Quarterly Review: Paradise Lost, Vinnum Sabbathi, Nighthawk, Familiars, Mountain Witch, Disastroid, Stonegrass, Jointhugger, Little Albert, Parahelio

Posted in Reviews on July 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-qr-summer-2020

Last day, you know the drill. It’s been a pleasure, honestly. If every Quarterly Review could feature the quality of material this one has, I’d probably only spend a fraction of the amount of time I do fretting over it. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading and enjoyed the music as much as I have. If you haven’t found something here to sit with and dig into yet, well, today’s 10 more chances to do just that. Maybe something will stick at last.

See you in September.

Quarterly Review #41-50:

Paradise Lost, Obsidian

paradise lost obsidian

It is impossible to listen to Order Essay Online and Stop Worrying about Your Grades . Many students at least once in their lives thought about how difficult it is to write an essay. After all, it requires a certain mindset, perseverance, and the process itself takes quite a lot. Fortunately, today it became possible to http://bursadacicek.com/?acknowledgement-sample-for-research-paper on any topic online. Obsidian and consider Need assistance with your college term paper? Order 100% original custom written term papers from our professional online research official site. Paradise Lost as anything other than masters of the form. Of course, that they were one of the original pioneers of gothic death-doom helps, but even in the decade-plus since they began to shift back toward a more metallic approach, they have established a standard that is entirely their own. essay writing my favourite story book Can You Doctoral Thesis On Self Esteem thesis and dissertation manual cheap essay online Obsidian collects nine tracks across a palatable 45 minutes, and if the hook of “Fall From Grace” is fan-service on the part of the band, then it is no less righteous for that. In atmosphere and aggression, cuts like “The Devil Embraced” and the galloping “Ghosts” deliver on high expectations coming off 2017’s Looking for cheap, high-quality content writers? Das Writing Services, a professional http://www.jsnds.de/?how-to-write-a-paper-on-team-communication or agency in India provides engaging web Medusa (review here), even as side B’s “Ending Days” and “Hope Dies Young” branch into a more melodic focus, not departing from the weight of impact presented earlier, but clearly adjusting the approach, leading to an all the more deathly return on “Ravenghast,” which closes out. Their doom remains second to none; their model remains one to follow.

Paradise Lost on Thee Facebooks

Nuclear Blast webstore

 

Vinnum Sabbathi, Of Dimensions and Theories

Vinnum Sabbathi Of Dimensions and Theories

The narrative thread carried through the six tracks of Need pay someone to Architecture Business Plan for me? Find out suitable service to write my assignment in Australia from professionals on GradeScout Vinnum Sabbathi‘s deaf homework help How To Write A Research Paper On A Disease On Financial critical thinking of the birthmark an essay explaining schizophrenia Of Dimensions and Theories is a futuristic sci-fi tale about humanity’s first foray into deep space amid a chaos of environmental collapse and nuclear threat. The real story, however, is the sense of progression the instrumentalist Mexico City outfit bring in following up their debut LP, 2017’s Our team of someone write my finance paper MBAs, charted accountants, industry experts and technical writers is How Can I Write Essay focused on. Gravity Works (review here). Tying thematically to the latest With a research paper sample it’s much easier to write a paper of your own. So Pay For Someone To Write Your Dissertation on your topic and prepare your writing 5 times Cegvera album — the two bands share personnel — pieces at the outset like “In Search of M-Theory” and “Quantum Determinism” maintain the exploratory vibe of the band’s jammier works in their “HEX” series, but through spoken samples give a human presence and plotline to the alternately atmospheric and lumbering tones. As the record progresses through the airier “An Appraisal” and the feedback-drenched “Beyond Perturbative States,” their dynamic finds realization in “A Superstring Revolution I” and the drum-led “A Superstring Revolution II.” I don’t know about humanity’s prospects as a whole, but How To Write Your Dissertation In 15 Minutess. Every high-school and college student will be assigned to write a research paper at some point of his or her academic process. Vinnum Sabbathi‘s remain bright.

Vinnum Sabbathi on Thee Facebooks

Stolen Body Records website

 

Nighthawk, The Sea Legs EP

Nighthawk The Sea Legs EP

Composed as a solo outing prior to the founding of When you Cpm Homework Help Closure Problemss online with emergency essay you can be sure to receive plagiarism-free papers. A dog almost being right buy out less cheated Heavy Temple, the How To Write A Convincing Essay of top quality from certified teachers and professional writers. MHR Writer UK offers you to buy online assignments in reasonable price. Nighthawk solo endeavor (presumably she wasn’t a High Priestess yet), we do assignment for you Best Phd Thesis In Education Service university essays online example of a research essay The Sea Legs EP, is plenty self-aware in its title, but for being a raw execution of material written performed entirely on her own, its four tracks also have a pretty significant scope, from the post- click - Answers When youre writing a research essay you are data in order to come to some sort of conclusion about a QOTSA heavy pop of “Goddamn” leading off through the quick spacegaze of “I’m From Tennessee Woman, All We Do is Honky Tonk,” into the deceptively spacious “I Can Haz” with its far-back toms, dreamy vocal melody and vaguely Middle Eastern-sounding guitar, and ending with the if- online thesis download http://www.naur-sir.dk/?holt-mathematics-course-3-homework-and-practice-workbook-answers my american dream essay graduate school personal statement sample Ween‘s-country-album-had-been-weirder finish of “Stay Gold.” enter - Entrust your essay to us and we will do our best for you professional writers, exclusive services, timely delivery and Nighthawk has issued a follow-up to The Sea Legs EP in the full-length Goblin/John Carpenter-style synth of The Dimensionaut, but given the range and balance she shows just in this brief 12 minutes, one hopes that indeed her songwriting explorations continue to prove so multifaceted.

