Review & Track Premiere: Kandodo3, K3

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on May 20th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

kandodo k3

[Click play above to stream ‘Everything – Green’s – Gone” from Kandodo3’s K3. Album is out June 21 on Rooster Rock Records.]

Headphones at the ready for the third/fourth-ish full-length from Kandodo, this time incarnated as Kandodo3 and expertly delivering a packed 79 minutes of mostly minimalist psychedelic brainmelt. It’s been dubbed K3, simple enough, and its lengthy run plays out across seven tracks whose far-out sprawl is mitigated only by the distance the imagination of the listener is willing to follow them. At the nexus of all things Kandodo is guitarist Simon Price, also of garage-psych-fuzz scorchers The Heads, but Kandodo is a different bird altogether — not a bird at all, really; a supermarket in Malawi — and even as Price brings aboard The Heads bandmates Hugh Owen Morgan on bass and Wayne Maskell on drums to manifest the ‘3’ in Kandodo3, the identity of the project remains distinctly separate. It’s just something else, even if it’s some of the same people.

But what the three-piece construct, or anti-construct, in these tracks ranges from the 83-second guitar noise experiment of “Lapwinger” through the 39-minute final track “High on Planes/Drifter” that consumes sides C and D of the double-vinyl and finds Price re-teaming on the latter “Drifter” part with John McBain, as last heard in 2016’s dual-speed Lost Chants/Last Chance (review here), a record that itself was an experiment, intended for play at 33 or 45RPM depending on the listener’s preference and also presented as a 2CD with each version on its own disc. K3 doesn’t work with the same kind of meta-conceptual foundation, but its spaciousness in cuts like “Holy Debut,” the straightforward-in-comparison-to-what-follows opener “King Vulture” and of course the its-own-album finale, the record nonetheless weaves its narrative through open creativity and exploratory sensation. Its drone is droning and its layers are layered, but even in the lysergic music-box “Lounge Core” that closes side B and is just one of the two inclusions under six minutes long at 3:39, K3 basks in the unexpected and a vibe of weirdoist bliss that goes beyond “for art’s sake” and is headfirst into passion in the making.

And maybe that’s not immediately apparent in the 13-minute soundscape of “Everything – Green’s – Gone” at the close of side A after “King Vulture” and “Lapwinger,” but there is a joy in the creative process even in that piece’s moodier early stretch, where Price‘s buzzsaw guitar lead seems to be reminding of the forests lost to building empty shopping malls. The underlying low end — presumably that’s Morgan, but one never really knows and that’s part of the fun — gives that track its extra brood, and the drone would be enough to make Earth jealous, but the quiet key-like guitar (or keys), echoes “King Vulture” while foreshadowing “Lounge Core” to come, so even there, there’s some manner of intertwining “Everything – Green’s – Gone” to K3 as a whole. Similarly, “Holy Debut” feeds into “The Gaping Maw,” which is perhaps titled in honor of its spaciousness, in a way that highlights the overarching flow of the material. Not all transitions are so direct, but that change does make the point of how easily K3 has moved from one vibe to the next all along, doing so via long fades into and out of silence and the general open spirit of the material.

kandodo

That is, it sets up the audience so that expectation mirrors breadth. That’s no small feat — putting the listener where you want them, without the aid of catchy hooks or other immediately accessible fare — but neither is this Price‘s first time at this particular dance, and though he seems in places to be willfully giving up command of the songs in the name of aural adventure, whether that’s improv or just putting consciousness to the side for a moment and feeling out where a piece like “Lapwinger” does and doesn’t want to go during its brief run. That in itself is a joyful act, embracing that task of helping a thing make itself, and Kandodo3, despite the obvious shifts in atmosphere throughout, seem to have a sense of when to let go and when to steer the direction more actively — though relativity applies in that regard as much as in everything else.

