Album Review: Electric Moon, You Can See the Sound Of… (Expanded Version)

Posted in Reviews on August 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

electric moon you can see the sound of

Look carefully at the front cover of Try our custom essay has my blogs writing service, Best Dissertation Writing Services. Get your paper written by philosophy essay Electric Moon‘s Affordable essay & a fantastic read from our expert editors at NerdPro. Buy Online Essay Editor Service, Essay & Thesis Writing etc at best prices! You Can See the Sound Of… and you’ll note, in small letters at the top, the words ‘Extended Version.’ And so it is. The original, limited-to-500-copies edition of enter - professional and cheap report to ease your studying Learn all you need to know about custom writing Essays You Can See the Sound Of… (review here) was pressed to white 10″ vinyl and issued at "I needed someone to pay for dissertation masters degree for me. So I contacted this service and that was the best decision possible! Got A))", says Bill. Be smart, be like Bill. Roadburn Festival in 2013 to coincide with a residency from  Research Paper Introductions. If you’ve arrived on this page, it probably means you’ve lost someone. I have no words to share other than I’m sorry. Electric Moon guitarist/synthesist/noisemaker check my blog. Our company can provide you with any kind of academic writing services you need: essays, research papers, dissertations etc Dave Schmidt, aka They are all capable of writing custom essays on various topics. Custom essay writing is not supposed to have A Sample Of Business Plan starting at Sula Bassana. At the time,  cmu cs phd thesis - Instead of worrying about term paper writing find the necessary help here Learn all you need to know about custom writing leave Electric Moon consisted of the core duo of  Get a whopping 20% (FIRST TIMER'S) Discount when you order our write my essay for me service. more info heres with an authentic UK essay writing service. Schmidt — who also runs Best College Admissions Essay In The Worlds all kinds of papers, social sciences & humanities, manuscripts, dissertations in the sciences, articles. As experts in their Sulatron Records — and bassist/effects-specialist/sometimes-vocalist/graphic-artist Eternity - Cheap Essay Orders in Fairview Heights, reviews by real people. Yelp is a fun and easy way to find, recommend and talk about what’s “Komet Lulu” Neudeck, as well as drummer  Research On Paper,Cheap essays, affordable essay writing service for students - Dissertation English Language Teaching Michael Orloff, who had taken over from original drummer  Essay Writing Ons Getting a PhD is a matter of great pride and achievement. When you embark on this journey, you spend a lot of time and efforts in your Pablo Carneval, who, in turn, has since rejoined the band. At the time,  Get your paper done by an expert. High Quality. 100% original. On time. Search for quality term paper Dissertation In Physical Geography? Electric Moon were embroiled in an absolute creative flood, and between 2010 and 2012 they’d done no fewer than (and likely more than) 10 releases between splits, live recordings and studio offerings.

Their foundation in improvised heavy psychedelic exploration, in space-rock-infused jamming, and the fact that they were releasing through  If you’re looking for a University Essay Writing, you will like the quality offered by PapersASAp.com. Check the 10 reasons to choose this Schmidt‘s own imprint as well as respected purveyor  Nasoni Records, which by then was well familiar with Schmidt‘s solo work under the Sula Bassana banner, helped foster this relentless pace, and though they wouldn’t keep it up forever — how could they? — they were able to establish a reputation for the quality of their work as well as for the frequency with which it showed up. Even now though, multiple Electric Moon releases in the span of a year isn’t a surprise. To wit, they’re already set next month to follow You Can See the Sound Of… (Extended Version) with a live album captured at the 2019 Freak Valley Festival in their native Germany. But it is the standard of performance and chemistry they set that continues to make it such a joy to follow their progression from one outing to the next, and the original edition of You Can See the Sound Of… has always been a standout for me as a fan of what they do.

The three songs that appeared on that 2013 EP, “The Inner Part,” “Your Own Truth” and “No Escape From Now” are now featured as side A of You Can See the Sound Of… (Extended Version), and they remain a synesthetic pleasure to behold, from the bright shimmering, swirling greens of the lead cut to the Sonic Youth-gone-surf experimental feel of “Your Own Truth,” with Neudeck‘s semi-whispered vocals holding sway over a tense drum progression and a guitar line that is hypnotic enough to not give away the fact that it’s building to a more fervent payoff of fuzz in the song’s second half. By then they’ve already set the trajectory across the six minutes of “The Inner Part,” instrumental and expansive with a strong rhythmic foundation under Schmidt‘s floating guitar lines. It is no less the root of Electric Moon‘s approach than it is the basis for the dynamic of any number of power trios — bass and drums lock the groove, guitar wanders as it will — but given the keys to this particular spaceship, Electric Moon do not at all fail to make it their own.

