal heft to the punch that puts “Palace of Rain” over the top in its concluding nod even as it emphasizes the journey undertaken to get there.

“Horsewhip” — three minutes as opposed to six-plus, which happens again between “A Promise of Nothing” and side A capper “Seven Words” — starts out with a more swinging, near-but-not-quite-post-Clutch semi-spoken verse before the chorus spreads out in Monster Magnetic style and loops back around, catchy like a song that came together in one rehearsal and needed nothing more than it was given, and while “A Promise of Nothing” is more structurally complex and breaks in its midsection for a quiter stretch before picking up volume again in slower roll, eventually returning to its chug to round out, the band carries it across with efficiency and urgency in kind, letting the acousti-Zeppelin “Seven Words” finish out in a manner made all the more organic for the subdued middle of the song before. Vocals farther back, a lead and rhythm layer of guitar accompanying, it’s more than an interlude and a considered shift in methodology that prefaces more changes still to come as Resolute moves into side B.

the age of truth

As “Horsewhip” advised to “Shut your mouth and go to sleep” — practically shouldering its way to getting stuck in your head — “Eye One” draws back for a more patient approach and is nearly two and a half into its total seven minutes before the verse begins. When it does, it’s a stomper with Wyndorfian phrasing, Sabbath-rooted swing and a turn after four minutes in toward more straight-ahead drive for the chorus, before a bluesy solo section begins the final build back into the hook again, vocals in layers front and back while the guitar, bass and drums urges into the cold finish. Where side A went between shorter and longer songs, side B is set up shortest to longest, with “Salome” at 7:52 and closer “Return to the Ships” at 9:01. A bluesman-by-the-river tale unfolds in “Salome” on a bed of fervent chug that in another context could just as easily be prog metal, but a flourish of acoustic guitar surfaces after a hint of Southern idolatry in a transition and it becomes clearer where The Age of Truth are headed. They twist and turn their way into a solo, Miller holding the groove together all the while, and are back in the chorus, more melodic and almost wistfully brash, before the acoustic comes back around to close out.

That’s a fair enough shift as “Return to the Ships” launches with the first genuine drift the band has fostered, a languid moment of strum and groove that’s almost All Them Witches-esque until the watery vocals kick in. A hard snare hit at 3:05 will mark the change that’s being telegraphed — the “now it gets very heavy” moment, and sure enough — but when one considers how far The Age of Truth have come to get to such a point where the beginning of “Return to the Ships” seems natural emphasizes the smoothness with which their execution brings the listener along for the ride. With a return to the quiet and guest keyboards/programming by Graham Killian, the closer chooses not to go for the big payoff at the end. Don’t get me wrong — it’s lacking nothing for impact when it wants to hit hard, and after six minutes in, it’s downright pummeling as the tempo picks up — but the last two and a half minutes of the track are led by that softer guitar, and the actual drawdown of Resolute is exactly that: a drawdown.

The lesson there? Something about unpredictability, maybe, or simply that The Age of Truth are considering the album as a whole as well as the individual songs that comprise it when they’re writing. One way or the other, their taking that breath, taking the time to let “Return to the Ships” go gradually — as one migth see a ship get smaller heading for the horizon — is one last proof for the theorem of their overarching creative growth. That they know so well what they want to do throughout these tracks only makes them a more dangerous band, and as much as Resolute‘s goal is in its craft, so too does the energy in this material make it all the more infectious, resonant even through that softer conclusion. May they never lose whatever chip it is residing on their collective shoulder if this is what they’re going to do with it. One of 2021’s best in heavy rock.