It’s hard not to think of “High on Planes/Drifter” as a highlight, focal point, whatever you want to call it, and maybe that’s fair enough. At 39 minutes, it’s about half the total runtime, and its droned-out ambience is an achievement apart even from a song like “Everything – Green’s – Gone” or “The Gaping Maw,” oozing out with a fluidity distinct enough to be placed on its own LP and making its way from minimal to minimal-est as it moves toward what one assumes is the near-midpoint transition between its two parts, drums gradually fading in after the arrival of the 23rd minute with a building tension of tom hits, eBow-sounding drone and a rhythmic line floating atop. That thud holds almost maddeningly steady over the next 10-plus minutes, with the arrival of McBain (ex-Monster Magnet, Wellwater Conspiracy, etc.) announced via a fuzzy solo that only adds to the immersion of the track as a whole and helps carry it toward its quieter finish.

With the title reference to High Plains Drifter, there is perhaps unsurprisingly some spaghetti west in the atmosphere, but however it might use a repeating figure, “High on Planes/Drifter” never really fully adopts that specific kind of presentation. Like the rest of the album before it, it almost can’t help but be its own thing. And that thing won’t be for everybody — what’s that you say? experimentalist drone isn’t universally approachable? tell me more! — but whether those who take it on do so for the almost-80-minute blissout or to sit and wade through each subtle turn of Price‘s guitar the various obscure elements as they wade in and out of the mix, K3 nonetheless makes a personal connection with the listener via the intimacy at play beneath its surface and the honest creative whim at its core. So maybe it’s not for everybody. Fine. Those willing to make the connection, however, will find it delivers on engagement to a degree worthy of its vast sonic reach.

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Trippy Wicked Release Lost Single “Hark at You” from Movin’ On Sessions

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 10th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

trippy wicked

London’s Trippy Wicked and the Cosmic Children of the Knight continue their celebration of the 10th anniversary for 2009’s debut full-length, Movin’ On (review here), by releasing another yet-unheard track from those sessions. How many songs did they record that didn’t make the album? I don’t know, but “Hart at You” is the second one released behind “Evil” (posted here), which they put out last month. “Hark at You” has a bit of the sleaze that “Southern” from the album accomplished, but is noisier and more of a banger in terms of tempo. Like its predecessor, it’s a fun cut and kind of a hidden gem that could just as easily have wound up on the record. Seems to me they’re building an EP one song at a time here, but if these tracks all wind up collected at some point or other, this is still a cool way to unveil them so that each gets properly highlighted.

Dig it:

trippy wicked hark at you

To celebrate the 10 year anniversary of their album “Movin On” TRIPPY WICKED & THE COSMIC CHILDREN OF THE KNIGHT have just released “Hark At You”.

Drummer Chris West commented “Hark at You was a song we were often playing live around the time of Movin On. I don’t remember if we’d already decided not to include it on the album by the time we were mixing but we treated the mix a little different to most of the others. It’s mostly mono guitar on the track with extra guitar/stereo stuff happening during the slower parts. The drums are also slightly off to one side to make a bit of room in the mix. For me at the time it seemed a little too rough sounding, but listening to it now I love how raw and gnarly it is.”

Listen to the track here: https://trippywicked.fanlink.to/Hark

The early years of Trippy Wicked & the Cosmic Children of the Knight are a mix of lineup changes, demos, gigs to empty rooms and stylistic development. Throughout that time the constants of founding members Pete Holland (guitar, vocals) and Chris West (drums), a DIY ethic, and a gut feeling they were onto something worth pursuing remained true. Early 2019 saw the reformation of the ‘not quite original but longest serving lineup’ of Holland and West with later addition bassist Dicky King. (West having previously quit the band in 2013 before his return.)

Along with the announcement of the lineup change, Trippy Wicked also noted they are writing their third full length album and will return to playing live after a two-year break.

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Trippy Wicked and the Cosmic Children of the Knight, “Hark at You”

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Bright Curse Stream New Album Time of the Healer in its Entirety; Out Tomorrow on Ripple Music

Posted in audiObelisk on May 9th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

bright curse

Bright Curse make their return with Time of the Healer tomorrow, May 10, through Ripple Music — almost three years to the day after their 2016 debut, Before the Shore (review here) was released. The time between has been eventful for the band to say the least. The label that put out the first outing, which was preceded by their 2013 self-titled EP (review here), was HeviSike Records, which unceremoniously folded thereafter amidst all kinds of shadiness accusations on the part of multiple parties. Also certainly relevant, Bright Curse are essentially a different band now than they were three years ago, with founding guitarist/vocalist Romain Daut revamping the lineup and moving from a trio to a four-piece now comprised of himself along with guitarist Tommy Foster, bassist Sammy Deveille and drummer Mark Buckwell. Unsurprisingly, there’s been an according shift in sound that’s evident throughout Time of the Healer as relates to Before the Shore, taking on a more weighted tonality — two guitars’ll do that — while exploring progressive textures of funk and jazz early on opener “Smoke of the Past” with start-stops and Peruvian flute.

