Album Review: Various Artists, Women of Doom

Posted in Reviews on May 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Various Artists Women of Doom

As a genre, doom is a long way from gender parity. It’s perhaps an optimistic viewpoint to take to say that the current generation of bands is past the point of seeing women artists as a novelty or downplaying their contributions to male bandmates or counterparts, but frankly I’m not even sure that’s true on a universal level. The inherent sexualization of performance — often willfully and hilariously ignored by men watching other men on stage — subjects women artists to a masculine gaze that at times is problematic even as it also serves as an expression of feminine power. As to what it means to be a woman artist in “doom,” or as to what “doom” is — where it starts and ends — I’m no one to speak to either experience, so I look at the Put a professional http://billiga-solglasögon.com/?blogs-vs-term-papers-ny-times to work for you today. Services are available 24/7. Women of Doom compilation, highlighting women artists in and out their respective bands, as kind of a sad celebration. It’s well worth underscoring the stylistic contributions these women are making — and in a society that saw women paid 79 cents per every dollar a man made in 2019, well worth giving women every nod they can get, if not things like universal health coverage and reproductive rights — but a bit of a bummer that we’re not in a place where the norm would make such a compilation superfluous.

Whatever else doom is, it’s not there, but if Get best do my paper for cheaps in U.S. at MyAssignmenthelp.com. Top paper editing services in U.S. at low price available. Avail when you need paper editors Blues Funeral Recordings and essays in english Writing phd thesis aims pay to get math homework done literature review writers uk Desert Records — both labels run by men, speaking of areas where women are underrepresented — wanted to, they could easily turn http://keresztirany.ro/?define-word-dissertation Australia Company. Looking for best online assignment help Australia? You are at the correct place then.Student gets worried Women of Doom into a series. While where can i buy essay online firm with good track record is always a wise option for everyones demands. There are too many proposal writing services online. Women of Doom brings together luminaries such as Order Online homework help 12 at EssayErudite.com. Here at EssayErudite we try to distribute ourselves as one of the most cost-effective methods of Amy Tung Barrysmith of But overall, the Paper Store earned its writers have a price you can afford f http://oranltd.com/dissertation-education-help-research/s. Dont Let the writing service support for the expecta Year of the Cobra, Pay you to do my homework Ghostwriter Lenni . Paying kids learn, do online - pay you! Teacher or get a credit card or nah? Doomstress Alexis of Doomstress, 10 best resume writing services for accountants dig this how to write an application letter nz writing a personal essay for college Mlny Parsonz of personal statement help online. Essay Basics Is The Best College Essay Writing Service, 24/7 Support, 10 Years Of Experience In Academic Writing, USA Based Company! Royal Thunder and introduces two projects of former Here are the top 25 education argumentative essay profiles on LinkedIn. Get all the articles, experts, jobs, and insights you need. SubRosa members in Best Dissertation Writing Quickly Providers in India. Get contact details and address of Technical Writing Service firms and companies. The Otolith and accounting homework solutions - Quality treatment just a few clicks away. Quality service and affordable medications. Most advantageous pharmacy on the internet Rebecca Vernon‘s Abraham Essays - Gun Control Essay Conclusion Service from uncanny pro-scribes. Online Custom Writing Service prices go from .95/page. The Keening, along with bands like Graduate students rarely turn to https://byota.ca/help-with-my-assignment-uk out of mere Thesis writing presupposes researching the credible sources and drawing Heavy Temple, Frayle, Sweden’s Besvärjelsen and France/Ireland’s Deathbell, there are a few conspicuous absences. Perhaps most glaringly, Windhand frontwoman, Dorthia Cottrell, is nowhere to be found, likewise an all-women act like Blackwater Holylight. And the same goes for a generational pioneer like Lori S. of Acid King, but it is inevitably a positive to say that it would be nearly impossible for Women of Doom — in a single go — to be so comprehensive. And as it is, the comp does well in setting an atmosphere across its full tracklisting, which reads as follows:

