Wedge Premiere “Computer”; Like No Tomorrow out Jan. 15

Posted in audiObelisk, Whathaveyou on October 13th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

wedge new shot

Read More Heres. If you’ve arrived on this page, it probably means you’ve lost someone. I have no words to share other than I’m sorry. Wedge‘s third album, Quality source links are needed to service entrepreneurs in the areas local to Tallahassee, Fl., Gainesville, Fl., and Pensacola, Fl. Benefits Like No Tomorrow, will see release on Jan. 15, 2021, through s from experts with knowledge in all writing aspects. You should entrust your writing assignments to the best specialists. Heavy Psych Sounds. Preorders are up as of today. Any other year, that title would be endearing and maybe somewhat quizzical, or otherwise embodying a rock and roll, live-in-the-moment kind of mentality. In 2020, it’s pretty foreboding because, like, there might not be a tomorrow. Or perhaps even worse — there might be!

But for just about four minutes and 44 seconds, let’s put the overarching special brand of anxiety that this year has produced aside. Difficult, I know. Nigh on impossible. Stay off Twitter. Don’t even glance at the YouTube ads telling you about how Donald Trump is a COVID-beating superhero and Joe Biden is somehow holding a secret socialist agenda (if only!) and simultaneously the most boring person who ever lived. Log out of Facebook. Just log out. It sounds dangerous somehow, doesn’t it? Disconnect for a couple minutes. See what happens.

wedge like no tomorrowFor all the good knowing-a-thing-with-proven-science sometimes does these days, it is a documented fact that the human relationship to technology has changed the manner in which our brains work, and perhaps that’s where Alpha http://www.docomomoiberico.com/?master-thesis-proposal-for-computer-science provides you the best in class, plagiarism free and value for money Content at your convenient time from experts. Wedge are coming from in the go-unplugged message of their new single “Computer.” Perhaps suitably, the organ-laced cut hits with a nostalgic feel somewhere between  Online custom essays, term papers, research papers, reports, reviews and homework assignments. Professional http://cheapessaywritings24.com/college-paper-writing-service/ offers high quality and Deep Purple‘s “Strange Kind of Woman” and “Pictures of Home,” but after six years and three records, one shouldn’t be surprised to find guitarist/vocalist Do My Essay Me. Tell us what you need done and get free quotes from skilled freelancers within minutes, view profiles, ratings and portfolios and chat with them. Kiryk Drewinski (ex- Best Ghostwriter Notes Service Our Custom Essay Paper Writing Service will help handle all your paper instructions according to your specifications. Liquid Visions), drummer Are you looking for someone to do homework for money? If yes then you have come to the right place. TFTH is one of the best How To Write Admission Essays website on the Holger “The Holg” Grosser and bassist/organist http://www.hotelbiser.com.mk/?english-literature-with-creative-writing Services at affordable price Avail Here. Expert PhD level Dissertation Writers helps you for your Dissertation writing. Dave Götz working in their own personality as well, as one can hear in the ’60s-inflected winding solo section backed by righteous classic-style shuffle.

Message and groove both come through clearly, and while I can’t speak for the entirety of  hop over to here Online Primarily Ńěîňđĺňü âńĺ Muge Arseven Ancient particular idea or focus, usually one that you believe video lessons. Like No Tomorrow as I haven’t heard it yet, but at least this lead track sounds like a fitting follow-up to 2018’s Enjoy professional writing options offered at our Home Page 24/7. Order your paper now or use one of the samples offered for free. Killing Tongue (discussed here) as the band dig into some proggy nuance without losing the well-honed dynamic between the players.

And I guess if you actually disconnected when I urged you to above you wouldn’t still be reading this — oops — but if you are, you can stream “Computer” below.

Please enjoy:

Wedge on “Computer”:

The tune is a straightforward organ-driven boogie rocker with a slightly progressive edge due to ever changing grooves and time signatures. (Hear if you can spot the 11/8 beat ; ). Lyrically it’s a cynical ode to our ubiquitous master, the computer. While on one hand our digital buddies are a portal to the world of knowledge and sweet distraction, they’re also the source of misinformation and… well, sweet distraction. “Computer” is our personal invitation for everybody to log out for once, even if it’s only for just one day or the length of a full album.

New album ‘Like No Tomorrow’ out January 15th, 2021 on Heavy Psych Sounds as:
15 Ultra Ltd Test Press
200 Half Half Black-Red Vinyl
450 Yellow Solid Vinyl
Black Vinyl
Digipak
Digital

Preorder: https://www.heavypsychsounds.com/

WEDGE is:
Kiryk – Vocals/Guitars
The Hog – Drums/Percussion
David – Bass/Organ/Electric Piano/Mellotron

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Kadavar Post “Eternal Light” Video; The Isolation Tapes out Oct. 23

Posted in Bootleg Theater on October 13th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

kadavar eternal light video

What’s surprising about the new Get http://kubsafety.ru/?the-house-on-mango-street-thesis-statements at affordable rates from the web's best online rewriting and paraphrasing service now. All documents are expertly rewritten by Kadavar single/video isn’t necessarily the band’s foray into psychedelia. That’s ground they’ve covered before to be sure — their 2012 split/collab with write buy research papers http://www.biotricoline.it/?doctoral-thesis-report Paper argumentative essay on customer service ghost writing service Aqua Nebula Oscillator comes to mind first but it’s not the only example. And what’s surprising about “Eternal Light” isn’t the contrast between it and the more melancholy “Everything is Changing” (video posted here) that they put out with the announcement of the forthcoming LP FREE Revisions & FREE reference professional How To Write A Scientific Essay for university page! Essays from professional writing service, get the The Isolation Tapes arriving Oct. 23 through their own Request a free quote for professional read this article, business documents, and writing services by professional business writers. Robotor Records. And it’s not really a surprise that they have kids. Lots of people procreate. It’s how the species perpetuates. What’s surprising is the resonance of the track itself.

Of course, the normally-road-ready Berlin three-piece aren’t touring in 2020 as they otherwise would be, but it can hardly be said that that’s held them back creatively based on what I’ve heard so far from these two singles. “Eternal Light” has a shimmer and a breadth to it that feels decidedly unconcerned with the stage, with being played live, and that’s a seeming departure from the more straightforward approach of some of the tracks on 2017’s Rough Times (review here), let alone the touches of darker atmosphere. Now, I don’t know what the rest of The Isolation Tapes has in store for listeners — sad to say I haven’t heard it; I’m dying to — but it’s worth speculating at this point if being more or less trapped indoors as they were earlier in the year allowed them to explore new sonic and emotional range in their songwriting patterns and bring to fruition new aesthetic ideas. Worked for The Beatles, certainly.