Across that 11-minute leadoff and two other extended pieces in “Shadows” and the title-track paired as the closing duo with the shorter “Laura” (5:36) and “Une Virée” (3:03) between, Bright Curse find a method of delivery that is at once heavy and spacious without relying too much on effects or echo to make it happen. The mix is natural even as lead guitar emerges at the fore, and they’re able to shift tempo and volume naturally as “Smoke of the Past” progresses, leading to a closing funk jam that moves directly into the blues guitar intro to “Laura,” which works on a linear build toward a trumpet-topped rolling payoff — life is full of surprises; sometimes that surprise is a trumpet — and gives way to its own transitional stretch at the end, letting the French-language (Daut is a France-to-London-to-France transplant) spoken word and quiet guitar and percussion add a jazzy feel that builds off that of “Smoke of the Past” without echoing it directly. A hazy groove ensues until what might be abright curse time of the healer manipulated sample of dogs barking leads the way into “Shadows” and the accordingly bluesy pulse that thrives at its outset.

That transition, which is also presumably where side A ends and side B begins, is particularly interesting since it speaks to Time of the Healer working on more of a linear pattern, intended to be taken as an unbroken entirety. The extended runtimes of some of its tracks speak to a change in mindset as well — Bright Curse have written their share of longer songs, but never before hit the 10-minute mark — and if the intention is that Time of the Healer‘s tracks should be read as pieces of a whole work, movements within something larger, then that sensibility is duly accomplished in the finished product of the album itself. The flow of “Shadows” with its bluesy and grungy nod and brighter lead coming forward like that of “Smoke of the Past” before it doesn’t hurt either in that regard, as Daut‘s vocals lead a transition into more bottom-heavy nod at about seven minutes in. They finish “Shadows” with a slow march and an obscured sludgy clip that’s not really identifiable. When the closer ensues a few seconds later, it’s with a funky rhythm and a full sense of summary for what the album that shares its name has had on offer. There are two departure jams — one with trumpet (hello again) and one more spacious of quiet guitar ambience and percussion and between and after them, Bright Curse get as heavy as they’ve ever gotten, winding up at the finish for one last hit answered by string sounds also of unknown origin.

The message there could hardly be clearer in that Bright Curse, as they’ve done all along here, provide the next song’s intro, only there’s no next song to follow. Bright Curse are saying they’re not done, and frankly, I believe it. If having their label pulled out from under them and completely remaking the band didn’t kill them, I’m not sure anything other than a self-imposed “okay that’s it” can do so. All the better they never got to that point, though, as Time of the Healer shows the ongoing will toward creative growth in its arrangements and general reach that has been a defining factor in the band’s expressive searching, and one hopes that, with such turbulence behind them and this record as the result, they’re able to move forward from here and continue that sonic expansion into parts yet unknown. Time of the Healer does this boldly.

I’m thrilled today to host the premiere of the full album ahead of its proper release tomorrow on Ripple. Please find it below and enjoy:

Romain Daut on Time of the Healer:

It has been an adventure to record and release Time of The Healer. A lot has changed since our last album Before The Shore.

With the departure of Zach and Max, former drummer and bass player, and the whole mess with HeviSike, I wasn’t sure if I wanted to carry on, then I realised that not playing music was not working for me, so I started writing new material, not really knowing if it would get released or not…

Then Sammy offered to come back in the band (He is one of the first 3) and Mark from Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters was up for it too. So we started working, and then recorded the whole thing. I had a daughter, moved back to France.

Everything Bright Curse related takes more time and money, but when you are motivated, it doesn’t matter…

Ripple offered to release the album and I am really happy to work with them now.