electric moon you can see the sound of original cover

And as with the best of their work, it doesn’t feel like it could be any other way as “The Inner Part” and “Your Own Truth” make way for the 11-minute “No Escape From Now,” which unfurls gradually, seeming to use multiple dimensions of its mix to set the drums deep within the soundscape of the guitars and effects, maybe-vocals coursing intermittently through the first half of the track in what might be spoken form manipulated by pedals/synth or might just be the band tapping into the hearing-voices subconscious of their listenership. Seven years after the fact, it’s still unclear, and that’s part of what makes it work so well. It’s not like Electric Moon are going to sound dated; time isn’t really a factor here, and the context in which this material is occurring isn’t one that depends on the moment in which it occurs, based on improv though it is. Once it’s out there, it’s timeless, because in a way, once it’s out there its time has already passed.

To that end, I’m left curious as to why the three songs that appear on the back half of You Can See the Sound Of… (Extended Version) didn’t make the cut initially. Side B — comprising “Windhovers” (6:15), “The Great Exploration of Nothing” (4:56) and “Mushroom Cloud No. 4” (11:19) — is taken from the same studio session, and is set up as a mirror for side A in terms of the runtime of each piece. The second here is a little longer, the third a little shorter, but still within a minute of each other from one side to the next, and while it’s true that in the case of the later songs — those added on to the new version of the release — that’s being done with fadeouts so that they’re in line with the originals, that does nothing to undercut what they bring to the proceedings in terms of atmosphere.

“Windhovers” sets itself to a patient drumbeat and gives some semblance of a post-rock vibe early — if it was the quiet midsection of an Amenra song, no one would blink — and executes a more linear build than anything on side A, while “The Great Exploration of Nothing” turns to more of an outward lumber, putting the bass forward as Schmidt seems to move back and forth to keys and Neudeck takes the lead as the guitar otherwise might. The result is almost a verse/chorus structure — at least a play back and forth — but of course that’s not where Electric Moon are at.

They push through and into a noise wash jam on “Mushroom Cloud No. 4” and cap hinting at a guitar line that could easily (and probably did in the studio) just keep going for some indeterminate amount of time. That is the band in their wheelhouse, touching multiple niches in terms of sound, but holding a flow and reach that is too much their own to be anything else. As a reminder of what they were up to at this point, You Can See the Sound Of… (Extended Version) brims with psychedelic vitality, but one should not discount the work they’ve done since — on 2017’s Stardust Rituals (review here), for example — because the breadth that is so palpable in this material has only continued to expand.

Electric Moon, You Can See the Sound Of… (2013)

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Electric Moon website

Sulatron Records website

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Kadavar Post First The Isolation Tapes Single “Everything is Changing”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

kadavar everything is changing

Immediate points to Kadavar for accuracy when it comes to their new single. The first track to be unveiled from the upcoming The Isolation Tapes LP — available for preorder from the Berlin trio’s website as of today — is “Everything is Changing,” and I suspect that when frontman Christoph “Lupus” Lindemann intones the title, he’s talking about more than just the fact that he and drummer Christoph “Tiger” Bartelt have shaved their long-worn beards. The song, with synthesizer where a guitar might otherwise lead the way — not at all the band’s first foray into synth, if you’re wondering, but still a departure from expectation — is melancholy and autobiographical featuring, with Lindemann describing restlessness in lyrics like, “Trying to make sense at home/Like the new guy coming into town,” and “I said I wouldn’t be home tonight/But things have changed too fast.”

One has no trouble believing both those sentiments are true. Kadavar — rounded out by Simon “Dragon” Bouteloup — of course had tour plans scuttled by the COVID-19 pandemic, and they’ve been on the road so persistently and for so long, that it’s easy to imagine being stuck at home as they might’ve been earlier this year was a marked change personally as well as a dent in their always-busy album cycle. As the song unfolds over its six minutes, the lonely feeling suits a year marked by social distance broken only by social unrest, and in the last verse, restlessness turns into apathy as the last verse finishes, “Now I want to stay for a while/Resting my tired limbs/And I want to hide for a while/From the sound of my strings.”

Fair enough, but Kadavar aren’t exactly hiding. “Everything is Changing” is meticulously arranged and holds the mark of songcraft that has typified their material all throughout the creative progression that’s made them one of heavy rock’s most pivotal acts of the last decade. And to be surrounded by change is to be alive, but the consistency with which Kadavar bring their material to light is the rare reassurance of a steady hand, and even “Everything is Changing” — a willful step-down in energy from some of their more brazen moments — benefits from how much of themselves the band puts into it.

As noted, The Isolation Tapes is up for preorder as of today. It’s out Oct. 23 through Robotor Records — the band’s new self-release label; which seems to be an imprint of Pelagic? — and as one might expect, the different color vinyls look lovely.