1. Nighthawk and Heavy Temple – Astral Hand 05:12
2. Amy Tung Barrysmith – Broken 06:04
3. Besvärjelsen – A Curse to be Broken 06:47
4. Mlny Parsonz – A Skeleton is Born 04:57
5. Frayle – Marrow 04:53
6. The Otolith – Bone Dust 04:31
7. Doomstress Alexis – Facade 04:47
8. Deathbell – Coldclaw 04:24
9. The Keening – A Shadow Covers Your Face 05:05
10. Mlny Parsonz – Broke An Arrow (Bonus) 03:25

Various Artists Women of Doom lp

The accomplishment of Women of Doom finding cohesion despite the variety of songwriting and performance modes is not to be understated. Beginning with Heavy Temple — here billed as Nighthawk and Heavy Temple — taking on a purely classic epic doom sound with the willfully Candlemassian “Astral Hand” sets a high bar, as grandiosity suits the Philly unit almost oddly well. They are maybe the odd-band-out in terms of aesthetic on Women of Doom, which is doubly ironic given “Astral Hand” is the most traditionally doomed song on the nine-plus-one-tracker and it’s not a style Heavy Temple generally play, but the darkened atmosphere they build sees immediate flourish in the piano-led composition “Broken” by Amy Tung Barrysmith, who only confirms through her work here that Year of the Cobra have only just begun their greater creative exploration. As one of two non-US acts present, Besvärjelsen are, as ever, a showcase for the vocal presence of Lea Amling Alazam, but their moodier post-doom on “A Curse to Be Broken” picks up well from “Broken” in more than just the similarity of titles.

By the time it’s a third of the way through, Women of Doom has already run a marked gamut in sound and dynamic, and that’s pretty clearly the intent of the thing. As arguably the most known performer featured, Mlny Parsonz, bassist/vocalist of Atlanta’s Royal Thunder brings a boozy classic rock powerhouse delivery to “A Skeleton is Born.” She returns for the bonus track “Broke an Arrow” in more subdued fashion to close out, and if mainstream rock and roll needed a woman figurehead — which it does, badly — she’d be a good candidate for the position in terms of craft; her work is equal parts dangerous and accessible. Frayle‘s “Marrow” carries mystique as a defining element, and The Otolith and Doomstress Alexis make a fitting pair for their use of strings. For The Otolith, that’s a trait inherited fairly enough from SubRosa, but it’s something of a surprise from Doomstress Alexis, who meets it with a likewise unexpected thrashiness in her guitar. Though maybe not as well known as some of the others, Deathbell stand out in such a way as to leave little to wonder why Kozmik Artifactz picked up their 2018 debut, With the Beyond, for a vinyl release. Their “Coldclaw” does not come from that outing, so perhaps portends something new in the works, and if so, is all the more welcome.

As the first offering from The Keening, “A Shadow Covers Your Face” is of particular interest, as was The Otolith‘s “Bone Dust,” but both projects have in common a nascent feel. That’s particularly true of The Keening‘s inclusion, which is a relatively minimal work of solo piano, placed in a way that answers Amy Tung Barrysmith‘s “Broken” earlier but has the distinction of being instrumental. Both works are evocative, but Rebecca Vernon‘s piano in “A Shadow Covers Your Face” seems to use the otherwise unfilled space surrounding it as an instrument unto itself. That shift in presentation at the conclusion is a well placed reminder of the breadth of what greater gender equity in heavy music has to offer, though frankly, if the case needs to be made by then — or at all — you as the listener have probably missed the point. Still, at its most basic level, removed from a context that sees women continually objectified and typecast in artwork, bands, and listener expectations, Women of Doom is a collection of new and encouraging tracks from a diverse array of up and coming artists and acts. Even the most established artist here, which is Parsonz, is reaching beyond what she’s done before, and that too is an important message that shouldn’t be ignored.

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Days of Rona: Daniel Pruitt of Lord Buffalo

Posted in Features on May 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

lord buffalo daniel pruitt

Days of Rona: Daniel Pruitt of Lord Buffalo (Austin, Texas)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? How is everyone’s health so far?