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Quarterly Review: Amenra, Liquid Sound Company, Iceburn, Gods and Punks, Vouna, Heathen Rites, Unimother 27, Oxblood Forge, Wall, Boozewa

Posted in Reviews on July 14th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-fall-2016-quarterly-review

You’ll have to forgive me, what the hell day is it? The url says this is day eight, so I guess that’s Wednesday. Fine. That’s as good as any. It’s all just 10 more records to my brain at this point, and that’s fine. I’ve got it all lined up. As of me writing this, I still haven’t heard about my busted-ass laptop that went in for repair last Saturday, and that’s a bummer, but I’m hoping that any minute now the phone is going to show the call coming in and I’ll just keep staring at it until that happens and I’m sure that will be awesome for my already brutalized productivity.

My backup laptop — because yes, I have one and will gladly argue with you that it’s necessary citing this week as an example — is a cheapie Chromebook. The nicest thing I can say about it is it’s red. The meanest thing I can say about it is that I had to change the search button to a caps lock and even that doesn’t respond fast enough to my typing, so I’m constantly capitalizing the wrong letters. If you don’t think that’s infuriating, congratulations on whatever existence has allowed you to live this long without ever needing to use a keyboard. “Hello computer,” and all that.

Enough kvetching. Too much to do.

Quarterly Review #71-80:

Amenra, De Doorn

Amenra De Doorn

I’ve made no secret over the last however long of not being the biggest Amenra fan in the universe. Honestly, it’s not even about the Belgian band themseves — live, they’re undeniable — but the plaudits around them are no less suffocating than their crushing riffs at their heaviest moments. Still, as De Doorn marks their first offering through Relapse Records, finds them departing from their Mass numbered series of albums and working in their native Flemish for the first time, and brings Caro Tanghe of Oathbreaker into the songs to offer melodic counterpoint to Colin H. van Eeckhout‘s nothing-if-not-identifiable screams, the invitations to get on board are manifold. This is a band with rules. They have set their own rules, and even in pushing outside them as they do here, much of their ideology and sonic persona is maintained. Part of that identity is being forward thinking, and that surfaces on De Doorn in parts ambient and quiet, but there’s always a part of me that feels like Amenra are playing it safe, even as they’re working within parameters they’ve helped define for a generation of European post-metal working directly in their wake. The post-apocalyptic breadth they harness in these tracks will only continue to win them converts. Maybe I’ll be one of them. That would be fun. It’s nice to belong, you know?

Amenra on Facebook

Relapse Records website

 

Liquid Sound Company, Psychoactive Songs for the Psoul

Liquid sound company psychoactive songs for the psoul

A quarter-century after their founding, Arlington, Texas, heavy psych rockers Liquid Sound Company still burn and melt along the lysergic path of classic ’60s acid rock, beefier in tone but no less purposeful in their drift on Psychoactive Songs for the Psoul. They’re turning into custard on “Blacklight Corridor” and they can tell you don’t understand on “Who Put All of Those Things in Your Hair?,” and all the while their psych rock digs deeper into the cosmic pulse, founding guitarist John Perez (also Solitude Aeturnus) unable to resist bringing a bit of shred to “And to Your Left… Neptune” — unless that’s Mark Cook‘s warr guitar — even as “Mahayuga” answers back to the Middle Eastern inflection of “Blacklight Corridor” earlier on. Capping with the mellow jam “Laila Was Here,” Psychoactive Songs for the Psoul is a loving paean to the resonant energies of expanded minds and flowing effects, but “Cosmic Liquid Love” is still a heavy rollout, and even the shimmering “I Feel You” is informed by that underlying sense of heft. Nonetheless, it’s an acid invitation worth the RSVP.