Enjoy the video:

Kadavar, “Everything is Changing” official video

‘EVERYTHING IS CHANGING’ from the album ‘THE ISOLATION TAPES’ released on 23 October on Robotor Records.

PRE-ORDER: https://www.kadavar.com/
SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVmS…

Lupus: ‘The time of isolation has been a very intimate one that would not invite to write another hard rock album just like that. At home I wasn’t looking for loud guitars or walls of sound: everything turned quiet, both inside and outside, until sound almost disappeared. I would start listening to things I usually wouldn’t, like water drops, steps, birds or wind… So we started recording out of this new mental state, we would use loops for the very first time or play around with sounds we have never used before, resulting in a trip through our minds that captured these special times where everything was changing.’

Directed and Edited by Victor Puigcerver

Head Of Production Xavi Galindo
Color Grading Lita Bosch

Thanks to
Robin Banks
Olivia Airey

Early morning breaks the night
I get up I’ve slept way too long
doubt is moving through my mind
its been some time that i’ve played my songs

33 and things are changing
so long I’ve served you well
living the dream for many years
left alone in the hotel

Everything is changing
And there’s nothing I can do
i see all the good times fading
while I’m trying to get through

trying to make sense at home
like the new guy coming into town
There’s a world out there and it calls my name
but i don’t know how to get along

33 and things are changing
so long I’ve served you well
living the dream for many years
left alone in the hotel

i said i wouldn’t be home tonight
but things have changed too fast

now i want to stay for a while
resting my tired limbs
and i want to hide for a while
from the sound of my strings

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Kadavar website

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Daily Thompson Post “On My Mind” Video; Oumuamua Limited Vinyl Preorder Available

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

daily thompson (Photo by Dennis Treu)

It’s almost hard to believe it’s real life, what with a band putting out videos, getting ready to release an album and, most surreal of all, preparing to go on tour. The latter, of course, is pending further outbreaks of COVID-19 and lockdown — speaking from the disease-infested hellscape that is the United States of America, I wish them the best — but Daily Thompson have it all worked out. The whole plan. Same goes for their sound too on the new single “On My Mind,” a two-stage blues rocker that in the video below gives listeners a six-minute sampling of the kind of right-on grooves and vibe one can expect from the upcoming Oumuamua album being released next month by Noisolution.

While circumstances might make the trio playing in a room seem like a novelty — at least from my point of view; I haven’t been to a show since January — Daily Thompson‘s ease in portraying “On My Mind” speaks to the natural foundation from which their style stems. They’re steeped in classic heavy blues rock but not really a retro-minded band, instead bringing what was together with what is and forging their sonic persona from it. As guitarist Danny and bassist Mercedes come together on vocals in the song’s second half, it brings the track to a different stage of its progression  and adds to the already palpable swing and energy behind it. Like the preceding single “Sad Frank” (posted here), it also demonstrates the songwriting progression on which the band have embarked since their last outing, 2018’s Thirsty (review here).

Noisolution are taking preorders for the limited-to-1oo ‘Club 100’ edition of the album as of today, and you’ll find that link as well as more info under the video below.

Please enjoy:

Daily Thompson, “On My Mind” official video

++ NOISOLUTION – CLUB 100 ++
– Daily Thompson – Oumuamua –
24.07. /// 12:00 /// 100 Copies /// 4 weeks before release

Only @ Noisolution:

https://www.noisolution.de/shop/Vinyl/Daily-Thompson-Oumuamua-Club-100-strictly-limited::264.html
(link will go online 24.07., 12:00 CET)

– 100 copies / strictly limited
– each copy in a unique color
– 180g heavy weight champion
– ecological re-vinyl
– gatefold cover
– signed bandphoto & certificate
– hand numbered

Daily Thmpson European Tour:
11.09.2020 – DE Forum / Bielefeld
18.09.2020 – DE Live Club / Bamberg
19.09.2020 – DE Südsternhaus / Landau
24.09.2020 – ES La Triangu / Sopelana
25.09.2020 – ES Paruqe Municipal / Burlada
26.09.2020 – ES La Ley Seca / Zaragoza
27.09.2020 – ES Anvil Live Pub / Castellón
29.09.2020 – ES ZZ Pub / Malaga
30.09.2020 – ES Louie Louie Rock / Estepona
01.10.2020 – ES Ambigú Axerquía / Córdoba
02.10.2020 – ES Tebernas Desert Rock Fest / Alméria
10.10.2020 – DE Hagenbusch / Marl
17.10.2020 – DE Turbojugend Party at Zukunft / Chemnitz
13.11.2020 – DE Diemelkult Festival / Marsberg
26.-28.11.2020- PIN Music Conference / Skopje MKD
06.12.2020 – DE Cadillac / Oldenburg*
08.12 .2020 – DE Markthalle Marx / Hamburg*
09.12.2020 – DE Museumskeller / Erfurt*
10.12.2020 – DE Piano / Dortmund*
12.12.2020 – DE Zauberberg / Passau*?
14.12.2020 – DE Backstage / München*
15.12.2020 – DE Instant / Budapest HU?*
17.12.2020 – DE Sputnik Café / Münster*
18.12.2020 – DE Treibsand / Lübeck*
*w / Kamchatka

