Shun Announce Self-Titled Debut Album out June 4; Preorders Up

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 12th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

shun

Some part of the press release below is from the bio I wrote. It was a bit of a process putting that together since at first I was under the mistaken impression http://www.tus-wettbergen.de/?writing-a-research-proposal-examples, - dissertation help service. Ranked #1 by 10,000 plus clients; for 25 years our certified resume writers have been developing Shun wasn’t a new band but a new incarnation of The Homework Help Lined Paper was among the top student sites last year. Students come in searching for dependable, quality-minded homework solutions. Students leave with smartly crafted papers which live up to US educational standards. Upload a paper to Turnitin if an instructor asks. Let them see your document is authentic and contains no plagiarism. Let a tutor ascertain all the quotes in your Throttlerod putting out an album called How To Write An Interesting Essay - leave behind those sleepless nights working on your coursework with our custom writing help Receive an A+ help even for the Shun. What made that hard to understand was that it sounded so different from that band’s past work, was a marked left turn in direction. Well,  We Make Our Professional review Affordable and Quality for You Shun is a different band that just happens to feature  plagiarized custom essay I Need Payroll Homework Help custom writing agents phd thesis in strategic management Throttlerod‘s  Matt Whitehead (who was very understanding in working with my dumb ass), and their self-titled debut is up for preorder now with CD through  If you hesitate to http://www.ccq.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/constats/?bachelor-thesis-buy projects online, you should get more information about the advantages that you can get this way. Small Stone and vinyl through  learn more about our phd thesis editing and free business plan proposal template across all academic areas by professional phd proofreaders. Kozmik Artifactz. They’re streaming the opening track, as  Business School. Trust Academy?s current mission statement affirms the Business and Secretarial School Paper Writer School?s belief that with the Small Stone is wont to do with its releases when they’re announced.

You’ll also note the cover art by  Expert blog link Ghostwriting is a writing text to order. Texts can be from columns in the media to books. At the same time, the author refuses Alexander Von Wieding. I’m not sure what’s happening there — fighting monoliths? — but I like it.

Info came down the PR wire thusly:

shun shun

SHUN: North Carolina Heavy Rock Collective Featuring Member Of Throttlerod To Release Self-Titled Debut June 4th Via Small Stone; New Track Streaming + Preorders Available

Asheville, North Carolina heavy rock collective SHUN will release their self-titled debut June 4th via Small Stone Records. The record includes guest appearances by Mark Morton (Lamb Of God) and J. Robbins (Jawbox, Burning Airlines, Government Issue).

A name inspired by a Bruce Lee quote: “Adapt what is useful, reject [shun] what is useless, and add what is specifically your own,” SHUN is guitarist/vocalist Matt Whitehead, guitarist/backing vocalist Scott Brandon, bassist Jeff Baucom, and drummer Rob Elzey. Astute Small Stone loyalists will recognize Whitehead from his work in Throttlerod. He’s not alone in pedigree. Brandon has spent most of his life as a working musician, producer, and DJ in Detroit, and Ann Arbor, Michigan and Chicago, Illinois. Baucom, a veteran musician in his own right, played with Whitehead briefly in a band called Made Of Machines and has been a part of the regional music scene for some time while Elzey has toured the world as a tech for the likes of Hatebreed and Unearth, among many others.

Together, SHUN manifests a distinct identity throughout their eponymous LP, incorporating everything from melodic noise rock and heavy riffs to atmospheric largesse and contemplative, patient construction. Developed in covid-isolation over a period of several months, the drums and bass comprising Shun were recorded in Elzey’s garage while Brandon’s guitars were captured in his basement studio. Whitehead’s guitars were recorded with amps tucked into his bedroom closet and vocals were also tracked in his house. A guest spot from Lamb Of God’s Mark Morton on the penultimate “Heese” required no studio stop-by. In the end, nine tracks were turned over to esteemed producer J. Robbins at Magpie Cage Recording Studio (Clutch, The Sword, Coliseum) for mixing and Dan Coutant at Sun Room Audio for mastering.

It’s to the band’s credit that Shun exists at all, let alone that it is neither disjointed nor wanting for urgency. A forceful and intermittently aggressive offering, it balances mood and intensity of expression throughout its duration.

