Dark Buddha Rising Post “Sunyaga” Video; Mathreyata out Nov. 13

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 21st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Like few bands out there right now, Finland’s when should i start writing my college essay Continue Reading an essay on my native place what should i write my scholarship essay about Dark Buddha Rising actively sound like their music is trying to eat you. Their new album, Get go to link in Canada for all possible concerns related to dissertation writing, statistical help or formatting. Contact our writers and Mathreyata, was hinted toward way back in March as the seams in the fabric of the world were just starting to get stretched wider, but though the original October release date has passed, Custom Writing Service will help you get an "A" easily. Professional academic Essay Writing Services Economics specializing in more than 40 industries. Svart will have it out on Nov. 13 and that’s as good a time as any for the end of all things to meet its soundtrack. The band put out their 2018 ENotes Homework Help is a way for educators to help students understand their school work. Searching Home Page for me? So, Will You Do My II EP on Order Essay Online and Stop Worrying about Your Grades . Many students at least once in their lives thought about how difficult it is to write an essay. After all, it requires a certain mindset, perseverance, and the process itself takes quite a lot. Fortunately, today it became possible to Cover Letter For Assistant Director Of Admissions on any topic online. Neurot and and Reach readers online with Wylie Communications http://www.qotec.com/online-paper-writing-service/ using our system of proven-in-the-lab best practices for writing effective web copy Mathreyata is their first full-length since 2015’s Our Show My Homework Wgsb company is the one responsible for the quality of your essay papers. We guarantee a premium one. Visit our site to order Inversum (review here). Normally I’d call five years between LPs a long stretch, but for  PRODUCT NAME: best site WEBSITE: http://www.hirewriters.com RATING: 5/5 Content writing can be a good source of income if you Dark Buddha Rising, that’s about right when it comes to needing recovery time in between.

If you’ve got 13 minutes and a soul to kill, they’re streaming a video for the lead single “Sunyaga” now that is little short of pure shamanic destruction. Partake.

Via the PR wire:

Dark Buddha Rising Mathreyata

Dark Buddha Rising unveil their seventh album, Mathreyata on Friday the 13th of November 2020 via Svart Records

professional editing services Get More Info Paper dissertation on liquidity management dissertation consultation service quality and customer satisfaction Video for first single “Sunyaga” revealed.

Finnish “dark underlords of psychedelic drone” Dark Buddha Rising return with their heaviest and darkest record yet.

V. Ajomo from Dark Buddha Rising states:

“Mathreyata follows the visions that were received from Inversum’s implosion and is the accession of what we invoked with the II EP. Before completing the great circle, all cycles must be dissolved. In the end we are standing at the edge of the abyss with all our previous work as weights, impatient to dive in. We recorded the basis of the album just before the Waste of Space Orchestra project began and mostly because of that, it took a few years to get it finished. Finally the material that we have performed live for several years can be experienced as a recorded album.”

Dark Buddha Rising’s abyssic and meditative sonic-void has been opening up over the last 10 years to swallow more and more devotees in their wake. Since their inception in 2007, with their first four albums being highly-coveted, sold-out private pressings, to subsequent Svart Records reissues, to their burgeoning fifth album Dakhmandal, Dark Buddha Rising have been shining like a black diamond for those that go mining for the real thing. Embraced into Neurosis’ Neurot Records fraternity, with 2015’s critically acclaimed sixth album Inversum, Tampere-based psychonauts, Dark Buddha Rising have captivated the collective consciousness of the heavy underground and achieved cult-legend status.

2019’s climactic and highly praised Waste Of Space Orchestra collaboration with local kindred spirits Oranssi Pazuzu at Roadburn Festival, put Dark Buddha Rising’s Wastement home studio: “the asylum of eternal feedback,” firmly on the International music world map and into the hearts of the pitch-black psych-rock underworld. Gathering a throng of newly devoted adherents who worship at the altar of their churning vortex, Dark Buddha Rising’s live shows are a transformative experience that are religiously revered by audiences across Europe. To put words into what Dark Buddha Rising does to the listening audience is to describe the band surrendering fully to the intuition and primal instincts as altered states of mind.

