Quarterly Review: Emma Ruth Rundle & Thou, Spaceslug, Malsten, Sun Crow, Honeybadger, Monte Luna, Hombrehumano, Veljet, Witchrider, Devil Worshipper

Posted in Reviews on December 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

New week, same Quarterly Review. Today is the next-to-last round for this time, though once again, I look at the folders of albums on my desktop and the CDs and LPs that have come in and I realize it could easily go longer. I never really caught up from the last QR. I guess it’s been that kind of year. In any case, more good stuff today, so sit tight and enjoy. If you didn’t find anything last week that stuck out to you, maybe today’s your day.

Quarterly Review #51-60:

Emma Ruth Rundle & Thou, May Our Chambers Be Full

emma ruth rundle thou may our chambers be full

Sure, there’s poise and plunder amid torrents of emotion and weighted tonality, but what’s really astonishing about Professional Speech Writers Prepare to the success of the writer’s production and your speech presentation. Bennington College Mfa Creative Writing and May Our Chambers Be Full, the first collaboration between Louisville’s When you buy essay from our writing service, you get your essays written on excellent topics. The experts go through various websites, blog posts and newspapers to choose a trending topic. Well-formatted Essays. Your essays will be accurately formatted, when you my review here help from us. The scholars create separate paragraphs, and they write catchy thesis statements. Proofreading. We Emma Ruth Rundle ( Economics Essay Writing Writing Service You Can Rely On. Finding reliable, custom dissertation writing services is not a simple task. You have to ensure that the custom dissertation writers you entrust with your project are responsible and will follow your instructions to the latter. Our goal is provide high-quality custom dissertations at competitive process. Are you interested in knowing how we Red Sparowes‘ third LP, the Students usually place their ‘Admission Essay Writing 6’ requests with a good amount of caution, and whowould blame them? It’s pretty difficult to trust a stranger with a paper as important as an admission essay, or even a dissertation on which your whole academic past and future is pivoted. We don’t think of ourselves as the best essay writing service in vain. We offer a variety of benefits that Nocturnes, However, others take a different course of action and purchase their dissertation from a professional writing agency like ours. When you http://www.jspe.de/fileadmin/?essays-on-huckleberry-finn from us, you get a great dissertation paper. To buy a custom paper on such conditions sounds like a good deal, doesn't it? It certainly does, especially if you consider the time and effort you'll have to invest in completing this assignment. This is one of the most important and complicated tasks that college and university students face in Marriages, etc.) and New Orleans’ sludgers High-quality English Beauty Salon Business Plan Frees by PhDs available 24/7 with same-day delivery option. Enago provides medical proofreading, scientific Thou is that it feels so much more substantial than its 36 minutes. That’s not to say it drags, though it does when it wants to in terms of tempo, but just that its impact both in songs where how to do my assignments online College Admission Essay On Leadership Online essays about ambition the pianist essay help Rundle and Tech Writer Today article that defines technical writing, introduces key concepts and provides guidance for Buy An Essay For Universitys starting their careers. Thou‘s support@theessayassignmenthelp.com; Contact Us. Services. Dissertation Writing Help. Help Me Write My Book Report Bryan Funck trade off like “Ancestral Recall” or when they come together as on opener “Killing Floor” is such that it feels longer. Atmosphere is certainly a factor, but To write an effective essay, you need to create a clear and well organized essay outline. Your outline will shape the entire content of your essay and will determine how successful your essay will be. To make http://fizmatika.lt/business-plan-buy-to-let/ outline easier give this article a thorough read. May Our Chambers Be Full is so striking because of its blend of extremity and melody, emotion and sheer catharsis, and the breadth that seems to accompany its consuming crush. In a couple years, there are going to be an awful lot of bands putting out debut albums that sound very much like this. Follow-up EP out soon.

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Thou on Instagram

Sacred Bones Records website

 

Spaceslug, Leftovers

spaceslug leftovers

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Spaceslug on Bandcamp

 

Malsten, The Haunting of SilvÄkra Mill

malsten The Haunting of Silvakra Mill

Malmö-based four-piece Malsten make their full-length debut on Interstellar Smoke Records with the four-song/44-minute The Haunting of SilvĂ„kra Mill, and in so doing show an immediate command of post-Pallbearer spaciousness and melodic-doom traditionalism. Their lumber is prevalent and engrossing tonally on opener “Torsion” (10:36), uses silence effectively on “Immolation” (10:24), and seems to find a place between Warning and Lord Vicar on “Grinder” (9:02) ahead of the epic-on-top-of-epics summary in closer “Compunction” (13:54), which finds Malsten having reserved another level of heavy to keep as their final statement. So be it. Very heavy and worthy of as much volume as you can give it, The Haunting of SilvĂ„kra Mill is an accomplished beginning and heralds significant potential on the part of what’s to come from Malsten. I’d watch this band do a live stream playing this record front-to-back. Just saying.

Malsten on Thee Facebooks

Interstellar Smoke Records webstore

 

Sun Crow, Quest for Oblivion

Sun Crow Quest for Oblivion

A significant undertaking of progressive heavy and noise rock, Sun Crow‘s Quest for Oblivion is among the most ambitious debut albums I’ve heard in 2020, but there’s nothing it sets for itself in terms of goals that it doesn’t accomplish, as vocalist Charles Wilson flips between clean melodies and effective screams atop the riffs of guitarist Ben Nechanicky, the bass of Brian Steel and Keith Hastreiter‘s drums. Somebody’s gonna sign these guys. Even at 70 minutes, Quest for Oblivion, from its post-apocalyptic standpoint, aesthetic cohesion, fluid songcraft and accomplished performance, is simply too good to leave without a proper 2LP release. Individualized in atmosphere though working with familiar-enough elements, it is an album that makes it joyously difficult to pick apart influences, unleashing an initial burst of four longer tracks before giving way (albeit momentarily) to “Fear” and the outlying, brazenly Motörheady “Nothing Behind” before returning to cosmic heavy in “Hypersonic” and the 11-minute “Titans,” which uses its time just as well as everything else that surrounds. Ironic that a record that seems to be about a wasteland should bring so much hope for the future.