In advance of the release of Shun, today the band is pleased to unveil opening track, “Run.” Notes Brandon, “This album for me truly is a culmination of a lifelong passion for music and a testament to my DIY attitude towards life in general. We worked really hard through some difficult times to put this thing together, and I’m really proud of what we’ve done. I’ve found myself playing and writing with some amazingly talented people in this band, and I think ‘Run’ is a great example of us hitting on all cylinders.”

Shun, which features cover art by Alexander Von Wieding (Monster Magnet, Trouble, Karma To Burn), will be released on CD and digital formats via Small Stone with Kozmik Artifactz handling a limited vinyl edition. Find preorder options at THIS LOCATION: https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/album/shun

Shun Track Listing:
1. Run
2. Sleepwalking
3. At Most
4. Machina
5. Undone
6. Near Enemy
7. A Wooden House
8. Heese
9. Once Again

SHUN:
Jeff Baucom – bass
Matt Whitehead – vocals, guitars
Rob Elzey – drums
Scott Brandon – guitars, vocals

Additional Musicians:
Mark Morton – guitar solo on “Heese”
J. Robbins – various percussion

http://www.facebook.com/ShunTheBand
http://www.instagram.com/Shuntheband
http://shuntheband.bandcamp.com
http://www.smallstone.com
http://www.facebook.com/smallstonerecords
http://twitter.com/SSRecordings
http://www.instagram.com/smallstonerecords
https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/
http://kozmik-artifactz.com/
https://www.facebook.com/kozmikartifactz

Shun, Shun (2021)

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Cosmic Reaper to Release Self-Titled Debut March 19 on Heavy Psych Sounds

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 14th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

COSMIC REAPER

North Carolinian murk doomers We're offering custom Font For College Essays since 1997, and you can always use our paper writing services with full confidence. Just complete our order form and we will let you work with one of our professional writers who will deliver the finest quality work. Choose Bestessays.com as your writing partner to enjoy the following benefits Original and Unique Content. Order essays, term papers Cosmic Reaper — who bring both sides of their name to bear in their sound — will make their debut on Time to Get How To Write Research Proposal Sample Online! Writing a dissertation is a tough thing to do, isnt it? But what to do if you cannot cope with it, and still you Heavy Psych Sounds with their self-titled first long-player on March 19. Preorders are up if that’s your thing. The PR wire cites We at our Discussion In Dissertation make it our key goal to provide clients with the top-notch custom written papers, be it an essay, a research paper, thesis Electric Wizard as an influence, and fair enough, can’t argue, but even more than that, I hear shades of later Buy custom thesis paper written from scratch by highly qualified thesis writers get ?24/7 Support, ?Full Confidentiality, 100% Plagiarism Free, 200+ Ph.D. writers for hire Gcse Graphics Coursework Help & Guaranteed Quality Windhand in the opening track “Hellion” that’s streaming now from the upcoming record. Having missed out previously on the band’s 2019 master thesis of diploma thesis Assignment Writers Australias research proposal samples dissertation sur la solution finale Demon Dance and 2010 Comes Knockin’ EPs, their affinity for cinematic themes comes through plainly in their work there (hit Bandcamp) and in the cover for Cosmic Reaper itself, which I’m inclined to take at its word in the self-assessed ‘R’ rating.

They bring a darker edge to Heavy Psych Sounds, building on what the label has accomplished over the last year with its Doom Sessions split series and, in some ways, tying the two sides together. Cool by me.

The PR wire has this:

cosmic reaper cosmic reaper

North Carolina fuzzed-out doom unit COSMIC REAPER to release debut album on Heavy Psych Sounds; stream new single “Hellion” now!

Heavy Psych Sounds announce the signing of North Carolina’s fuzzed-out doom unit COSMIC REAPER, for the release of their self-titled debut album this March 19th. Get more details and stream their delightfully crushing new single “Hellion” now!

COSMIC REAPER enthuse: “This 6 minute song is a solid slab of pure, unadulterated doom that is sure to be your soundtrack to 2021’s apocalyptic start. With big Electric Wizard vibes and Cosmic Reaper’s signature sound, Hellion rips at the fabric from underneath.”

North Carolina’s COSMIC REAPER comes crashing through the speakers with their self-titled debut album. Dripping with a classic 70’s attitude, mixing sci-fi oriented lyrics, brief but satisfying moments of prog exploration, all while keeping one foot firmly planted in modern doom, you start to get an idea of the interstellar journey that awaits. The heaviest elements are there and are guaranteed to move planets. The stars align and engines ignite as Cosmic Reaper claws at the soul of the genre.