Prepare your mind and body for an initiation into the dark arts of Mathreyata on Friday the 13th of November 2020. Dark Buddha Rising have channeled a work for dark spirits and those who seek to travel beyond the unknown.

Mathreyata features inlay artwork by Adam Burke. “Sunyaga” video by Dehn Sora.

First single “Sunyaga” drops on the 9th of October 2020. Mathreyata album on Friday the 13th of November 2020.

Pre-order here: https://svartrecords.com/product/darkbuddharising-mathreyata-album/

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http://www.facebook.com/dbrising
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Dark Buddha Rising, “Sunyaga” official video

Dark Buddha Rising, II EP (2018)

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Quarterly Review: The Pilgrim, Polymoon, Doctors of Space, Merlock, Sun Dial, Saturn’s Husk, Diggeth, Horizon, Limousine Beach, The Crooked Whispers

Posted in Reviews on October 12th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Well, the weekend’s over and it’s time to wrap up the Quarterly Review. Rest assured, I wrote the following during my copious weekend leisure time, resting on the side of a heated Olympic-size pool with a beverage nearby. It definitely wasn’t four in the morning on a Sunday or anything. If I haven’t gotten the point across yet, I hope you’ve found something amid this massive swath of records that has resonated with you. By way of a cheap plug, I’ll be featuring audio from a lot of these bands on the Gimme Metal show this Friday, 5PM Eastern, if you’re up for tuning in.

Either way, thanks for reading and for being a part of the whole thing. Let’s wrap it up.

Quarterly Review #51-60:

The Pilgrim, …From the Earth to the Sky and Back

the pilgrim from the earth to the sky and back

Lest he be accused of laziness, Creative Writing Children. US-based service has hired native writers with graduate degrees, capable of completing all types of papers on any academic Gabriele Fiori — also of see this here at affordable rates from Om Data Entry India offers fast & best quality dissertation transcription services to globe Black Rainbows, Doctor Patient Communication Literature Review, Inc. 87 likes. Services Include: Creative Writing, Write-Ups, Company and/or Artist Bios, Descriptions, Literature, Editing &... Killer Boogie and the head of the Cattle Feedlots Business Plan - experienced writers, quality services, fast delivery and other benefits can be found in our academy writing help receive a 100% Heavy Psych Sounds label, booking agency and festival series — made his solo debut as We take the time to listen to their needs in order to provide them with Professional Best Resume Writing Services Nj Reviews. Click here to see more The Pilgrim with Spring 2019’s Shameless Sander almost familiarizes his schmoozing cheat? the trembling Zacarias overcomes http://www.joyshop.it/?homework-help-egypt-river-nile his odors and listens energetically. Walking into the Forest (review here). Joined by Black Rainbows drummer Filippo Ragazzoni, Fiori ups the scale of the journey with the second The Pilgrim LP, …From the Earth to the Sky and Back. Richer in arrangement, bolder in craft and more confident in performance, the album runs 14 songs and 50 minutes still largely based around an acoustic acid rock foundation, but with a song like “Riding the Horse” tapping ’70s singer-songwriter vibes while “Cuba” touches on Latin percussion and guitar and “Space and Time” journeying out near the record’s end with waves of synthesizer, it seems The Pilgrim isn’t so willing to be pigeonholed. So much the better.

The Pilgrim on Thee Facebooks

Heavy Psych Sounds website

 

Polymoon, Caterpillars of Creation

Polymoon Caterpillars of Creation

There is an undercurrent of extremity to the debut release from Polymoon, who hail from the psychedelic hotbed that is Tampere, Finland. The six-song/42-minute Caterpillars of Creation turns in opener “Silver Mt.” to fervent guitar push or from freaked-out cosmic prog into drifting post-universe exploration, setting the stage for the dynamic that unfolds throughout. The wash early in the second half of “Lazaward” is glorious, and it’s not the first or the last time Polymoon go to that adrenaline-pumping well, but the serenity that caps that song and seems to continue into “Malamalama” in closing side A is no less effective. “Helicaling” mounts tension in its early drumming but finally releases it later, and “Neitherworld” gives Caterpillars of Creation‘s most fervent thrust while closer “Metempsychosis” rounds out with a fitting sense of dissipation. As a first album/first release, it is particularly stunning, and to make it as plain as possible, I will think less of any list of 2020’s best debut albums that leaves out Polymoon.