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Sun Crow on Bandcamp

 

Honeybadger, Pleasure Delayer

honeybadger pleasure delayer

It doesn’t take Honeybadger long to land their first effective punch on their debut LP, Pleasure Delayer, as the hook of opener/longest track (immediate points) “The Wolf” hits square on the jaw and precedes an atmospheric guitar outro that leads into the rest of the album as a closer might otherwise lead the way out. A product of Athens’ heavy rock boom, the four-piece distinguish themselves in fuzzy tones and an approach that comes right to the edge of burl and doesn’t quite tip over, thankfully and gracefully staving off chestbeating in favor of quality songcraft on “The Well” and the engagingly bass-led “Crazy Ride,” from which the initially slower, bluesier “Good for Nothing” picks up with some Truckfighters, some 1000mods and a whole lot of fun. Side B’s hooks are no less satisfyingly straightforward. “That Feel” feels born for the stage, while “Laura Palmer” makes a memorable chorus out of that Twin Peaks character’s slaying, the penultimate “Holler” feels indeed like the work of a band trying to stand themselves out from a crowded pack and “Truth in the Lie” caps mirroring the energy of “Good for Nothing” but resounding in a cold finish. Efficient, hooky, smoothly executed. There’s nothing one might reasonably ask of Pleasure Delayer that it doesn’t deliver.

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Honeybadger on Bandcamp

 

Monte Luna, Mind Control Broadcast

monte luna mind control broadcast

Released name-your-price as a benefit for the venue The Lost Well in Monte Luna‘s hometown of Austin and derived from a CvltNation-sponsored livestream, the three-song Mind Control Broadcast follows 2019’s Drowners’ Wives (review here) and is intended as a glimpse at their impending third LP, likely due in 2021. That record will be one to look forward to, but it’ll be hard to trade out the raw bludgeon of “Blackstar” — the leadoff here — for another, maybe-not-live-recorded version. True, the setting doesn’t necessarily allow for the band to bring in guests like they did last time around or to flesh out melodies in the same way, but the sound is brash and thrilling and lets “Rust Goliath” live up to its name in largesse, while saving its nastiest for last in “Fear the Sun,” the glorious bassline of which it feels like a spoiler even mentioning for someone who hasn’t heard it yet. 22 of the sludgiest minutes you’re likely to spend today.

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Monte Luna BigCartel store

 

Hombrehumano, Crepuscular

hombrehumano crepuscular

As satisfying as the laid-back-heavy desert rock flow of “Rolito” is, and as well done as what surrounds on Hombrehumano‘s 2019 debut album, Crepuscular, turns out to be in its 53-minute run, it’s in the longer pieces like the Western “Puerto Gris” or the post-Brant Bjork “Metamorfosis” that they really shine. That’s not to take away from the opening instrumental “Nomada” that establishes the tones and sets the atmosphere in which the rest of the record takes place, or the nod of “Primaveras de Olvido,” and certainly the fuzz-boogie and percussion of “Ouroboro” shine in a manner worthy of being depicted on the cover, but the Argentinian four-piece do well with the extra time to flesh out their material. But, either way you go, you go. Hombrehumano craft sweet fuzz and spaciousness on “Puerto Gris” and answer it back later in “Zombakice” and add twists of percussion and acoustics and vocal effects — never mind the birdsong — on closer “Del Ensueño.” Es un ejemplo mĂĄs de lo que le falta a la cultura gringo al no adorar fuertemente a los sudamericanos.

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Hombrehumano on Bandcamp

 

Veljet, Viva El Diablo

veljet viva el diablo

Even my non-Spanish-speaking ass can translate Viva el Diablo, the title of Mexican instrumentalist three-piece Veljet‘s debut album. Initially released by the band in March 2020, it was subsequently reissued for physical pressing with a seventh track, “Leviatan,” added, bringing the runtime to a vinyl-ready 37 minutes. The apparently-devil-worshiping title-cut is still the longest at a doomly eight minutes, but though the production is fairly raw, Veljet‘s material taps into a few different impulses within the heavy rock sphere, offsetting willfully repetitive riffing in “El DĂ­a de las Manos” with scorching solo work while “Jay Adams” — presumably named in homage to the Dogtown skater — pulls some trad-metal riffing into its second half. “Cutlass” is short at 2:36, but makes the record as a whole feel less predictable for that, and the add-on “Leviatan” embodies its great sea beast with a nod up front that opens to later cacophony. The vibe throughout is you’re-in-the-room live jams, and Veljet have well enough chemistry to carry the songs across in that setting.

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The Swamp Records website

 

Witchrider, Electrical Storm

witchrider electrical storm

Smoothly produced and executed, not lacking energy but produced for a very studio-style fullness, Witchrider‘s second LP arrives via Fuzzorama Records in answer to 2014’s Unmountable Stairs with a pro-shop feel for its 50-minute duration. Songs are sharply hooked and energetic, beefing up Queens of the Stone Age-style desert rock early on “Shadows” and “You Lied” before the guitars introduce a broader palette with the title-track. The chorus of “Mess Creator” and the big finish in closer “The Weatherman” are highlights, but songs like “Keep Me out of It” and “Come Back” feel built for a commercial infrastructure that — at least in radio-free America — doesn’t exist anymore. I’m not sure what it takes to attract the attention of picky algorithms, but if it’s grounded songwriting, varied material and crisp performance like it was when there was a cable channel playing music videos, then Witchrider are ready to roll. As it stands, the Austrian outfit seem underserved by the inability to even get on a festival stage and play this material live to win converts in that manner. They’re hardly alone in that, but with material that seems so poised specifically toward audience engagement, it comes through all the more, which of course is a testament to the quality of the work itself.

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Fuzzorama Records website

 

Devil Worshipper, 3

devil worshipper 3

Opening with its longest track (immediate points) in the 10-minute “Silver Dagger” and presented with the burning red eyes of Christopher Lee’s Dracula on the front, the 33-minute 3 tape from Seattle’s Devil Worshipper maintains the weirdo-experimental spirit of the outfit’s 2015 self-titled debut (review here), finding a kind of Butthole Surfers-into-a-cassette-recorder, anything-goes-until-it-sucks, dark ’90s psychedelia they call “garage metal.” Fair enough. Apparently more efficient than anything I can come up with for it, though what doesn’t necessarily account for is the way the 3 challenges the listener, the remastered versions of “Into Radiation Wave” and “Chem Rails” from the first album, or the horror atmospherics of “Drinking Blood.” It’s like it’s too weird for this planet so it finally made one for itself. Well earned.

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Puppy Mill Recordings on Bandcamp

 

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Cortége Sign to Desert Records for Chasing Daylight EP

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

cortege

Austin, Texas, heavy Americana soundscapers CortĂ©ge have signed to Desert Records to release their recently-recorded Chasing Daylight EP. As hinted below, the band will also appear on the label’s split series Legends of the Desert, the first volume of which boasted Lord Buffalo and Palehorse/Palerider; part of the label’s ongoing effort to expand the definition of “desert” aesthetic to something beyond simple geography.