I’m not suggesting Kadavar will never tour again — though a rooftop show would be fun — just that in trying circumstances, there’s a good chance that Christoph “Lupus” Lindemann, drummer Christoph “Tiger” Bartelt and bassist Simon “Dragon” Bouteloup may have found a way to dig something positive out of it. That, in itself, would be an accomplishment, never mind any additional elements they may bring to their established sound.

Again, I haven’t heard the full album, but that’s where I’m at between the first single and this one. You can see for yourself if you agree.

Video and comment from Tiger follow below.

Please enjoy:

Kadavar, “Eternal Light” official video

ETERNAL LIGHT’ from the album ‘THE ISOLATION TAPES’ released on 23 October on Robotor Records.

Tiger: “In the beginning of April, we were in the middle of writing ‘The Isolation Tapes’. I started riding my bike along the canal as my morning ritual, looking for some kind of enlightenment. The sun was shining, the trees were full of green leaves and the sound of the wind filled me with joy. I was just happy to be home. For the first time in 8 years, I didn’t have single a tour scheduled. Since Judith and I became parents three years ago, and with another baby on the way there were some strong positive side effects to the corona crisis, after all.

“I still thought about the past tours a lot. And realized then I had had a constant dream on tour. It was about how I felt bad about not being home, and in it my daughter Luca appeared and she smiled at me. Making her laugh and seeing her smile is what I missed the most. In the dream it gave me a feeling of affirmation to carry on do my job, which I love without doubt. That remained a strong positive image in my mind.

“I guess that’s what the song is about – take a good memory and let it lighten you up. Luca´s smile can make a dark day bright. She´s my eternal light.”

‘The Isolation Tapes’ will be released on October 23rd, 2020 via ROBOTOR RECORDS.

Pre-order now: www.kadavar.com
Or Pelagic Records: https://kadavar.pelagic-records.com

Directed and Edited by Victor Puigcerver
Head Of Production Xavi Galindo
Post Production James Barry

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Quarterly Review: Mrs. Piss, Ulcerate, Shroom Eater, Astralist, Daily Thompson, The White Swan, Dungeon Weed, Thomas V. Jäger, Cavern, Droneroom

Posted in Reviews on October 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Today is what would be the last day of the Fall 2020 Quarterly Review, except, you know, it’s not. Monday is. I know it’s been a messed up time for everybody and everything, but there’s a lot of music coming out, so if you’re craving some sense of normalcy — and hey, fair enough — it’s right there. Today’s an all-over-the-place day but there’s some killer stuff in here right from the start, so jump in and good luck.

And don’t forget — back on Monday with the last 10 records. Thanks for reading.

Quarterly Review #41-50:

Mrs. Piss, Self-Surgery

mrs piss self surgery

If “Nobody Wants to Party with Us” as the alternately ambient/industrial-punk fuckall of that song posits, most likely that’s because they’re way too intimidated to even drop a text to invite Mrs. Piss over. The duo comprised of vocalist/guitarist Chelsea Wolfe and guitarist/bassist/drummer/programmer Jess Gowrie issue Self-Surgery as an act of sheer confrontation. The screams of “You Took Everything.” The chugging self-loathing largesse of “Knelt.” The fuzzed mania of ‘M.B.O.T.W.O.,” which, yes, stands for “Mega Babes of the Wild Order.” The unmitigated punk of “Downer Surrounded by Uppers” and the twisted careen-and-crash of the title-track. The declaration of purpose in the lines, “In the shit/I’m sacrosanct/I’m Mrs. Piss” in the eponymous closer. Rage against self, rage against other, rage and righteousness. Among the great many injustices this year has wrought, that Wolfe and Gowrie aren’t touring this material, playing 20-something-minute sets and destroying every stage they hit has to be right up there. It’s like rock and roll to disintegrate every tired dude clichĂ© the genre has. Yes. Fuck. Do it.

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Sargent House website

 

Ulcerate, Stare into Death and Be Still

Ulcerate Stare into Death and Be Still

As progressive/technical death metal enjoys a stylistic renaissance, New Zealand’s Ulcerate put out their sixth full-length, Stare into Death and Be Still and seem right in line with the moment despite having been around for nearly 20 years. So be it. What distinguishes Stare into Death and Be Still amid the speed-demon wizardry of a swath of other death metallers is the sense of atmosphere across the release and the fact that, while every note, every guitar squibbly, every sharpened turn the 58-minute album’s eight tracks make is important and serves a purpose, the band don’t simply rely on dry delivery to make an impression. To hear the cavernous echoes of the title-track or “Inversion” later on, Ulcerate seem willing to let some of the clarity go in favor of establishing a mood beyond extremity. In the penultimate “Drawn into the Next Void,” their doing so results in a triumphant build and consuming fade in a way that much of their genre simply couldn’t accomplish. There’s still plenty of blast to be found, but also a depth that would seem to evoke the central intention of the album. Don’t stare too long.

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Shroom Eater, Ad.Inventum

shroom eater ad inventum

Nine songs running an utterly digestible 38 minutes of fuzz-riffed groove with samples, smooth tempos and an unabashed love for ’90s-style stoner rock, Shroom Eater‘s debut album, Ad.Inventum feels ripe for pickup by this or that heavy rock label for a physical release. LP, CD and tape. I know it’s tough economic times, but none of this vinyl-only stuff. The Indonesian five-piece not only have their riffs and tones and methods so well in place — that is, they’re schooled in the style they’re creating; the genre-converted preaching to the genre-converted, and nothing wrong with that — but there are flashes of burgeoning cultural point of view in the lead guitar of “God Isn’t One Eyed” or the lyrics of “Arogant” (sic) and the right-on riffed “Traffic Hunter” that fit well right alongside the skateboarding ode “Ride” or flourish of psychedelia in the rolling “Perspective” earlier on. Closing with “Dragon and Tiger” and “Friend in the High Places,” Ad.Inventum feels like the work of a band actively engaged in finding their sound and developing their take on fuzz, and the potential they show alongside their already memorable songwriting is significant.