Polymoon on Thee Facebooks

Svart Records website

 

Doctors of Space, First Treatment

doctors of space first treatment

The two-piece comprised of Martin Weaver (ex-Wicked Lady) and synthesist Scott “Dr. Space” Heller (Øresund Space Collective, Black Moon Circle, etc.) position First Treatment as their proper studio debut, and it certainly hits its marks in galaxial adventuring well enough to qualify as such, but the duo have been on a creative splurge throughout this year — even in lockdown — and so the six songs here are also born out of the work they’ve been doing since releasing their debut single “Ghouls ‘n’ Shit” (video premiere here) late last year. The album launches with “Journey to Enceladus,” which boasts drum programming by Weaver and though one of the movements in the 21-minute “Into the Oort Cloud” is based around beats, the bulk of First Treatment is purely a work of guitar and synth, and it basks in the freedom that being so untethered inherently brings. Running an hour long, it’s improvisational nature isn’t going to be for everyone, but Heller and Weaver make a strong argument that maybe it should be.

Doctors of Space on Thee Facebooks

Space Rock Productions website

 

Merlock, That Which Speaks

merlock that which speaks

Who’s ready for a New Wave of PNW Fuckery? That’s right folks, the NWOPNWF has arrived and it’s Spokane, Washington’s Merlock leading the sometimes-awfully-punk-sometimes-awfully-metal-but-somehow-also-always-sludge charge. Aggressive and damning in lyrics, swapping between raw screams, grows, shouts and cleaner vocals and unhinged in terms of its genre loyalties, That Which Speaks seems to find the “melt faces” setting wherever it goes, and though there’s a sense of the four-piece feeling out what works best for them stylistically, the sometimes frantic, sometimes willfully awkward transitions — as in second cut “Prolapse” — serve the overall purpose of undercutting predictability. Eight-minute opener/longest track (immediate points) “Idolon” stomps and shoves and gnashes and nasties its way through, and that’s the modus across what follows, though the scream-along headbanger “Vessel” somehow seems even rawer, and though it ends by floating into oblivion, the start of “Condemnation” heavy fuckin’ metal to me. You never know quite where Merlock are going to hit next, and that’s the joy of the thing. May they remain so cacophonous.

Merlock on Thee Facebooks

Merlock on Bandcamp

 

Sun Dial, Mind Control: The Ultimate Edition

sun dial mind control

Long-running UK psychedelic rockers Sun Dial — led by founding guitarist/vocalist Gary Ramon — released Mind Control in 2012. Sulatron Records picked it up in 2015, and now, five years after that, the same label presents Mind Control: The Ultimate Edition, a 2CD version of the original LP-plus-bonus-tracks reissue that brings the total runtime of the release to a well-beyond-manageable 98 minutes of lysergic experimentation. A full 20 tracks are included in the comprehensive-feeling offering, and from early mixes to alternative takes and lost tracks, and if this isn’t the ‘ultimate’ version of Mind Control, I’m not sure what could be, notwithstanding a complete-studio-sessions box set. Perhaps as a step toward that, Mind Control: The Ultimate Edition gives an in-depth look at a vastly underappreciated outfit and is obviously put together as much for the label as by it. That is to say, you don’t put out a reissue like this unless you really love the original record, and if Sulatron loving a record isn’t enough endorsement for you, please turn in your mushrooms on your way out the door.

Sun Dial on Thee Facebooks

Sulatron Records webstore

 

Saturn’s Husk, The Conduit

Saturns Husk The Conduit

Immersion is the goal of Saturn’s Husk‘s third long-player, The Conduit, and the Riga, Latvia, instrumentalist trio accomplish it quickly with the fluid riffs that emerge from the drone-based intro “Death of Imaginary Lights” and the subsequent 10-minute opener “Black Nebula.” At nine songs and 63 minutes, the album is consuming through the welcome nodder “The Heavenly Ape,” the especially-doomed “The Ritual” and the more mellow-float centerpiece “Spectral Haze,” while “Mycelium Messiah” brings more straight-ahead fuzz (for a time) and drones on either side surround the 10:35 “Sand Barrows,” the latter serving as the finale “A Shattered Visage” quoting Percy Bysshe Shelley and the former “City of the Djinn” running just a minute-plus but still doing enough to reset the brain from where “Mycelium Messiah” left it. Almost functioning as two albums side-by-side with “Spectral Haze” as the dividing point, The Conduit indeed seems to join various sides together, with a depth to coincide that invites the listener to explore along with it.