In that, the duo are nothing if not a fit, their 2019 Capricorn LP (discussed here) finding ground between heavy atmospheric rock and purposefully cast expanse, a progressive sense of arrangement doing little to take away from the ability to convey something big and seemingly empty while teeming with life close to the ground. You can hear that record below and see the art for Chasing Daylight here, along with the label’s announcement.

The bottom line is yeah, this one makes sense. So let it make sense:

CORTEGE CHASING DAYLIGHT

CortĂ©ge, the Austin based post-western, heavy ambient Doom duo will be releasing their new EP “Chasing Daylight” via Desert Records on Feb. 26th.

The band is self-described as “If Earth and Pink Floyd teamed up and did a soundtrack to a David Lynch film”.

From Desert Records: “This collaboration has been under wraps for over a year now. I saw these guys open for Mdou Moctar at Sister Bar in Albuquerque and instantly knew they were perfect for the label. This is just the beginning…The Raven whispered in my ear that Cortege will be on a future volume of some compilation that has to do with Legends or Deserts or something…”

FROM THE DUO: “We couldn’t possibly be more pleased to announce our formal partnership with Albuquerque, New Mexico-based Desert Records, for both the release of the forthcoming Chasing Daylight EP and yet to be revealed future endeavors. In procuring an impressively diverse and uniquely curated armada of heavy, droning talent across the country, Brad and his team have carved a deep etching in the independent label sphere and we’re proud to say many of our new label mates we already count among friends. And so, from an otherwise dismal year, hope springs eternal. Mark your calendars for the release of our first collaboration together; a cascading, hypnotic post western epic taken to the edge of the sunrise. Chasing Daylight out 2/26/2021”.

According to the band: “we’re very excited and even with preemptively dry mixes, this little release is truly dramatic and we can’t wait for you to hear it. It’s part of a larger concept but it towers on its own two legs, our portrait du temps to the end of the world.”

Cortége is:
Mike Swarbrick – Bass Guitar, Synthesizers, Percussion & Tape Delay
Adrian Voorhies (ex Canyon of the Skull, ex Humut Tabal) – Drums

cortege.bandcamp.com/
facebook.com/cortegeatx/
instagram.com/cortegeatx/
https://www.facebook.com/desertrecordslabel/
https://desertrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://desertrecords.bigcartel.com/

Cortége, Capricorn (2019)

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Quarterly Review: Hum, Hymn, Atramentus, Zyclops, Kairon; IRSE!, Slow Draw, Might, Brimstone Coven, All Are to Return, Los Acidos

Posted in Reviews on October 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Day three of the Quarterly Review. Always a landmark. Today we hit the halfway point, but don’t pass it yet since I’ve decided to add the sixth day next Monday. So we’ll get to 30 of the total 60 records, and then be past half through tomorrow. Math was never my strong suit. Come to think of it, I wasn’t much for school all around. Work sucked too.

Anyway, if you haven’t found anything to dig yet — and I hope you have; I think the stuff included has been pretty good so far — you can either go back and look again or keep going. Maybe today’s your day. If not, there’s always tomorrow.

Quarterly Review #21-30:

Hum, Inlet

HUM INLET

One has to wonder if, if Hum had it to do over again, they might hold back their first album in 23 years, Inlet, for release sometime when the world isn’t being ravaged by a global pandemic. As it stands, the largesse and melodic wash of the Illinois outfit’s all-growed-up heavy post-rock offers 55 minutes of comfort amid the tumult of the days, and while I won’t profess to having been a fan in the ’90s — their last studio LP was 1997’s Downward is Heavenward, and they sound like they definitely spent some time listening to Pelican since then — the overarching consumption Inlet sets forth in relatively extended tracks like “Desert Rambler” and “The Summoning” and the manner in which the album sets its own backdrop in a floating drone of effects make it an escapist joy. They hold back until closer “Shapeshifter” to go full post-rock, and while there are times at which it can seem unipolar, to listen to the crunching “Step Into You” and “Cloud City” side-by-side unveils more of the scope underlying from the outset of “Waves” onward.

Hum on Thee Facebooks

Polyvinyl Records webstore

 

Hymn, Breach Us

Hymn Breach Us

Oslo’s Hymn answer the outright crush and scathe of their 2017 debut, Perish (review here), with a more developed and lethal attack on their four-song/38-minute follow-up, Breach Us. Though they’re the kind of band who make people who’ve never heard Black Cobra wonder how two people can be so heavy — and the record has plenty of that; “Exit Through Fire”‘s sludgeshuggah chugging walks by and waves — it’s the sense of atmosphere that guitarist/bassist/vocalist Ole Rokseth and drummer Markus StĂžle bring to the proceedings that make them so engrossing. The opening title-track is also the shortest at 6:25, but as Breach Us moves across “Exit Through Fire,” “Crimson” and especially 14-minute closer “Can I Carry You,” it brings forth the sort of ominous dystopian assault that so many tried and failed to harness in the wake of NeurosisThrough Silver in Blood. Hymn do that and make it theirs in the process.

Hymn on Thee Facebooks

Fysisk Format on Bandcamp

 

Atramentus, Stygian

Atramentus stygian

Carried across with excruciating grace, Atramentus‘ three-part/44-minute debut album, Stygian, probably belongs in a post-Bell Witch category of extreme, crawling death-doom, but from the script of their logo to the dramatic piano accompanying the lurching riffs, gurgles and choral wails of “Stygian I: From Tumultuous Heavens
 (Descended Forth the Ceaseless Darkness)” through the five-minute interlude that is “Stygian II: In Ageless Slumber (As I Dream in the Doleful Embrace of the Howling Black Winds)” and into the 23-minute lurchfest that is “Stygian III: Perennial Voyage (Across the Perpetual Planes of Crying Frost and Steel-Eroding Blizzards)” their ultra-morose procession seems to dig further back for primary inspiration, to acts like Skepticism and even earliest Anathema (at least for that logo), and as guttural and tortured as it is as it devolves toward blackened char in its closer, Stygian‘s stretches of melody provide a contrast that gives some semblance of hope amid all the surrounding despair.

