Bill Fisher Premieres “The Dark Triad” From Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad

Posted in audiObelisk on August 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Bill Fisher Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad

[Click play above to stream ‘The Dark Triad’ from Bill Fisher’s Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad. Album is out Aug. 21 on Septaphonic Records.]

Finding a custom writing my order service that will write a great essay for you is harder than it may seem. Write My Essay Cheap will help you to survive in Church of the Cosmic Skull founder and frontman analytical history essay Need My Thesis Writer a professional business plan i write my homework Bill Fisher is set to release his first solo album, When you want to Cheap Book Editings for college there are things to consider in order not to fall a victim of poorly prepared work Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad, on Aug. 21. It is a complex and multifaceted release for one that boasts a relatively unassuming 31-minute runtime, and its eight songs quickly distinguish themselves from http://www.furore.de/?writing-a-expository-essay - Instead of wasting time in inefficient attempts, receive professional assistance here Benefit from our inexpensive custom essay Church of the Cosmic Skull with the crunch of the opening riff to “All Through the Night” at the outset. In tone and progressive twist, it stands apart from¬† Help in planning for Example Of Research Proposal In Education in Australia Business assignment help have too many assignments to be submitted at a time. Even have many Fisher‘s main outfit, and as his LP liner notes explain, there are some snippets that go back to his time in We are seeking a Part-time premium custom essay writing service with the ability to capture the essence of whatís happening in the field, and then bring it vividly into.... Mammothwing (whose lone full-length came out in 2015) and before that. In terms of philosophy, the album centers around its two titular concepts.

The former being more straightforward, the latter is the ‘dark triad,’ which is comprised of three personality traits¬† Do you want to get A for your essay? Use our http://www.gergonne.com/?i-need-a-website-to-do-my-homework. 100% guarantee of original paper, the best writers with MBA and PhD in your area, fair Fisher, as he notes, is bringing to light in hopes that we — humans — might see them in ourselves and swear them off. They are psychopathy, Machiavellianism and narcissism, and¬† Music History Research Paper Buying An Essay - Title Ebooks : Buying An Essay - Category : Kindle and eBooks PDF - Author : ~ unidentified - ISBN785458 - File Type Fisher — via an in-album graphic — presents a Venn diagram wherein these ideas intersect along with factors like money, power, status, the past, present and future. Mass hypnosis itself is represented by an all-seeing eye, and perhaps missing is a discussion of capitalism as a driving force behind said psychopathy and status-craving greed, but it’s not hard to look around in 2020 and understand where his point of view is coming from. In the UK and in many other countries, including my own, a rise of nationalist populism and open disdain for intellectualism, science and the like, has acted not so much as a wrench halting the gears of progress but one systemically undoing the bolts holding those gears together. Perhaps, at the least, it is fair to say Literature Review Topic Ideas In Education - Order the needed essay here and put aside your concerns witness the merits of qualified custom writing assistance Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad is an album that wants context, lines like “And the empty voices fill the brain/To guide the hands in such a way” from the penultimate “Message in the Sky” not at all pretending to occur in a vacuum.

At the same time Learn about what an Automotive Do Essay On Time does, skills, salary, and how you can become one in the future. Fisher has put these ideas to work across¬† Buy A Dissertation Online Oldenburg - Affordable medications with fast delivery. Secure payments and guaranteed satisfaction when you purchase drugs. Order your Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad, he’s also made an utterly accessible collection of songs. It’s not the spirited, harmony-laced pop of his main outfit, or the heavier post-rock of¬† Get Quality official sites and Dissertation Help at Best Price Ever, DissertationHelpUK all kind of writing services in UK. Contact us now! Dystopian Future Movies —¬†which is led by¬† Buy Research Paper Online of high quality written from scratch by custom research paper writing services & Buy A Dissertation Online Kit UK. Church of the Cosmic Skull‘s¬† Purchasing dissertation service uk 2007 online should not be overwhelming even though they are numerous custom writing services. Caroline Cawley and in which¬† Buy Research Paper Online of high quality written from scratch by custom research paper writing services & Jewellery Business Plan UK. Fisher¬†features; the drums were reportedly recorded while making that band’s latest album — but the material he presents is deeply melodic and that acts to ground some of the proggier twists, as can be heard in “Psychopathy” at the outset of side B, or again, in the mathy stops and turns of “All Through the Night.” Affecting a full-group style while playing all the instruments himself,¬† Fisher crafts an impression that stands beyond decreed genre boundaries, toying with the balance between heavy rock, progressive metal, progressive rock and touches of psychedelia.