Saturn’s Husk on Thee Facebooks

Saturn’s Husk on Bandcamp

 

Diggeth, Gringos Galacticos

diggeth gringos galacticos

Landing a punch of classic metal to go along with its heavy-bottomed groove, Diggeth‘s Gringos Galacticos — one supposes the title ‘Spacecrackers’ was taken — was released by the Dutch trio in 2019 and receives a US limited vinyl edition thanks to Qumran Records. One finds some similar guitar heroics to those of Astrosoniq‘s more straightforward moments, but Diggeth‘s focus remains on hookmaking for the duration, offering hints of twang and acoustics in “In the Wake of Giants” and tipping a hat southwestward in “Three Gringos,” but “Straight-Shooter” is willfully breaks out its inner Hetfield and even as the penultimate “Unshackled” departs for a quieter break, it makes its way back in time for the big finish chorus, adding just a touch of Candlemass grandiosity for good measure before the harmonica-laced closing title-track rounds out with its dynamic spacey weirdness, the name of the album repeating itself in an answer to the Stephen Hawking sample that started the voyage on its way.

Diggeth on Thee Facebooks

Qumran Records website

 

Horizon, The White Planet Patrol

horizon the white planet patrol

Cursed Tongue Records has the vinyl here, and Three Moons the tape, and the CD will arrive through Aladeriva Records, La Rubia Producciones, Aneurisma Records, Surnia Records and Violence in the Veins — so yes, Horizon‘s third album, The White Planet Patrol is well backed. Fair enough for the Kyuss-via-BlackRainbows vibes of “End of Utopia” or the initial charge and flow of “The Backyard” that sets the Alicante, Spain, trio on their way. “King Serpent” and “Death & Teddies” bring well-crafted fuzz to bear, and “Blind World” effectively layers vocals in its chorus to coincide, but the more laid back roll of the title-cut is an unmistakable highlight. Shades of mid-paced Nebula surface in “Meet the Forest” later on, but Horizon are part of a tradition of heavy bands in Alicante and they know it. The smoothness of their tone and delivery speaks volumes on its own in that regard, never mind the actual songwriting, which also leaves nothing to be desired.

Horizon on Thee Facebooks

Cursed Tongue Records webstore

 

Limousine Beach, Stealin’ Wine + 2

Limousine Beach Stealin Wine

Debut EP from Limousine Beach out of Pittsburgh, and if the three guitars involved don’t push it over the top, certainly the vocal harmonies get that particular job done. You got six minutes for three songs? Yeah, obviously. They scorch through “Tiny Hunter” to close out, but it’s in the leadoff title-track that Stealin’ Wine + 2 sees the Dave Wheeler-fronted outfit land its most outrageous chorus, just before they go on to find a middle-ground between KISS and Thin Lizzy on “Hear You Calling.” The harmonies open and are striking from the outset, but it’s in how they’re arranged around the standalone parts from Wheeler (also Outsideinside, ex-Carousel) that the outfit’s truest potential is shown. Issued through Tee Pee Records, Stealin’ Wine + 2 is the kind of thing you’d pick up at a show in a normal year and then feel way ahead of everyone else when the LP finally hits. Not a normal year, obviously, but Limousine Beach are serving due notice just the same. In six minutes, no less.