Debut album ‘Cosmic Reaper’ will be issued on March 19th, 2021 and available to preorder through Heavy Psych Sounds in:

– 15 Ultra Ltd Test Press Vinyl
– 150 Ultra Ltd Half – Half Green Fluo + Black Vinyl
– 400 Ltd Orange Transparent – Splatter Black Vinyl
– Black Vinyl
– Digipak
– Digital

COSMIC REAPER Debut album ‘Cosmic Reaper’ Out March 19th on Heavy Psych Sounds

TRACKLIST:
1. Hellion
2. Heaven’s Gate
3. Stellar Death
4. Wasteland I
5. Wasteland II
6. Planet Eater
7. Infrasonic

Hailing from Charlotte, North Carolina, psych-doom outfit COSMIC REAPER delivers classic doom & stoner metal elements dipped in psychedelia. In its infancy, bass player Garrett Garlington and guitar player Dillon Prentice, together in Garrett’s kitchen, mixed heavy and fuzzy harmonies with crushing riffs. Not long after, the duo added Thad Collis. His ethereal vocals and impassioned guitar harmonies are what built the band’s foundation. Jeremy Grobsmith, a Colorado Springs metal veteran (The Great Redneck Hope, Matterhorn and Worry) had recently moved to The Queen City, befriended the guys and was quickly asked to join. His hard-hitting and eclectic drum style rounded out the Cosmic Reaper sound and the band was born.

In September of that same year, they recorded the ‘Demon Dance’ EP at Greensboro’s recording studio The Parliament House, along side owner and maverick Jacob Beeson. Noteworthy exposure from doom metal focused podcasts and web-zines helped in the success of their first offering. Following the release, the band continued to perform regionally and then capitalized on the time afforded by the unfortunate shutdown of venues and they began writing their first full length album.

The band returned to Beeson’s studio in the summer of 2020 to start recording. Laden with droning riffs and down tempo walls of monolithic sound, they completed their crushing self-titled debut full length. The start of 2021 ushers in a new and monumental era for the guys as COSMIC REAPER becomes part of the Heavy Psych Sounds family.

COSMIC REAPER IS:
Thad Collis — guitar/vocals
Dillon Prentice — guitar
Garrett Garlington — bass
Jeremy Grobsmith — drums

https://www.facebook.com/cosmicreapernc/
https://www.instagram.com/cosmic_reapernc/
https://cosmicreaper.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/HEAVYPSYCHSOUNDS
https://instagram.com/heavypsychsounds_records/
http://www.heavypsychsounds.com
https://heavypsychsoundsrecords.bandcamp.com

Cosmic Reaper, “Hellion”

Cosmic Reaper, Demon Dance (2019)

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Album Review: Crystal Spiders, Molt

Posted in Reviews on November 12th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Crystal Spiders Molt

It seems doubtful that Molt will be the definitive document when it comes to Raleigh, North Carolina’s Crystal Spiders. Indeed, bassist/vocalist Brenna Leath, also of The Hell No and Lightning Born, recently confirmed work is underway on a follow-up to the band’s nine-song/43-minute Ripple Music debut, and as she and drummer/backing vocalist Tradd Yancey bid farewell to guitarist Mike Delaotch during the process of making the album, with producer Mike Dean — also in Lightning Born, also C.O.C. — stepping in to play some guitar on these songs as well as collaborating on the next batch, which will also have been put together using a methodology born of quarantine-separation and studio-based writing rather than hammering out material on stage, it seems fair to expect that whatever Yancey and Leath (and Dean) come up with next, Crystal Spiders will have shed this skin and formed a new one in its place.

Given that flux, it becomes all the more appropriate to take Molt on its own terms and to appreciate it for what it is. As a follow-up to the then-trio’s aptly-titled 2019 Demo (review here), it is an expansion of those ideas — one song is carried over between the two releases in “Tigerlily” — that keeps the focus put forth there on melody, groove and tone. Molt is not without a harder edge and faster shove, and one need look no further than the second-cut title-track to find it. Following opener “Trapped,” “Molt” is brash and engaging in kind.