BILL FISHER CHURCH OF THE COSMIC SKULL

“Mirror of Tomorrow,” which follows the opener, complements its crunch and impact with melody of layered vocals as well as fuzzy lead guitar, rolling through a crisp 2:47 before “Celador” — the title of course being derived from the sounds said to be the most pleasing to the human ear — dives into the realm of metaphor and storytelling, a tense chug like a ticking clock behind an initial verse pushing into an eventual unveiling of the hook that finally explodes in the final minute of the song,¬†Fisher having expertly swapped one structure for another ahead of the crashing roll that begins the side-A-ending semi-title-track “The Dark Triad.” The two together, “Celador” and “The Dark Triad,” are the longest songs on¬†Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad at 4:44 and 4:35, respectively, but neither could rightly be accused of any more indulgence than the rest of what surrounds,¬†Fisher discussing ideas on his own terms, certainly, but keeping his audience engaged in that conversation through craft and touches like the harmonized soloing and vocals, let alone the underlying bassline, of “The Dark Triad” as it moves into its gracefully flowing second half, something of an aural wash, but one effectively grounded by the drums as it enters its fadeout.

“Psychopathy” picks up on side B and boasts enough¬†Rush and King Crimson-style chase to satisfy any quota Fisher might have imagined, and accordingly, it’s only fair that its bounce and quick-cut style should be complemented by the ensuing “Days of Old,” a quiet, folky beginning manifesting the sentimentality of the title. It is as close as¬†Fisher¬†comes to¬†Church of the Cosmic Skull as more layers of vocals enter, but the song stays softer, and even the guitar solo that arrives later on feels subdued and contemplative as it fills out overtop of the central figure. These outward-directed reaches aren’t placed by accident, as¬†Fisher is well acquainted with a classic LP structure, and it should accordingly be little surprise that the subsequent closing duo, “Message from the Sky” and “Mass Hypnosis,” bring the proceedings back to their hooky center, much as an individual song might branch outward with a bridge before turning back to end on its chorus. “Mass Hypnosis” of course serves double-duty as the finisher and a complement to “The Dark Triad,” and its central question, “How many more/How many more to make it?” echoes the “I wanna know” repetitions of the earlier track.

These touches make¬†Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad¬†no less sonically fluid than it is thematically so. The production is a surprisingly organic presence in the recording for something so progressive in its makeup, but that only feeds the atmosphere of the entire piece as a solo work, lending an air of intimacy to what might otherwise come across as cold or lacking personality. Despite the variety of ideas being presented in the material, though, what remains at the core is¬†Fisher‘s own take on songwriting, and it is the songs as much as the overarching statement of the LP as a whole that make an impression.¬†Fisher has set himself up for a new creative exploration alongside that of Church of the Cosmic Skull. The possibilities for how he might bring that to bear are another exciting factor emerging from his work here.

Bill Fisher website

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Church of the Cosmic Skull website

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Album Review: OZO, Pluto

Posted in Reviews on August 5th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

ozo pluto

Nothing matters out here in the abyss.

“They” say no one can hear you scream in space, but “they” say all kinds of stupid shit to sell movie tickets. Tell it to the sax. Or tell it to the saz.

It’s Karl D’Silva on the former, Mike Vest (Bong, et al) on the latter as well as bass and guitar, and Graham Thompson doing the yeoman’s work on drums for this second transmission from the outer outer far out outer. Pluto, that woeful, coulda-been-somebody planetesimal, tracks in terms of distance with where OZO are coming from in the Drone Rock Records LP follow-up to Feb. 2020’s Saturn.

Five slabs to stretch out upon, a vaguely digestible 40-ish minutes in total, but what a 40 minutes. Freakery abounds as sax and the Turkish saz combine and the guitar issues effects waves like dictatorial proclamations, the drums doing duly whacked jazz snare insistence as if the point might be driven directly into the listener’s skull — and, rest assured, there are moments on Pluto where that feels like exactly what is happening. Looking at you, “Fine Tune Abuser.”

That particular 15-minute assault from the eighth dimension is placed second-to-last ahead of the finale in “Kerberos,” but by then the UK trio have already turned your brain into so much blood sausage that all that’s really left to do is wrap it in some intestine and take it to market.

Doom jazz. Space jazz. Cosmic battery of cymbals crashing. It’s somehow-improvised madness, the kind of claustrophobia one might feel in a vacuum, operating in a bound-to-be-misunderstood-or-worse-overlooked quadrant of the galaxy that the likes of Blind Idiot God have been known to inhabit while unquestionably finding its own way to oblivion. It careens there, and it courses and it runs and it dies and it lives and it kills and it saves along the way — up, down, in, out, wailing and woodchipping whatever it finds.

The human psyche wasn’t built for this, but let’s take Pluto‘s howls and shoot them out beyond the Kuiper Belt and see if the aliens get back and are like, “Wow you guys are really weird.” You know, really sass the neighbors, fireworks and all that. Elon Musk wishes this was what his brain was like: an on-its-own-wavelength shimmer of untamed will, not just refusing to bend, but refusing to be unbent.

There is nothing arcane about it. “Ninety Nine Years” ain’t cult rock, and nobody here is trying to convince you they’re Dracula or some shit. This is real-deal, spit-in-the-face-of-expectation creativity, and if that isn’t horror enough, they’ll turn structure on its head 50 times as they churn through the suitably vast reaches of “Pluto” and the somehow-motorik centerpiece “Hydra,” which might be classy if you consider showing up to the party dripping wet in a car made from a giant whelk shell class.