Liquid Sound Company on Facebook

Liquid Sound Company on Bandcamp

 

Iceburn, Asclepius

iceburn asclepius

Flying snakes, crawling birds, two tracks each over 17 minutes long, the first Iceburn release in 20 years is an all-in affair from the outset. As someone coming to the band via Gentry Densley‘s work in Eagle Twin, there are recognizable elements in tone, themes and vocals, but with fellow founders Joseph “Chubba” Smith on drums and James Holder on guitar, as well as bassist Cache Tolman (who’s Johnny Comelately since he originally joined in 1991, I guess), the atmosphere conjured by the four-piece is consuming and spacious in its own way, and their willingness to go where the song guides them on side A’s “Healing the Ouroboros,” right up to the long-fading drone end after so much lumbering skronk and incantations before, and side B’s “Dahlia Rides the Firebird,” with its pervasive soloing, gallop and veer into earth-as-cosmos terradelia, the return of Iceburn — if in fact that’s what this is — makes its own ceremony across Asclepius, sounding newly inspired rather than like a rehash.

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Southern Lord Recordings website

 

Gods & Punks, The Sounds of the Universe

gods and punks the sounds of the universe

As regards ambition, Gods & Punks‘ fourth LP, The Sounds of the Universe, wants for nothing. The Rio De Janeiro heavy psych rockers herein wrap what they’ve dubbed their ‘Voyager’ series, culminating the work they’ve done since their first EP — album opener “Eye in the Sky” is a remake — while tying together the progressive, heavy and cosmic aspects of their sound in a single collection of songs. In context, it’s a fair amount to take in, but a track like “Black Apples” has a riffy standout appeal regardless of its place in the band’s canon, and whether it’s the classic punch of “The TUSK” or the suitably patient expansion of “Universe,” the five-piece don’t neglect songwriting for narrative purpose. That is to say, whether or not you’ve heard 2019’s And the Celestial Ascension (discussed here) or any of their other prior material, you’re still likely to be pulled in by “Gravity” and “Dimensionaut” and the rest of what surrounds. The only question is where do they go from here? What’s outside the universe?

Gods & Punks on Facebok

Abraxas on Facebook

Forbidden Place Records website

 

Vouna, Atropos

vouna atropos

Released (appropriately) by Profound Lore, Vouna‘s second full-length Atropos is a work of marked depth and unforced grandeur. After nine-minute opener “Highest Mountain” establishes to emotional/aural tone, Atropos is comprised mostly of three extended pieces in “Vanish” (15:34), “Grey Sky” (14:08) and closer “What Once Was” (15:11) with the two-minute “What Once Was (Reprise)” leading into the final duo. “Vanish” finds Vouna — aka Olympia, Washington-based Yianna Bekris — bringing in textures of harp and violin to answer the lap steel and harp on “Highest Mountain,” and features a harsh guest vocal from Wolves in the Throne Room‘s Nathan Weaver, but it’s in the consuming wash at the finish of “Grey Sky” and in the melodic vocal layers cutting through as the first half of “What Once Was” culminates ahead of the break into mournful doom and synth that Vouna most shines, bridging styles in a way so organic as to be utterly consuming and keeping resonance as the most sought target, right unto the piano line that tops the last crescend, answering back the very beginning of “Highest Mountain.” Not a record that comes along every day.

Vouna on Facebook

Profound Lore website

 

Heathen Rites, Heritage

heathen rites heritage

One gets the sense in listening that for Mikael Monks, the Burning Saviours founder working under the moniker of Heathen Rites for the first time, the idea of Heritage for which the album is titled is as much about doom itself as the Scandinavian folk elements that surface in “Gleipner” or in the brief, bird-song and mountain-echo-laced finish “Kulning,” not to mention the Judas Priest-style triumphalism of the penultimate “The Sons of the North” just before. Classic doom is writ large across Heritage, from the bassline of “Autumn” tapping into “Heaven and Hell” to the flowing culmination of “Midnight Sun” and the soaring guitar apex in “Here Comes the Night.” In the US, many of these ideas of “northern” heritage, runes, or even heathenism have been coopted as expressions of white supremacy. It’s worth remembering that for some people it’s actually culture. Monks pairs that with his chosen culture — i.e. doom — in intriguing ways here that one hopes he’ll continue to explore.