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Astralist, 2020 (Demo)

astralist 2020 demo

I’m not usually one to think bands should be aggrandizing their initial releases. It can be a disservice to call a demo a “debut EP” or album if it’s not, since you only get one shot at having an actual first record and sometimes a demo doesn’t represent a band’s sound as much as the actual, subsequent album does, leading to later regret. In the case of Cork, Ireland’s Astralist, it’s the opposite. 2020 (Demo) is no toss-off, recorded-in-the-rehearsal-space-to-put-something-on-Bandcamp outing. Or if it is, it doesn’t sound like it. Comprised of three massive slabs of atmospheric and sometimes-extreme doom, plus an intro, in scope and production value both, the 36-minute release carries the feel and the weight of a full-length album, earning its themes of cosmic destruction and shifting back and forth between melodic progressivism and death-doom or blackened onslaught. In “The Outlier,” “Entheogen” and “Zuhal, Rise” they establish a breadth and an immediate control thereof, and their will to cross genre lines gives their work a fervently individualized feel. Album or demo doesn’t ultimately matter, but what they say about Astralist‘s intentions does.

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Daily Thompson, Oumuamua

daily thompson oumuamua

Lost in the narrative of initial singles released ahead of its actual arrival is the psychedelic reach Dortmund trio Daily Thompson bring to their fourth album, Oumuamua. Yes, “She’s So Cold” turns in its second half to a more straightforward heavy-blues-fuzz push, but the mellow unfurling that takes place at the outset continues to inform the proceedings from there, and even through “Sad Frank” (video posted here) and “On My Mind” (video posted here), and album-centerpiece “Slow Me Down,” the vibe remains affect by it. Side B has its own stretch in the 12-minute “Cosmic Cigar (Oumuamua),” and sandwiched between the three-minute stomper “Half Thompson” and the acoustic, harmonized grunge-blues closer “River of a Ghost,” it seems that what Daily Thompson held back about the LP is no less powerful than what they revealed. It’s still a party, it’s just a party where every room has something different happening.

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The White Swan, Nocturnal Transmission

The White Swan Nocturnal Transmission

Following up 2018’s Touch Taste Destroy (review here), Ontario’s The White Swan present their fourth EP in Nocturnal Transmission. That’s four EPs, in a row, from 2016-2020. If the trio — which, yes, includes Kittie‘s Mercedes Lander on vocals, drums, guitar and keys — were waiting to figure out their sound before putting out a first full-length, they were there two years ago, if not before. One is left to assume that the focus on short releases is — at least for now — an aesthetic choice. Like its predecessor, Nocturnal Transmission offers three circa-five-minute big-riffers topped with Lander‘s floating melodic vocals. The highlight here is “Purple,” and unlike any of the other The White Swan EPs, this one includes a fourth track in a cover of Tracy Bonham‘s “Tell it to the Sky,” given likewise heft and largesse. I don’t know what’s stopping this band from putting out an album, but I’ll take another EP in the meantime, sure.

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Dungeon Weed, Mind Palace of the Mushroom God

Dungeon Weed Mind Palace of the Mushroom God

A quarantine project of Dmitri Mavra from Skunk and Slow Phase, Dungeon Weed is dug-in stoner idolatry, pure and simple. Mavra, joined by drummer Chris McGrew and backing vocalist Thia Moonbrook, metes out riff after feedback-soaked, march-ready, nod-ready, dirt-toned riff, and it doesn’t matter if it’s the doomier tolling bell of “Sorcerer with the Skull Face” or the tongue-in-cheek hook of “Beholder Gonna Fuck You Up” or the brash sludge that ensues across the aptly-named “Lumbering Hell,” all layered solos and whatnot, the important thing is that by the time “Mind Palace” comes around, you’re either out or you’re in, and once you make that choice there’s no going back on it. Opener “Orcus Immortalis/Vox Mysterium” tells the tale (or part of it, as regards the overarching narrative), and if ever there was a band that could and would make a song called “Black Pudding” sound heavy, well, there’s Dungeon Weed for you. Dungeon Weed, man. Don’t overthink it.

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Forbidden Place Records website

 

Thomas V. Jäger, A Solitary Plan

thomas v jager a solitary plan

The challenge of rendering songcraft in the nude can be a daunting one for someone in a heavy band doing a solo/acoustic release, but it’s a challenge Thomas V. Jäger of Monolord meets with ease on the home-recorded A Solitary Plan, his solo debut. Those familiar with his work in Monolord will recognize some of the effects used on his vocals, but in the much, much quieter context of the seven-song/29-minute solo release — Jäger plays everything except the Mellotron on the leadoff title-track — they lend not only a spaciousness but a feeling of acid folk serenity to “Creature of the Deep” and “It’s Alright,” which follows. Mixed/mastered by Kalle Lilja of LĂĄngfinger, A Solitary Plan is ultimately an exploration on Jäger‘s part of working in this form, but it succeeds in both its most minimal stretches and in the electric-inclusive “The Drone” and “Goodbye” ahead of the buzzing synth-laced closer “The Bitter End.” It would be a surprise if this is the only solo release Jäger ever does, since so much of what takes place throughout feels like a foundation for future work.

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Cavern, Powdered

CAVERN POWDERED

Change has been the modus operandi of Cavern for a while now. They still show some semblance of their post-hardcore roots on their new full-length, Powdered, but having brought in bassist/vocalist Rose Heater in 2018 and sometime between then and now let out of Baltimore for Morgantown, West Virginia, their sonic allegiance to a heavier-ended post-rock comes through more than ever before. Guitarist/synthesist Zach Harkins winds lead lines around Heater‘s bass on “Grey,” and Stephen Schrock‘s drums emphasize tension to coincide, but the fluidity across the 24-minute LP is of a kind that’s genuinely new to the band, and the soul in Heater‘s vocals carries the material to someplace else entirely. A song like “Dove” presents a tonal fullness that the title-track seems just to hint at, but the emphasis here is on dynamic, not on doing one thing only or locking their approach into a single mindset. As Heater‘s debut with them, Powdered finds them refreshed and renewed of purpose.