Bright Curse is:
Romain Daut: Guitar, Flute, Vocals 
Sammy Deveille: Bass, Double Bass 
Mark Buckwell: Drums, Percussions 
Tommy Foster: Additional guitarsDylan Jones: Trumpet on “Laura” and “Time of The Healer”
Produced By Romain Daut and JB Pilon 
Recorded and Mixed at Buffalo Studio (London UK) 
Mastered at Audiosiege Portland. 

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Forming the Void Announced for Red Crust Festival 2020 in the UK

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 7th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

forming the void (Photo by Rachael Aloia)

This was going to happen eventually, but it’s worth marking the fact that Forming the Void‘s first-announced show outside of North America will be held a year from this week at Red Crust Festival 2020 in the UK. I say it’s their first-announced, because I expect they’ll have more dates either before or after it, and I wouldn’t be surprised to find them popping up on other fests here and there next Spring. Pure speculation, but still. And hey, while we’re speculating, it seems incredibly reasonable to think that by the time next Spring rolls around, the Louisiana heavy prog rockers will have a new record out to serve as their debut on Ripple Music.

I had the pleasure of seeing the four-piece twice in the last couple months, and my takeaway from that is that they’re ready for this kind of thing. The release of Rift (review here) last year opened many doors — including that of Ripple — for them, and they’ve been quick to take advantage. The task before them now is to make an album that builds on Rift‘s rather significant accomplishments in terms of scope and songwriting. No reason to think they can’t do it, as they’ve been moving forward and figuring out who they are as a band all along. I don’t know if it’ll be out before the end of 2019 — I think it was September they were going to record? — but it’ll be welcome when it shows up, and congrats to the band on continuing to broaden their touring horizons. This is a big one.

The fest announced them thusly:

red crust festival 2020 forming the void

We are pleased to announce that the next Red Crust Festival will be taking place at La Belle Angele in Edinburgh on 8th, 9th,10th of May 2020.

We are able to announce that ‘Forming the Void’ will be one of our headliners. Their recent album ‘Rift’ was hailed worldwide by critics and has performed well in various charts. Hailing from Louisiana, they play a potent blend of heavy progressive rock, stoner & doom.

Check out the single ‘On We Sail’. It’s an anthem!

Get your tickets now at the event page below: https://www.facebook.com/events/289893015226269/
https://www.facebook.com/redcrustfestival/

Forming The Void:
James Marshall – Guitar/Vocals
Shadi Omar Al-Khansa – Guitar
Luke Baker – Bass
Thomas Colley – Drums

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Forming the Void, “Arrival” official video

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End of the World Festival 2019: Dead Witches, Elephant Tree, Tuskar, Oak & More to Play

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 6th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

end of the world festival logo

At very least, it’ll be the end of your liver. Nestled into the southwest of England in the port town of Plymouth, the third End of the World Festival 2019 is set to feature the formidable likes of Dead Witches, Elephant Tree, Gandalf the Green, Cybernetic Witch Cult, Lacertilia, Oak and a likewise formidable slew of others for a one-dayer that looks like a marathon and will likely feel like one for anyone in attendance over the age of 30. As a one-and-done-type event, it’s a celebration of the UK’s native scene, which is indeed worthy of celebrating, and its lineup showcases not only regional heavy, but a bit of the various forms in which that heavy plays out — some sludge, some rock, some doom, some this, some that. There’s a lot to dig here, so needless to say I’ll be sailing in for it.

Nah, not really, but that would be awesome. Book project! I set sail from Massachusetts’ Plymouth to the real Plymouth for a fest, caught in a storm, stranded on an island, etc. The whole bit.

Ah screw it. Here’s the lineup:

end of the world festival

End Of The World festival in Plymouth is in their third year, showcasing some of the best stoner, psych, doom and sludge metal bands in the UK. This year they’ve expanded to include Dead Witches, featuring the legendary Mark Greening (ex-Electric Wizard). These are exclusive South-West shows for many of these acts; the event typically showcases the South-West scene but has expanded to include Manchester’s Ritual King, Welsh alt-stoner act Heavy on the Ride and London-based blues-doom outfit Oak. In their third outing, they’re stronger than ever and hoping for their best turnout yet.

The event takes place between The Underground and The Junction in Plymouth on 06.07.19.