Fortunately we’re all healthy and ¾ of the band has been able to keep their jobs and work from home. I work in the service industry and was laid off. I am lucky to work for a solid musician-owned company that paid me for a few weeks after the shop closed and also made it easy to get unemployment. I’m hiding out in Oklahoma City for a bit and the rest of the band is in Austin. We Facetime weekly and are cooking up ideas for some new music. On top of that I’ve got a few collaborations I’m working on with friends that are nice distractions.

Have you had to rework plans at all?

This whole thing hit right as we were leaving for a West Coast tour in support our LP Tohu Wa Bohu. We made it three dates in before it became clear that trying to tour wasn’t safe for us or our fans. Not great timing. We arrived home to find SXSW and the rest of our spring schedule was canceled. Since then we’ve had several summer shows and festivals cancel and/or tentatively reschedule.

I sent Desert Records the final mixes for a split LP with Palehorse/Palerider a couple days before we left for tour. The release date and road shows for this release are getting pushed back until later in the summer. We’re trying to reschedule everything we can, but at this point no one really knows when it will be ok to gather for live music again. Everything is a little up in the air.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

In the city of Austin we have smart local government who made shelter-in-place happen relatively quickly. Essential businesses are open with social distancing in effect. Everyone who can work from home is doing that. The city is asking people to wear masks in public. Meanwhile, the Governor of Texas is an idiot who values dollars over humans and is reopening the state already. I think it’s a huge mistake. I hope I’m wrong. Many businesses are disregarding the lifting of restrictions from the governor’s office because they value the safety of their employees and customers, which is heartening to see.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The isolation is certainly strange, I wonder how it will affect our communities in the long run. Crossing the street when you see another human does something to you after a while. Initially we all approached this pandemic as a sprint, but now that it’s clear that it’s more of a marathon I think there is a different sort of stress that sets in. I have family and friends who work in healthcare and I worry about them. Not just in the sense of exposure to the virus but the long term psychological effects of waking up everyday and putting yourself and your family into harm’s way. Heavy stuff.

As far as the musical community, there’s been a proliferation of live music streams and social media events, which are good and necessary placeholders. I think live music is a form of creative release for the performer and the audience. At the same time, live streams are not a substitute for the stink of making a proper mess in a room together with other humans and I think we’re all trying to figure out when we can do that again. We’ve done some interviews remotely and live on Instagram. There’s definitely a captive audience in these times. Outside of social media, it seems there’s more getting in touch with fellow musicians and saying, “Hey, you know how we’ve talked about collaborating on X, let’s finally do it.” I’m excited to see some of those come to life.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

I’ve struggled with productivity, worrying I’m not as productive as I think I should be right now. You spend your whole adult life trying to simultaneously pay rent and bills and make music, wishing you had more time to focus on music without the physical and emotional drain of outside work. Then, Boom, out of nowhere, it’s forced on you, but it’s paired with the financial stress of losing your job and the anxiety of being in the midst of a pandemic. Suddenly, it’s hard to feel creative. Anxiety is a drain on your brain, keeping you from mentally getting into a creative space.

I wonder if the larger problem isn’t how we derive our personal value? How we base our self-worth on our production? I’m trying not to engage in the circular thinking of what I should be accomplishing, instead attempting to be present, to value slowness, to take a breath and try to get acquainted with who I am when I’m not running, running, running; who I am when I’m not defining myself by my work. Do I really know? I still sit down to work, but I’m trying not to get mad when nothing seems to come of it. Making yourself available is all you can do sometimes. I trust that when glacier starts to thaw and the juices flow again, when the muse is coaxed down from her perch, this time spent grounding and expanding this knowledge of ourselves will be an undeniable asset.