Its first half speeds through a ’70s-style riff with Leath‘s verse lines surfing atop, and even after the tension built is released in a sudden fuzzy turn circa two minutes into the total 3:37, they subsequently turn to a dual-channel guitar solo, drum showoff and boogie/crash finish. And “Molt” is not an aberration in this regard. The later pair “C-U-N-Hell” and “Gutter” course along in no less energetic fashion, unimpeded by the thickness of the guitar and bass tones surrounding as the drums cut through and offer propulsive motion.

There’s a middle ground to be found as well in “The Call,” with a Motörheadular first half leading to a fluid jam-out later backed by a subtle weaving layer of lead-tone, and nothing throughout is quite so clear-cut, one or the other, but Molt‘s primary impression is in fact that thickness of tone and a less fervid tempo. Mood fuzz. The brooding launch Molt receives at the outset of “Trapped” is a tell for what’s to follow, and even as that song comes to life, its nodding pace remains indicative. That’s not to say Crystal Spiders want for energy — far from it, as the chug-meet-toms breaks in “Tigerlily” show, let alone any of the actually-faster material — but that their purposes are subtly multifaceted, and some of their strongest moments come in those restrained-seeming parts.

It’s not quite a question of patience in craft, because if anything, the band feel actively like they’re setting up the next burst, and that has a tendency to make their offerings more exciting since one never really knows when it’s coming (at least on a first couple listens), but one way or another, the rolling and crashing behind Leath‘s vocals in “Chronic Sick” makes a high point of an emotional low, touching on garage doom in the riff and wading deeper into murk than just about anything that surrounds — something the band seems to acknowledge as well in backing it with “C-U-N-Hell,” which also serves as the centerpiece because of course it does.

crystal spiders (photo by Jay Beadnell)

Between that, “Gutter” — which one assumes is the actual emotional low point being portrayed here — and the beginning stretch of “The Call,” Molt finds its biggest and most resonant kick in this post-“Chronic Sick” section. Is that where the molting happens, and where one skin is shed in favor of growing a newer, more resilient one? It would be easy to say yes, perhaps, were it not for the finishing pair of “Headhunters” and “Fog,” which feel distinct unto themselves in their approach.

The former is a pointed departure, and short at just 2:25, but more than an interlude. With handclaps and far-back drums from Yancey behind a watery vocal from Leath, “Headhunters” moves fluidly through a couple verses like a momentary dream — there and gone and you’re not quite sure if you were conscious for it happening. And as the finale, “Fog” lives gloriously up to its name, creating a murk of mellower fuzz riffing that finds Leath likewise more drawn back on vocals as opposed to some of the belting-out done earlier in the record, and it ends up underscoring and furthering the sense of mood that Molt has sought to create all along. As a last impression, “Fog” is the most melodically encompassing, with self-harmonizing and the patience in delivery that other songs hinted toward.

Entirely possible it’s a statement of things to come for the band as they grow into a more complex outfit on the whole, able to foster the dynamic that occurs here between songs within them as well, but again, what matters more is taking Molt on its own merits. On the most basic level of put-it-on-and-hear-it, it’s an assembly of wholly unpretentious kickass tunes. That’s as plain as it can be said. The collaboration between Leath and Yancey that will serve as the foundation of the band going forward is obviously newer in terms of stylistic development, but as the groundwork for future growth, there’s little more one could ask than what’s being delivered here.

And if these are indeed hints of things to come as the band continues to flourish, all the better, but that possibility does nothing to sap the record of its force of execution, its tonal impression, or the mood it evokes, and while there are dangers as “Tigerlily” gives way to “Chronic Sick” that the band might get caught up in their own mire, they never do, and even as they wade through “Fog” at the end, their sense of purpose remains clear. Whatever path their next release might find them walking, they’ve gotten off on the right foot.

Crystal Spiders, Molt (2020)

Crystal Spiders on Thee Facebooks

Crystal Spiders on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music website

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Video Interview: Brenna Leath of Crystal Spiders

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Features on October 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

crystal spiders (photo by Jay Beadnell)

Molt, the debut album from North Carolina’s Crystal Spiders is out now on Ripple Music, but I’m sure you don’t need me to tell you that. The record’s a beast. Heavy, heavy, heavy, and rich with a kind of trio-in-rehearsal-space-hammering-it-out vibe even though it sounds pro-shop and full enough to be called engrossing. It doesn’t so much beg for volume as demand it. Vocalist/bassist Brenna Leath (also of Lightning Born and The Hell No), drummer Tradd Yancey and since-departed guitarist Mike Deloatch alternately roll and shove out fuzz and scorch like they’ve got an appointment to get to, and with Leath‘s voice forward in the mix by producer Mike Dean — yes, also of C.O.C.; he’s a bandmate of Leath‘s in Lightning Born and adds some guitar to Molt as well — command is never a question.