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20 Buck Spin webstore

 

Zyclops, Inheritance of Ash

zyclops inheritance of ash

As it clocks in 27 minutes, the inevitable question about Zyclops‘ debut release, Inheritance of Ash, is whether it’s an EP or an LP. For what it’s worth, my bid is for the latter, and to back my case up I’ll cite the flow between each of its four component tracks. The Austin, Texas, post-metallic four-piece save their most virulent chug and deepest tonal weight for the final two cuts, “Wind” and “Ash,” but the stage is well set in “Ghost” and “Rope” as well, and even when one song falls into silence, the next picks up in complementary fashion. Shades of Isis in “Rope,” Swarm of the Lotus in the more intense moments of “Ash,” and an overarching progressive vibe that feels suited to the Pelagic Records oeuvre, one might think of Zyclops as cerebral despite their protestations otherwise, but at the very least, the push and pull at the end of “Wind” and the stretch-out that comes after the churning first half of “Rope” don’t happen by mistake, and a band making these kinds of turns on their first outing isn’t to be ignored. Also, they’re very, very heavy.

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Zyclops on Bandcamp

 

Kairon; IRSE!, Polysomn

Kairon IRSE Polysomn

It’s all peace and quiet until “Psionic Static” suddenly starts to speed up, and then like the rush into transwarp, Kairon; IRSE!‘s Polysomn finds its bliss by hooking up a cortical node to your left temple and turning your frontal lobe into so much floundering goo, effectively kitchen-sink kraut-ing you into oblivion while gleefully hopping from genre to cosmic genre like they’re being chased by the ghost of space rock past. They’re the ghost of space rock future. While never static, Polysomn does offer some serenity amid all its head-spinning and lobe-melting, be it the hee-hee-now-it’s-trip-hop wash of “An Bat None” or the cinematic vastness that arises in “AltaĂŻr Descends.” Too intelligent to be random noise or just a freakout, the album is nonetheless experimental, and remains committed to that all the way through the shorter “White Flies” and “Polysomn” at the end of the record. You can take it on if you have your EV suit handy, but if you don’t check the intermix ratio, your face is going to blow up. Fair warning. LLAP.

Kairon; IRSE! on Thee Facebooks

Svart Records webstore

 

Slow Draw, Quiet Joy

slow draw quiet joy

The second 2020 offering from Hurst, Texas’ Slow Draw — the one-man outfit of Mark “Derwooka” Kitchens, also of Stone Machine Electric — the four-song Quiet Joy is obviously consciously named. “Tightropes in Tandem” and closer “Sometimes Experiments Fail” offer a sweet, minimal jazziness, building on the hypnotic backwards psych drone of opener “Unexpected Suspect.” In the two-minute penultimate title-track, Kitchens is barely there, and it is as much an emphasis on the quiet space as that in which the music — a late arriving guitar stands out — might otherwise be taking place. At 18 minutes, it is intended to be a breath taken before reimmersing oneself in the unrelenting chaos that surrounds and swirls, and while it’s short, each piece also has something of its own to offer — even when it’s actively nothing — and Slow Draw brims with purpose across this short release. Sometimes experiments fail, sure. Sometimes they work.

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Slow Draw on Bandcamp

 

Might, Might

might might

It took all of a week for the married duo of Ana Muhi (vocals, bass) and Sven Missullis (guitars, vocals, drums) to announce Might as their new project following the dissolution of the long-ish-running and far-punkier Deamon’s Child. Might‘s self-titled debut arrives with the significant backing of Exile on Mainstream and earns its place on the label with an atmospheric approach to noise rock that, while it inevitably shares some elements with the preceding band, forays outward into the weight of “Possession” and the acoustic-into-crush “Warlight” and the crush-into-ambience “Flight of Fancy” and the ambience-into-ambience “Mrs. Poise” and so on. From the beginning in “Intoduce Yourself” and the rushing “Pollution of Mind,” it’s clear the recorded-in-quarantine 35-minute/nine-song outing is going to go where it wants to, Muhi and Missullis sharing vocals and urging the listener deeper into doesn’t-quite-sound-like-anything-else post-fuzz heavy rock and sludge. A fun game: try to predict where it’s going, and be wrong.

Might on Thee Facebooks

Exile on Mainstream website

 

Brimstone Coven, The Woes of a Mortal Earth

brimstone coven the woes of a mortal earth

Following a stint on Metal Blade and self-releasing 2018’s What Was and What Shall Be, West Virginia’s Brimstone Coven issue their second album as a three-piece through Ripple Music, calling to mind a more classic-minded Apostle of Solitude on the finale “Song of Whippoorwill” and finding a balance all the while between keeping their progressions moving forward and establishing a melancholy atmosphere. Some elements feel drawn from the Maryland school of doom — opener the melody and hook of “The Inferno” remind of defunct purveyors Beelzefuzz — but what comes through clearest in these songs is that guitarist/vocalist Corey Roth, bassist/vocalist Andrew D’Cagna and drummer Dave Trik have found their way forward after paring down from a four-piece following 2016’s Black Magic (review here) and the initial steps the last album took. They sound ready for whatever the growth of their craft might bring and execute songs like “When the World is Gone” and the more swinging “Secrets of the Earth” with the utmost class.

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Ripple Music website

 

All Are to Return, All Are to Return

all are to return all are to return

Take the brutal industrial doom of Author and Punisher and smash it together — presumably in some kind of stainless-steel semi-automated contraption — with the skin-peeling atmosphere and grueling tension of Khanate and you may begin to understand where All Are to Return are coming from on their debut self-titled EP. How they make a song like four-minute centerpiece “Bare Life” feel so consuming is beyond me, but I think being so utterly demolishing helps. It’s not just about the plodding electronic beat, either. There’s some of that in opener “Untrusted” and certainly “The Lie of Fellow Men” has a lumber to go with its bass rumble and NIN-sounding-hopeful guitar, but it’s the overwhelming sense of everything being tainted and cruel that comes through in the space the only-19-minutes-long release creates. Even as closer “Bellum Omnium” chips away at the last remaining vestiges of color, it casts a coherent vision of not only aesthetic purpose for the duo, but of the terrible, all-gone-wrong future in which we seem at times to live.

All Are to Return on Bandcamp

Tartarus Records website

 

Los Acidos, Los Acidos

Los Acidos Los Acidos

I saved this one for last today as a favor to myself. Originally released in 2016, Los Acidos‘ self-titled debut receives a well-deserved second look on vinyl courtesy of Necio Records, and with it comes 40 minutes of full immersion in glorious Argentinian psicodelia, spacious and ’60s-style on “Al Otro Lado” and full of freaky swing on “Blusas” ahead of the almost-shoegaze-until-it-explodes-in-sunshine float of “Perfume Fantasma.” “Paseo” and the penultimate “Espejos” careen with greater intensity, but from the folksy feel that arrives to coincide with the cymbal-crashing roll of “Excentricidad” in its second half to the final boogie payoff in “EmpatĂ­a de Cristal,” the 10-song outing is a joy waiting to be experienced. You’re experienced, right? Have you ever been? Either way, the important thing is that the voyage that, indeed, begins with “Viaje” is worth your time in melody, in craft, in its arrangements, in presence and in the soul that comes through from front to back. The four-piece had a single out in late 2019, but anytime they want to get to work on a follow-up LP, I’ll be waiting.