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Days of Rona: Martin Wegeland of Domkraft

Posted in Features on April 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

domkraft martin wegeland

Days of Rona: Martin Wegeland of Domkraft (Stockholm, Sweden)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Well, since our focus right now is to get the next album written and recorded, it hasn’t really affected the band that much. A few shows have been cancelled, but since most of our booked shows this year are in the fall, there’s still hope that those will happen. We’re all healthy (as for now) and are still able to get together in our practice space so we are pretty much as active as we can be.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

[As of April 9:] There are restrictions, but not as strict as in most other affected countries. Schools are still open and the limit for gatherings is 50 persons, so many restaurants and bars are also still up and running, but many of them are on their knees right now. I live in Stockholm, which is the by far most affected region in Sweden and I think this is where we’ve seen the biggest impact on daily life also. I’ve been working from home for a month, like most people in lines of work that allow that. Sweden has gone the route where we lay a lot of responsibility on the individual instead of governmental restrictions, basically to keep a social distance, not travel or use public transportation unless completely necessary – and to keep washing hands and to stay home at the very tiniest sign of illness whether it be a runny nose or a headache. The only strict restriction apart from the gathering limit is that no visits are allowed in nursing homes and hospitals, basically. And it does feel like most people take the threat seriously and adhere to the recommendations, so fingers crossed the flattened curve strategy will work.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The streets are less crowded, no doubt about that. But it’s not full on ghost town mode. As far as the music scene goes, I think the biggest concern is that – apart from the disease itself and the fact the people die from it, obviously – many already struggling venues and promoters are going through extremely rough times right now. It has always been a game with tight margins, and I honestly don’t know how many of them will make it through this. And that also goes for all the freelancers in the scene. And we also have friends in other bands that really, really suffered from this with tours being cancelled with all the costs already taken and non-refundable. Our own losses from cancelled shows are nothing in comparison.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

Personally, I really hope that everyone takes this seriously. My mother is old and in the risk group and she will most likely neither see her kids nor grandchildren until this is over. And there is no telling how far away that is. The uncertainty is really frustrating since it affects us on so many levels; the damage done by the actual disease, but also all the effects of the lockdowns and restrictions all over the world. The only thing that is for certain is that we will come out to a something very different when this is over. From a band perspective, it does give us time to work on new music, but it’s strange to not have any idea of when we will be able to perform in front of a crowd again. Which of course is a non-issue when set against the fatalities and personal tragedies of those directly affected by the virus, but in the micro perspective of what the aftermath of all this will bring on a personal level, music still feels really important. Hopefully, this test of respect and solidarity will lead to something good coming out of it also. And not just an endless blame game fueled by political cheap shots.

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Days of Rona: Zach Wheeler of Howling Giant

Posted in Features on April 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

howling giant zach wheeler

Days of Rona: Zach Wheeler of Howling Giant (Nashville, Tennessee)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Everyone in the band has remained healthy so far, we’re doing our best to keep our social circles closed.

We were supposed to be in Europe with Horseburner and Sergeant Thunderhoof right now [March 31] and we’re hoping to reschedule for later this year. Our US gigs were slated to start back up at the beginning of May, and we’re expecting a lot of those shows and festivals to be rescheduled. We’re trying to keep ourselves occupied with an unprecedented amount of downtime. We’ve hunkered down for now and have started work on some new music. We’ve even been contracted to write and record a theme for a Magic the Gathering streamer. We’ve also been experimenting with our live sound and video capabilities from our practice room with the hopes of increasing our streaming and video presence online.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

Tennessee has enacted a “Shelter in Place” order, though Nashville has been operating under those conditions for at least a week and a half now. Tom, Seabass, and I all bartend, so we’ve been out of work since March 15th.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Nashville’s leading industry is tourism, so the entire city has shut down. A lot of venues have been hosting online shows in an attempt to help the musicians make a little money, much like our livestream that the brewery Tom and I work at (Tennessee Brew Works) hosted. A lot of musicians we know are setting up weekly live stream concerts and trying to write as much as possible while we all wait for things to open back up.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

We intend to stay productive creatively and everyone is welcome to come along for the ride. Expect more live streams and riff-heavy content.

The Wizard Lives.