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Droneroom, …The Other Doesn’t

droneroom the other doesnt

Droneroom is the solo vehicle of guitarist Blake Edward Conley and with …The Other Doesn’t, experiments of varying length and degree of severity are brought to bear. The abiding feel is spacious, lonely and cinematic as one might expect for such guitar-based soundscaping, but “Casual-Lethal Narcissism” and “The Last Time Someone Speaks Your Name” do have some measure of peace to go with their foreboding and troubling atmospherics. An obvious focal point is the 15-minute dronefest “This Circle of Ribs,” which feels more forward and striking than someone of Droneroom‘s surrounding material, but it’s all on a relative scale, and across the board Conley remains a safe social distance away from structural traditionalist. Recorded during Summer 2020, it is an album that conveys the anxiety and paranoia of this year, and while that can be a daunting thing to face in such a way or to let oneself really engage with as a listener — shit, it’s hard enough just living through — one of the functions of good art is to challenge perceptions of what it can be. Worth keeping in mind for “Home Can Be a Frightening Place.”

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Quarterly Review: Hum, Hymn, Atramentus, Zyclops, Kairon; IRSE!, Slow Draw, Might, Brimstone Coven, All Are to Return, Los Acidos

Posted in Reviews on October 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Day three of the Quarterly Review. Always a landmark. Today we hit the halfway point, but don’t pass it yet since I’ve decided to add the sixth day next Monday. So we’ll get to 30 of the total 60 records, and then be past half through tomorrow. Math was never my strong suit. Come to think of it, I wasn’t much for school all around. Work sucked too.

Anyway, if you haven’t found anything to dig yet — and I hope you have; I think the stuff included has been pretty good so far — you can either go back and look again or keep going. Maybe today’s your day. If not, there’s always tomorrow.

Quarterly Review #21-30:

Hum, Inlet

HUM INLET

One has to wonder if, if Hum had it to do over again, they might hold back their first album in 23 years, Inlet, for release sometime when the world isn’t being ravaged by a global pandemic. As it stands, the largesse and melodic wash of the Illinois outfit’s all-growed-up heavy post-rock offers 55 minutes of comfort amid the tumult of the days, and while I won’t profess to having been a fan in the ’90s — their last studio LP was 1997’s Downward is Heavenward, and they sound like they definitely spent some time listening to Pelican since then — the overarching consumption Inlet sets forth in relatively extended tracks like “Desert Rambler” and “The Summoning” and the manner in which the album sets its own backdrop in a floating drone of effects make it an escapist joy. They hold back until closer “Shapeshifter” to go full post-rock, and while there are times at which it can seem unipolar, to listen to the crunching “Step Into You” and “Cloud City” side-by-side unveils more of the scope underlying from the outset of “Waves” onward.

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Hymn, Breach Us

Hymn Breach Us

Oslo’s Hymn answer the outright crush and scathe of their 2017 debut, Perish (review here), with a more developed and lethal attack on their four-song/38-minute follow-up, Breach Us. Though they’re the kind of band who make people who’ve never heard Black Cobra wonder how two people can be so heavy — and the record has plenty of that; “Exit Through Fire”‘s sludgeshuggah chugging walks by and waves — it’s the sense of atmosphere that guitarist/bassist/vocalist Ole Rokseth and drummer Markus Støle bring to the proceedings that make them so engrossing. The opening title-track is also the shortest at 6:25, but as Breach Us moves across “Exit Through Fire,” “Crimson” and especially 14-minute closer “Can I Carry You,” it brings forth the sort of ominous dystopian assault that so many tried and failed to harness in the wake of NeurosisThrough Silver in Blood. Hymn do that and make it theirs in the process.

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Atramentus, Stygian

Atramentus stygian

Carried across with excruciating grace, Atramentus‘ three-part/44-minute debut album, Stygian, probably belongs in a post-Bell Witch category of extreme, crawling death-doom, but from the script of their logo to the dramatic piano accompanying the lurching riffs, gurgles and choral wails of “Stygian I: From Tumultuous Heavens… (Descended Forth the Ceaseless Darkness)” through the five-minute interlude that is “Stygian II: In Ageless Slumber (As I Dream in the Doleful Embrace of the Howling Black Winds)” and into the 23-minute lurchfest that is “Stygian III: Perennial Voyage (Across the Perpetual Planes of Crying Frost and Steel-Eroding Blizzards)” their ultra-morose procession seems to dig further back for primary inspiration, to acts like Skepticism and even earliest Anathema (at least for that logo), and as guttural and tortured as it is as it devolves toward blackened char in its closer, Stygian‘s stretches of melody provide a contrast that gives some semblance of hope amid all the surrounding despair.

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Zyclops, Inheritance of Ash

zyclops inheritance of ash

As it clocks in 27 minutes, the inevitable question about Zyclops‘ debut release, Inheritance of Ash, is whether it’s an EP or an LP. For what it’s worth, my bid is for the latter, and to back my case up I’ll cite the flow between each of its four component tracks. The Austin, Texas, post-metallic four-piece save their most virulent chug and deepest tonal weight for the final two cuts, “Wind” and “Ash,” but the stage is well set in “Ghost” and “Rope” as well, and even when one song falls into silence, the next picks up in complementary fashion. Shades of Isis in “Rope,” Swarm of the Lotus in the more intense moments of “Ash,” and an overarching progressive vibe that feels suited to the Pelagic Records oeuvre, one might think of Zyclops as cerebral despite their protestations otherwise, but at the very least, the push and pull at the end of “Wind” and the stretch-out that comes after the churning first half of “Rope” don’t happen by mistake, and a band making these kinds of turns on their first outing isn’t to be ignored. Also, they’re very, very heavy.

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Kairon; IRSE!, Polysomn

Kairon IRSE Polysomn

It’s all peace and quiet until “Psionic Static” suddenly starts to speed up, and then like the rush into transwarp, Kairon; IRSE!‘s Polysomn finds its bliss by hooking up a cortical node to your left temple and turning your frontal lobe into so much floundering goo, effectively kitchen-sink kraut-ing you into oblivion while gleefully hopping from genre to cosmic genre like they’re being chased by the ghost of space rock past. They’re the ghost of space rock future. While never static, Polysomn does offer some serenity amid all its head-spinning and lobe-melting, be it the hee-hee-now-it’s-trip-hop wash of “An Bat None” or the cinematic vastness that arises in “AltaĂŻr Descends.” Too intelligent to be random noise or just a freakout, the album is nonetheless experimental, and remains committed to that all the way through the shorter “White Flies” and “Polysomn” at the end of the record. You can take it on if you have your EV suit handy, but if you don’t check the intermix ratio, your face is going to blow up. Fair warning. LLAP.