It’s hard to know at any moment what’s coming next since inevitably that’s more of the same which is wild and intangible. You spend your time trying to get a handle on it and maybe that’s missing the point. OZO aren’t the frog to be dissected, or the Grey laying across the metal table. They’re the band. Tip the band. Tip, tip, tip the band.

Or whatever it is you kids do these days. You kids with your far-out, all-the-way-gone hyper-lysergics. You kids out there getting laid on the holodeck. You kids throwing rocks at your elders with your telekinetic powers. That’s not even fair. Come on now.

Melt and wash away, maybe. Maybe tell the constable it’s time to get fucked twice and bear out the scorch. Maybe. How many channels. You’ll need all of them.¬†Pluto. From the bark, you dummies.

We live in a galaxy of ass. Who among you? I ask. Who among you?

OZO, “Hydra” official video

OZO, Pluto (2020)

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OZO on Bandcamp

OZO preorder at Drone Rock Records

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Bill Fisher of Church of the Cosmic Skull Announces Solo Album out Aug. 21

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 31st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Today, Church of the Cosmic Skull founder Bill Fisher announces the release of his first solo album under his own name. Set to arrive on Aug. 21, the title isn’t being revealed yet, though presumably that will come with subsequent announcements of things like the tracklisting, preorders and so on. In the interim, Fisher is offering a link where one can sign up for updates and details on all of the above. He calls it the “Billuminati,” which is adorable and you know it.

Though a solo record in name, it is very much a rock album in the main, and those curious as to just how much of Church of the Cosmic Skull bears the hallmark of Fisher‘s songwriting — he’s also a former member of Mammothwing — will find the answer to be plenty, but while there are melodies a-plenty, the upcoming collection is a marked turn from, say, Church of the Cosmic Skull‘s most recent offering, late-2019’s Everybody’s Going to Die (review here). Let’s hope the solo album is less prescient.

Here’s his announcement:

billfisher.net/joinBILL FISHER CHURCH OF THE COSMIC SKULL

Church of the Cosmic Skull Founder Bill Fisher to Release Solo Album

Album Release Date: Friday 21st August 2020

As an aside to the musical works realised by Church of the Cosmic Skull, I have decided to release some other material under my own name via Septaphonic Records and a new website: billfisher.net

Rest assured that the Church has never been stronger, and will continue to spread the light of the Cosmic Rainbow with full and unstoppable force, with new songs and other announcements soon to follow.

The works to be sent forth from this new platform will be myriad and multiform, varied in genre but of high standard and rich with heart.

The first will take the form of a full studio album, an exploration into heavier realms but still very much melody driven; prog with elements of proto-metal and stoner rock.

Super-deluxe limited edition vinyl, CD, and other merch will on preorder soon via Septaphonic Records and billfisher.net

Listeners can get an exclusive pre-listen of the whole album before public release via a sequence of emails and secret web pages about the concepts behind the album and how we can stop sociopathy taking over the universe.

To get access to this and avoid missing out on the other mind-blowing surprises to come, you are invited to join the suitably-titled ‘Billuminati’ here: billfisher.net/join

Yours in peace and harmony,

BF

billfisher.net
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cosmicskull.org
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Church of the Cosmic Skull, Everybody’s Going to Die (2019)

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Crippled Black Phoenix Announce Elleng√¶st out Oct. 9; Stream “Cry of Love”

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 30th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

My little dog Dio had cancer eating her alive in 2018 when we put her down, and I’ll be honest, I’m not over it. I’ve got a new puppy sleeping snuggling my leg right now as I type this and I’m still not over it. Grief is real and takes many forms, and as Crippled Black Phoenix explore this particular one in the new single “Cry of Love,” their atmospheric and emotional weight is no less affecting than ever. Their new album, titled Elleng√¶st, is out Oct. 9 on Season of Mist, and features the likes of Vincent Cavanaugh from Anathema, which is kind of like, “okay, you got me,” when it comes to the simple concept. I’ll look forward to hearing that and probably being sad afterward.

The PR wire brings art, info and audio:

crippled black phoenix ellengaest

CRIPPLED BLACK PHOENIX Announces New Album, Premieres New Single

Dark Progressive rock outfit CRIPPLED BLACK PHOENIX will be releasing the full-length ‘Elleng√¶st’ on October 9 via Season of Mist! The band has shared the emotional first single, “Cry of Love,” which features guest vocals from Ryan Michael Patterson (FOTOCRIME, ex-COLISEUM.) The song is available along with an official music video, which is created by Guilherme Henriques, at THIS LOCATION.

Several prominent guest vocalists lend their considerable talents to Elleng√¶st: ANATHEMA‚Äôs Vincent Cavanagh, GAAHLS WYRD‚Äôs Kristian ‚ÄúGaahl‚ÄĚ Espedal, COLISEUM/FOTOCRIME/one-time Crippled Black Phoenix touring bassist Ryan Patterson, up-and-coming U.K. solo artist Suzie Stapleton and TRIBULATION‚Äôs Jonathan Hult√©n. The album art and tracklist can be found below.