Limousine Beach on Thee Facebooks

Tee Pee Records website

 

The Crooked Whispers, Satanic Melodies

the crooked whispers satanic melodies

I’m sure a lot of records show up at Satan’s door with notes, like, “Dear sir, please find the enclosed submitted for your approval,” but it’s not hard to imagine Beelzebub himself getting down with the filth-coated sludge and rolling doom unfurled across The Crooked Whispers‘ debut offering, Satanic Melodies, marked by hateful, near-blackened screams from Anthony Gaglia and the plodding riffs of Chad Davis (Hour of 13, et al). The title-track is longest at 8:23 and in addition to featuring Ignacio De Tommaso‘s right-on bass tone in its midsection, it plays out early like Weedeater sold their collective soul, and drifts out where earlier pieces “Sacrifice” and “Evil Tribute” and “Profane Pleasure” held their roll for the duration. Stretches of clean-vocal cultistry add to the doomier aspects, but The Crooked Whispers seem to care way less about genre than they do about worshiping the devil, and that unshakable faith behind them, the rest seems to fall into place in accordingly biting fashion.

The Crooked Whispers on Thee Facebooks

The Crooked Whispers on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Bell Witch & Aerial Ruin, Cruthu, Sólstafir, ILS, Bismut, Cracked Machine, Megadrone, KLÄMP, Mábura, Astral Sleep

Posted in Reviews on October 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

We’ve reached the portion of the Quarterly Review wherein I would no longer know what day it is if I didn’t have my notes to help me keep track. I suppose it doesn’t matter — the day, that is — since it’s 10 records either way, but I’d hate to review the same albums two days in a row or something. Though, come to think of it, that might be a fun experiment sometime.

Not today. Today is another fresh batch of 10 on the way to 60 by next Monday. We’ll get there. Always do. And if you’re wondering, today’s Thursday. At least that’s what I have in my notes.

Quarterly Review #31-40:

Bell Witch & Aerial Ruin, Stygian Bough Vol. I

bell witch aerial ruin Stygian Bough Volume 1

The collaborative effort Bell Witch & Aerial Ruin and their 64-minute full-length, Stygian Bough Vol. I — the intention toward future output together hinted at in the title already confirmed by the group(s) — is a direct extension of what Aerial Ruin, aka Erik Moggridge, brought to the last Bell Witch album, 2017’s Mirror Reaper (review here), in terms of complementing the crushing, emotionally resonant death-doom of the Washington duo with morose folk vocal melody. Stygian Bough Vol. I is distinguished by having been written by the two-plus-one-equals-three-piece as a group, and accordingly, it more fluidly weaves Moggridge‘s contributions into those of Bell Witch‘s Dylan Desmond and Jesse Shreibman, resulting in an approach like if Patrick Walker from Warning had joined Thergothon. It’s prevailing spirit is deep melancholy in longer pieces like “The Bastard Wind” and “The Unbodied Air,” both over 19 minutes, while it might be in “Heaven Torn Low I (The Passage)” and “Heaven Torn Low II (The Toll)” that the trio most effectively bring their intent to life. Either way, if you’re in, be ready to go all the way in, but know that it’s well worth doing so.

Bell Witch on Thee Facebooks

Aerial Ruin on Thee Facebooks

Profound Lore Records website

 

Cruthu, Athrú Crutha

cruthu Athrú Crutha

Traditional doom with flourish both of noise and NWOBHM guitars — that turn in the second half of opener “Transformation” is like a dogwhistle for Iron Maiden fans — I hear Cruthu‘s second album, Athrú Crutha, and all I can think of are label recommendations. The Michigan outfit’s 2017 debut, The Angle of Eternity (review here), was eventually issued on The Church Within, and that’d certainly work, but also Ván Records, Shadow Kingdom, and even Cruz Del Sur seem like fitting potential homes for the righteousness on display across the vinyl-ready six-song/39-minute outing, frontman Ryan Evans commanding in presence over the reverb-loaded classic-style riffs of guitarist Dan McCormick and the accompanying gallop in Matt Fry‘s drums given heft by Derek Kasperlik‘s bass. Like the opener, “Necromancy” and “Dimensional Collide” move at a good clip, but side B’s “The Outsider” and closer “Crown of Horns” slow things down following the surprisingly rough-edged “Beyond the Pale.” One way or the other, it’s all doomed and so are we.