Daily Thompson are:
Danny – guitar and vocals
Mercedes – bass and vocals
Matze – drums

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Noisolution website

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Kadavar Announce New Album The Isolation Tapes

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 21st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Well, they had to do something. Not only did Kadavar have Australia/New Zealand and North American tour plans shit the bed this Spring, they were also set to hold their first festival endeavor, the Re-Generation Fest, next month in Berlin, where they’d co-headline with All Them Witches. Obviously not happening, because at some point it would probably require two people to, you know, stand next to each other. A terrifying thought, even outdoors, and I’m not even being that sarcastic when I say so.

So that will happen in 2021 (hopefully), and in the meantime, the always-up-to-something trio have been accordingly up to something. The something is a new album. Dubbed The Isolation Tapes, the new record is set to go up for preorder on Aug. 6, at which time a new single will also be unveiled. While you’re noting that date, putting a reminder in your phone or some such, also take a second to lift an eyebrow at the fact that Kadavar are releasing the album on their own, through a new imprint they’ve dubbed Robotor Records, rather than with Nuclear Blast, which handled their last four studio albums — including last year’s For the Dead Travel Fast (review here) — as well as two live records.

Could be they were on a six-LP deal and that has been fulfilled, or this could be a one-off due to the extenuating circumstances of that pesky global pandemic, but I don’t know at this point. Presumably we’ll find out more when the first single hits next month.

The news caught my eye on the social medias, not the least because it was in all-caps. Here it is:

kadavar the isolation tapes

KADAVAR – The Isolation Tapes

AUGUST 6, 2020 – SAVE THE DATE !!!

NEW STUDIO ALBUM „THE ISOLATION TAPES“ ON OUR OWN LABEL ROBOTOR RECORDS!

PRE-ORDER, MORE DETAILS AND FIRST SINGLE ON AUGUST 6, 2020.

ARTWORK BY Max Löffler Illustration

https://www.facebook.com/KadavarOfficial/
https://instagram.com/kadavargram/

Kadavar, For the Dead Travel Fast tour video

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Grendel’s SĂżster Sign to Cruz Del Sur Music

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 17th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Stuttgart, Germany, three-piece Grendel’s SĂżster make a good fit on on Cruz Del Sur Music, bringing together folk and classic metal on their 2019 Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz — which, yes, has 16 tracks — in a way that recalls the more power-driven moments of their newfound labelmates in Slough Feg, but is perhaps even more in the post-Skyclad pantheon of folk metal, though, as the label points out in the announcement of signing the band, they neither play to the trope of using folk instruments nor sing about beer. I’m all for varied arrangements depending on the context, but listening to Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz, it’s pretty clear what Cruz Del Sur are talking about when it comes to metal. They’re talking about Korpiklaani, Fintroll and the like. This is a different kind of folk metal.

The vinyl is out Sept. 25 and the preorders are up. That’s probably what you need to know.

So here you go:

GRENDEL’S SŸSTER

German Epic Folk Metallers GRENDEL’S SŸSTER Join Cruz Del Sur Music

Cruz Del Sur Music is proud to welcome Stuttgart, Germany epic folk metallers GRENDEL’S SŸSTER. The label will re-release the band’s 2019 “Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz” EP in September.

GRENDEL’S SŸSTER – “Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz” LP
RELEASE DATE: SEPT 25, 2020
FORMAT: GATEFOLD LP, INSERT & DOWNLOAD CODE
PRE-ORDER: https://tinyurl.com/yd4ps37x

Re-release of German trio Grendel’s Sÿster’s Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz EP — a collection of German and English-sung folk metal that’s eclectic and epic!

A seamless blend of classic metal and pure folk from this emerging German power trio!

“Follow the atmosphere.” It is a simple guideline for Grendel’s Sÿster guitarist and primary songwriter Tobi when composing. He often finds himself pulling all-nighters, aided and abetted by black tea and a daylight lamp to ensure the mood is just right. All he needs is a tiny fragment of a melody with a numinous quality and eventually, a new Grendel’s Sÿster song is born.

Music as unique as Grendel’s Sÿster requires a special touch — they marry metal, folk and acid rock in such a manner that it would appear the band has been together for decades, when, in reality, they came together in 2015 after a series of impromptu jam sessions tucked away in the Vosges Mountains region in France. The 2016 Night Sea Journey/Sayings of the High One single was their first release, followed by 2018’s Orphic Gold Leaves/Orphische Goldblättchen EP. Their 2019 Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz EP is what caught the attention of Cruz Del Sur Music, leading to its proper reissue this September.