The bands playing are:

Mother Vulture
Oak
Heavy on the Ride
Victus
Gandalf the Green
Greenhorn
Ritual King
Beggar
Lacertilia
Tuskar
Cybernetic Witch Cult
Elephant Tree
Mother Vulture

Tickets are £15 in advance or £17 OTD

Ticket link: https://cyberneticwitchcult.bigcartel.com/product/end-of-the-world-festival-2019-ticket

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Elephant Tree, “Dawn” live at HRH Doom vs. Stoner 2018

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Elder Druid Post Golgotha Cover Art; Album Due Late 2019

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 2nd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

elder druid

Northern Irish riffers Elder Druid are preparing to release their second full-length later this year. Titled Golgotha, it will be the answer to 2017’s Carmina Satanae, which saw them blending sludge burl and doomed atmospheres and themes to encouraging and engaging degrees. What does the new album hold? Beats the hell out of me — I haven’t heard it yet. But if the cover art by Mariusz Lewandowski is anything to go by, things won’t be any less bleak this time around. Lewandowski was the painter behind the the striking cover of Bell Witch‘s Mirror Reaper, and Golgotha would seem to be on-point in terms of its general outlook. Murky and depressive. Heavy like slumped shoulders.

There’s no audio from the record as yet, or even a solid release date made public, so there’s probably more to come before the album is actually out — unless they get sneaky and just drop it without telling anyone first; it happens — but until then, the cover art and tracklisting are what there is to go on, so that’s what I’m going on. If you’re curious to learn what a song called “Paegan Dawn of Anubis” sounds like, me too. I’ll look forward to finding out.

Here’s the art and their corresponding post:

elder-druid-golgotha

ELDER DRUID – ‘GOLGOTHA’

Delighted to finally reveal the artwork and tracklist for our second full-length album, ‘Golgotha’, due for release in late 2019.

We have the honour of using this piece by one of the greatest surrealist painters in the world right now… the mighty Mariusz Lewandowski. (The artist behind Bell Witch’s ‘Mirror Reaper’ and Shrine Of The Serpent’s ‘Entropic Disillusion’).

Recorded in our rehearsal space in Belfast.

TRACKLIST:
1. Golgotha
2. Dreadnought
3. Sleeping Giant
4. Vincere Vel Mori
5. Sentinel
6. Paegan Dawn of Anubis
7. The Archmage

Elder Druid is:
Gregg McDowell – Vocals,
Jake Wallace – Guitar,
Mikey Scott – Guitar,
Dale Hughes – Bass,
Brien Gillen – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/elderdruidband
https://elderdruid.bandcamp.com/releases
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Elder Druid, Golgotha (2017)

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Trippy Wicked and the Cosmic Children of the Knight Post “Evil” from Movin’ On Sessions

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 18th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

trippy wicked

With an opening riff that channels Phantom of the Opera, Trippy Wicked and the Cosmic Children of the Knight dig back into their past to unveil “Evil.” It’s not a Willie Dixon cover, which was my first thought — you might recall Cactus‘ version of that song on Restrictions, among many others — but the seven-minute piece comes from the sessions of 2009’s debut full-length, Movin’ On (review here), and in honor of the record’s 10th anniversary and the recently announced reformation of that lineup, they will post a series of lost tracks from that era. There are three of them and “Evil” is the first. The next, I’m sure, will be posted as soon as this goes live — because that’s how good my timing usually is in terms of making sure I’m constantly behind on everything — but until then, you can enjoy “Evil” at the bottom of this post. Nostalgia achieved, gents.

And that’s a quick 10 years.

From the PR wire:

trippy wicked evil

Trippy Wicked release previously unreleased track “Evil” from Movin On recording sessions

Trippy Wicked & the Cosmic Children of the Knight recently announced original drummer Chris West is back in the band after a five-year departure. Given that the band also announced they were writing new material, you would be forgiven for asking why they are now releasing material from a decade ago.

Well, October 2019 marks the 10-year anniversary of the band’s debut album, Movin On. During the recording session at Chuckalumba Studios (most noted for being the studio Electric Wizard recorded Dopethrone and Let Us Pray), Trippy Wicked recorded some songs that either didn’t get an official release or have never been heard.