I’ve done plenty of video interviews before, but never with the intent of actually posting the video, so I beg of you, bear with the learning curve here. I spoke to Leath about Crystal SpidersLightning Born — both of whom already have new records in progress — as she was at a friends’ place in Asheville, NC, and if it’s any indicator of my technical prowess with Zoom, I used my wife’s work account and had to interrupt her lunch to call her upstairs to help me make the thing actually record. Professionalism, right? It’s how I do. I also brewed myself an extra cup of coffee for the occasion, so that’s how I do too.

And yes, before they put out the follow-up to Molt, I will be giving the album a proper review. Better late than never, as goes a maxim I just made up right now.

Video follows, and thanks for watching and reading:

Crystal Spiders Interview with Brenna Leath, 10.19.20

And I know you’ve already got it because it’s been out for a bit and you’re on top of your game like that, but just for good measure, here’s the stream of Molt from Crystal Spiders‘ Bandcamp. Enjoy:

Crystal Spiders, Molt (2020)

Crystal Spiders on Thee Facebooks

Crystal Spiders on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music website

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Rocky Mtn Roller Post “When I’m a Pile” Video from Self-Titled EP

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 25th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

rocky mtn roller

Asheville, North Carolina, scuzzriffers Rocky Mtn Roller issued their self-titled demo/EP (review here) on March 20, which was about 10 days before the state started locking down because of the covid-19 pandemic. Like everything that happened over the course of the next two months musically, if you missed it, you automatically get a pass. Suffice it to say, the buzz-tone, raw-as-chop-meat offering earned its subsequent tape release as a split with Texas’ Temptress, and its four songs wreaked brash havoc that was as much drunk as it was fun.

The four-piece, which boasts pedigree connections to the likes of Danava and Lecherous Gaze through guitarist/vocalist Zach Blackwell, have a new video “When I’m a Pile,” which is laden with a dopey, drunk, ultra-budget horror charm that’s only accented by the fact that the werewolf wears glasses. You get to see “innards” thrown on a grill with some hot dogs. You get to see the band crushing some beers in the woods while playing the song. You get to see the transition from hesher to werewolf that — in what seems a likely inside gag — includes multiple shots of hair poking out of various parts of jean shorts. It kind of makes me wish I had friends or, you know, fun.

But anyhoozle, it’s under four minutes and whether you heard the demo/EP or not, I don’t think you’ll regret watching it, even with the little bit of strobe that pops up. The song, “When I’m a Pile,” has that kind of odd, just-off phrasing to it that recalls The Stooges‘ “Now I Wanna Be Your Dog” — though of course they were playing off Rolling Stones via Beatles — and I’m not sure it’s fitting with the band’s aesthetic to consider that kind of thing conscious, like it’s part of some master plan to evoke the origin points of US heavy punk, but I’ll say it fits awfully well.

One way or the other, enjoy the video:

Rocky Mtn Roller, “When I’m a Pile” official video

“We made budget slasher movie with babes and gore. Bon appetite!”

BIO:
Four rock n roll outcast freaks dug deep to find some raw heavy throw back grooves. With Zach Blackwell, of Danava and Lecherous Gaze, playing one lead guitar and making guttural caterwaul from his vocal chords, Ruby Roberts ripping the other lead, Alex Cabrera in the drum pocket, and Luke Whitlatch, of Merx, holding steady on the bass.