Mastermind Justin Greaves comments on the track: “This is a song about losing a loved family member, but not a human one, it‚Äôs about our feline companions. Ryan [Patterson] came back with the words and vocals after I sent him the song and it blew us away. We already connected with Ryan when on tour and being fellow animal lovers and vegans, he, Belinda and myself have a deep appreciation for speaking out about our animal friends.

“The song lyrics are about Ryan‚Äôs cat Willie who sadly passed away. Coincidentally, at the same time we (Belinda and myself) lost two of our cat family, Nell and Tigger (the old three-legged dude who starred on the cover of Horrific Honorifics). So this song is like a coming together to celebrate the love we have for the cats, how we miss them and how they influence our lives.

“Joining Ryan on ‘Cry Of Love’ is our friend and previous collaborator Suzie Stapleton. Putting her distinctive voice on, giving it another dimension. The video for this fried my brain, I love it so much and so do the rest of the band; Guilherme [Henriques] totally understood what the feelings of the song are about, and he made a beautiful and simple narrative which will touch even the coldest heart. If you love your cat, or lost one you love, then be prepared to grab the tissues.‚ÄĚ

‘Elleng√¶st’ can be pre-ordered in various formats HERE: https://shopusa.season-of-mist.com/band/crippled-black-phoenix/

Track-list
1. House Of Fools (7:52)
2. Lost (8:11)
3. In The Night (8:38)
4. Cry Of Love (5:46)
5. Everything I Say (7:21)
6. (-) (1:51)
7. The Invisible Past (11:26)
8. She’s In Parties (3:51)

https://www.facebook.com/CBP444/
https://crippledblackphoenixsom.bandcamp.com/
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Crippled Black Phoenix, “Cry of Love” official video

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Stream Review: Elephant Tree, Live at Buffalo Studio, London, 07.24.20

Posted in Reviews on July 27th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

elephant tree boiler room

It is a fortunate happenstance of relative geographic positioning that so many live streams taking place in European primetime occur right in the midst of my toddler son’s afternoon nap. An 8PM start in¬†Elephant Tree‘s native London meant 3PM for me, and amidst global pandemic and a chaotic year that no one could have anticipated except for all the people who did and were ignored, I’ll take what I can get. As far as I’m concerned, 3PM is primetime anyway.

I parked myself on the couch to stream Elephant Tree‘s hour-long performance at¬†Buffalo Studio in East London — presented and produced/directed by The Preservation Room — and even managed to cast it to the tv, which the Facebook app has been iffy on in the past. Presumably, the four-piece would’ve been on tour by now under different circumstances, supporting their album-of-the-year-contending second LP,¬†Habits (review here), on¬†Holy Roar/Deathwish Inc., but like everybody’s everything, well, you’re alive, so you know.

Shit luck. The record deserves to be hand-delivered by the band to audiences far and wide.¬†Elephant Tree‘s progression as a four-piece, what guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist¬†John Slattery — who joined in 2018 — brings to the lineup, was evident when I last saw the band in Nov. 2019 at¬†Magnetic Eye‘s Brooklyn showcase at¬†Saint Vitus Bar (review here), and they seemed all the more comfortable highlighting songs from¬†Habits, moving from a windy drone opening similar to that which starts the album with “Wake.Repeat” into lead-single “Sails,” quickly adjusting the line sound to pull¬†Sam Hart‘s reverby snare down and bring up fellow founder¬†Jack Townley‘s guitar and vocals, joined in the chorus as he was by¬†Slattery and bassist¬†Peter Holland¬†(also of¬†Trippy Wicked). Under studio lighting with two movable cameras, it was very much a made-for-tv stream, as opposed to more of a concert-minded experience.

If there was a warmup-factor, they were through it fast. I don’t know how often the four of them have been able to get together or rehearse over the last several mostly-locked-down months, but they ended “Sails” tight and shifted immediately to the between-song banter that has become a staple of their live sets,¬†Townley remarking on how is ears were too small for the in-ear monitors in what would become a running gag for the set —¬†Slattery later referred to himself as “blessed” in that regard — before they moved into the harmony-focused roller “Faceless,” continuing to follow the progression of the album’s tracklisting,¬†Townley chastising himself after for getting the lyrics wrong. New songs. Likewise,¬†Hart reminded¬†Holland before they went into “Wasted” that the count-in was six stick-clicks. Holland pointed to the camera: “Six clicks. Remember.”