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Necio Records on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Molasses Barge, Slow Green Thing, Haze Mage & Tombtoker, White Dog, Jupiterian, Experiencia Tibetana, Yanomamo, Mos Eisley Spaceport, Of Wolves, Pimmit Hills

Posted in Reviews on October 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

We roll on with day two of the Fall 2020 Quarterly Review featuring another batch of 10 records en route to 50 by Friday — and actually, I just put together the list for a sixth day, so it’ll be 60 by next Monday. As much as things have been delayed from the pandemic, there’s been plenty to catch up on in the meantime and I find I’m doing a bit of that with some of this stuff today and yesterday. So tacking on another day to the end feels fair enough, and it was way easy to pick 10 more folders off my far-too-crowded desktop and slate them for review. So yeah, 60 records by Monday. I bet I could get to 70 if I wanted. Probably better for my sanity if I don’t. Anyhoozle, more to come. For now…

Quarterly Review #11-20:

Molasses Barge, A Grayer Dawn

molasses barge a grayer dawn

Following up their 2017 self-titled debut issued through Blackseed Records, Pittsburgh-based rockers Molasses Barge present A Grayer Dawn through Argonauta, and indeed, in songs like “Holding Patterns” or the melancholy “Control Letting Go,” it is a somewhat moodier offering than its predecessor. But also more focused. Molasses Barge, in songs like stomping opener “The Snake” and its swing-happy successor “Desert Discord,” and in the later lumber of “Black Wings Unfurl” and push of the title-track, reside at an intersection of microgenres, with classic heavy rock and doom and modern tonality and production giving them an edge in terms of overarching heft in their low end. Riffs are choice throughout from guitarists Justin Gizzi and Barry Mull, vocalist Brian “Butch” Balich (Argus, ex-Penance, etc.) sounds powerful as ever, and the rhythm section of bassist Amy Bianco and drummer Wayne Massey lock in a succession of grooves that find welcome one after the other until the final “Reprise” fades to close the album. Its individuality is deceptive, but try to fit Molasses Barge neatly in one category or the other and they’ll stand out more than it might at first seem.

Molasses Barge on Thee Facebooks

Argonauta Records website

 

Slow Green Thing, Amygdala

slow-green-thing_amygdala-2000

Yes, this. Slow Green Thing‘s third album, Amygdala, is melodic without being overbearing and filled out with a consuming depth and warmth of tone. A less jammy, more solo-prone Sungrazer comes to mind; that kind of blend of laid back vocals and heavy psychedelic impulse. But the Dresden four-piece have their own solidified, nodding grooves to unveil as well, tapping into modern stoner with two guitars setting their fuzz to maximum density and Sven Weise‘s voice largely floating overtop, echo added to give even more a sense of largesse and space to the proceedings, which to be sure have plenty of both. The six-track/44-minute outing picks up some speed in “Dirty Thoughts” at the outset of side B, and brings a fair bit of crush to the title-track earlier and lead-laced finale “Love to My Enemy,” but in “Dreamland,” they mellow and stretch out the drift and the effect is welcome and not at all out of place beside the massive sprawl conjured in side A capper “All I Want.” And actually, that same phrase — “all I want” — covers a good portion of my opinion on the band’s sound.

Slow Green Thing on Thee Facebooks

Fuzzmatazz Records website

 

Haze Mage & Tombtoker, Split

Haze Mage Tombtoker Split

Anyone bemoaning the state of traditionalist doom metal would do well to get their pants kick’d by Haze Mage, and when that’s done, it’s time to let the stoned zombie sludge of Tombtoker rip your arms off and devour what’s left. The two Baltimorean five-pieces make a righteously odd pairing, but they’ve shared the stage at Grim Reefer Fest in Charm City, and what they have most in common is a conviction of approach that comes through on each half of the four-song/19-minute offering, with Haze Mage shooting forth with “Sleepers” and the semi-NWOBHM “Pit Fighter,” metal, classic prog and heavy rock coming together with a vital energy that is immediately and purposefully contradicted in Tombtoker‘s played-fast-but-is-so-heavy-it-still-sounds-slow “Braise the Dead” and “Botched Bastard,” both of which find a way to be a ton of fun while also being unspeakably brutal and pushing the line between sludge and death metal in a way that would do Six Feet Under proud. Horns and bongs all around, then.

Haze Mage on Thee Facebooks

Tombtoker on Thee Facebooks

 

White Dog, White Dog

white dog white dog

Oldschool newcomers White Dog earn an automatic look by releasing their self-titled debut through former Cathedral frontman Lee Dorrian‘s Rise Above Records, but it’s the band’s clearcut vintage aesthetic that holds the listener’s attention. With proto-metal established as an aesthetic of its own going on 20 years now, White Dog aren’t the first by any means to tread this ground, but especially for an American band, they bring a sincerity of swing and soul that speaks to the heart of the subgenre’s appeal. “The Lantern” leans back into the groove to tell its tale, while “Abandon Ship” is more upfront in its strut, and “Snapdragon” and opener “Sawtooth” underscore their boogie with subtle progressive nods. Closing duo “Pale Horse” and “Verus Cultus” might be enough to make one recall it was Rise Above that issued Witchcraft‘s self-titled, but in the shuffle of “Crystal Panther,” and really across the whole LP White Dog make the classic ideology theirs and offer material of eminent repeat listenability.

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Rise Above Records website

 

Jupiterian, Protosapien

jupiterian protosapien

The only thing that might save you from being swallowed entirely by the deathly mire Brazil’s Jupiterian craft on their third full-length, Protosapien, is the fact that the album is only 35 minutes long. That’s about right for the robe-clad purveyors of tonal violence — 2017’s Terraforming (review here) and 2015’s Aphotic (review here) weren’t much longer — and rest assured, it’s plenty of time for the band to squeeze the juice out of your soul and make you watch while they drink it out of some need-two-hands-to-hold-it ceremonial goblet. Their approach has grown more methodical over the years, and all the deadlier for that, and the deeper one pushes into Protosapien — into “Capricorn,” “Starless” and “Earthling Bloodline” at the end of the record — the less likely any kind of cosmic salvation feels. I’d say you’ve been warned, but really, this is just scratching the surface of the trenches into which Jupiterian plunge.