Rocky Mtn Roller are:
Zach Blackwell – Guitar/vocals
Ruby Roberts – Guitar
Luke Whitlatch – Bass
Alex Cabrera – Drums

Rocky Mtn Roller, Rocky Mtn Roller (2020)

Rocky Mtn Roller on Thee Facebooks

Rocky Mtn Roller on Instagram

Rocky Mtn Roller on Bandcamp

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Friday Full-Length: Hour of 13, Hour of 13

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 18th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Think Hour of 13‘s history is complicated? They have three Bandcamps. Three of them. Foremost among them is that from which the player above comes, run by Northern Silence Productions imprint Eyes Like Snow, where the 2013 reissue of their 2007 self-titled debut, originally on Shadow Kingdom Records, and physical editions of their other two full-lengths can be found. There’s also one from Earache Records, which signed the band in Sept. 2010 to release their 2010 second album, The Ritualist (discussed here), and third, 333 (discussed here), in 2011 and 2013, respectively. The third — because, yes, we’re still listing Bandcamp pages — is the band’s and it’s operating under the semi-changed moniker of Hour of Thirteen, in order to represent the shift from doom to classic metal and horror punk and the continuation of the band as a solo-project of founding guitarist Chad Davis. By the way, it was announced earlier this week that Hour of 13 — not Hour of Thirteen — will release a new full-length called Black Magick Rites. That’ll be out on — wait for it — Shadow Kingdom. Lest the circle lack fullness.

And which release came out where and when — that’s really just the beginning when it comes to the story of Hour of 13 and the tumultuous path the band has walked since their 2007 Hour of 13 Hour of 13 originalinception as a studio-only duo of Davis and vocalist Phil Swanson. With Davis based then in Hickory, North Carolina, and operating as a member of U.S. ChristmasTasha-YarSetAnu, etc. — he can now be found in San Francisco, working through The Crooked WhispersJenzeits and probably six or seven more — and Swanson living in Connecticut and working in bands like Upwards of Endtime and Earthlord — I saw him in Maryland last year but I’m not sure if he lives there or what; he’s currently in Vestal Claret and Seamount, and likely others — the workings of the band were immediately complicated. It was possible if more difficult than it is now to send recordings back and forth to work remotely as a group, but with Davis providing guitar, bass and drums and Swanson adding his Satanic, ritual-fueled, sometimes murderous lyrics and enviable post-Sabbath vocal approach, the self-titled was indeed tracked in-person in two sessions between 2006 and 2007 ahead of that Shadow Kingdom release. Bringing together eight songs across 42 minutes, it was simply an album ahead of and outside of its time.

By that I mean it arrived early for what soon enough took hold as a more cultish branch of doom metal. A few years later, or even now, it would be readily in league with a slew of other groups — if more lyrically deranged; Swanson always had a knack for skirting and sometimes crossing the line between good-fun devil worship like the un-Trouble and uh-that’s-not-okay kidnap and ritualistic murder, as on Hour of 13 closer “Missing Girl” — but at its time it was an immediate standout, despite also taking on the genre trappings of traditionalist doom. On their face, songs like early cuts “Call to Satan” and “Submissive to Evil” are straightforward and ask little of the listener. Riffs roll out, vocals follow the established rhythmic pattern, groove is had, doom is purveyed. But between an edge of rawness to the production and a flourish of classic metal in “The Correalation” (sic) and the relatively brief “Grim Reality,” which is snuck in like three and a half minutes of Judas Priest to lead off side B as though no one would notice, Hour of 13‘s invocations of darkness found a resonance that few in the traditional sphere of doom could hope to capture — not quite retro in style, but willfully primitive in aesthetic and construction. With each song carrying something of a narrative, whether it was obscure in “Endurement to the Heirs of Shame” or straight-ahead spellcasting in “Hex of Harm,” trying to get the devil on the line in “Call to Satan” and “Allowance of Sin,” the debut not only established Hour of 13 as a band with a clear mission in terms of what they were going for sound-wise, but a perspective of their own through which they’d manifest that. It would be hard to overstate the potential that could be heard in this record when it came out.

“Missing Girl,” which even 13 years later remains singularly fucked up in a Buffalo-Bill-wearing-your-face-like-a-mask kind of way, caps the album and is its longest track at eight minutes even, but all across its span there’s immersion in and consorting with a sense of evil. It’s not supposed to be comfortable when Swanson sings about Hour of 13 Hour of 13cutting himself and jerking off into the blood in “Call to Satan,” and that interplay between sex, violence, and ritual is, if not ubiquitous in the songs, then certainly lurking in the background. It is the one adult male at the playground sitting on the bench watching the children who clearly has no child of his own. Call-the-cops creepy. The reality behind “Aqualung.”