Nighthawk on Bandcamp

Heavy Temple on Thee Facebooks

 

Familiars, All in Good Time

familiars all in good time

Contending for one of the year’s best debut albums, FamiliarsAll in Good Time offers eight songs across 43 minutes that blend organic-feeling grit with more ethereal, landscape-evocative psychedelics. The Ontario three-piece have a few singles to their credit, but the lushness of “Rocky Roost” and the emergent heft of “Barn Burning,” the fleshy boogie of “The Dirty Dog Saloon” and the breadth of “Avro Arrow” speak not just to Familiars‘ ability to capture a largesse that draws their songs together, or the nuance that lets them brings subtle touches of Americana (Canadiana?) early on and echoing desert roll to the fuzzy “The Common Loon,” but also to the songwriting that makes these songs stand out so much as they do and the sense of purpose Familiars bring to All in Good Time as their first long-player. That turns out to be one of the most encouraging aspects of the release, but in that regard there’s plenty of competition from elements like tone, rhythm, melody, craft, performance — so yes, basically all of it.

Familiars on Thee Facebooks

Familiars on Bandcamp

 

Mountain Witch, Extinct Cults

Mountain Witch Extinct Cults

Mountain Witch‘s fourth album, Extinct Cults, brings the Hamburg-based duo of guitarist RenĂ© Sitte and drummer/vocalist RenĂ© Roggmann back after a four-year absence with a collection that straddles the various lines between classic heavy rock, proto-metal, ’70s heavy prog and modern cultism. Their loyalties aren’t necessarily all to the 1968-’74 period, as the chug and gruff vocals of “Back From the Grave” show, but the post Technical Ecstasy sway of the title-track is a fascinating and rarely-captured specificity, and the vocal melodies expressed in layers across the record do much to add personality and depth to the arrangements while the surrounding recording remains essentially raw. No doubt vinyl-minded, Extinct Cults is relatively brief at six songs and 33 minutes, but the Priestly chug of “Man is Wolf to Man” and the engrossing garage doom of closer “The Devil Probably” offer plenty of fodder for those who’d dig in to dig into. It is a sound familiar and individual at once, old and new, and it revels in making cohesion out of such contrasts.

Mountain Witch on Thee Facebooks

This Charming Man Records website

 

Disastroid, Mortal Fools

disastroid mortal fools

You might find San Francisco trio Disastroid hanging out at the corner of noise and heavy rock, looking disreputable. Their first record for Heavy Psych Sounds is Mortal Fools, and to go with its essential-bloody-essential bass tone and melodic semi-shouted vocals, it brings hints of angularity rounded out by tonal thickness and a smoothness between transitions that extends to the flow from one song to the next. While for sure a collection of individual pieces, Mortal Fools does move through its 43 minutes with remarkable ease, the sure hand of the three-piece guides you through the otherwise willfully tumultuous course, brash in the guitar and bass and drums but immersive in the overarching groove. They seem to save a particular melodic highlight for the verses of closer “Space Rodent,” but really, whether it’s the lumbering “Hopeless” or the sharper-toothed push of “Bilge,” the highlight is what Disastroid accomplish over the course of the record as a whole. Plus that friggin’ bass sound.

Disastroid on Thee Facebooks

Heavy Psych Sounds website

 

Stonegrass, Stonegrass

stonegrass self titled

I don’t know when this was first released, but the 2020 edition seems to be a remaster, and whenever it first came out, I’m pleased to have the chance to check it out now. Toronto duo Stonegrass brings together Matthew “Doc” Dunn and Jay Anderson, both of a markedly psyched-out pedigree, to dig into experimentalist acid-psych that pushes boundaries stylistic and national, tapping Afrobeat vibes with closer “Drive On” and the earlier 13-minute go-go-go jam “Tea” while “The Highway” feels like a lost psychedelic disco-funk 45, “The Cape” drones like it’s waiting for someone to start reading poetry over-top, and mellow hand-percussion and Turkish psych on centerpiece “Frozen Dunes.” The whole thing, which runs a manageable 39 minutes, is as cool as the day is long, and comes across like a gift to those of expanded mind or who are willing to join those ranks. I don’t know if it’s new or old. I don’t know if it’s a one-off or an ongoing project. I barely know if it’s actually out. But hot damn it’s rad, and if you can catch it, you should.

Cosmic Range Records on YouTube

Cosmic Range Records on Bandcamp

 

Jointhugger, I Am No One

jointhugger i am no one

Norwegian half-instrumental trio Jointhugger have already captured the attention of both Interstellar Smoke Records and Ozium Records with their four-song debut long-player, I Am No One, and as the follow-up to their 2019 Daemo, it leaves little question why. The more volume, the merrier, when it comes to the rolling, nodding, undulations of riff the band conjure, as each member seems geared toward bringing as much weight to bear as much as possible. I’m serious. Even the hi-hat is heavy, never mind the guitar or bass or the cave-echoing vocals of the title-track. “Domen” slips into some shuffle — if you can call something that dense-sounding a shuffle — and underscores its solo with an entire bog’s worth of low end, and though closer “Nightfright” is the only inclusion that actually tops 10 minutes, it communicates an intensity of crush that is nothing if not consistent with what’s come before. There are flashes of letup here and there, but it’s impact at the core of Jointhugger‘s approach, and they offer plenty of it. Don’t be surprised when the CD and LP sell through, and don’t be surprised if they get re-pressed later.