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Days of Rona: Peder Bergstrand of Lowrider

Posted in Features on April 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

lowrider peder bergstrand

Days of Rona: Peder Bergstrand of Lowrider (Stockholm, Sweden)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

To be honest, it hasn’t hit us that hard as a band, at least not yet. We luckily did not have any long tours planned that now are cancelled, that financial situations depended on. Fortunately our new record is already out and distribution of it has not been affected by all of this too much, at least not yet.

On a personal level, it’s hitting harder though. Ola is a nurse outside of the band, so he’s very much in the middle of the storm right now.

The rest of us are working from home since 3 weeks, most Swedes that can are. We’re ok, but trying to juggle stay-at-home kids and every day life is a little intense – but that’s of course a total non-issue compared to what people who are ill, or the ones treating them, are going though right now.

We’ve obviously also had to postpone the London and Berlin DesertFest gigs. We were looking forward to those so so much – but honestly it wasn’t even a choice or anything to debate. It was just something we needed to do – we all need to stay home and try to flatten the curve.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

The rules here in Sweden are so far pretty mild compared to rest of Europe. You aren’t allowed to have any gatherings larger than 50 people, and the recommendation is to stay at home if you can, but the latter is not enforced by police or anything. Also, people above 70 are advised to not go out at all.

Me and my siblings take turns leaving groceries outside our mum’s door. It’s a good thing she enjoys staying home reading – it’s going to be a lot of it by the looks of things. They aren’t expecting things to change before mid May, and it probably will be even longer than that.

People are out walking a lot here though, but of course social distancing. Exercising is encouraged by authorities but in ways where you can keep your distance.

It’s now a reversed Stockholm in a lot of ways – the streets are empty, but the surrounding forests are full of people.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Oh it’s a lot. Most people work from home, staying in. Therefor restaurants, businesses and venues are having a really really rough time. Many are looking at going belly up in a month or two. Friends in the industry are in free fall. It’s rough. Booking agencies, promoters, bands… all are getting hit by this.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

Well, we are safe, and in a country with free healthcare and with — what at least seems like now — a decent shot at flattening the curve. So, knock on wood, we are okay, considering. Our near and dear are okay as well, but there’s a lot of friends of friends and neighbors that have the virus or have had severe symptoms. We are, as a city, definitely in the middle of it. Trying not to get to bogged down in negativity though, and focus on all the things that are good rather than the opposite.

This whole involuntary pause from playing live has also forced us to shift focus and look ahead instead. So me and Andreas have started working on the drums for the third album, and by the looks of things we might even finish it this year. It feels good to focus on that in the middle of all of this. Keeps you going. Keeps you sane.

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Lord Buffalo Post “Dog Head” Official Live Video; Tohu Wa Bohu Out This Week

Posted in Bootleg Theater on March 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

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I’ve had occasion more than once now to say I dig Lord Buffalo‘s second album, Tohu Wa Bohu, which is released this week through Blues Funeral Recordings, and hey, here’s one more before the thing actually comes out. It’s fitting the Austin, Texas, four-piece’s dug-in heavy Americana ethic that the video they’d make and put out closest to the record’s arrival is live, and that it’s performed somewhat differently from what’s actually on said record, and that it’s for a deep cut, down on side B rather than something frontloaded onto side A like some outfits do. It is, then, an invitation to dig further.

In the live version of “Dog Head,” some more of the All Them Witches vocal influence comes through, but that violin is sweet and sad and it seems to carry its own melody for the voice to play soulfully off of in full-on earlier-Woven Hand fashion, all the while a swell of tone and rhythm builds up around it and seems to consume the entire thing by the time it’s done. There’s no piano, as there is in the studio incarnation of “Dog Head,” and there’s a part of me that misses that crash of the keys here, but you can only be in so many places playing so many instruments at one time, and Lord Buffalo have clearly positioned themselves well. It works, is all I’m saying.

And guess what? I dig the album. It’s out Friday.