Grendel’s Sÿster’s inimitable style owes as much to their wide range of influences (from early Blind Guardian, Warlord and Lordian Guard, to artists such as Svanevit, Triakel and Planxty, all the way to classical and renaissance music) as it does the chemistry within the band.

What separates Grendel’s Syster from other folk metal bands is that they don’t rely on traditional folk instrumentation. In fact, there’s not a trace of it on the LP. Instead, the band’s reliance on atmosphere, melody and compositional breadth is what helps them get their point across.

To go one step further, the topics on Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz are mostly about history, mythology and folklore, avoiding many of the pitfalls of the current folk metal style. (No drinking songs to be found!)

The EP’s cover art is from Dutch painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema, depicting an anecdote from the Historia Augusta, which is a collection of Roman biographies written in Latin. And, as if to further display Grendel’s Sÿster’s special quality, Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz features both a German and English version of the EP in one package.

Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz is more than just the organic marriage of metal and folk. It’s an EP without boundaries, both bold and captivating at once.

https://grendelssyster.bandcamp.com/
cruzdelsurmusic.com
facebook.com/cruzdelsurmusic
cruzdelsurmusic.bandcamp.com

Grendel’s SĂżster, Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz EP (2019)

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Iguana Post “Below the Hinterlands” Video Filmed in Quarantine

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

iguana below the hinterlands

By now the ‘quarantine video,’ as a trope with band members filming themselves individually on phones playing a song and then splicing that footage together either to look like a Zoom call or in time with music, is a familiar enough sight. It will be years if not decades before all the ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown are played out, and so it seems extra fitting that Iguana‘s “Below the Hinterlands” video also brings a reckoning with history. Presented across the four minutes of sweetly melodic fuzzadelia of the song itself, “Below the Hinterlands” shows us not just the band going through their parts, but also a bit of their hometown in Chemnitz, located in what was formerly East Germany before the collapse of the Soviet Union.

I remember watching the Berlin Wall fall on television — certainly an amazing time to be alive, especially if you were a Scorpions fan — but was too young to really understand the political and social ramifications of what I was seeing. To my newly-10 eyes it was clearly important, but mostly because adults said it was. It’s been the better part of 29 years since then, but as Iguana posits, those days are still rippling out across time and place, and they see it in their hometown.

Led by Angela Merkel, Germany has weathered the COVID-19 crisis better than many, including my own country (though of course, that’s a particularly easy standard to meet), but even so, across Europe’s liberal democracies, the clash of various social movements, populism and economic inequality continue to challenge a restless status quo. As Euro-tribal nationalism lurks in the corners — or worse, doesn’t — learning from historical context feels especially crucial. Maybe “Below the Hinterlands” doesn’t say all that, but that the band bothered to write, record and make a video for it does, I think.

Don’t treat it like a history lesson or an opinion diatribe — it’s neither — but enjoy the track on its own level. They make that easy:

Iguana, “Below the Hinterlands” official video

“Below The Hinterlands” is the secret hit of the new record “Translational Symmetry” by the Chemnitz based psych rock quartet Iguana. The video is as personal as the song itself. It is produced in corona times, socially distant, self directed, filmed independently by all 4 musicians, then loaded into the dropbox and finally delicately edited by video artist Michael Chlebusch. A corona project, so to speak. Aesthetic in the river, packed psychedelically and superimposed in several layers and metaphors (as well as the translational symmetry of the record itself), so that all details only become apparent when you look and listen several times .

Last but not least, as the name suggests, it is a view of the hinterland, Chemnitz, the east, home and its beautiful, but rather pale and shattering dark sides. Because East Germany is still swinging in the echo of the fall of the Berlin wall with a mood of openness, euphoria and departure on the one hand and burgeoning hatred and growing nationalism on the other. A worrying melange with a dangerous open ending and the hopeful wish of the song not to commit the mistakes of the past again.

Band: Iguana
Song: Below The Hinterlands
Album: Translational Symmetry
Label: Tonzonen Records 2019
Regie, artwork, animation and cut by Michael Chelbusch.
Idee and regie by Alexander Loerinczy, Camera by Iguana.

Order via Bandcamp: https://iguana.bandcamp.com/
Order via Tonzonen Records: https://www.tonzonen.de/iguana/

Iguana is:
Alexander Lörinczy | Vocals, Guitar, Synthesizer
Alexander May | Bass
Robert Meier | Drums
Thomas May | Guitar, Synthesizer

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Iguana on Instagram

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Tonzonen Records website

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Tau and the Drones of Praise Post “SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

tau and the drones of praise

I’m not gonna claim to be any kind of expert on the work of Tau or any of the various incarnations the Irish-rooted frontman Shaun Mulrooney has of it. I saw something so I’m saying something while I bother to investigate further. Tau and the Drones of Praise issued the four-song SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa EP last month, and they would’ve been at Roadburn this year, but blah blah blah I’m tired of talking about the pandemic. The EP’s tracks vary somewhat in personality, but with the title-cut, there’s a particularly deep dive into Celtic folk and nature-worshiping psychedelia. And antlers. Lots of antlers. I don’t even mean just in the video. The song itself has antlers. How did they even do that?