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Transcending Obscurity Records on Bandcamp

 

Experiencia Tibetana, Vol. I

Experiencia Tibetana Vol I

It’s an archival release, recorded in 2014 and 2015 by the Buenos Aires-based band, but all that really does for the three-song/hour-long Vol. I is make me wonder what the hell Experiencia Tibetana have been up to since and why Vols. II and III are nowhere to be found. The heavy psych trio aren’t necessarily inventing anything on this debut full-length, but the way “Beirut” (18:36) is peppered with memorable guitar figures amid its echo-drifting vocals, and the meditation tucked into the last few minutes of the 26:56 centerpiece “Espalda de Elefante” and the shift in persona to subdued progressive psych on “Desatormentandonos” (14:16) with the bass seeming to take the improvisational lead as guitar lines hold the central progression together, all of it is a compelling argument for one to pester for a follow-up. It may be an unmanageable runtime, but for the come-with-us sense of voyage it carries, Vol. I adapts the listener’s mindset to its exploratory purposes, and proves to be well worth the trip.

Experiencia Tibetana on Thee Facebooks

Experiencia Tibetana on Bandcamp

 

Yanomamo, No Sympathy for a Rat

yanomamo no sympathy for a rat

Filth-encrusted and lumbering, Yanomamo‘s sludge takes Church of Misery-style groove and pummels it outright on the opening title-track of their four-song No Sympathy for a Rat EP. Like distilled disillusion, the scream-laced answer to the Sydney four-piece’s 2017 debut, Neither Man Nor Beast, arrives throwing elbows at your temples and through “The Offering,” the wait-is-this-grindcore-well-kinda-in-this-part “Miasma” and the suitably destructive “Iron Crown,” the only letup they allow is topped with feedback. Get in, kill, get out. They have more bounce than Bongzilla but still dig into some of Thou‘s more extreme vibe, but whatever you might want to compare them to, it doesn’t matter: Yanomamo‘s unleashed assault leaves bruises all its own, and the harsher it gets, the nastier it gets, the better. Can’t take it? Can’t hang? Fine. Stand there and be run over — I don’t think it makes a difference to the band one way or the other.

Yanomamo on Thee Facebooks

Iommium Records on Bandcamp

 

Mos Eisley Spaceport, The Best of Their Early Year

mos eisley spaceport the best of their early year

They mean the title literally — “early year.” Bremen, Germany’s Mos Eisley Spaceport — who so smoothly shift between space rock and classic boogie on “Further When I’m Far” and brash tempo changes en route to a final jam-out on “Mojo Filter,” finally unveiling the Star Wars sample at the head of organ-inclusive centerpiece “Space Shift” only to bring early Fu Manchu-style raw fuzz on “Drop Out” and finish with the twanging acoustic and pedal steel of “My Bicycle Won’t Fly” — have been a band for less than a full 12 months. Thus, The Best of Their Early Year signals some of its own progressive mindset and more playful aspects, but it is nonetheless a formidable accomplishment for a new band finding their way. They lay out numerous paths, if you couldn’t tell by the run-on sentence above, and I won’t hazard a guess as to where they’ll end up sound-wise, but they have a fervent sense of creative will that comes through in this material and one only hopes they hold onto whatever impulse it is that causes them to break out the gong on “Space Shift,” because it’s that sense of anything-as-long-as-it-works that’s going to continue to distinguish them.

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Thee Facebooks

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Bandcamp

 

Of Wolves, Balance

of wolves balance

One doesn’t often hear “the Wolfowitz Doctrine” brought out in lyrics these days, but Chicago heavy noise metallers Of Wolves aren’t shy about… well, anything. With volume inherent in the sound no matter how loud you’re actually hearing it, conveyed through weighted tones, shouts of progressions unified in intensity but varied in aggression and actual approach, the three-piece take an unashamed stance on a range of issues from the last two decades of war to trying to put themselves into the head of a mass shooter. The lyrics across their sophomore outing, Balance, are worth digging into for someone willing to take them on, but even without, the aggro mosh-stomp of “Maker” makes its point ahead of the 17-second “Flavor of the Weak” before Of Wolves dive into more progressively-structured fare on the title-track and “Clear Cutting/Bloodshed/Heart to Hand.” After “Killing Spree” and the aural-WTF that is “Inside (Steve’s Head),” they finish with a sludgecore take on the Misfits‘ “Die, Die My Darling,” which as it turns out was exactly what was missing up to that point.

Of Wolves on Thee Facebooks

Trepanation Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Pimmit Hills, Heathens & Prophets

Pimmit Hills Heathens Prophets

Comprised of four-fifths of what was Virginian outfit King Giant, it’s hard to know whether to consider Pimmit Hills a new band or a name-change, or what, but the first offering from vocalist David Hammerly, guitarist Todd “TI” Ingram, bassist Floyd Lee Walters III and drummer Brooks, titled Heathens & Prophets and self-released, hits with a bit of a bluesier feel than did the prior outfit, leaving plenty of room for jamming in each track and even going so far as to bring producer J. Robbins in on keys throughout the four-song/29-minute release. I suppose you could call it an EP or an LP — or a demo? — if so inclined, but any way you cut it, Heathens & Prophets plainly benefits from the band’s experience playing together, and they find a more rocking, less moody vibe in “Baby Blue Eyes” and the harmonica-laced “Beautiful Sadness” that has a feel as classic in substance as it is modern in sound and that is both Southern but refusing to bow entirely to clichĂ©.

Pimmit Hills on Thee Facebooks

Pimmit Hills on Bandcamp

 

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The Well Post “Sabbah” Live in Quarantine Video; Should Probably Be Touring

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 2nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the well

One has to assume that if all were even close to being right in the world, Austin trio The Well would be spending a goodly portion of 2020 on the road. Such narratives are familiar enough by now when it comes to touring bands — yet still somehow sad — but as their home nation and mine continues its descent into reactionary fascism against the majority of public will, feels the ravages of climate change in various fires and storms — and firestorms! — and yes, still boasts tens of thousands of new cases of a not-so-global-anymore pandemic every. single. day., creativity will not be stifled. Perhaps that will be the last refuge before whatever grim fate the next several years might bring. Perhaps it will save us in the end. I won’t profess to know how it’s gonna work out.