Enjoy the video:

Lord Buffalo, “Dog Head” official video

Live version of “Dog Head” by Lord Buffalo. Performed at Breathing Rhythm Studio, August 3rd, 2019. Recorded and mixed by Steve Boaz. Filmed and edited by Brian Blackwood.

Studio version of Dog Head appears on the album “Tohu Wa Bohu” Available March 27th, 2020 from Blues Funeral Recordings.

Austin, TX dark rock / post-Americana band Lord Buffalo will release its new LP, ‘Tohu Wa Bohu’, on March 27 via Blues Funeral Recordings. Recorded in Lockhart, TX with producer Danny Reisch (Chelsea Wolfe, Okkervil River) and mastered by Dave Shirk (Mastodon, Sun Ra), the album is the follow-up to the folk-psych group’s 2017 self-titled full length.

“Dog Head” is a song from our new LP, ‘Tohu Wa Bohu’, and while the album version begins as a dark, downtempo piano creeper, we’d been doing the song live with an extended intro of bowed guitar and violin,” says vocalist / guitarist Daniel Jesse Pruitt. “Lord Buffalo songs often come out a little different every night, and we wanted to capture a little of that with this live-in-studio version of ‘Dog Head’. ‘Dog Head’ begins with a drone of bowed guitar and violin and the holds to the low road until the switch gets flipped and fuzzed-out guitar breaks in to end the piece with an exclamation point. The end gets chaotic, the song comes off the tracks a bit, but the heaviness feels redemptive, a release from the previous dirge.”

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G.J. Hellman
P.J. Patterson
Yamal Said
D.J. Pruitt

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Lord Buffalo Set March 13 Release for Tohu Wa Bohu; Tour Dates Announced

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

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This is a record I dig, and while I’m fairly certain the news of the March 13 release date isn’t new, I realized that the last time I posted about Lord Buffalo was in December, when they signed to Blues Funeral Recordings and premiered the title-track of their impending second album, Tohu Wa Bohu. Clerical error. Not my first.

So yes, March 13. The band will tour to support it — pretty sure that news is newer, if it helps — and they have a second single streaming through a YouTube channel that isn’t the one that caused the kerfuffle last week but you’ll pardon me anyhow if I’m more gunshy than usual on posting from such sources. If you want to search it out, the song is “Halle Berry” and it’s my favorite on the record for more than just the title. I assume it’ll be on Bandcamp eventually, so I’ve included the album’s embed below to be ready for when it might show up there. See? I can be ahead of the game even as I’m behind it.

As Ronnie James Dio once said, “magic.”

To the PR wire:

Lord Buffalo Tohu Wa Bohu

Austin’s LORD BUFFALO Embrace Dark Folk and Psychedelic Americana on TOHU WA BOHU

Atmospheric quartet capture western skies and unsettling prairie on Blues Funeral Recordings debut

America’s vast ocean of rolling prairie, brutal in its rhythmic repetition and sameness, can be unsettling to take in. The plains force a communion with the open sky, the endless landscape turning the eyes inward.

LORD BUFFALO’s second LP is just that: the outward gaze forced inward, where the unknowable treads the blurred borders between land, sky and mind.

On March 13, Blues Funeral Recordings will release Tohu Wa Bohu, the new album from Austin’s Lord Buffalo, a band whose dark folk and Gothic Americana sees them chasing the same storm-threatening horizon sky as All Them Witches, Woven Hand, Nick Cave and Dead Meadow.

With their spacious soft/loud dynamics and violin drone, Lord Buffalo is often the loudest band on folk night and the softest on a metal bill, never failing to hold their own and make the dichotomy feel effortless.

An unsettling ride through open plains and melancholic Midwestern imagery, Tohu Wa Bohu is thick with captivating intensity and brooding heaviness of the soul. With its haunted themes and spacious soundscapes, the record plays across genres, taking cues equally from Morricone and Badalementi as well as Sabbath and Swans.

Tohu Wa Bohu will be released on digital, CD and LP from Blues Funeral Recordings on March 13th.