Jointhugger on Thee Facebooks

Ozium Records webstore

Interstellar Smoke Records webstore

 

Little Albert, Swamp King

Little Albert Swamp King

Stepping out both in terms of style and substance from his position as guitarist in atmospheric doomers Messa, Little Albert — aka Alberto Piccolo — pronounces himself “swamp king” in the opening lines of his debut solo release of the same name, and the mellow ambiance and psychedelic flourish of tone in “Bridge of Sighs” and “Mean Old Woman” and the aptly-titled “Blues Asteroid” offer an individualized blend of psychedelic blues that seems to delight in tipping the balance back and forth from one to the other while likewise taking the songs through full band arrangements and more intimate wanderings. Some of the songs have a tendency to roll outward and not return, as does “Mary Claire” or “Mean Old Woman,” but “Outside Woman Blues” and the closer “Hard Time Killing Floor Blues” hold tighter to the ground than some of what surrounds, so again, there’s a balance. Plus, as mellow as Swamp King is in its overarching affect, it’s neither difficult nor anything but a pleasure to follow along where Piccolo leads. If that’s off the psych-blues deep end, so be it. Only issue I take with him being king of the swamp is that the album’s domain hardly seems so limited.

Little Albert on Thee Facebooks

Aural Music on Bandcamp

 

Parahelio, Surge Evelia, Surge

Parahelio Surge Evelia Surge

Beautiful, patient and pastoral psychedelia fleshes out across the three tracks of Parahelio‘s debut full-length, Surge Evelia, Surge. Issued on vinyl through Necio Records, the three-song offering reportedly pays homage to a mining town in the band’s native Peru, but it does so with a breadth that seems to cover so much between heavy post-rock and psych that it’s difficult not to imagine places decidedly more ethereal. Beginning with its title-track (12:33) and moving into the swells and recessions of “Gestos y Distancia,” the album builds to an encompassing payoff for side A before unveiling “Ha’Adam,” a 23-minute side-consuming rollout that encompasses not only soundscaping, but a richly human feel in its later take, solidifying around a drum march and a heavy build of guitar that shouldn’t sound strange to fans of Pelican or Russian Circles yet manages somehow to transcend the hypnotic in favor of the dynamic, the immersive, and again, the beautiful. What follows is desolation and aftermath, and that’s how the record ends, but even there, the textures and the spirit of the release remain central. I always do myself a favor with the last release of any Quarterly Review, and this is no exception.

Parahelio on Thee Facebooks

Necio Records on Bandcamp

 

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Atramentus to Release Stygian LP Aug. 21

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 30th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Atramentus

This shit sounds pretty fucking fierce and I stumbled on the audio sample on Twitter (yeah, Twitter, because somehow I decided my life need more social media and not less) before I even got this press release, so yeah, I’m posting about it. I know jack squat about Atramentus — nothing beyond what I heard in that sample and what’s in the press release below, which by the time this is posted I can only assume I will have read — but it sure seems to me that the more eternally miserable I myself get, the more death-doom seems to make my blood curdle in just the right way. 20 Buck Spin? Well, they put out Samothrace — you know, among a ton of other cool stuff — so they need not prove their know-heavy-when-they-hear-it to the likes of me. I’ll fuckin’ take this and be quite happy to have it, thank you very much.

I’ll be lurching back to my wretched fucking cave if you need me. Don’t call. Don’t text either.

PR wire:

Atramentus stygian

ATRAMENTUS: Quebec Funeral Doom Act To Release Stygian LP Through 20 Buck Spin; Audio Excerpt Posted

Longueuil, QuĂ©bec-based ATRAMENTUS – with members of Chthe’ilist, Funebrarum, Gevurah, and more among its ranks – presents its debut LP, Stygian, now confirmed for August release through 20 Buck Spin.

From the frozen northlands, ATRAMENTUS unveils the icebound agony of the monolithic Stygian. Birthed on a cold winter night in 2012 and during an autumnal sunset in 2013, the cursed tale remained dormant for years, only recently being put to tape so the nameless knight’s saga could be told.

Granted immortality through the gift of the God’s sword, the nameless knight eventually witnesses the death of the sun and the end of all life on Earth. Surviving the great deluge, he is left to wander amongst the ruins of a now frozen earth under a sunless sky for eternity, alone and unable to die even by the scorching-cold blizzard winds around him, enduring perpetual physical torture while haunted by the memories of his past life and everyone he once knew buried under miles of ice.

Each of the three epic songs contained within differ widely to reflect the changing of autumn to perpetual winter. While adorned in the language of extreme funeral doom and dark ambient soundscape, ATRAMENTUS owe further debt to epic doom metal in sound and aesthetic and black metal’s anguished ferocity, but always the arc of ATRAMENTUS remains bound to the tumultuous melancholy and guttural immensity of extreme doom. Stygian is thematically tied, on different timelines, to the themes on Chthe’ilist’s latest EP and forthcoming album.