Fruitful as their collaboration was, Davis and Swanson never seemed to click as a lineup. They played few gigs together — I was fortunate enough to see them in 2010 (review here) — and the vocalist left the band in 2011, following the release of The Ritualist, and Davis hooked up with Beaten Back to Pure‘s Ben Hogg shortly thereafter as part of what became a touring configuration of the band. But shifts in personnel were common, and though Hogg was on board for a tour with Kylesa and fronted some demos, by the time Hour of 13 issued 333Swanson was back in the band. Still, the momentum they’d had leading into Earache releasing the second album had largely evaporated, and touring was never a huge priority. When the band posted a single in tribute to The Gates of Slumber bassist Jason McCash (R.I.P.) in 2014, that was to be their final recording, but Davis revived the project two years later for the Salt the Dead: The Rare and Unreleased (review here) compilation, before shifting in 2018 to Hour of Thirteen, seeing Davis release a debut in 2019 with The Sabbathian (review here) on Svart, while still issuing a couple EPs to keep the flame burning and now, apparently, moving toward a fourth Hour of 13 full-length done completely as a solo affair.

Whatever the future brings for Hour of 13 — you can understand I’m sure why one might hesitate to predict, but maybe more Bandcamps? — their self-titled continues to be a defining document of their take on doom and what they represented at their outset. It is one of those kinds of albums that had more of an effect than people generally realize, and in discussion of acts who helped foster revivalist doom in the last ten years-plus should in no way be ignored.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

It’s 7:20AM and I’ve already had half a xanax this morning, which may or may not be a good sign for how the rest of the day is going to go. The Pecan has been up for an hour — woke up early as I was finishing the above, ran in his closet and proceeded to take a massive dump in his diaper as he will; fortunately it was contained — so I grabbed him, changed him, started him on breakfast. He’s had a snotty nose the last three days or so but seems to be on the mend if his bouncing-off-the-walls, complete-lack-of-focus is anything to go by. It was after I found myself on my knees on the rug begging him for not the first time in my life to eat a spoonful of yogurt that I hopped up and took a pill. I expect in about 20 minutes life will seem more manageable in that particular my-blood-is-moving-slower-than-it-was kind of way that the medication induces.

What a week.

The dog continues to be what I feel is an unnecessary challenge. Case in point she went to doggy-daycare on Tuesday — same time The Pecan was at actual-daycare — and the two-plus hours I had to sit quietly were some of the most satisfying I’ve experienced in at least the last two months since she came into our home. I was on board with getting this dog. I am now on board with getting rid of this dog. Sometimes it just doesn’t work, and while The Patient Mrs. — being more patient as she is — is advocating professional training, unless we’re going to do the same for our child, I fail to see how that substantial, multi-thousand-dollar investment might pay off. As projects go, I’d much prefer to get started redoing the kitchen now that we own the house.

These are adult concerns, and shitty besides. Far more fun is that I’ve had Cardi B. and Megan Thee Stallion’s “WAP” stuck in my head for the better part of the last 72 hours. “Catchy” doesn’t begin to cover it.

New Gimme Metal show today at 5PM Eastern: http://gimmemetal.com or their app to listen. The app is easier.

Alright, I gotta get this kid to leave the house before it burns it down so I’m punching out. Have a great and safe weekend. Be well, hydrate. All that good stuff.

FRM.

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GIVEAWAY: Enter to Win Crystal Spiders’ Molt on Vinyl

Posted in Features on August 13th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

crystal spiders molt vinyl

See that thing up there? You can win that! Ripple Music is set to release Crystal Spiders’ debut album, Molt, on Sept. 25. The Raleigh, North Carolina, two-piece already premiered their video for “Trapped” here, and that ruled (you can see the clip below), but the record’s a burner to be sure. Heavy soul vibes from singer/bassist Brenna Leath (also of Lightning Born with C.O.C.‘s Mike Dean, who produced here), a full-band sound between her low-end riffing and drummer/vocalist Tradd Yancey, with a little garage doom flair but still some punker edge when that’s what it wants. The title-track is right in there, crunch crunch crunch and stomp stomp. If I called it “fun” would you hate it?

Anyway, it’s a thing! You can win! Nobody hates winning things. So here’s the form to enter to get it from Ripple. If you prefer the direct link, go here: https://www.toneden.io/ripple-music/post/win-crystal-spiders-debut-lp-on-wax

You can use Spotify or Twitter or whatever to enter or I guess whatever you’ve got, and sign up to get on Ripple’s email list, which is actually kind of useful when it comes to finding out what they’re up to with preorders and whatnot. If you’ve seen giveaways here before you know I usually just do the “leave a comment here” thing and keep it simple, and I’m not into email harvesting, but the label went to the trouble to make it pretty so it seems the least I can do to post the thing as intended. Take it as a sign the record rules, if nothing else.