LORD BUFFALO is on tour in March and will perform at this year’s Psycho Las Vegas festival (August 2020).

Live Dates:
Fri 3/6/20 Austin, TX— The Lost Well
Wed 3/11/20 El Paso, TX — Rockhouse
Thu 3/12/20 Bisbee, AZ — The Quarry Bisbee
Fri 3/13/20 Tempe, AZ — Yucca taproom
Sat 3/14/20 Los Angeles, CA — 5 Star Bar
Sun 3/15/20 Spring Valley, Ca — Bancroft
Tue 3/17/20 Salt Lake City, UT — Loading Dock
Wed 3/18/20 Denver, CO — Cervantes
Thu 3/19/20 Albuquerque, NM — Sister Bar
Sat 3/21/20 Arlington, TX — Division Brewing
Thu 4/30/20 Austin, TV — Waterloo Records (in-store performance)
August 2020 Las Vegas, NV — Psycho Las Vegas Festival

LORD BUFFALO:
Daniel Pruitt – Vocals, Guitar
Garrett Hellman – Guitar, Organs
Patrick Patterson – Violin
Yamal Said – Percussion

https://www.facebook.com/lord.buffalo.band/
http://instagram.com/lordbuffalo
https://lord-buffalo.bandcamp.com/
http://www.lordbuffalo.com/
https://www.facebook.com/bluesfuneral/
http://bluesfuneral.com/

Lord Buffalo, Tohu Wa Bohu (2020)

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Review & Track Premiere: Lowrider, Refractions

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on January 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Lowrider Refractions

[Click play above to stream the premiere of ‘Red River’ from Lowrider’s Refractions. Album is out Feb. 21 on Blues Funeral Recordings with preorders here.]

Peder Bergstrand on “Refractions”:

“’Red River’ has been with us since maybe 2001-2002… It’s the first riff we wrote for our second album, we even recorded it in 2003 — but it just one of those songs that needed to mature to become what it was intended to be. It feels so right that it’s the first one out of the gate from this forever-in-the-making album, and it couldn’t feel more like the perfect amalgamation or Lowrider then and Lowrider now. Absolutely STOKED to share it with you.”

Then and now, it is an elite class to which Lowrider‘s work belongs. Few single albums have helped steer the course of the European heavy underground to the degree of their MeteorCity-issued 2000 debut, Ode to Io (reissue review here). Along with fellow Swedes Dozer, as well as Colour Haze, Orange Goblin and a select group of others from around the continent, they helped pave the path of the emergent stoner rock scene at the turn of the century, taking lessons from California desert heavy and inherently bringing something of their own to the creative process that more than a generation of bands has learned from in their wake. Two key differences between Lowrider and those other bands who made such a mark at the time: they were very young and they only did the one record. Both are crucial when it comes to understanding how their first full-length in 20 years, Refractions — released through Blues Funeral Recordings — manages to sound so vibrant in its 41-minute front-to-back.

Comprised of bassist/vocalist Peder Bergstrand, lead guitarist/vocalist Ola Hellquist, guitarist Niclas Stålfors and drummer Andreas ErikssonLowrider‘s youth gave Ode to Io an imitable energy, and with Refractions, in “Red River” and “Ol’ Mule Pepe,” that original, vital spark is honored and expanded upon in a way that’s mature but by no means “old-sounding.” That is, as much as one might and probably should consider Refractions a “comeback” album, Lowrider do not come across in pieces like the organ-laced second cut “Ode to Ganymede,” the eight-minute side A finale “Sernanders Krog” and the 11-minute closer “Pipe Rider” like old men trying to recapture past glories.

Rather, the great triumph of Refractions, which also saw limited issue last year through Blues Funeral‘s Postwax vinyl subscription service (and for which I had the honor of doing liner notes), is to acknowledge the accomplishments Lowrider made two decades ago but not be restrained by them. This is where the fact of their only having been one prior full-length comes most into play. Lowrider had a couple other releases — a 1997 split with Sparzanza (discussed here), their 1998 split with Nebula (discussed here) — but their legacy and influence was localized almost entirely in Ode to Io, and that essentially set that record up as a monolith in time.