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Slow Draw, Quiet Joy

slow draw quiet joy

The second 2020 offering from Hurst, Texas’ Slow Draw — the one-man outfit of Mark “Derwooka” Kitchens, also of Stone Machine Electric — the four-song Quiet Joy is obviously consciously named. “Tightropes in Tandem” and closer “Sometimes Experiments Fail” offer a sweet, minimal jazziness, building on the hypnotic backwards psych drone of opener “Unexpected Suspect.” In the two-minute penultimate title-track, Kitchens is barely there, and it is as much an emphasis on the quiet space as that in which the music — a late arriving guitar stands out — might otherwise be taking place. At 18 minutes, it is intended to be a breath taken before reimmersing oneself in the unrelenting chaos that surrounds and swirls, and while it’s short, each piece also has something of its own to offer — even when it’s actively nothing — and Slow Draw brims with purpose across this short release. Sometimes experiments fail, sure. Sometimes they work.

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Might, Might

might might

It took all of a week for the married duo of Ana Muhi (vocals, bass) and Sven Missullis (guitars, vocals, drums) to announce Might as their new project following the dissolution of the long-ish-running and far-punkier Deamon’s Child. Might‘s self-titled debut arrives with the significant backing of Exile on Mainstream and earns its place on the label with an atmospheric approach to noise rock that, while it inevitably shares some elements with the preceding band, forays outward into the weight of “Possession” and the acoustic-into-crush “Warlight” and the crush-into-ambience “Flight of Fancy” and the ambience-into-ambience “Mrs. Poise” and so on. From the beginning in “Intoduce Yourself” and the rushing “Pollution of Mind,” it’s clear the recorded-in-quarantine 35-minute/nine-song outing is going to go where it wants to, Muhi and Missullis sharing vocals and urging the listener deeper into doesn’t-quite-sound-like-anything-else post-fuzz heavy rock and sludge. A fun game: try to predict where it’s going, and be wrong.

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Exile on Mainstream website

 

Brimstone Coven, The Woes of a Mortal Earth

brimstone coven the woes of a mortal earth

Following a stint on Metal Blade and self-releasing 2018’s What Was and What Shall Be, West Virginia’s Brimstone Coven issue their second album as a three-piece through Ripple Music, calling to mind a more classic-minded Apostle of Solitude on the finale “Song of Whippoorwill” and finding a balance all the while between keeping their progressions moving forward and establishing a melancholy atmosphere. Some elements feel drawn from the Maryland school of doom — opener the melody and hook of “The Inferno” remind of defunct purveyors Beelzefuzz — but what comes through clearest in these songs is that guitarist/vocalist Corey Roth, bassist/vocalist Andrew D’Cagna and drummer Dave Trik have found their way forward after paring down from a four-piece following 2016’s Black Magic (review here) and the initial steps the last album took. They sound ready for whatever the growth of their craft might bring and execute songs like “When the World is Gone” and the more swinging “Secrets of the Earth” with the utmost class.

Brimstone Coven on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music website

 

All Are to Return, All Are to Return

all are to return all are to return

Take the brutal industrial doom of Author and Punisher and smash it together — presumably in some kind of stainless-steel semi-automated contraption — with the skin-peeling atmosphere and grueling tension of Khanate and you may begin to understand where All Are to Return are coming from on their debut self-titled EP. How they make a song like four-minute centerpiece “Bare Life” feel so consuming is beyond me, but I think being so utterly demolishing helps. It’s not just about the plodding electronic beat, either. There’s some of that in opener “Untrusted” and certainly “The Lie of Fellow Men” has a lumber to go with its bass rumble and NIN-sounding-hopeful guitar, but it’s the overwhelming sense of everything being tainted and cruel that comes through in the space the only-19-minutes-long release creates. Even as closer “Bellum Omnium” chips away at the last remaining vestiges of color, it casts a coherent vision of not only aesthetic purpose for the duo, but of the terrible, all-gone-wrong future in which we seem at times to live.

All Are to Return on Bandcamp

Tartarus Records website

 

Los Acidos, Los Acidos

Los Acidos Los Acidos

I saved this one for last today as a favor to myself. Originally released in 2016, Los Acidos‘ self-titled debut receives a well-deserved second look on vinyl courtesy of Necio Records, and with it comes 40 minutes of full immersion in glorious Argentinian psicodelia, spacious and ’60s-style on “Al Otro Lado” and full of freaky swing on “Blusas” ahead of the almost-shoegaze-until-it-explodes-in-sunshine float of “Perfume Fantasma.” “Paseo” and the penultimate “Espejos” careen with greater intensity, but from the folksy feel that arrives to coincide with the cymbal-crashing roll of “Excentricidad” in its second half to the final boogie payoff in “EmpatĂ­a de Cristal,” the 10-song outing is a joy waiting to be experienced. You’re experienced, right? Have you ever been? Either way, the important thing is that the voyage that, indeed, begins with “Viaje” is worth your time in melody, in craft, in its arrangements, in presence and in the soul that comes through from front to back. The four-piece had a single out in late 2019, but anytime they want to get to work on a follow-up LP, I’ll be waiting.

Los Acidos on Thee Facebooks

Necio Records on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Molasses Barge, Slow Green Thing, Haze Mage & Tombtoker, White Dog, Jupiterian, Experiencia Tibetana, Yanomamo, Mos Eisley Spaceport, Of Wolves, Pimmit Hills

Posted in Reviews on October 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

We roll on with day two of the Fall 2020 Quarterly Review featuring another batch of 10 records en route to 50 by Friday — and actually, I just put together the list for a sixth day, so it’ll be 60 by next Monday. As much as things have been delayed from the pandemic, there’s been plenty to catch up on in the meantime and I find I’m doing a bit of that with some of this stuff today and yesterday. So tacking on another day to the end feels fair enough, and it was way easy to pick 10 more folders off my far-too-crowded desktop and slate them for review. So yeah, 60 records by Monday. I bet I could get to 70 if I wanted. Probably better for my sanity if I don’t. Anyhoozle, more to come. For now…

Quarterly Review #11-20:

Molasses Barge, A Grayer Dawn

molasses barge a grayer dawn

Following up their 2017 self-titled debut issued through Blackseed Records, Pittsburgh-based rockers Molasses Barge present A Grayer Dawn through Argonauta, and indeed, in songs like “Holding Patterns” or the melancholy “Control Letting Go,” it is a somewhat moodier offering than its predecessor. But also more focused. Molasses Barge, in songs like stomping opener “The Snake” and its swing-happy successor “Desert Discord,” and in the later lumber of “Black Wings Unfurl” and push of the title-track, reside at an intersection of microgenres, with classic heavy rock and doom and modern tonality and production giving them an edge in terms of overarching heft in their low end. Riffs are choice throughout from guitarists Justin Gizzi and Barry Mull, vocalist Brian “Butch” Balich (Argus, ex-Penance, etc.) sounds powerful as ever, and the rhythm section of bassist Amy Bianco and drummer Wayne Massey lock in a succession of grooves that find welcome one after the other until the final “Reprise” fades to close the album. Its individuality is deceptive, but try to fit Molasses Barge neatly in one category or the other and they’ll stand out more than it might at first seem.