One more time, Molt is out Sept. 25 and the prize here is one — count ’em, one — copy of the album on vinyl. I’ll have a review of it up at some point, so I’ll spare you all that, but the short version is there’s a decent chance it’s a thing you want if you’re seeing these words. Giveaway runs for eight days, so have at it.

facebook.com/crystalspidersinmymind
crystalspiders.bandcamp.com
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Crystal Spiders, “Trapped” official video

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Crystal Spiders Sign to Ripple Music for Debut Album Molt; Premiere “Trapped” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Whathaveyou on July 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

crystal spiders (photo by Jay Beadnell)

North Carolina’s Crystal Spiders will issue their debut album, Molt, through Ripple Music on Sept. 25, and to mark the announcement of the signing and the album below, they’re premiering a video for “Trapped” made by Chariot of Black Moth as the first single to come from the record. And quite a first impression it makes. Crystal Spiders have pared down from the trio they were on their striking 2019 demo (review here) to just the two-piece of vocalist/bassist Brenna Leath and drummer/vocalist Tradd Yancey, and with “Trapped” they — bolstered the production from C.O.C.‘s Mike Dean, who doubles in Lightning Born, also on Ripple — recall some of the low-end largesse of the first Year of the Cobra album even as Leath‘s voice keeps them steeped in a classic rock mindset. That’s the rock. The groove of the song itself is the roll.

I haven’t heard the rest of the record yet — September is so far in the future my feeble brain can’t even conceive it — but preorders are up now if you’d like to save yourself the trouble later. Needless to say I’m thrilled to host the premiere of the track and the video and I’m sure there will be more to come before the release date gets here.

Until then, I won’t keep you. Find the video below, followed by the announcement itself.

And please enjoy:

Crystal Spiders, “Trapped” official video

CRYSTAL SPIDERS – Debut album ‘Molt’ out on September 25th through Ripple Music.

European preorder: https://en.ripple.spkr.media/ripple-music/crystal-spiders-molt.html

US preorder: https://ripplemusic.bigcartel.com/product/crystal-spiders-molt-deluxe-vinyl-editions

It didn’t take long for North Carolina’s Crystal Spiders to draw attention. The early poise of their self-recorded 2019 demo caught the attention of Ripple Music head honcho Todd Severin, who decided to put out their LP before he even heard the mixes.

Their devotion to riff-worship drives the invigorating sound of Molt. Crystal Spiders fits within the lineage of Sabbath-bred influences ranging from Fu Manchu to Kyuss, from Weedeater to Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats. But their broad scope — which pulls eagerly from classic rock dynamics and hardcore punk intensity, psychedelic texture and bluesy swing — pulls the band closer to contemporaries like Heavy Temple and The Well, who build upon well-trod templates to forge new territories of their own.

This rebuff of genre conventions has been a steady current in past and concurrent projects. Leath’s affection for classic metal and hard-rock is as apparent in her charged rock ‘n’ roll outfit The Hell No as it is in her doomy proto-metal band, Lightning Born, and Yancey lends a heavy swing to the psych-seared doom crew Doomsday Profit.

For Molt, the band pulls elements from across genres to create an album that traces the band’s full spectrum. Early songs like “Tigerlily” and “Trapped” find new complements in brand-new cuts like “Chronic Sick” and the title track. With a production assist from Mike Dean — Corrosion of Conformity bassist and Leath’s bandmate in fellow Ripplers Lightning Born — Molt finds Crystal Spiders at their most powerful.

Following a year of consistent gigging and short runs alongside The Well and Omen Stones, Crystal Spiders are looking to up the ante in 2020, with confirmed appearances at Raleigh Deathfest and the Maryland Doom Fest, as well as ranging further along the East Coast and into the western US.

Riding the momentum of their first year of shows and the strength of a potent debut, it’s a safe bet that Crystal Spiders will soon take space in the minds of fuzz-addicted legions far and wide.

Members:
Brenna Leath – Bass/Vocals
Tradd Yancey – Drums/Vocals

facebook.com/crystalspidersinmymind
crystalspiders.bandcamp.com
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Crystal Spiders, Demo (2019)

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