One record. And they were basically kids. Bergstrand was a teenager.

It doesn’t even seem fair. How could a modern incarnation of Lowrider possibly be expected to live up to such a standard? Refractions meets this question head-on. It does not shirk the responsibility Lowrider have in following their debut — and that may have something to do with why it’s coming out now when their reunion began at Desertfest some seven years ago — but it shows that Lowrider are different people than they were at 17 or in their early 20s, etc., and it brings new character and breadth to their craft that is more progressive than one could have reasonably hoped.

lowrider (Photo by Anna Liden Wiren)

In particular, Bergstrand‘s time fronting the pop-tinged melodic rock outfit I are Droid — whose underrated 2013 second LP, The Winter Ward (review here), still resonates — doesn’t seem to be forgotten, and even as “Pipe Rider” builds its forward wash of fuzz leading to the jam that will carry Refractions to its finish, its vocals deep in the mix bask in a melody more complex than anything Lowrider have done previously. That song is twice-over pivotal to Refractions, since its lyrics directly acknowledge the central task of the album in carrying forward what the band were into what they are: “Give me something new…Fragments from our youth,” and so on (that’s a point I raised in the liner notes as well, but it applies just the same).

And preceded by the instrumental pair “Sun Devil/M87,” the finale’s arrival is all the more an occasion on a side B, expanding on the lushness of “Ode to Ganymede” in tone and depth while finding its own course much as Lowrider themselves do all across the album, whether it’s the hooky nod and crash — I’ll just say outright that Eriksson‘s drums are a highlight unto themselves across the entire span of the record both in what he’s playing and the production value — of “Red River” or “Ol’ Mule Pepe” with Hellquist taking the lead vocal spot on the latter. At five minutes long, that brash rocker is paired well as the side B leadoff counterpart to “Red River” opening Refractions as a whole, but its vibe is even more of a standout for drawing the clearest line between the stoner rock of Lowrider‘s past and the heavy rock of their present, manifesting the Kyuss idolatry that fueled the band’s early work into a shuffling riff that’s righteous in its genre familiarity even as they take ownership of it.

Especially with the turn into “Sun Devil/M87” afterward, one gets the impression that even as Lowrider know the formidable task they’re facing, they’re still unafraid to have a good time here. It doesn’t all need to be a serious we-put-out-a-very-important-record-20-years-ago museum piece. It’s still rock and roll. “Sun Devil” is a wah-solo-topped blast, and “M87” picks up at the divide with a bassline from Bergstrand that sets a fuzzy course of pulled notes hypnotic in their repetition that end up a perfect lead-in for the closer, which again serves to mirror its side A counterpart in “Sernanders Krog” while at least in part telling the story of what Refractions is intended to be and what it means to the band. These are central moments for Lowrider, and they make it obvious on all six tracks that, while they know that Ode to Io means a lot to a lot of people, the best justice they can do to that album is to leave it in its place. So that’s what they do. Beautifully.

Refractions has been thus far received with a considerable amount of album-of-the-year-type hyperbole. Though it’s early in 2020 for such assignations and with the prior Postwax release, I admit I’m not sure if it counts as 2019 or not (or if it matters), but as a fan of Lowrider‘s past accomplishments, I can’t disagree with the excited sentiment around these songs. The album succeeds in every way in bringing Lowrider into the present and finds them indeed reflecting on the past, but refusing to lose themselves in it. As an entire generational shift has taken place in terms of audience over the last 10, let alone 20, years, Lowrider reestablish their place among heavy rock’s most momentous purveyors. If their new album is an occasion, it is one to which on every level they live up.

Recommended.

Lowrider on Thee Facebooks

Lowrider on Instagram

Lowrider on Bandcamp

Blues Funeral Recordings on Bandcamp

Blues Funeral Recordings on Thee Facebooks

Blues Funeral Recordings website

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