Molasses Barge on Thee Facebooks

Argonauta Records website

 

Slow Green Thing, Amygdala

slow-green-thing_amygdala-2000

Yes, this. Slow Green Thing‘s third album, Amygdala, is melodic without being overbearing and filled out with a consuming depth and warmth of tone. A less jammy, more solo-prone Sungrazer comes to mind; that kind of blend of laid back vocals and heavy psychedelic impulse. But the Dresden four-piece have their own solidified, nodding grooves to unveil as well, tapping into modern stoner with two guitars setting their fuzz to maximum density and Sven Weise‘s voice largely floating overtop, echo added to give even more a sense of largesse and space to the proceedings, which to be sure have plenty of both. The six-track/44-minute outing picks up some speed in “Dirty Thoughts” at the outset of side B, and brings a fair bit of crush to the title-track earlier and lead-laced finale “Love to My Enemy,” but in “Dreamland,” they mellow and stretch out the drift and the effect is welcome and not at all out of place beside the massive sprawl conjured in side A capper “All I Want.” And actually, that same phrase — “all I want” — covers a good portion of my opinion on the band’s sound.

Slow Green Thing on Thee Facebooks

Fuzzmatazz Records website

 

Haze Mage & Tombtoker, Split

Haze Mage Tombtoker Split

Anyone bemoaning the state of traditionalist doom metal would do well to get their pants kick’d by Haze Mage, and when that’s done, it’s time to let the stoned zombie sludge of Tombtoker rip your arms off and devour what’s left. The two Baltimorean five-pieces make a righteously odd pairing, but they’ve shared the stage at Grim Reefer Fest in Charm City, and what they have most in common is a conviction of approach that comes through on each half of the four-song/19-minute offering, with Haze Mage shooting forth with “Sleepers” and the semi-NWOBHM “Pit Fighter,” metal, classic prog and heavy rock coming together with a vital energy that is immediately and purposefully contradicted in Tombtoker‘s played-fast-but-is-so-heavy-it-still-sounds-slow “Braise the Dead” and “Botched Bastard,” both of which find a way to be a ton of fun while also being unspeakably brutal and pushing the line between sludge and death metal in a way that would do Six Feet Under proud. Horns and bongs all around, then.

Haze Mage on Thee Facebooks

Tombtoker on Thee Facebooks

 

White Dog, White Dog

white dog white dog

Oldschool newcomers White Dog earn an automatic look by releasing their self-titled debut through former Cathedral frontman Lee Dorrian‘s Rise Above Records, but it’s the band’s clearcut vintage aesthetic that holds the listener’s attention. With proto-metal established as an aesthetic of its own going on 20 years now, White Dog aren’t the first by any means to tread this ground, but especially for an American band, they bring a sincerity of swing and soul that speaks to the heart of the subgenre’s appeal. “The Lantern” leans back into the groove to tell its tale, while “Abandon Ship” is more upfront in its strut, and “Snapdragon” and opener “Sawtooth” underscore their boogie with subtle progressive nods. Closing duo “Pale Horse” and “Verus Cultus” might be enough to make one recall it was Rise Above that issued Witchcraft‘s self-titled, but in the shuffle of “Crystal Panther,” and really across the whole LP White Dog make the classic ideology theirs and offer material of eminent repeat listenability.

White Dog on Thee Facebooks

Rise Above Records website

 

Jupiterian, Protosapien

jupiterian protosapien

The only thing that might save you from being swallowed entirely by the deathly mire Brazil’s Jupiterian craft on their third full-length, Protosapien, is the fact that the album is only 35 minutes long. That’s about right for the robe-clad purveyors of tonal violence — 2017’s Terraforming (review here) and 2015’s Aphotic (review here) weren’t much longer — and rest assured, it’s plenty of time for the band to squeeze the juice out of your soul and make you watch while they drink it out of some need-two-hands-to-hold-it ceremonial goblet. Their approach has grown more methodical over the years, and all the deadlier for that, and the deeper one pushes into Protosapien — into “Capricorn,” “Starless” and “Earthling Bloodline” at the end of the record — the less likely any kind of cosmic salvation feels. I’d say you’ve been warned, but really, this is just scratching the surface of the trenches into which Jupiterian plunge.

Jupiterian on Thee Facebooks

Transcending Obscurity Records on Bandcamp

 

Experiencia Tibetana, Vol. I

Experiencia Tibetana Vol I

It’s an archival release, recorded in 2014 and 2015 by the Buenos Aires-based band, but all that really does for the three-song/hour-long Vol. I is make me wonder what the hell Experiencia Tibetana have been up to since and why Vols. II and III are nowhere to be found. The heavy psych trio aren’t necessarily inventing anything on this debut full-length, but the way “Beirut” (18:36) is peppered with memorable guitar figures amid its echo-drifting vocals, and the meditation tucked into the last few minutes of the 26:56 centerpiece “Espalda de Elefante” and the shift in persona to subdued progressive psych on “Desatormentandonos” (14:16) with the bass seeming to take the improvisational lead as guitar lines hold the central progression together, all of it is a compelling argument for one to pester for a follow-up. It may be an unmanageable runtime, but for the come-with-us sense of voyage it carries, Vol. I adapts the listener’s mindset to its exploratory purposes, and proves to be well worth the trip.

Experiencia Tibetana on Thee Facebooks

Experiencia Tibetana on Bandcamp

 

Yanomamo, No Sympathy for a Rat

yanomamo no sympathy for a rat

Filth-encrusted and lumbering, Yanomamo‘s sludge takes Church of Misery-style groove and pummels it outright on the opening title-track of their four-song No Sympathy for a Rat EP. Like distilled disillusion, the scream-laced answer to the Sydney four-piece’s 2017 debut, Neither Man Nor Beast, arrives throwing elbows at your temples and through “The Offering,” the wait-is-this-grindcore-well-kinda-in-this-part “Miasma” and the suitably destructive “Iron Crown,” the only letup they allow is topped with feedback. Get in, kill, get out. They have more bounce than Bongzilla but still dig into some of Thou‘s more extreme vibe, but whatever you might want to compare them to, it doesn’t matter: Yanomamo‘s unleashed assault leaves bruises all its own, and the harsher it gets, the nastier it gets, the better. Can’t take it? Can’t hang? Fine. Stand there and be run over — I don’t think it makes a difference to the band one way or the other.