But while things are bleak and growing bleaker with each executive tweet actively courting white supremacy, The Well have a new video. I know. Sometimes when you look at the stakes of shit happening in the world right now, these things seem minor, but you have to understand that they’re not. The fact is creativity matters — and no, that’s not a play on or a contradiction of Black Lives Matter, because jesus fucking christ Black Lives Fucking Matter and what the fuck did your parents do to you if you think otherwise, I’m just saying art is important — especially in times of turmoil. Consider the crucial output of Weimar Germany, film and paintings capturing the foreboding of that era. I wonder if decades from now people will look at the work being done in 2020 and feel the palpable sense of how we knew something was going and had gone horribly wrong, and were aware of the dangers we faced every day.

It all feels completely overwhelming, and it is. Whether you use the new The Well video for a few minutes of escapism, or just to see some color in a universe that looks increasingly grey, or just to check out the song, I’m not going to argue. It is the function of art, consciously or not, to reflect the moment of its creation in the interpretation of those making it. “Sabbah,” this live-captured version of the track from The Well‘s 2019 third album, Death and Consolation (review here), is a work in which the circumstance itself becomes part of the expression. Recorded separately by the members of the band, each then filming their part alone, they are seen spliced together, evoking the sum-of-their-parts clichĂ© maybe, but emphasizing the importance of group function even in a moment that demands and enforces solitude.

Did The Well mean for all that to be in the video? I don’t know. Maybe they’re just trying to keep a little momentum going since they can’t, as noted, be touring. I don’t think that lessens the validity of the above. If you do, I guess you can start your own blog and write about it.

Enjoy the video:

The Well, “Sabbah” live quarantine video

During a global pandemic, an American political revolt and a new world in quarantine, one has to consider fresh ways to view the production of videos and making and performing music in unchartered territory, unlike anything this generation has seen before. The Well tackled just that when faced with creating a video for their single ‘Sabbah’ from their most recent release Death and Consolation. With a limited time frame and social distancing in full effect, The Well had to get creative, channeling a psychedelic dark experience through a very different means. Each member of the band (Ian Graham on guitar, Jason Sullivan on drums, and Lisa Alley on bass) recorded their parts individually with sound engineer, TV’s Daniel, masked up in their practice space in Austin, Texas.

The next night, on a small outdoor set, each band member filmed their respective video parts solo, joined only by TV’s Daniel as masked director and videographer. The scenes were then inter-woven together into a mesmerizing smokey psychedelic dreamscape using 3 cameras and projector lights to reconstruct the group experience. All said and done, this live version of Sabbah was recorded, mixed, shot and edited in a three day quarantine time turnaround, resulting in a unique and experimental piece of work that encapsulates the energy of The Well’s live performance, despite being surrounded by nothing but uncertainty and detachment in the world around them.

The Well, Death and Consolation (2019)

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The Well on Instagram

The Well on Bandcamp

The Well website

RidingEasy Records website

RidingEasy Records on Instagram

RidingEasy Records on Bandcamp

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Palehorse/Palerider & Lord Buffalo: Legends of the Desert Vol. 1 Split out Aug. 21

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 29th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Okay, so when I originally posted about Desert Records starting its Legends of the Desert series of splits with Palehorse/Palerider and Lord Buffalo, it was set to release in June. And — get this — it was going to coincide with LIVE SHOWS! Can you imagine living in that world? Well, just about everyone else on the planet is starting to imagine things like that (sorry, Brazil), but apparently an essential component of all things modern Americana is being fucked over unless you’re impossibly wealthy, so here we are. Legends of the Desert Vol. 1 — which rules, by the way — is out Aug. 21, and if you’re holding your breath for live shows, well, I hope you have something soft to land on when you pass out.

Desert Records notes below that the series will run seven LPs over the course of three years. That seems smart to me. Two or three a year max, and it’s probably planned out well in advance. Of course, anyone currently alive knows that plans can change — and these already have if you’re going by release dates — but we can see here Desert Records operating in the spirit of Ripple Music‘s The Second Coming of Heavy, if more specific in its mission.

More on that below, courtesy of the PR wire:

palehorse palerider lord buffalo legends of the desert vol 1

LEGENDS OF THE DESERT Vol. 1 Featuring Palehorse/Palerider & Lord Buffalo Drops August 21st

Desert Records is excited to announce this new compilation series. Spanning seven albums total over the course of three years, the series will include legendary Desert Rock bands (to be announced) mixed in with new and upcoming bands.

“This is the soundtrack to the New West. The focus of the Legends of the Desert is to provide a modern perspective to the antiquated ‘Wild West’ we have etched in our brains. These songs and tales are not told by the same ol’ perspective of the white male Cowboy. These are narratives told by those who never got their stories heard. We will hear from musicians, artists, Natives, outlaws, desert rats, desert dwellers, cactuses and mesas, ravens and roadrunners, snakes and endless skies. Fuck John Wayne, Fuck his lame racist ass, and Fuck the horse he rode in on. This is Legends of the Desert.”

-Brad Frye
Owner/Operator
Desert Records

Pre-orders for Legends of the Desert Vol. 1 on limited edition vinyl, CD and digital are located at:
https://desertrecords.bandcamp.com/album/legends-of-the-desert-volume-1-palehorse-palerider-lord-buffalo

desertrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://palehorsepalerider1.bandcamp.com/
https://lord-buffalo.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/palehorse.palerider.denver/
https://www.instagram.com/palehorsepalerider/
https://www.facebook.com/lord.buffalo.band/
https://www.instagram.com/lordbuffalo/
https://www.facebook.com/desertrecordslabel/
https://desertrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://desertrecords.bigcartel.com/

Palehorse/Palerider & Lord Buffalo, Legends of the Desert Vol. 1 (2020)

Lord Buffalo, Tohu Wa Bohu (2020)

Palehorse/Palerider, Fire Gone Out/Haxan (2019)

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White Dog Self-Titled Debut Coming Sept. 25 on Rise Above

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Getting anyone to release your debut album is a feather in the cap. Getting Lee Dorrian to do it through his Rise Above Records imprint is the stuff of which legends are made. Austin’s White Dog may have a ways to go before they hit their standard — this is their first record, after all — but as they’ve shown over the last several years playing festivals like End Hip End It in their native Texas and Electric Funeral Fest in Colorado, as well as taking part in projects like the Glory or Death Records tribute to Thin Lizzy, Bow to Your Masters — they did “Don’t Believe a Word” — they’ve been making strides for a while now, so perhaps this is one more, even if an especially noteworthy one.

The album is out Sept. 25 with preorders opening soon through Rise Above, who sent the following down the PR wire:

white dog white dog

White Dog Signs to Rise Above Records; Self-Titled Album Set For Release September 25th

New Single “The Lantern” Streaming Now!