Stygian was recorded, engineered re-amped, and mixed by Xavier Berthiaume at Studio Tehom in Montreal, mastered by Greg Chandler (Esoteric, Lychgate) at Priory Recording Studios in Birmingham, and is completed with artwork by Mariusz Lewandowski (Atlantean Kodex, Bell Witch, Mizmor) and layout by Chimere Noire.

20 Buck Spin will release Stygian on LP, CD, cassette, and digital formats on August 21st. Fans of Unholy, Evoken, Worship, Mournful Congregation, Disembowelment, Skepticism, Thergothon, Esoteric, The Ruins Of Beverast, and Morgion, watch for additional audio samples, preorders, and more to be issued over the weeks ahead.

Stygian Track Listing:
1. Stygian I: From Tumultuous Heavens… (Descended Forth The Ceaseless Darkness)
2. Stygian II: In Ageless Slumber (As I Dream In The Doleful Embrace Of The Howling Black Winds)
3. Stygian III: Perennial Voyage (Across The Perpetual Planes Of Crying Frost & Steel-Eroding Blizzards)

ATRAMENTUS:
Phil Tougas – vocals, guitars
Claude Leduc – guitars
François Bilodeau – keys, dark ambient elements,
Antoine Daigneault – bass
Xavier Berthiaume – drums

https://www.facebook.com/AtramentusDoom
https://www.instagram.com/atramentusqc
http://www.20buckspin.com
http://www.facebook.com/20buckspin
https://www.instagram.com/20buckspinlabel

Atramentus, Stygian excerpt

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Empress Premiere “Lion’s Blood” from Premonition out July 24

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on June 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

empress

Vancouver-based trio Empress will release their debut full-length, Premonition, on July 24. The expansive seven-track/49-minute offering is an amalgam of modern influences, drawing from niche microgenres from progressive psych to black metal and running a cohesive line through post-metallic atmospheres and a lurching aggression in their approach. Setting melody against harsh, echoing shouts, the three-piece of guitarist/vocalist Peter Sacco, bassist Brenden Gunn — who passed away in 2019 and to whom the album is dedicated — and drummer Chris Doyle make no attempt to hide their stylistic ambition, pulling together influences from the likes of Amenra, Elder, Isis, The Ocean and latter-day Enslaved in an attempt to make something new from the melding.

Premonition sets its course with the eight-minute opener “A Pale Wanderer” and uses the momentum it builds there to unfurl two shorter tracks in “Sepulchre” and “Passage” before the six-minute “Trost” closes out side A. The progression from one piece to the next is essential to the listening experience of the side and the record as a whole, as each cut gracefully complements and expands on the one before it, whether it’s the heavy post-rock air-squibblies and subsequent gallop in the guitar of “A Pale Wanderer” feeding into the immediate angularity that begins “Sepulchre,” or “Passage” building a winding linear movement of riffs edged with psychedelic intent even as they payoff with more aggressive churning — Empress Premonitiona perfect lead-in for the semi-blackened rush at the start of “Trost,” which holds its melodic statement for the finish in a slower-rolling unfurl that gives way to a silence that feels well earned.

Of course, that’s only half the story, and Premonition takes a noticeable turn for the immersive with “Hiraeth,” the first of the three inclusions on its second half. “Hiraeth” (8:03), “Premonition” (7:05) and “Lion’s Blood” (9:39) seem in form to call back to the outset of the album, but that only makes the journey being undertaken seem all the more purposeful. Like the songs preceding, they are progressive in form and thoughtful in composition, but naturally their increased runtime lends a more patient feel, and that proves especially true in the longest of them, which is the finale. Building up from a quiet line of standalone guitar, “Lion’s Blood” reaches two successive crescendos, the first melodic, the second angrier, and in that, the ending of the record answers back to the preceding title-track’s summary of Empress‘ songcraft with a step forward toward individualism, still based around the root influences noted above, but succeeding in its goal of internalizing and adding to them.

It’s a first step, but a brazen one, even unto its title, which would seem to be telling listeners that Premonition is just the beginning of a longer stylistic evolution on the part of Empress. If that’s the case and that’s the challenge the band are setting for themselves, bring it on. While not a minor undertaking at nearly 50 minutes long, Premonition isn’t trying to be humble, it’s trying to be consuming, and it is that. I don’t know how losing Gunn will ultimately affect this mission, but with this first long-player, the band show a marked potential that not only makes a fitting tribute to what might’ve been for the trio as they wore, but still holds promise for the band Empress might become. Whatever their future brings, the obvious consciousness they bring to their songwriting here will only continue to serve them well as they move forward.

And it’s heavy, too.

Happy to host the premiere of “Lion’s Blood” on the player below, all the more so since it serves as the culmination of Premonition and the inevitable step from which Empress will launch whatever may come next.

More background from the PR wire follows.

Please enjoy:

On July 24th, Canada’s EMPRESS will self-release their highly anticipated debut album, Premonition.

Preorder here: http://thisisempress.bandcamp.com

EMPRESS are a three-headed beast from Vancouver, B.C., born after guitarist/vocalist Peter Sacco (Seer) and drummer Chris Doyle attended a show headlined by doom mavens Elder. Inspired by the massive wall of sound and psychedelia they encountered on that fateful night, the pair enlisted bassist Brenden Gunn (Craters) and set out to create their own brand of stoner/sludge metal.