They had threatened new material — newer even than the album, which came out in April — but none was aired. The combination of fuzz tones and keys in “Wasted” would be a highlight just the same, Slattery bringing more synthy melody later in the song, before they wished a happy birthday to superfan¬†Sister Rainbow and APF Records‘¬†Andy Field and launched into “Aphotic Blues.” It was one of two cuts from their 2016 self-titled debut (review here) they would play, and perhaps shifting into something older let them loosen up a bit more, but as that track turned to its bigger-riffing second half, they seemed to let fly a little and get into it, having pushed through the three-part vocal midsection and positively nailed it.

elephant tree buffalo studio

Goofing their way through a vinyl giveaway that would continue after — the game was that¬†Townley¬†was thinking of a number between 1-1,000 and if you guessed it you won a vinyl; I guessed eight and 42 — they soon went into “Bird,” another Habits high point and particularly emblematic of the progressive edge that’s emerged in their sound. With a duly floating vocal above¬†Hart‘s steady drum and¬†Holland‘s bass, they segued smoothly into the song’s atmospheric middle and dynamic ending with energy worthy of a live show, and though I’d seen them play it in November, knowing the song from actually having the record of course made a difference. Not ashamed to say I was singing along with the television at several points during their set, “Bird” being one of them.

Holland, who had been handling shout-outs (though¬†Townley mentioned¬†Sister Rainbow), gave me a hello — hey¬†Pete — and “Exit the Soul” followed, with its extended break, three-part vocal and before closing with “Dawn” from the first record, they gave away the¬†Habits vinyl. The winning number was five. At least I was close. Finishing off, they seemed once more right at home, as they had long since gotten momentum on their side and rolled through with apparent ease. Newer songs or older, they had it down and I don’t know if it was me projecting or an actual feeling on the part of the band, but there was evident relief when it was over before the feed cut, like they were glad to have gotten it off their collective chest. There wasn’t a full audience in the room to see it, but hell, at least they got to play and at least those who tuned in got to watch.

I was glad I did, and again, thankful for the afternoon timing making it possible to do so. I wound up spending a decent portion of the second half of the set being chewed on by our new puppy, which reminded me not only to take her out, but of how “real life” and music interact with live streaming in a way that never happens with actual live shows. If it was 10PM, would I have watched in bed on my phone before crashing out for the night? If it was 7PM, would I have been annoyed at having my nightly¬†Star Trek viewing interrupted? Maybe. These are weird times and they’ve forced those who care about art and creativity to adjust the balance of the space they occupy in the day to day. The dog nipped at my hand while they played “Exit the Soul.” I was happy that at no point did she pee on the floor.

Watching the several streams I’ve seen — some trying to capture a band-on-stage experience, some a fly-on-wall camera in the rehearsal space, some, like this, kind of in-between — I can’t help but feel some pressure to bring it in the context of the “current moment,” but honestly, screw that. Bands are trying to get by, like everyone else. They can’t play shows so this seems to be what’s happening. It’s interesting seeing different acts’ personalities come through their A/V presentation, and of course it’s different than watching a band on stage. Do I need to say that? Do I need to say how important supporting each other through a global pandemic is? If I do, I shouldn’t have to. Whatever.

I took the dog for a walk after¬†Elephant Tree were done, then got the kid up from his nap at the appointed wake-up time (4:38PM, if you’re curious). We drove around for a bit while he looked at sundry construction vehicles and ate some food, and when we came home, watched PBS Newshour, took the dog for another walk. I made leftovers for dinner, we watched¬†Star Trek, the dog peed on the floor, and we went to bed. The Yankees — also playing without a crowd — had a day off. Life happened, and the stream got folded into the day, not quite the escapist experience a live show would be, but still something special while it lasted. Listen to¬†Habits.

If you’re still reading, thanks and I’ll make it easy:

Elephant Tree, Habits (2020)

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Elephant Tree website

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Trippy Wicked Premiere Acoustic Crowbar Cover “The Lasting Dose”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Trippy wicked

Hey, if you’re feeling like you’re having the year you expected to have in 2020, congratulations on your success as a supervillain. For the rest of us, it’s improv-mode, trying to make the most of whatever we’ve got to make the most of. For London heavy rockers Trippy Wicked and the Cosmic Children of the Knight that means stepping back from putting together their third long-player and instead working at home, remotely, on putting together properly recorded versions of the backlog of acoustic versions of their own songs and covers that they’ve built up over the years. The third of these is Crowbar‘s “The Lasting Dose,” which premieres below.

The original Crowbar song was the lead cut on 2001’s landmark Sonic Excess in its Purest Form and I don’t think I’m speaking out of turn when I say it’s one of the band’s best tracks — something of a landmark in their increasingly vast discography. As with the other acoustic cuts they’ve unveiled thus far, guitarist/vocalist Peter Holland (here on ukulele and vocals) and drummer Christopher West (here on acoustic guitar) did a live take on “The Lasting Dose” some eight years ago. Seated at what appears to be a backyard picnic table, they manage to hold it together as a car horn honks and neighbors start chatting loudly in the second half of the song. If you think that doesn’t add charm, I’ll invite you to watch that clip after the premiere of the new one and revisit your position.