“From the beginning we were beating the streets of Austin. This city is fuckin’ wild. There’s always something going on and the party never ends so that good time rock ‘n’ roll thing definitely rubbed off on us as little pups…”

In a world full of fakes and clowns, nothing quite hits the spot like a band that walks it, talks it and rocks it for real. Born amid the musical and cultural whirlwind of Austin, Texas, White Dog already sound like the perfect antidote to plastic sonic bullshit and sanitized radio fodder. In fact, as guitarist Carl Amoss explains, White Dog are the bastard sons of their city’s entire underground scene /and/ the spirit of rock ’n’ roll itself. Alongside drummer brother John, bassist Rex Pape, co-guitarist Clemente De Hoyos and singer Joe Sterling, these old school troublemakers are on a clearly defined mission.

White Dog are set to release their self-titled Rise Above Records debut on September 25th. Today the first single from the album entitled “The Lantern.”

Pre-orders will be available in the coming weeks.

Like all the greatest bands, White Dog were swift to establish a gang mentality, locating common ground and setting up shop in the middle of it. As you will hear on the band’s fiery and fearless self-titled debut album, Carl and his comrades have a chemistry that can only be conjured through true friendship and shared ideals.

With a sound that owes a noble debt to the greats of proto-metal, heavy progressive rock and turbocharged psychedelia, White Dog explore all kinds of exhilarating territory on their debut. From the flailing, psych-rock kaleidoscope of opener Sawtooth to the edgy, Witchcraft-like strut of Lanterns, and on to the lysergic garage rock of Crystal Panther and wickedly epic closer Verus Cultus, the Texans’ first full-length is a triumph for unpretentious authenticity and the art of old school songwriting.

True to their shared belief in playing untamed rock ’n’ roll that sounds real and alive, White Dog was conceived and executed with analogue values firmly at the forefront. As a result, the album feels almost like a real-time fever dream, with the ultimate psychedelic house band wailing away as reality disintegrates elsewhere.

The final piece of the White Dog jigsaw came when the band signed up with revered UK imprint Rise Above Records. Firmly in their natural habitat, Carl and his band mates are looking forward to a bright future, supported by like-minded people and buoyed by a strong sense that mind-expanding rock ‘n’ roll is still a formidable force, even in this insane world.

White Dog Tracklisting:
1. Sawtooth
2. Black Powder
3. The Lantern
4. Snapdragon
5. Crystal Panther
6. Abandon Ship
7. Pale Horse
8. Verus Cultus

http://facebook.com/whitedogusa
https://www.instagram.com/whitedogusa/
https://whitedogusa.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/riseaboverecords/
http://www.riseaboverecords.com/

White Dog, “The Lantern”

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Monte Luna Release Mind Control Broadcast EP Today

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

monte luna

Well yes, that’s quite heavy. Quite fucking heavy indeed, Monte Luna. How’s that new lineup of Monte Luna sound? If the issued-today Mind Control Broadcast three-songer is anything to judge by, they sound rather heavy. Like over-the-top tone. All-in heavy. Even the quiet part of “Blackstar” is fucking heavy. Introducing bass was a good idea.

Guitarist/vocalist James Cl and newcomers Garth Condit (bass) and Danny Marschner (drums) are premiering the tracks “Blackstar,” “Rust Goliath” and “Fear the Sun” as a part of some video thing today, and that’s super, but I guess they’re putting out the audio too in order to help The Lost Well in Austin. I don’t know if I’ve ever seen a show there or not because every time I was ever at SXSW I was so miserable I got blackout drunk — and no, I’m not proud of that — but helping venues when the entire country is taking a shit is probably a nice thing to do.

So: Nice and heavy. My kind of band. Maybe we could hang out. Nah, these guys are way too cool for my ass. They probably stay up, like, past 9PM and stuff. Still, Mind Control Broadcast is fucking righteous — exactly what sludge should sound like in this wretched horror show of a reality we’re living — and you should listen to it.

Check it out:

monte luna mind control broadcast

MONTE LUNA RELEASE ‘MIND CONTROL BROADCAST’ EP JULY 3RD

Austin, Texas Psychedelic Sludge slingers Monte Luna are making lots of noise with a new line up and a new ep.- ‘Mind Control Broadcast’

Being a band that thrives on stage, close and one with their audience, these last few months have been trying to say the least for Monte Luna. But with their strong resilience and will to make art no matter what obstacle lies ahead, they have managed to make the absolute most of their time. The band has been fortunate enough to be isolated together during Covid-19, which has created a perfect environment for artistic genius to flourish. Monte Luna might be locked down, but this beast is far from caged!

James says: “We are thankful to have been stuck together during all of this. Most of our families live elsewhere, this music scene for us is family (Austin) we are thankful for it. We aren’t sure when we will be able to play on a real stage again but we are looking forward to it, in the meantime we are trying to figure out ways to better connect with our fans! We hope this ep reflects our efforts and helps friends, followers and people around the world get to the other side of this historical and humbling time.”

James says: “Phil’s departure left some big shoes to fill, and with his blessing, we sought to expand on something we had wanted to do for a long time. Just wait till you hear the album versions of all these songs and more!”(3 more not revealed)

About release:
Monte Luna are pleased to unveil 3 new songs to unleash onto the world which is the audio from an upcoming video stream in partnership with CVLT Nation on July 3rd, and will release on the same day. A portion of the album sales will be donated to help “The Lost Well”, an Austin, Texas live music venue to help keep their doors open. The stream can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/F404rOYGJ_A

These live takes are the early demos of the bands next full length album set to debut sometime in 2021/2022, depending on the state of the world. The main goal of this ep is to raise money for a worthwhile cause, while planting the seeds of anticipation for the upcoming full length album and demonstrating the full power of Monte Luna’s brand new line-up. The album touches on the topics of fear, loss, paranoia, depression and the vastness of the universe while still holding a very Dungeons and Dragons theme.

Monte Luna says: “Sonically it’s a whole new ball park. Bringing Bass into the mix really changed what we can do as a band. We’ve always been a two piece, but wanted to move past our limitations, because creativity should be as vast as the universe itself.”

Monte Luna says: “We do this because we love our community and this is what makes us happy. We’ve all had a lot of jobs, but this is the only job that brings us true happiness.”

Track list:
1- Blackstar
2- Rust Goliath
3 – Fear the Sun

Monte Luna is:
James cl – Guitar/vox
Danny Marschner – Drums
Garth Condit – Bass

www.facebook.com/pg/MonteLuna666
www.monteluna666.bandcamp.com
https://www.instagram.com/monte_luna_tx/
www.argonautarecords.com

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