Above all, EMPRESS is not a vehicle for entertainment or flashy showmanship. Rather, it is an emotionally driven, abstract band, and meant to serve as an artistic experience which has a culmination of life experiences, doubts, and growth from what life has brought each member.

EMPRESS boldly and (daresay) beautifully display that across their long-awaited debut album, Premonition. As befitting a first full-length, Premonition took years to write, and was made with excitement and, most especially, a newfound purpose and meaning for driving the songwriting. Once again laying it all on the line, arguably more so than ever, the album’s lyrics are about the mental health of Sacco, his family members, and the experiences he has had with them – the traumas he deals with as payment for being there for someone mentally ill, and accepting loved ones, strangers, and anyone else with mental health issues. But, Sacco stresses, “No one should be pushing people that come forward with their mental health issues and leave them secluded with those issues.”

Comprising seven shape-shifting songs in an all-enveloping 49 minutes, Premonition is the unleashing of emotions from trauma. It is an outlet for each member of the band to deal with whatever it is they need to deal with. Each person writes their parts with whatever intention they would like. That culmination led to the most accomplished album any of them have written, and they are grateful for the support of their loved ones, friends, and strangers who listen to their music and feel that connection EMPRESS want to have come across.

The album is in loving memory of Brenden Gunn, who passed away Oct 31st, 2019. Artwork by Orion Landau and Robin Harris.

Empress on Thee Facebooks

Empress on Instagram

Empress on Bandcamp

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Lammping Premiere Two-Song Greater Good Single; Bad Boys of Comedy out July 21

Posted in audiObelisk on June 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

lammping

Lammping will release their debut album, Bad Boys of Comedy, July 21 through Nasoni Records. The unpretentious eight-song/36-minute jaunt makes itself comfortable amid a lush sunshine of melodic vibe, the Toronto-based duo of multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Mikhail Galkin and drummer Jay Anderson (Stonegrass, Comet Control) taking advantage of the studio setting to do the work of at least four players between layers of guitar, synth, bass and drums. Effects ebb and flow in a wash that reminds at times of the ’90s revivalist psych that ultimately spawned shoegaze, but there’s something classically playful about the insistent rhymes of the lyrics in opener “Forest for the Trees” and the subsequent “Soakin'” as well that seems to offer a kind of garage-rocking wink to the listener, as if to say, “S’all a joke, innit?” and already know the answer.

All around, languid instrumental flow taps varied realizations of psych — some poppy, some not — and meandering excursions that resonate with an improvised feel if not actual improvisation. Galkin and Anderson may be crafting a full-band sound, but the sense of space in the recording also becomes a presence as the echoes stretch out, coming and going to allow for the Hawkwind-via-MonsterMagnet crunch of “Lightheaded” and the Dead Meadow buzztone boogie in “Greater Good” to shine though no less awash in purpose than they are in reverb.

Let’s get personal for a minute. This is about where my head’s at these days. That’s as honest as I can be with you. I put this record on for the first time a couple weeks ago and it was an utter relief to hear it. “Oh good,” I said. Really. Sweetly melodic, LAMMPING THE BAD BOYS OF COMEDYheavy enough to have a presence and some physicality behind the psychedelia, and given some structure of songwriting to complement the fluid rhythms that persist throughout. It’s not in a rush, it’s not trying to blow you away with how aggressive, or progressive, or regressive it is. It’s just two players collaborating on songs that they obviously dig. No doubt there’s some Beatles-awareness happening as they don Middle Eastern scales in “Within You,” but the dream-toned gorgeousness that rolls out with Anderson‘s cymbal crashes is righteously their own. I dig the hell out of this record. It’s not going to be the biggest release of the year. The hype machine probably won’t be about it. It won’t be “of the moment” or whatever we’re valuing right now. All it is is everything it needs to be.

“Within You” swirls into a fade ahead of the more percussively intense “Eater” but laid back vocals bring to mind some of The Heads‘ freakouts even as some of Anderson‘s tom sounds feel recognizable from his work in Comet Control. Another jam fades into the tambourine-included “Tumble,” which might be named for something falling over at the end, but uses a steady beat during its four minutes to keep the drift in check as much as possible, or at very least as much as it wants to. Side B is more hypnotic than not, which serves the album well as it moves toward “Closer to the Sun” at the finish. My only complaint with the finale, which tops six minutes, is that it isn’t longer, as I have no trouble imagining Galkin and Anderson diving headfirst into longer-form rehearsal-room improvisations, following the whims of one or the other of them wherever they might go. Particularly interesting in the closer is that the bass seems to come into the forward position where so much of Bad Boys of Comedy to that point is led by the guitar.

Again, I’ll take it either way — if I haven’t gotten the point across yet, I’m on board for what Lammping are doing here — but putting the low-end fuzz up front allows the guitar to jam out overtop all the more at the outset of the track, and that is immersive and satisfying, making the two minutes before the first verse that much more evidence of the natural chemistry between Galkin and Anderson. That, of course, is the foundation of everything that plays out across Bad Boys of Comedy, and it remains a palpable unifying factor in the material.

With the release still a month-plus off, Nasoni are taking preorders on their site, and the band has elected to premiere “Greater Good” and “Within You.” The two songs appear in succession on Bad Boys of Comedy and I’m thrilled to host them here for the reach they represent as a whole.