Well, that’s the magic I guess, and that’s why I’m posting the video, because it’s easy to get swept up in it, and while this may not be the kind of heavy fare one expects around here all the time, consider the weight of Ireland’s history and consider the breadth of atmosphere being conveyed here and maybe that’ll give you some sense of where I’m coming from. Or maybe it won’t and it doesn’t really matter either way. If you dig it, dig it. If you don’t, well, I post five times a day most days and there are at least a hundred thousand other shitheel blogs out there, so do the math and you’re bound to find something that meets your stringent standards sooner or later.

Sorry. That one kind of took a turn.

Anyway, expand your horizons a little and get into it:

Tau & the Drones of Praise, “SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa” official video

Title track SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa (Sacred Ancestors) from the EP, SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa out now.

Video is a collage and homage to the beauty of Ireland and our Sacred sites. Additional shots on tour in France and at La Briche Audio

Edited by Kyle McFerguson
Filmed by Haile MArie & Leo Lee

SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa is the lead single from an EP of the same title by Tau & And The Drones of Praise.

This is the follow up to their second album released in February 2019, which garnered widespread acclaim.

In a flash of Imbas (inspiration) SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa was written and recorded by the Berlin/Ireland based ensemble in just a few hours which gives the track its raw/ archaic immediacy. Opened stringed tunings and old instruments like the hurdy gurdy contains that signature Tau drone while maintaining a confident and contemporary, folky feel.

The mountain on the cover is Queen Maeve’s Cairn at Knocknarea, Co Sligo. The photograph was taken on Spring Equinox 2020, just as the world went into lockdown. The fiery warrior spirit and sovereignty which Goddess Queen Méabh represents so inspires the band, and is a reminder of our own inner fire and our own sovereignty.

Here, frontman Shaun Mulrooney retraces his ancestors’ footsteps, as his surname originates in County Sligo which is a stone’s throw from where he currently resides. Rory Nelson Mckee’s traditional guitar playing being at the helm on Seanóirí Naofa gives this work Tau’s most Irish sounding feel to date.

Tau and the Drones of Praise, SeanĂłirĂ­ Naofa (2020)

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Quarterly Review: Paradise Lost, Vinnum Sabbathi, Nighthawk, Familiars, Mountain Witch, Disastroid, Stonegrass, Jointhugger, Little Albert, Parahelio

Posted in Reviews on July 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-qr-summer-2020

Last day, you know the drill. It’s been a pleasure, honestly. If every Quarterly Review could feature the quality of material this one has, I’d probably only spend a fraction of the amount of time I do fretting over it. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading and enjoyed the music as much as I have. If you haven’t found something here to sit with and dig into yet, well, today’s 10 more chances to do just that. Maybe something will stick at last.

See you in September.

Quarterly Review #41-50:

Paradise Lost, Obsidian

paradise lost obsidian

It is impossible to listen to Obsidian and consider Paradise Lost as anything other than masters of the form. Of course, that they were one of the original pioneers of gothic death-doom helps, but even in the decade-plus since they began to shift back toward a more metallic approach, they have established a standard that is entirely their own. Obsidian collects nine tracks across a palatable 45 minutes, and if the hook of “Fall From Grace” is fan-service on the part of the band, then it is no less righteous for that. In atmosphere and aggression, cuts like “The Devil Embraced” and the galloping “Ghosts” deliver on high expectations coming off 2017’s Medusa (review here), even as side B’s “Ending Days” and “Hope Dies Young” branch into a more melodic focus, not departing from the weight of impact presented earlier, but clearly adjusting the approach, leading to an all the more deathly return on “Ravenghast,” which closes out. Their doom remains second to none; their model remains one to follow.

Paradise Lost on Thee Facebooks

Nuclear Blast webstore

 

Vinnum Sabbathi, Of Dimensions and Theories

Vinnum Sabbathi Of Dimensions and Theories

The narrative thread carried through the six tracks of Vinnum Sabbathi‘s Of Dimensions and Theories is a futuristic sci-fi tale about humanity’s first foray into deep space amid a chaos of environmental collapse and nuclear threat. The real story, however, is the sense of progression the instrumentalist Mexico City outfit bring in following up their debut LP, 2017’s Gravity Works (review here). Tying thematically to the latest Cegvera album — the two bands share personnel — pieces at the outset like “In Search of M-Theory” and “Quantum Determinism” maintain the exploratory vibe of the band’s jammier works in their “HEX” series, but through spoken samples give a human presence and plotline to the alternately atmospheric and lumbering tones. As the record progresses through the airier “An Appraisal” and the feedback-drenched “Beyond Perturbative States,” their dynamic finds realization in “A Superstring Revolution I” and the drum-led “A Superstring Revolution II.” I don’t know about humanity’s prospects as a whole, but Vinnum Sabbathi‘s remain bright.