In listening to the two back-to-back, one might notice a bit more embellishment from Holland on the vocal melody, but the basic form is consistent, and despite taking a very, very heavy song and taking out the tonal weight, the emotional burden of the tempo remains. I’m not sure what the plans are for Trippy Wicked — generally completed by bassist Dicky King — to release the acoustic material they’ve put to tape at this point. I don’t even know if they know. But again, they’re making the most of what they’ve got, and I think once you listen you’ll agree it’s worth the effort.

Please enjoy:

Trippy Wicked, “The Lasting Dose” (Crowbar cover) premiere

The Lasting Dose is the third in a series of acoustic singles we’re putting out in 2020.

We were recording our 3rd full length album at the beginning of the year when coronavirus happened and we had to stop working on that.

Without any work and not able to continue with the album we started recording and releasing some acoustic songs because we can record them remotely from each other.

The songs are a mix of acoustic covers of heavy songs and also acoustic versions of our own songs that we have worked on over the years.

Check out the playlist of acoustic singles here: https://youtu.be/CUfW5RioWDQ

Trippy Wicked, “The Lasting Dose” (Live in 2012)

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Trippy Wicked website

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Friday Full-Length: Stubb, Stubb

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 17th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Stubb did not emerge out of London’s heavy underground as a band trying to keep secrets. There was no asking how they did what they did on their 2012 self-titled debut (review here) — it was all right there for the listener to hear. Issued through Superhot Records, Stubb‘s Stubb collected eight tracks of just-varied-enough riff rockers, driven by a dense fuzz and hooky songwriting that unfolded to some later jamminess. As debuts go, the eight-song/35-minute outing was not void of ambition, but it was what it already showcased in its dynamic that made it so enjoyable, whether it was the PG-sleaze of “Soul Mover” and “Scale the Mountain” with its “And I hope I can scale your mountain sometime” chorus and “Hard Hearted Woman” in the classic panacea of British heavy or the opening pusher “Road,” the winding boogie of “Flame” and on and on. Happening concurrent to the beginning stages of a boom in UK heavy fostered by Desertfest in London, Stubb‘s laid-back but still weighted grooves, the interplay on vocals between guitarist Jack Dickinson and bassist/vocalist Peter Holland (who went on to join Elephant Tree) and the solid foundation of the established chemistry between Holland and drummer Chris West from working together in Trippy Wicked and the Cosmic Children of the Knight helped to enrich the songs and give the record all the more personality.

Tempos shift through side A’s four tracks, but the songs are united through the vitality of the performance, the tried and true power trio dynamic that lets Dickinson‘s guitar get playful on “Road” before the more relaxed rollout of “Scale the Mountain.” To contrast, side B starts with the acoustic “Crosses You Bear,” still catchy and deceptively quick-moving in the guitar, but at just over two minutes, it’s enough to efficiently signal the increase in the album’s scope and the departure from the ultra-straightforward shove of¬†Stubb‘s first half. The album was recorded by Tim Cedar of Part Chimp, and though “Road,” “Flame” and “Galloping Horses” had appeared on Stubb‘s¬†Dropout Sessions demo in 2007 — a completely different lineup around¬†Dickinson at the time — they each sounded fresh in their inclusion on¬†Stubb, the latter closing out side B with a stretch past the seven-minute mark that found the band purposefully breaking their own rules in terms of craft, setting up a catchy progression of repeated lines early — “The skies¬†stubb stubbare crimson red,” “Ride on high/Crimson sky” — before turning just about at the halfway point to a broader jam. There’s a stop preceded by West wailing on his snare, and¬†Dickinson‘s guitar returns in standalone fashion to set the stage.¬†Holland and West reenter and by the time they hit 4:30 of the total 7:13, they’re underway and headed outward. Dickinson — who by then has already impressed in terms of soloing on “Road,” “Flame,” “Soul Mover,” the bluesy drift that emerges in “Hard Hearted Woman,” and even the melancholy penultimate inclusion “Crying River,” on which the guitar seems most to sing the chorus on its own — leads the trio’s exodus as¬†Holland and¬†West offer sharp but not overblown groove coinciding. A brief return hinting at the hook finishes out, and¬†Stubb finish out with a crash and a bonk like they hardly got a speck of dirt on them despite kicking up so much on their way.

2012 saw a few landmark releases, from¬†Conan‘s¬†Monnos and¬†Orange Goblin‘s¬†A Eulogy for the Damned¬†in the UK to records from the likes of¬†Om,¬†Neurosis,¬†Kadavar,¬†Greenleaf and¬†Colour Haze elsewhere. Through that glut,¬†Stubb still managed to make an impression with these songs, and again, it wasn’t a mystery why. They represented a next generation of English fuzz that, far from trying to escape the past, embraced it and pushed it forward into a new era. In some ways they were a vanguard of things to come from London’s soon-to-be-flooded underground, but while there was a buzz in the town at that time, it’s friggin’ London. There almost always is. In any case, the fact that¬†Stubb had already toured — they did a UK stint in 2011 with Stone Axe, whose guitarist¬†Tony Reed (soon enough to reignite¬†Mos Generator) would end up mixing and mastering the LP — undoubtedly had an effect on how the songs ultimately came out. They feel tightened and worked through in their construction even eight years after the fact, but maintain their natural base, and the clarity of the recording only helps the organic guitar and bass tones shine through with the drums punctuating underneath. Stubb were the kind of band a kid could listen to and want to start a band, and I suspect a few did along the way.