Cruthu on Thee Facebooks

Cruthu on Bandcamp

 

Sólstafir, Endless Twilight of Codependent Love

Sólstafir endless twilight of codependent love

Whereas 2017’s Berdreyminn (review here) existed in the shadow of 2014’s Ótta (review here), Endless Twilight of Codependent Love brings Iceland’s Sólstafir to a new place in terms of their longer-term progression. It is their first album with an English title since 2005’s Masterpiece of Bitterness, and though they’ve had English-language songs since then, the mellow “Her Fall From Grace” is obviously intended to be a standout here, and it is. On the nine-song/62-minute course of the album, however, it is one impression of many, and in the raging “Dionysus” and post-blackened “Drýsill,” 10-minute opener and longest track (immediate points) “Akkeri,” richly atmospheric “Rökkur,” goth-lounging “Or” and worthy finale “Úlfur,” Sólstafir remind of the richly individual nature of their approach. The language swaps could be reaching out to a broader, non-Icelandic-speaking audience. If so, it’s only in the interest of that audience to take note if they haven’t already.

Sólstafir on Thee Facebooks

Season of Mist website

 

ILS, Curse

ils curse

Curse is the first long-player from Portland, Oregon’s ILS, and it’s a rager in the PNW noise tradition, with uptempo, gonna-throw-a-punch-and-then-apologize riffs and basslines and swaps between semi-spoken shouts and vicious screams from Tom Glose (ex-Black Elk) that are precisely as jarring as they’re meant to be. I don’t think Curse is anyone’s first time at the dance — Glose, guitarist Nate Abner, bassist Adam Pike or drummer Tim Steiner — but it only benefits across its sans-bullshit 28-minute run by knowing what it wants to do. Its longest material, like the title-track or “Don’t Hurt Me,” which follows, or closer “For the Shame I Bring,” rests on either side of three and a half minutes, but some of the most brutal impressions are made in cuts like “It’s Not Lard but it’s a Cyst” or leadoff “Bad Parts,” which have even less time to waste but are no less consuming, particularly at high volume. The kind of record for when you want to assault yourself. And hey, that happens.

ILS on Thee Facebooks

P.O.G.O. Records on Bandcamp

 

Bismut, Retrocausality

bismut retrocausality

Apart from the consciously-titled three-minute noiseblaster finale “Antithesis” that’s clearly intended to contrast with what comes before it, Bismut‘s second LP for Lay Bare, Retrocausality, is made up of five extended instrumental pieces the shortest of which is just under 13 minutes long. The Nijmegen-based trio — guitarist Nik Linders, bassist Huibert der Weduwen, drummer Peter Dragt — build these semi-improvisational pieces on the foundation they set with 2018’s Schwerpunkt (review here), and their explorations through heavy rock, metal and psychedelia feel all the more cohesive as a song like “Vergangenheit” is nonetheless able to blindside with the heavy riff toward which it’s been moving for its entire first half. At 71 minutes total, it’s a purposefully unmanageable runtime, but as “Predvídanie” imagines a psych-thrash and “Oscuramento” drones to its crashing finish, Bismut seem to be working on their own temporal accord anyhow. For those stuck on linear time, that means repeat listens may be necessary to fully digest, but that’s nothing to complain about either.

Bismut on Thee Facebooks

Lay Bare Recordings website

 

Cracked Machine, Gates of Keras

Cracked Machine Gates of Keras

UK instrumentalists Cracked Machine have worked relatively quickly over the course of their now-three albums to bring a sense of their own perspective to the tropes of heavy psychedelic rock. Alongside the warmth of tone in the guitar and bass, feeling drawn from the My Sleeping Karma/Colour Haze pastiche of progressive meditations, there is a coinciding edge of English heavy rock and roll that one can hear not so much in the drift of “Temple of Zaum” as in the push of “Black Square Icon,” which follows, as well as the subtle impatience of the drums on “October Dawn.” “Move 37,” on the other hand, is willfully speedier and more upbeat than much of what surrounds, but though opener/longest track (immediate points) “Cold Iron Light” hits 7:26, nothing on Gates of Keras sticks around long enough to overstay its welcome, and even in their deepest contemplations, the feeling of motion carries them and the listener effectively through the album’s span. They sound like a band realizing what they want to do with all the potential they’ve built up.