Vinnum Sabbathi on Thee Facebooks

Stolen Body Records website

 

Nighthawk, The Sea Legs EP

Nighthawk The Sea Legs EP

Composed as a solo outing prior to the founding of Heavy Temple, the Nighthawk solo endeavor (presumably she wasn’t a High Priestess yet), The Sea Legs EP, is plenty self-aware in its title, but for being a raw execution of material written performed entirely on her own, its four tracks also have a pretty significant scope, from the post-QOTSA heavy pop of “Goddamn” leading off through the quick spacegaze of “I’m From Tennessee Woman, All We Do is Honky Tonk,” into the deceptively spacious “I Can Haz” with its far-back toms, dreamy vocal melody and vaguely Middle Eastern-sounding guitar, and ending with the if-Ween‘s-country-album-had-been-weirder finish of “Stay Gold.” Nighthawk has issued a follow-up to The Sea Legs EP in the full-length Goblin/John Carpenter-style synth of The Dimensionaut, but given the range and balance she shows just in this brief 12 minutes, one hopes that indeed her songwriting explorations continue to prove so multifaceted.

Nighthawk on Bandcamp

Heavy Temple on Thee Facebooks

 

Familiars, All in Good Time

familiars all in good time

Contending for one of the year’s best debut albums, FamiliarsAll in Good Time offers eight songs across 43 minutes that blend organic-feeling grit with more ethereal, landscape-evocative psychedelics. The Ontario three-piece have a few singles to their credit, but the lushness of “Rocky Roost” and the emergent heft of “Barn Burning,” the fleshy boogie of “The Dirty Dog Saloon” and the breadth of “Avro Arrow” speak not just to Familiars‘ ability to capture a largesse that draws their songs together, or the nuance that lets them brings subtle touches of Americana (Canadiana?) early on and echoing desert roll to the fuzzy “The Common Loon,” but also to the songwriting that makes these songs stand out so much as they do and the sense of purpose Familiars bring to All in Good Time as their first long-player. That turns out to be one of the most encouraging aspects of the release, but in that regard there’s plenty of competition from elements like tone, rhythm, melody, craft, performance — so yes, basically all of it.

Familiars on Thee Facebooks

Familiars on Bandcamp

 

Mountain Witch, Extinct Cults

Mountain Witch Extinct Cults

Mountain Witch‘s fourth album, Extinct Cults, brings the Hamburg-based duo of guitarist RenĂ© Sitte and drummer/vocalist RenĂ© Roggmann back after a four-year absence with a collection that straddles the various lines between classic heavy rock, proto-metal, ’70s heavy prog and modern cultism. Their loyalties aren’t necessarily all to the 1968-’74 period, as the chug and gruff vocals of “Back From the Grave” show, but the post Technical Ecstasy sway of the title-track is a fascinating and rarely-captured specificity, and the vocal melodies expressed in layers across the record do much to add personality and depth to the arrangements while the surrounding recording remains essentially raw. No doubt vinyl-minded, Extinct Cults is relatively brief at six songs and 33 minutes, but the Priestly chug of “Man is Wolf to Man” and the engrossing garage doom of closer “The Devil Probably” offer plenty of fodder for those who’d dig in to dig into. It is a sound familiar and individual at once, old and new, and it revels in making cohesion out of such contrasts.

Mountain Witch on Thee Facebooks

This Charming Man Records website

 

Disastroid, Mortal Fools

disastroid mortal fools

You might find San Francisco trio Disastroid hanging out at the corner of noise and heavy rock, looking disreputable. Their first record for Heavy Psych Sounds is Mortal Fools, and to go with its essential-bloody-essential bass tone and melodic semi-shouted vocals, it brings hints of angularity rounded out by tonal thickness and a smoothness between transitions that extends to the flow from one song to the next. While for sure a collection of individual pieces, Mortal Fools does move through its 43 minutes with remarkable ease, the sure hand of the three-piece guides you through the otherwise willfully tumultuous course, brash in the guitar and bass and drums but immersive in the overarching groove. They seem to save a particular melodic highlight for the verses of closer “Space Rodent,” but really, whether it’s the lumbering “Hopeless” or the sharper-toothed push of “Bilge,” the highlight is what Disastroid accomplish over the course of the record as a whole. Plus that friggin’ bass sound.