To mark the anniversary Trippy Wicked are releasing these songs as singles and the first of these comes in the form of “Evil’. The song had appeared on an earlier demo but this version gets the full ‘blown out amps committed to tape’ treatment that Chuckalumba does so well.

Singer Pete Holland commented on the inspiration behind “Evil”:
“Evil is about the oppression from forces that try to dictate how you should live your life, and trying to break that train of thought to be free to imagine the life you want.”

Listen to the song on all major platforms here: http://smarturl.it/TrippyEvil

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Trippy Wicked and the Cosmic Children of the Knight, “Evil”

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Orange Goblin Announce US Dates Starting Aug. 27

Posted in Whathaveyou on April 5th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

ORANGE GOBLIN DAVID BOULONGNE

Okay, got your calendar marked yet? Got a place to crash if you need one? Well, doesn’t matter. You can figure that out later. The point is Orange Goblin are coming to the US supporting their righteous 2018 offering, The Wolf Bites Back (review here), and they’re doing six shows, and that’s probably it for the entire album cycle. And while you’ve got your leather-bound day-planner out, you might want to make a note to yourself to send a thank you card to Muddy Roots Fest in Tennessee, because if they weren’t bringing the band over to play, the tour probably wouldn’t be happening at all, so really they’re just doing everyone a favor. So yeah, thanks Muddy Roots.

New York, Chicago, Muddy Roots, Dallas, Austin and Los Angeles. That’s it. They’re giving everyone plenty of times to get their lives in order and make showing-up happen. Frankly, if these shows don’t sell out, it’s a sad day in America.

From the PR wire:

orange goblin tour

Orange Goblin Announces U.S. Tour Dates

UK Heavy Metal Titans to Play Exclusive Live Shows in NYC, Chicago, Los Angeles, Austin and more this Summer

Orange Goblin, the heavy hitting British metal band that has inspired a generation of up-and-coming rock acts has announced summer U.S. headlining tour dates. The week-long set of exclusive live shows will kick off on August 27 in New York City and will include a performance as part of the 2019 Muddy Roots Festival on August 30, where the respected group will share the stage with MC50, Off!, and more.

Orange Goblin continues to tour in support of its most recent album, ‘The Wolf Bites Back’, the band’s ninth studio release. Support on the Orange Goblin tour will come from a slew of today’s best underground rock acts including The Skull, Mothership, Wo Fat and Black Cobra.

“We haven’t been able to tour the US since 2014 so it’s been a long 5 years, but we are excited to be coming back this year for a select few dates,” says vocalist Ben Ward. “We have gathered an amazing array of supports for this special tour and we can’t wait to bring the Orange Goblin thunder back to our rabid US fan base! Grab your tickets ASAP as these will be the most insane, wild and memorable shows we have done in the US, drawing on our full back catalog of material spanning the bands whole career! Let’s have it America, Orange fuckin’ Goblin is back!”

Orange Goblin US tour dates:
August 27 New York, NY Gramcery Theatre (w/ The Skull)
August 29 Chicago, IL Thalia Hall (w/ The Skull)
August 30 Cookeville, TN June Bug Boogie Ranch (as part of Muddy Roots Festival)
August 31 Dallas, TX Gas Monkey (w/ The Skull, Mothership, Wo Fat)
September 1 Austin, TX Come and Take It Live (w/ The Skull, Mothership)
September 2 Los Angeles, CA Regent Theatre (w/ Black Cobra)

Orange Goblin UK/Europe live dates:
06.04 – Faster & Louder Fest, Eindhoven, Netherlands
11.05 – HRH Road Trip, Ibiza, Spain
18.05 – Manorfest, Keighley, UK
23.06 – Graspop Metal Meeting, Dessel, Belgium
29.06 – Full Force Festival, Ferropolis, Germany
05.07 – Oltrasuoni Festival, Dro, Italy
06.07 – Traffic Club, Rome, Italy
07.07 – Cueva Club, Cagliari, Sardinia
28.09 – HRH Doom V Stoner IV, Sheffield, UK

In addition to vocalist Ben Ward, Orange Goblin features Joe Hoare (guitar), Martyn Millard (bass) and Chris Turner (drums).

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Orange Goblin, Live in Moscow, March 29, 2019

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