I hope you dig them half as much as I do:

‘Greater Good’ is the second single off Lammping’s debut LP ‘Bad Boys of Comedy’, out July 2020 on Nasoni Records. The drum heavy, riff driven exploration of working class paranoia is side A of this release, with the introspective, psychedelic “Within You” on side B.

Lammping is a new psych-rock outfit from Toronto, formed by multi-instrumentalist Mikhail Galkin and drummer Jay Anderson. The album incorporates a wide range of influences that Jay and Mikhail bonded over, from Tropicalia and Turkish psych to classic NY boom-bap drum patterns and CSNY-style vocal harmonies.

While rooted in riffs and heavy drumming, the debut LP showcases a fresh, eclectic approach to modern psychedelia, eschewing cliched musical categorizations.

Lammping is:
Mikhail Galkin: Guitar, bass, vocals, etc.
Jay Anderson: Drums

Lammping on Instagram

Lammping on Bandcamp

Nasoni Records website

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The Death Wheelers Post “Divine Filth” Video; Album out Sept. 11

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Violence, motorcycles, grainy footage, blown-out riffs — you get the idea where The Death Wheelers are coming from aesthetically. The Canadian troupe have been kicking up dust since their 2015 self-titled debut and their latest, Divine Filth, will be out on Sept. 11 through RidingEasy Records. The band have staged the record as the soundtrack to an ’80s biker movie that never happened which is fun, and the single is likewise a rager of marked vroom-vroom. I’m somewhat curious how The Death Wheelers might ultimately distinguish themselves from the likes of Satan’s Satyrs, who tread a similar path in terms of style if not substance(s), but whatever. That band broke up anyway and The Death Wheelers are instrumental, so I guess there’s room on the highway for more than one gang. Hopefully no one gets stabbed. I hear that’s a thing.

People being turned into zombies by lysergic drugs, the world ending, whatnot. Could it really be any worse than life is right now?

Possibly?

The PR wire:

the death wheelers divine filth

Canadian ‘bikesploitation’ inspired rock & sleaze a la Davie Allan & The Arrows, The Wild Angels, Psychomania, The Cramps

Canadian heavy rock instrumentalists The Death Wheelers share a video single for the title track to their forthcoming album Divine Filth today. Watch and share the B-movie ode “Divine Filth” HERE. Hear & share the single via Bandcamp.

From beyond the gutter, The Death Wheelers bring you their second album, the soundtrack to the fictional bikesploitation flick that never was: Divine Filth. Drawing inspiration from instrumental rock, proto-metal, punk and funk, the band embalms the listener in their sonic world of decay, groove and debauchery. Surfing the line between Motörhead, The Cramps and Dick Dale, the Canadian quartet uncompromisingly blends rawness and power in their riff fueled compositions. Recorded entirely in 48 hours in a live setting just like in the good old days, this second opus is a testament to what the band stands for: a no BS attitude spiked with a heavy layer of crass. Just like their previous offering, the album is devised to serve as a soundtrack loosely based on a plot synopsis of a B-movie:

It’s 1982. Spurcity is run-down. The crime rate is up and so is drug use. A new kind of kick has hit the streets and it ain’t pretty. DTA, a powerful and highly addictive hallucinogenic drug, is transforming its loyal citizens into undead trash. Its users experience an indescribable high, but it leaves them rotting away within days, craving human flesh. No one knows who is dealing this new potent drug, but rumour has it that the motorcycle cult, The Death Wheelers, is behind this concoction. Could this be the end of civilization as we know it? What is motivating this group of psychotic individuals?

The cycle of violence indeed continues with this sordid slab of sounds. So hop on, and enjoy one last ride with The Death Wheelers.

Divine Filth will be available on LP, CD and download on September 11th, 2020 via RidingEasy Records. Pre-orders are available at RidingEasyRecs.com.

Artist: Death Wheelers
Album: Divine Filth
Label: RidingEasy Records
Release Date: Sept 11th, 2020

01. Welcome to Spurcity
02. Ditchfinder General
03. DTA (Suicycle Tendencies)
04. Divine Filth
05. Lobotomobile
06. Corps Morts
07. Murder Machines
08. Motörgasm (Carnal Pleasure)
09. Chopped Back To Life
10. Road Rite
11. Nitrus

Max ‘The Axe’ Tremblay, Richard ‘The Bastard’ Turcotte, Ed ‘ Back from the dead’ Desaulniers, Hugo ‘Red Beard’ Bertacchi

facebook.com/thedeathwheelersband
https://www.instagram.com/thedeathwheelers/
https://thedeathwheelers.bandcamp.com/
ridingeasyrecs.com

The Death Wheelers, “Divine Filth” official video

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Days of Rona: Bill Kole of Ol’ Time Moonshine

Posted in Features on June 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

ol time moonshine bill kole

Days of Rona: Bill Kole of Ol’ Time Moonshine (Toronto, Canada)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

Ol’ Time Moonshine was in the studio laying down drums and bass for our new record at the beginning of March when the reports of the virus started to become more frequent. It wasn’t long before the shelter in place/quarantine orders came down. It’s now been a bit more than 10 weeks since we’ve all been in the same room playing together. We’ve been working on our parts for the record and taking care of some band business and promotion, including uploading our releases to streaming services after more limited release. The uncertainty of what the musical landscape will look like when this is all over has been weighing a bit heavily – a number of venues in our province have already shut down permanently since the pandemic began, and a lot more are close. Even when they open up, the capacity restrictions are likely to devastate their businesses. As a band we’re just taking everyday and doing what we can; looking after all the little projects we always said we’d do if we ever had time. The plan right now is to get back and start tracking guitars and vocals in June, which was our original target for completing the record. We’re lucky to live in an era of connected technology that can keep us together and informed if we choose to use it that way.