Disastroid on Thee Facebooks

Heavy Psych Sounds website

 

Stonegrass, Stonegrass

stonegrass self titled

I don’t know when this was first released, but the 2020 edition seems to be a remaster, and whenever it first came out, I’m pleased to have the chance to check it out now. Toronto duo Stonegrass brings together Matthew “Doc” Dunn and Jay Anderson, both of a markedly psyched-out pedigree, to dig into experimentalist acid-psych that pushes boundaries stylistic and national, tapping Afrobeat vibes with closer “Drive On” and the earlier 13-minute go-go-go jam “Tea” while “The Highway” feels like a lost psychedelic disco-funk 45, “The Cape” drones like it’s waiting for someone to start reading poetry over-top, and mellow hand-percussion and Turkish psych on centerpiece “Frozen Dunes.” The whole thing, which runs a manageable 39 minutes, is as cool as the day is long, and comes across like a gift to those of expanded mind or who are willing to join those ranks. I don’t know if it’s new or old. I don’t know if it’s a one-off or an ongoing project. I barely know if it’s actually out. But hot damn it’s rad, and if you can catch it, you should.

Cosmic Range Records on YouTube

Cosmic Range Records on Bandcamp

 

Jointhugger, I Am No One

jointhugger i am no one

Norwegian half-instrumental trio Jointhugger have already captured the attention of both Interstellar Smoke Records and Ozium Records with their four-song debut long-player, I Am No One, and as the follow-up to their 2019 Daemo, it leaves little question why. The more volume, the merrier, when it comes to the rolling, nodding, undulations of riff the band conjure, as each member seems geared toward bringing as much weight to bear as much as possible. I’m serious. Even the hi-hat is heavy, never mind the guitar or bass or the cave-echoing vocals of the title-track. “Domen” slips into some shuffle — if you can call something that dense-sounding a shuffle — and underscores its solo with an entire bog’s worth of low end, and though closer “Nightfright” is the only inclusion that actually tops 10 minutes, it communicates an intensity of crush that is nothing if not consistent with what’s come before. There are flashes of letup here and there, but it’s impact at the core of Jointhugger‘s approach, and they offer plenty of it. Don’t be surprised when the CD and LP sell through, and don’t be surprised if they get re-pressed later.

Jointhugger on Thee Facebooks

Ozium Records webstore

Interstellar Smoke Records webstore

 

Little Albert, Swamp King

Little Albert Swamp King

Stepping out both in terms of style and substance from his position as guitarist in atmospheric doomers Messa, Little Albert — aka Alberto Piccolo — pronounces himself “swamp king” in the opening lines of his debut solo release of the same name, and the mellow ambiance and psychedelic flourish of tone in “Bridge of Sighs” and “Mean Old Woman” and the aptly-titled “Blues Asteroid” offer an individualized blend of psychedelic blues that seems to delight in tipping the balance back and forth from one to the other while likewise taking the songs through full band arrangements and more intimate wanderings. Some of the songs have a tendency to roll outward and not return, as does “Mary Claire” or “Mean Old Woman,” but “Outside Woman Blues” and the closer “Hard Time Killing Floor Blues” hold tighter to the ground than some of what surrounds, so again, there’s a balance. Plus, as mellow as Swamp King is in its overarching affect, it’s neither difficult nor anything but a pleasure to follow along where Piccolo leads. If that’s off the psych-blues deep end, so be it. Only issue I take with him being king of the swamp is that the album’s domain hardly seems so limited.

Little Albert on Thee Facebooks

Aural Music on Bandcamp

 

Parahelio, Surge Evelia, Surge

Parahelio Surge Evelia Surge

Beautiful, patient and pastoral psychedelia fleshes out across the three tracks of Parahelio‘s debut full-length, Surge Evelia, Surge. Issued on vinyl through Necio Records, the three-song offering reportedly pays homage to a mining town in the band’s native Peru, but it does so with a breadth that seems to cover so much between heavy post-rock and psych that it’s difficult not to imagine places decidedly more ethereal. Beginning with its title-track (12:33) and moving into the swells and recessions of “Gestos y Distancia,” the album builds to an encompassing payoff for side A before unveiling “Ha’Adam,” a 23-minute side-consuming rollout that encompasses not only soundscaping, but a richly human feel in its later take, solidifying around a drum march and a heavy build of guitar that shouldn’t sound strange to fans of Pelican or Russian Circles yet manages somehow to transcend the hypnotic in favor of the dynamic, the immersive, and again, the beautiful. What follows is desolation and aftermath, and that’s how the record ends, but even there, the textures and the spirit of the release remain central. I always do myself a favor with the last release of any Quarterly Review, and this is no exception.

Parahelio on Thee Facebooks

Necio Records on Bandcamp

 

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