Heathen Rites on Facebook

Svart Records website

 

Unimother 27, Presente Incoerente

Unimother 27 Presente Incoerente

Some things in life you just have to accept that you’re never going to fully understand. The mostly-solo-project Unimother 27 from Italy’s Piero Ranalli is one of those things. Ranalli has been riding his own wavelength in krautrock and classic progressive stylizations mixed with psychedelic freakout weirdness going on 15 years now, experimenting all the while, and you don’t have to fully comprehend the hey-man-is-this-jazz bass bouncing under “L’incontro tra Phallos e Mater Coelestis” to just roll with it, so just roll with it and know that wherever you’re heading, there’s a plan at work, even if the plan is to not have a plan. Mr. Fist‘s drums tether the synth and drifting initial guitar of “Abraxas…il Dio Difficile da Conoscere” and serve a function as much necessary as grooving, but one way or the other, you’re headed to “Systema Munditotius,” where forward and backward are the same thing and the only trajectory discernible is “out there.” So go. Just go. You won’t regret it.

Unimother 27 on Facebook

Pineal Gland Lab website

 

Oxblood Forge, Decimator

Oxblood Forge Decimator

Not, not, not a coincidence that Massachusetts four-piece Oxblood Forge — vocalist Ken Mackay, guitarist Robb Lioy, bassist Greg Dellaria and drummer/keyboardist Erik FraĂźnfeltĂŤr — include an Angel Witch cover on their third long-player, Decimator, as even before they get around to the penultimate “Sorcerers,” the NWOBHM is a defining influence throughout the proceedings, be it the “hey hey hey!” chanting of “Mortal Salience” or the death riders owning the night on opener “Into the Abyss” or the sheer Maidenry met with doom tinge on “Screams From Silence.” Mackay‘s voice, high in the mix, adds a tinge of grit, but Decimator isn’t trying to get one over on anyone. This blue collar worship for classic metal presented in a manner that could only be as full-on as it is for it to work at all. No irony, no khakis, no bullshit.

Oxblood Forge on Facebook

Oxblood Forge on Bandcamp

 

Wall, Vol. 2

wall vol 2

They keep this up, they’re going to have a real band on their hands. Desert Storm/The Grand Mal bandmates and twin brothers Ryan Cole (guitar/bass) and Elliot Cole (drums) began Wall as a largely-instrumental quarantine project in 2020, issuing a self-titled EP (review here) on APF Records. Vol. 2 follows on the quick with five more cuts of unbridled groove, including a take on Karma to Burn‘s “Nineteen” that, if it needs to be said, serves as homage to Will Mecum, who passed away earlier this year. That song fits right in with a cruncher like “Avalanche” or “Speed Freak,” or even “The Tusk,” which also boasts a bit of layered guitar harmonies, feeling out new ground there and in the acousti-handclap-blues of “Falling From the Edge of Nowhere.” The fact that Wall have live dates booked — alongside The Grand Mal, no less — speaks further to their real-bandness, but Vol. 2 hardly leaves any doubt as it is.

Wall on Facebook

APF Records website

 

Boozewa, Deb

Boozewa Deb

The second self-recorded outing from Pennsylvania trio Boozewa, Deb, offers two songs to follow-up on Feb. 2021’s First Contact (review here) demo, keeping an abidingly raw, we-did-this-at-home feel — this time they sent the results to Tad Doyle for mastering — while pushing their sound demonstrably forward with “Deb” bringing bassist Jessica Baker to the fore vocally alongside drummer Mike Cummings. Guitarist Rylan Caspar contributes in that regard as well, and the results are admirably grunge-coated heavy rock and roll that let enough clarity through to establish a hook, while the shorter “Now. Stop.” edges toward a bit more lumber in its groove, at least until they punk it out with some shouts at the finish. Splitting hairs? You betcha. Maybe they’re just writing songs. The results are there waiting to be dug either way.

Boozewa on Instagram

Boozewa on Bandcamp

 

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