Stubb toured again with¬†Stone Axe¬† and Trippy Wicked —¬†Holland and¬†West pulling double-duty —¬†in Europe, and I was fortunate enough to see them in Eindhoven (review here). What a night. What a blast. Hard to think about it now and not get sentimental. In any case,¬†Stubb went on to sign to Ripple Music ahead of the release of their second album, 2014’s Cry of the Ocean (review here), which incorporated more soulful influence and psychedelic range. By then,¬†Tom Fyfe (now also¬†The Brothers Keg) had replaced West on drums and a split with Mos Generator (discussed here) followed in 2015 through the then-emergent-since-collapsed¬†HeviSike Records. Stubb continued to play shows, bringing¬†Tom Hobson in on bass and exploring jammier and more psychedelic textures on the 24-minute 2017 single “Burning Moon” (premiered here). That blowout is the last they were heard from in terms of studio work, though they played¬†Ripplefest in London and have maintained a social media presence all along. The latest is they’re passing ideas back and forth digitally during COVID-19 distancing, so perhaps a new album could follow in the next year or two.¬†Cry of the Ocean hardly sounded like a band with nothing left to say, so whenever such a thing might surface, it would only be welcome on these shores.

An album that, for me at least, is a bit of an escape into nostalgia, but which has not at all gone stale in the actual listening. As always, I hope you enjoy.

Thanks for reading.

Thanks for reading.

So, we got a dog. A Wheaten/Poodle mix. She’s eight weeks old as of today — bought her from a family in Wisconsin who had a litter; my mother-in-law trekked out there to get her — and we’ve named her Iommi, though she mostly just goes by Omi. “Omi come,” “Omi sit,” “Omi don’t chew that,” “Omi no!” “Good girl, Omi,” and so on. She is currently asleep and dream-wiggling on my feet.

Kid and dog together is a lot. Either on their own is plenty, to be honest. I’m not sure The Pecan is in an emotional place where he’s ready to share things like attention with something new — it’s like he got a little sister — but it is what it is, and unless the dog starts showing crazy aggression, which seems unlikely given what we’ve seen of her personality this first week, I don’t think she’s going anywhere.

I wasn’t really ready for a new dog either, to be honest. I thanked my wife this week for picking one that was all-black, as opposed to the still-much-missed Dio, who was just about all-white. But behavior comparisons are inevitable; puppies, like people, engage in certain universal behaviors. I catch myself playing with her a certain way or talking to her a certain way and feel a bit like I’m cheating on the memory of my old dog. Which I suppose I am, if you want to come right to it. Isn’t that what you do when a dog dies and you get another dog, like some broken toy you replace?

What a species we are.

But it’s been nearly two years and the boy needs a dog — the one overriding point with which I can’t argue and, ultimately, the reason we have a dog — so there it is. She’s cute, as nearly almost all puppies and baby animals are. It’s a transition. Everything is change. Constant change. Every new reality, every new ability The Pecan demonstrates, it’s all a new world to which my puny hew-mon brain stumbles in processing.

We picked him up from daycare yesterday and while we were changing his shoes to leave — they put them in slippers to hang out — he pulled the fire alarm. I was holding him at the time, and he just looked up, saw a thing, reached up and pulled it. The bell was right above us and it was loud the way you think of Sunn O))) as loud. It was also naptime, so as caregivers rushed out of the adjoining rooms to see what the hell happened and/or what was on fire, an entire daycare’s worth of kids and babies woke up crying. That’s my son. I feel relatively sure that, having done it once, he’ll try it again. I can only hope a plastic box of some kind is placed over the fire alarm.

“He’s not the first,” said the woman who runs the place. I told her that was very comforting and kind of her to say. I said this while wearing a mask that, sadly, could not hide the shame in my eyes.

By the end of the day, it was already kind of funny. I suspect in years to come it will grow more so. But off, living through it was a rough and loud couple minutes. Then The Pecan ran away from us on our way out to the car. He was overwhelmed — obviously; we all were — but still totally unacceptable. That was another meltdown that basically ended with driving home and putting him down for his afternoon nap.

The dog is awake and puppy-chewing my toes. “Omi no biting.”

You can see perhaps why I might have been driven toward a nostalgia for simpler times in picking Stubb to close out the week.

No Gimme show today. Back next week with a new one.

Have a great and safe weekend, and again, thanks for reading. Be safe, have fun. And don’t tell anybody, but I’m going to have another post up after this.