I’m blessed to work for a wonderful, family owned film audio support business that has kept me on payroll, even when the office was shut, and we’ve reached a point where I’m able to come in to the office safely, mostly working alone, for a few hours a few days a week. It helps break up the monotony of the days, and I’ve been walking the few kilometres to work to avoid public transit and get some exercise. It’s been wonderful to see my family pull together and be strong in the face of this, and to have friends and family making masks for one another, shopping for those less mobile, trying to make the kids in the neighbourhood feel special on their birthdays, etc. I finally was able to teach my daughter the basics of riding her bike after several seasons of trying, and we’ve done lots of work on our apartment to freshen it up. I’ve been working on a few album covers and posters in my free time (and a lot of revisions on posters due to shows moving). I’ve tried to keep getting up at the same time everyday and keeping somewhat of a schedule so that the days don’t just fade away into one another. Motivation has its good days and bad days, but I try not to be hard on myself. I’ve found my emotions bubble closer to the surface; joy and sadness bring me to tears pretty quickly these days. Trying to look at the positives each day and stay strong for my family and friends.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

I generally feel that the federal and provincial and municipal governments have done a decent job of looking after their people in this crisis, though there is always room for improvement and some communities have been more affected than others. Unfortunately, a few have felt that the rules they make do not apply to them. We’re seeing that in a lot of places, though, not just Canada. I fear that a lot of restaurants, theatres, venues and other cultural institutions may not weather this storm without further intervention. It will certainly be interesting to see what survives and thrives on the other side of this unprecedented economic disaster. On a personal level, most of my friends and family have remained rational and followed precaution. I’m proud of them. I am particularly proud of my friends and family in health care and food service that have sacrificed so much to ensure our safety and wellbeing. I haven’t had anyone close to me pass from COVID-19 complications, but I do have several friends and family members that have lost loved ones. It’s probably too late and too difficult for most, but I feel a stricter lockdown, sooner, would have been more effective then and less painful now. We’re a bit too eager to get back to “normal” and I fear that opening up too soon will undo the progress we’ve made. We just loosened a few restrictions last week, and already people are getting lax about wearing masks and distancing. As someone with asthma and autoimmune issues I need to be a bit extra cautious, and it can be disheartening to see someone not wearing a mask in an enclosed space like a store, or just as bad, wearing it as a chin strap or taking it off to lean over a protective barrier and speak to them.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

I think most of the people in my musical circle have adapted well, but miss being able to see each other and hang out at shows. I’ve watched a number of great live streams, and some cool pro-shot shows are coming online soon. It’s not entirely the same without the atmosphere and immersion, but it’s the best we’ve got for the moment. I’ve had more time to listen to music, so I’ve been diving in and doing a lot of deep listening, catching a lot of great records I missed the first time around. There have been some great articles and discussions in the scene, and it’s been fun to see what a lot of my fellow musicians have been listening to. I’ve talked to a few groups of musicians about contributing guitar or vocals to a few different projects outside of OTM. I’m really proud of the record Ol’ Time Moonshine is working on, and I REALLY want to get it finished and out there. We’ve gone through a lot these past few years since the release of “The Apocalypse Trilogies”, so it has been a bitter pill to swallow to see us get all of our game pieces in order just for the game to change, but we’ll adapt and move forward, we always do. It could have been much worse, though, so I’m grateful we haven’t lost more. So many friends have had to cancel their release parties and tours. So many promoters and touring companies have lost their livelihood for the perceivable future. So many recovering addicts and people with mental health issues have lost their support. If you are having a good, positive day and feel you can handle it, please, reach out to someone you know who might not be and let them know they have someone that loves them.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

I don’t think things can possibly go back to the way they were. It’s all going to be a bit different, and take some getting used to. I think some have found they are stronger than expected, and some are not as strong as they thought. We need to be compassionate and help one another, especially those that fall through the cracks, and we need to take better care of our mental health. We need to be kinder, and more honest with ourselves and loved ones. I miss my US and worldwide doom family, and hope the borders open back up soon and that everyone stays safe so we can enjoy live music again soon.

https://www.facebook.com/oltimemoonshine/
https://oltimemoonshine.bandcamp.com/
http://www.oltimemoonshine.com/

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Stonegrass Release Self-Titled Debut; Vinyl Preorder Available

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

I’ll bottom line it for you: Cool record, out today. Just listen to it.

Vinyl will be out later, but Stonegrass, which has Jay Anderson of Biblical and Comet Control on drums/percussion and Matthew “Doc” Dunn (many projects, most of them delightfully freaked out) on bass/guitar/flute/organ, capture vibes reminiscent of Here Lies Man‘s quest to educate the world on Afrobeat’s righteousness. The recording of Stonegrass‘ self-titled review has some circa-’74 tape grit and the vibe just oozes off jams both longform and cohesive.

Yes, I’ve said this before, but listening to this will make your day better. That’s all I can assure you of.