Yanomamo on Thee Facebooks

Iommium Records on Bandcamp

 

Mos Eisley Spaceport, The Best of Their Early Year

mos eisley spaceport the best of their early year

They mean the title literally — “early year.” Bremen, Germany’s Mos Eisley Spaceport — who so smoothly shift between space rock and classic boogie on “Further When I’m Far” and brash tempo changes en route to a final jam-out on “Mojo Filter,” finally unveiling the Star Wars sample at the head of organ-inclusive centerpiece “Space Shift” only to bring early Fu Manchu-style raw fuzz on “Drop Out” and finish with the twanging acoustic and pedal steel of “My Bicycle Won’t Fly” — have been a band for less than a full 12 months. Thus, The Best of Their Early Year signals some of its own progressive mindset and more playful aspects, but it is nonetheless a formidable accomplishment for a new band finding their way. They lay out numerous paths, if you couldn’t tell by the run-on sentence above, and I won’t hazard a guess as to where they’ll end up sound-wise, but they have a fervent sense of creative will that comes through in this material and one only hopes they hold onto whatever impulse it is that causes them to break out the gong on “Space Shift,” because it’s that sense of anything-as-long-as-it-works that’s going to continue to distinguish them.

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Thee Facebooks

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Bandcamp

 

Of Wolves, Balance

of wolves balance

One doesn’t often hear “the Wolfowitz Doctrine” brought out in lyrics these days, but Chicago heavy noise metallers Of Wolves aren’t shy about… well, anything. With volume inherent in the sound no matter how loud you’re actually hearing it, conveyed through weighted tones, shouts of progressions unified in intensity but varied in aggression and actual approach, the three-piece take an unashamed stance on a range of issues from the last two decades of war to trying to put themselves into the head of a mass shooter. The lyrics across their sophomore outing, Balance, are worth digging into for someone willing to take them on, but even without, the aggro mosh-stomp of “Maker” makes its point ahead of the 17-second “Flavor of the Weak” before Of Wolves dive into more progressively-structured fare on the title-track and “Clear Cutting/Bloodshed/Heart to Hand.” After “Killing Spree” and the aural-WTF that is “Inside (Steve’s Head),” they finish with a sludgecore take on the Misfits‘ “Die, Die My Darling,” which as it turns out was exactly what was missing up to that point.

Of Wolves on Thee Facebooks

Trepanation Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Pimmit Hills, Heathens & Prophets

Pimmit Hills Heathens Prophets

Comprised of four-fifths of what was Virginian outfit King Giant, it’s hard to know whether to consider Pimmit Hills a new band or a name-change, or what, but the first offering from vocalist David Hammerly, guitarist Todd “TI” Ingram, bassist Floyd Lee Walters III and drummer Brooks, titled Heathens & Prophets and self-released, hits with a bit of a bluesier feel than did the prior outfit, leaving plenty of room for jamming in each track and even going so far as to bring producer J. Robbins in on keys throughout the four-song/29-minute release. I suppose you could call it an EP or an LP — or a demo? — if so inclined, but any way you cut it, Heathens & Prophets plainly benefits from the band’s experience playing together, and they find a more rocking, less moody vibe in “Baby Blue Eyes” and the harmonica-laced “Beautiful Sadness” that has a feel as classic in substance as it is modern in sound and that is both Southern but refusing to bow entirely to clichĂ©.

Pimmit Hills on Thee Facebooks

Pimmit Hills on Bandcamp

 

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Desert Tree House Release Cactus Eater LP

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 30th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

desert tree house

Playing out across four extended tracks, the debut full-length Cactus Eater by Freiburg, Germany, desert-fuzz duo Desert Tree House was first released digitally by the band in June 2019. That’s about a year after Alpha and Pedro (the latter also of Deaf Proof) got together and started jamming, so yeah, they made pretty good time coming up with circa 45 minutes of material for the record. Safe to assume they had a pretty good idea of what they were going for, and the guitar-and-drum rawness conveys the spirit of their desert rock homage pretty smoothly, and as I apparently missed it the first time around, I’m glad to have caught wind of their doings via the news of the Cactus Eater vinyl release today through Clostridium Records.

For the converted, there’s little to argue with, and if you’re looking for some trippy groove to wander along with, the ebbs and flows of “Blue Sun Overdrive” do quite nicely. I’m not gonna say they’re changing the world — or trying to for that matter — but on a by-genre-for-genre level, they’ll get knowing heads nodding.

Stream’s at the bottom of the post if you want to check it out before you chase down a platter:

desert tree house cactus eater

Desert Tree House – Cactus Eater LP

Desert Tree House is Alpha (guitars) and Pedro (drums), an instrumental Stoner Rock duo from Freiburg (GER) delivering songs ranging from doom to psychedelic and onward toward more progressive elements.

CLOSTRIDIUM RECORDS released their kick-ass debut on vinyl on 30.09.20. As DIE HARD “Sunrise Skytrip” edition in transparent and black with red and white splatter (incl. exklusive CACTUS EATER THE VOCAL SESSIONS CD feat Anti Man (Vocals LOA RIDE) & Isa (Vocals SOUND OF SMOKE), download code, poster and beer mat) or in classic black (incl. download code and beer mat).

This gorgeous LP treatment will maximize the enjoyment of listening to CACTUS EATER!

Desert Tree House is Alpha on guitar and Pedro on drums, an instrumental Stoner Rock duo from Freiburg, Germany, founded in mid 2018.

For these two men, it is all about the music, any fan of the Stoner style will thoroughly enjoy their brand of music as their debut CACTUS EATER with four songs, most of them running over 10 minutes, delivers catchy melodies and Psychedelica in a Truckfighters Style (“Cactus Eater”), a really heavy, doomy stonergroove like Kyuss did (“Cyancali Desert”), straight-forward rocking (“Dry Valley”) or bluesy and progressive stuff (“Blue Sun Overdrive”). And it’s not a simple citation or an arbitrary mixture, it’s a unique sound, it is pure riff worshipping for mind and soul!