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The Brothers Keg Premiere “Moorsmen” Video; Folklore, Myths & Legends out Sept. 18

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the brothers keg

London heavy rockers The Brothers Keg will release their debut album, Folklore, Myths & Legends, through APF Records on Sept. 18. The album follows behind a well received 2017 demo of similar title, Folklore, Myths & Legends of The Brothers Keg (review here), and runs a gamut from the brash rock of “No Earthly Form” and largesse of “Introducing the Brothers Keg” to the prog-style ambience and narration of “…From the Records of Arthur Shnee” and “The Ice Melteth” and “From the Battle of Castle Keg” to the wink at The Beatles‘ “Within You Without You” in the 12-minute space-doomer “Brahman,” with the brazen sludgy shouts in the culminating “Castle Keg” and the spare guitar and aptly-titled spoke “Epilogue” at the end for good measure.

With the nine-minute “Moorsmen” at the outset, it is something of a dizzying back and forth array, but what it works out to is each ‘song’ song is followed by a companion interlude, with the exception of “Introducing the Brothers Keg” and “Brahman” in the album’s midsection, and “Moorsmen” begins with an introductory sample/spoken part as well, so clearly the storyline is a major factor in what The Brothers Keg are bringing to their first record. It’s an ambitious 43 minutes presented across the nine total tracks by bassist/vocalist Paul Rosser, the brothers keg folklore myths and legendsguitarist/vocalist Tom Hobson and drummer Tom Fyfe (the latter two also of Stubb), and while the sound of the album has raw aspects — the shouts, the crackly speech, the pop of the snare drum — that does not take away from the atmosphere the three-piece are able to conjure. It is fitting that “Moorsmen” should be the first audio to make its way to public ears from¬†Folklore, Myths & Legends, since it functions much as a closer otherwise might in terms of summarizing the proceedings that follow, from its angular and sludgy earlier riffs all the way to its spacious and headspinning solo later on.

Ultimately, with “Moorsmen,”¬†The Brothers Keg charge into the story the telling of which consumes the rest of the album, but rest assured, it well earns each of its nine minutes. The video is suitably over the top and features not only elements of the plotline, but also a bit of lightning coming off¬†Rosser,¬†Hobson and¬†Fyfe for good measure. That too is only appropriate as throughout their debut,¬†The Brothers Keg make their enjoyment of what they’re doing as up front as their riffs. It’s a willfully peculiar record, but has a certain charm for that, and it’s clear that¬†The Brothers Keg were going all-in on the recording and bringing their ideas to life. You can dig as deep into it as you like, or you can just enjoy the grooves and the figurative (and literal, in the case of the video) lightning. It’s really up to the listener, but the record works either way.

I’m happy of course to host the premiere of the “Moorsmen” video, which you’ll find below, followed by¬†APF‘s announcement of the record and a choice quote from¬†Hobson, the all-over-the-place-all-over-the-top nature of which sums up the record more beautifully than I ever could.

Please enjoy:

The Brothers Keg, “Moorsmen” official video premiere

Sometimes, heavy isn’t purely about brutal riffs and gut-wrenching, despair-invoking themes; often, heaviness shines through when it’s filtered through jam-invoking psychedelic tightness. The Brothers Keg fall into that latter side of heavy, and in their few short years have become one of the finest examples of it in the whole of the UK.

Made up of the rhythm section of psych / stoner scene mainstays STUBB ‚Äď with Tom Fyfe on drums and Tom Hobson switching out his bass for guitar / vocal duties – as well as Paul Rosser, who completes the trio on bass / vocals, The Brothers Keg have been kicking up an avalanche of the finest elements of stoner-doom as well as grunged-out psychedelia since their formation in London in 2018.

Now we are finally able to unleash The Brothers Keg’s debut album “Folklore, Myths and Legends of The Brothers Keg” upon you. Recorded at Bear Bites Horse Studio in London (Green Lung, Terminal Cheesecake, Opium Lord and many others), producer Wayne Adams has expertly extracted the esoteric essence of the project, and the spirit of the KEG flows freely in full force. The album, as the title suggests, follows the origin story of ‚ÄėThe Brothers Keg‚Äô – three ancient folk characters which the band is named after.

Tom Hobson: “We imagined the record as akin to a fantasy film soundtrack, with cinematic voiceovers and a nod to sci-fi classics. Expect heavy riffing psyched-out sci-fi doomageddon. HP Lovecraft meets Queen‚Äôs Flash Gordon listening to Jeff Wayne‚Äôs War of the Worlds at the wrong speed smoking a medieval spliff dipped in poppers.”

Tracklisting
1. Moorsmen
2. …From the Records of Arthur Shnee
3. No Earthly Form
4. The Ice Melteth
5. Introducing the Brothers Keg
6. Brahman
7. From the Battle of Castle Keg
8. Castle Keg
9. Epilogue

The Brothers Keg are:
Tom Hobson – Guitar/Vocals
Paul Rosser – Bass/Vocals
Tom Fyfe – Drums

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APF Records on Thee Facebooks

APF Records on Instagram

APF Records on Bandcamp

APF Records website

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