Thanks for reading if you did. Here’s album info and the stream:

stonegrass self titled

Stonegrass – Stonegrass – May 22

It’s out May 22nd digitally on Bandcamp and you can order the vinyl through that. Should ship late summer/early fall.

Let it go. Let it flow. Let it grow. When Matthew ‘Doc’ Dunn and Jay Anderson finally reconnected after the fall of their previous project, The Spiritual Sky Blues Band, that was the M.O. Barely using words to communicate, their instruments became highly charged positive ion conductors for a natural telepathy between these two local burnouts.

On board was Tony Price, manning the controls, with the results, of what you have here, their FRIED AS THE SKY debut LP.

It’s overcooked and burnt to the CORE, but once cooled, these jams come LEAKING out of your mind hole like an unholy baptism of PEACE.

Rough and frayed like yr mind, but comforting like yr old Uncle Billy’s drug rug. Ask the peyote coyote, he’ll tell you its no easy ride, but enlightenment never is. So take it EZ or just TAKE IT.

With more volumes to follow, Stonegrass will be touring this summer all over your mind. Let it burn. LET IT BLOW.”

Tracklisting:
Side A:
1. The Lady In The Moon
2. Tea
3. The Robe
Side B:
4. Frozen Dunes
5. The Highway (To All Known Places)
6. The Cape
7. Drive On

Stonegrass is:
Jay Anderson: Drums & Percussion
Matthew Dunn: Bass, Flute, Guitar & Organ

https://cosmicrangerecords.bandcamp.com/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpVjMSgJgE0Mzs8c7NbzmaA

Stonegrass, Stonegrass (2020)

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Itus Premiere “Primordial” Lyric Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 5th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

itus (Photo by Justin Ryan Lawrence)

Though the aftermath of the recording finds vocalist Reinier Vandenbosch and bassist/guitarist Brandon Lucking without a drummer, Primordial is nonetheless cohesive as the debut EP from Toronto-based sludge aggressors Itus. The offering is made up of five tracks total and wastes little time on that which isn’t furious, setting an atmosphere of violence and dwelling therein even as Vandenbosch‘s vocals shift between clean melodic singing and guttural growls on opener “Cloud Reader.”

Itus are not without some ambience, either in that cut or “Question Everything” which follows, but that atmosphere is unmistakably bent toward the brutal in tone and general vibe, and Lucking, Vandenbosch and then-drummer Jackson Ward revel in it, both as “Question Everything” chug-plods to its rumbling finish, and as the subsequent title-track distills Primordial‘s punishing aspects to arguably their purest form.

Some clean vocals at the outset remind a bit of Burton C. Bell of Fear Factory in theiritus primordial use of effects, but the growls and screams that come shortly in layers are the stuff of rawer and deathlier fare. With the drums backing the verse, volume recedes and surges again, and the air gives way to solo-topped, screaming chaos later, coming to a stop ahead of the comparatively mellow beginning of “This Can’t Be.” Well shit, “Primordial” did the same thing — I’m not falling for that trap again. False sense of security denied.

Except in this case it’s not false. Itus put “This Can’t Be” on a linear path, daring toward melody in the lead guitar payoff, and that leads smoothly into the closer, “The Chaplain.” A growling resurgence isn’t unexpected, but is welcome just the same over the lumbering progression that it accompanies, and the roll that ensues is a fitting end to Primordial in concept, execution and mindset. By that I mean it’s heavy as shit.

There’s another video out there for “Primordial” if you’re up for a bit of YouTubing, and the whole EP is streaming below if you’re up for something more conveniently located, but if Itus want to highlight the EP’s title-track further with a lyric video maybe to catch a few eyes — like mine — that missed the EP when it first came through because, oh, I don’t know, a global fucking pandemic, I’m hardly one to begrudge them that chance.

Accordingly, here’s this. Enjoy it:

Itus, “Primordial” lyric video premiere

Atmospheric and energetic, this EP is a step in a new musically direction for the duo of Brandon Lucking and Reinier Vandenbosch, and they are encouraged that the reception for their latest endeavour will be well received as they explain:

“We think that Itus could have a much wider appeal than previous efforts of ours. Songs on the EP like ‘Cloud Reader’ and ‘This Can’t Be” are much more accessible, especially with Vandenbosch’s newly developed clean singing. We think the heavier tracks will strike a nice balance with the mellower tracks on the EP as a whole.”

Two very different singles will be released from the EP, the first being the title track ‘Primordial’. Painting the mood like a classic horror creature reveal, it’s both abrasive and calm, and the accompanying music video is shot like a horror film to accentuate the brutality and dark riffage in the track. ITUS details the track:

“We chose to make this the first song we release because to us, it embodies the aspect of human savagery. Primordial uses the idea of coming out of a euphoric bliss into a hellish existence. Its lyrics comment on what forces within people work to pull society back down to chaos. This is the most aggressive song on the EP with its crisp, and aggressive guitar tones that really make it stand out from the other songs.”

Produced, mixed and mastered by Luc Chiasson
Drums performed and engineered by Jackson Ward (Strata Recordings)

Itus EP lineup:
Reinier Vandenbosch – Vocals
Brandon Lucking – Guitar and Bass
Jackson Ward – Drums (on EP)

Itus, Primordial (2020)

Itus on Thee Facebooks

Itus on Instagram

Itus on Bandcamp

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