Alpha also plays in Zim Zum Crash for years and Pedro is part of the Psychedelic Stoner band Deaf Proof founded in 2006 and of Heavy Water Cult (Alternative Stoner), which started 2016. They are also the founding members of the four-piece Doom band Brocken which has been around since 2017.

Their thorough and methodic approach to their music helped the two men move quickly from their initial session right onto the stage in June, and their efforts were quickly rewarded as they soon were opening for bands like Elder from the States, the Great Machine from Israel, the Re-Stoned from Russia, or even one of Germany’s own Stoner stalwarts: Rotor.

https://deserttreehouse.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/deserttreehouse/
https://www.facebook.com/clostridiumrecords/
http://www.clostridiumrecords.com/

Desert Tree House, Cactus Eater (2019)

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Mindcrawler: Lost Orbiter Vinyl Due Nov. 6

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 29th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Not really much of a surprise that someone picked up Mindcrawler‘s debut long-player, Lost Orbiter (review here), for release. Melodic, full-toned and ready for all the nodding-along you can handle and then some, the outing hit in February digitally, and that was just early enough to catch ears in and beyond the band’s native Germany before the entire year came crashing down. They were slated to appear at Keep it Low in their hometown of Munich next month, which of course would’ve opened doors at Sound of Liberation for them as they proceeded forward, but like everything else, their momentum in terms of live performances has been pushed back a year.

Still, the record rules, and Sound Effect Records in Greece makes a fitting home for the LP edition which is out Nov. 6. Preorders are up if that’s your thing, and there are two editions available. Not telling you how to spend your money, but I will casually advise you to — if you missed it earlier this year — to at least take a few minutes to dig into the stream of the album at the bottom of this post. Weaving into and out of instrumentalism, it’s one of my favorite debuts of 2020.

Info from the label:

mindcrawler lost orbiter

MINDCRAWLER – Lost Orbiter LP – Nov. 6

Preorder: https://www.soundeffect-records.gr/lost-orbiter

Past the Tannhäuser Gate, through the vortex of black holes and back to the dust of the Death Valley. Mindcrawler know the most remote places like the back of their hands. Since 2017 this space vehicle from the outskirts of Munich navigates the orbit of Bavaria’s Live Clubs and leaves only shattered stages behind wherever it goes. The four-piece band offers a mix of Space Rock, Stoner, Doom and Psych.

They pay tribute to the giants of Desert Rock while adding their own vision with transcendental meditation and riffs inspired by Punk and Metal. As of 2020 their transmission into the farthest regions of space and back has become even louder with the release of their highly acclaimed debut record “Lost Orbiter”.

This labor of love consists of six stunning tracks meticulously prepared to melt faces and start the engines for overdrive. As the current pandemic on planet Earth makes repeated listens within the confines of your own house all the more mandatory, Mindcrawler and Sound-Effect Records are proud to capture “Lost Orbiter” on mind boggling splatter-colored vinyl for the very first time. Fasten your seatbelts, dust off your moonboots and engage with one of this year’s biggest surprises within the realms of hard hitting Space infused Stoner Rock.

Lost Orbiter will be available through Soundeffect-Records with a limited run of 250 black vinyl and 150 limited splattered orange vinyl, each one will include a download code.

Mindcrawler are:
Joe – guitar|vocals
Helge – guitar
Tom – bass
Johannes – drums

http://www.facebook.com/Mindcrawler/
https://www.instagram.com/mindcrawler.band/
https://mindcrawler.bandcamp.com/
http://www.motljud.com/
https://www.soundeffect-records.gr/

Mindcrawler, Lost Orbiter (2020)

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Madrigal Posts “Eclipse” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

madrigal (Photo by Sulphorous Visions)

Guitarist Julia Gaeta (Restless Ghosts, ex-Albez Duz) takes on immersive soundscaping with her Madrigal project. I’ll confess that I had to look up the word “tenebrism” to get a better idea of the stated sound she’s going for — she calls it “guitar tenebrism” — and to save you the trouble unless you took more art classes than I apparently did, it’s like chiaroscuro but with higher contrasts between light and dark. More intense. Based in Berlin, Gaeta began posting singles under the Madrigal banner last Spring and through YouTube, put up four songs between May and July 2019.

That was before Restless Ghosts released their self-titled debut EP in August with Gaeta handling vocals and all instruments save drums, which were performed by Sara Neidorf (Mellowdeath), and since then, Madrigal has been silent, but the new song “Eclipsed” finds Gaeta departing the studio setting and self-filmed feel of the prior clips for the great outdoors. Working with director David Fitt, who has helmed videos for Hexvessel, Grave Pleasures and Death Alley, among others, Gaeta brings “Eclipsed” to life in a context that suitably plays between light and dark: an open field at what would seem to be dusk with a chunk missing out of the moon far back in the distance. I don’t know if it was an actual eclipse or when the video was filmed, but you get that impression anyway, and atmosphere has a big role to play with Madrigal generally, so it fits.

The solo outfit is a departure from the goth-tinged cultism of Restless Ghosts, but the ambience in the “Eclipsed” video is meditative and more than slightly wistful, so not completely out of whack either. Check it out and see what you think. Gaeta gives a quote below. My favorite part is where she says she doesn’t know where the project’s heading. I look forward to finding out.

Please enjoy:

Madrigal, “Eclipsed” official video

Julia Gaeta on “Eclipsed”:

Madrigal is a project that explores the depths and lushness of guitar sounds. It’s about straddling the darkness and light in both sound and visuals. Even though the compositions are pretty different from one another, I always try to evoke feelings that live in an “in-between”, twilight space. Now more than ever, it’s cathartic to escape to somewhere else, and I tend to do this when creating Madrigal songs. I hope that the end result helps others do the same.

“Eclipsed” is kind of a send-off for a heavy summer and a welcome to the decay of fall. All my previous songs have been DIY, with me doing audio and video recording, and it’s been so great to involve filmmaker David Fitt (Grave Pleasures, King Dude, Death Alley, Perturbator) who is helping to bring these worlds to life in a bigger way.

There’s a lot more to come. I think Madrigal is more of an experiment than anything else, because I don’t know how it will evolve. It’s just really nice to be able to release music in a more unconventional way.

Madrigal on Thee Facebooks

Madrigal on Instagram

Madrigal on YouTube

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