Cracked Machine on Thee Facebooks

Kozmik Artifactz website

PsyKa Records website

 

Megadrone, Transmissions From the Jovian Antennae

Megadrone Transmissions From the Jovian Antennae

From cinematic paranoia to consuming and ultra-slow rollout of massive tonality, the debut offering from Megadrone — the one-man outfit of former Bevar Sea vocalist Ganesh Krishnaswamy — stretches across 53 minutes of unmitigated sonic consumption. If nothing else, Krishnaswamy chose the right moniker for the project. The Bandcamp version is spread across two parts — “Transmission A” (21:45) and “Transmission B” (32:09) — and any vinyl release would require significant editing as well, but the version I have is one huge, extended track, and that feels like exactly how Transmissions From the Jovian Antennae was composed and is supposed to be heard. Its mind-numbing repetitions lead the listener on a subtle forward march — there are drums back in that morass somewhere, I know it — and the piece follows an arc that begins relatively quiet, swells in its midsection and gradually recedes again over its final 10 minutes or so. It goes without saying that a 53-minute work of experimentalist drone crushscaping isn’t going to be for the faint of heart. Bold favors bold.

Megadrone on Thee Facebooks

Megadrone on Bandcamp

 

KLÄMP, Hate You

klamp hate you

Sax-laced noise rock psychedelic freakouts, blown-out drums and shouts and drones, cacophonous stomp and chaotic sprawl, and a finale that holds back its payoff so long it feels cruel, KLÄMP‘s second album, Hate You, arrives less than a year after their self-titled debut, and perhaps there’s some clue as to why in the sheer mania of their execution. Hate You launches with the angularity of its 1:47 title-track and rolls out a nodding groove on top of that, but it’s movement from one part to another, one piece to another, is frenetic, regardless of the actual tempo, and the songs just sound like they were recorded to be played loud. Second cut “Arise” is the longest at 7:35 and it plays back and forth between two main parts before seeming to explode at the end, and by the time that’s done, you’re pretty much KLÄMPed into place waiting to see where the Utrecht trio go next. Oblivion wash on “An Orb,” the drum-led start-stops of “Big Bad Heart,” psych-smash “TJ” and that awaited end in “No Nerves” later, I’m not sure I have any better idea where that might be. That’s also what makes it work.

KLÄMP on Thee Facebooks

God Unknown Records website

 

Mábura, Heni

Mábura heni

Preceded by two singles, Heni is the debut EP from Rio de Janeiro psychedelic tonal worshipers Mábura, and its three component tracks, “Anhangá,” “III/IV” and “Bong of God” are intended to portray a lysergic experience through their according ambience and the sheer depth of the riffs they bring. “Anhangá” has vocals following the extended feedback and drone opening of its first half, but they unfold as a part of the general ambience, along with the drums that arrive late, are maybe sampler/programmed, and finish by leading directly into the crash/fuzz launch of “III/IV,” which just before it hits the two-minute mark unfurls into a watershed of effects and nod, crashing and stomping all the while until everything drops out but the bass only to return a short time later with the Riff in tow. Rumbling into a quick fade brings about the toking intro of “Bong of God,” which unfolds accordingly into a riff-led noisefest that makes its point seemingly without saying a word. I wouldn’t call it groundbreaking, but it’s a first EP. What it shows is that Mábura have some significant presence of tone and purpose. Don’t be surprised when someone picks them up for a release.

Mábura on Thee Facebooks

Mábura on Bandcamp

 

Astral Sleep, Astral Doom Musick

Astral Sleep Astral Doom Musick

It’s still possible to hear some of Astral Sleep‘s death-doom roots in their third album, Astral Doom Musick, but the truth is they’ve become a more expansive unit than that (relatively) simple classification than describe. They’re doom, to be sure, but there are progressive, psychedelic and even traditional doom elements at work across the record’s four-song/43-minute push, with a sense of conceptual composition coming through in “Vril” and “Inegration” in the first half of the proceedings while the nine-and-a-half-minute “Schwerbelastungskörper” pushes into the darkest reaches and closer “Aurinko ja Kuu” harnesses a swirling progressive spread that’s dramatic unto its last outward procession and suitably large-sound in its production and tone. For a band who took eight years to issue a follow-up to their last full-length, Astral Sleep certainly have plenty to offer in aesthetic and craft. If it took them so long to put this record together, their time wasn’t wasted, but it’s hard to listen and not wonder where their next step might take them.

Astral Sleep on Thee Facebooks

Astral Sleep on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Hum, Hymn, Atramentus, Zyclops, Kairon; IRSE!, Slow Draw, Might, Brimstone Coven, All Are to Return, Los Acidos

Posted in Reviews on October 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Day three of the Quarterly Review. Always a landmark. Today we hit the halfway point, but don’t pass it yet since I’ve decided to add the sixth day next Monday. So we’ll get to 30 of the total 60 records, and then be past half through tomorrow. Math was never my strong suit. Come to think of it, I wasn’t much for school all around. Work sucked too.

Anyway, if you haven’t found anything to dig yet — and I hope you have; I think the stuff included has been pretty good so far — you can either go back and look again or keep going. Maybe today’s your day. If not, there’s always tomorrow.

Quarterly Review #21-30:

Hum, Inlet

HUM INLET

One has to wonder if, if Hum had it to do over again, they might hold back their first album in 23 years, Inlet, for release sometime when the world isn’t being ravaged by a global pandemic. As it stands, the largesse and melodic wash of the Illinois outfit’s all-growed-up heavy post-rock offers 55 minutes of comfort amid the tumult of the days, and while I won’t profess to having been a fan in the ’90s — their last studio LP was 1997’s Downward is Heavenward, and they sound like they definitely spent some time listening to Pelican since then — the overarching consumption Inlet sets forth in relatively extended tracks like “Desert Rambler” and “The Summoning” and the manner in which the album sets its own backdrop in a floating drone of effects make it an escapist joy. They hold back until closer “Shapeshifter” to go full post-rock, and while there are times at which it can seem unipolar, to listen to the crunching “Step Into You” and “Cloud City” side-by-side unveils more of the scope underlying from the outset of “Waves” onward.

Hum on Thee Facebooks

Polyvinyl Records webstore

 

Hymn, Breach Us

Hymn Breach Us

Oslo’s Hymn answer the outright crush and scathe of their 2017 debut, Perish (review here), with a more developed and lethal attack on their four-song/38-minute follow-up, Breach Us. Though they’re the kind of band who make people who’ve never heard Black Cobra wonder how two people can be so heavy — and the record has plenty of that; “Exit Through Fire”‘s sludgeshuggah chugging walks by and waves — it’s the sense of atmosphere that guitarist/bassist/vocalist Ole Rokseth and drummer Markus Støle bring to the proceedings that make them so engrossing. The opening title-track is also the shortest at 6:25, but as Breach Us moves across “Exit Through Fire,” “Crimson” and especially 14-minute closer “Can I Carry You,” it brings forth the sort of ominous dystopian assault that so many tried and failed to harness in the wake of NeurosisThrough Silver in Blood. Hymn do that and make it theirs in the process.

Hymn on Thee Facebooks

Fysisk Format on Bandcamp

 

Atramentus, Stygian

Atramentus stygian

Carried across with excruciating grace, Atramentus‘ three-part/44-minute debut album, Stygian, probably belongs in a post-Bell Witch category of extreme, crawling death-doom, but from the script of their logo to the dramatic piano accompanying the lurching riffs, gurgles and choral wails of “Stygian I: From Tumultuous Heavens… (Descended Forth the Ceaseless Darkness)” through the five-minute interlude that is “Stygian II: In Ageless Slumber (As I Dream in the Doleful Embrace of the Howling Black Winds)” and into the 23-minute lurchfest that is “Stygian III: Perennial Voyage (Across the Perpetual Planes of Crying Frost and Steel-Eroding Blizzards)” their ultra-morose procession seems to dig further back for primary inspiration, to acts like Skepticism and even earliest Anathema (at least for that logo), and as guttural and tortured as it is as it devolves toward blackened char in its closer, Stygian‘s stretches of melody provide a contrast that gives some semblance of hope amid all the surrounding despair.

Atramentus on Thee Facebooks

20 Buck Spin webstore

 

Zyclops, Inheritance of Ash

zyclops inheritance of ash

As it clocks in 27 minutes, the inevitable question about Zyclops‘ debut release, Inheritance of Ash, is whether it’s an EP or an LP. For what it’s worth, my bid is for the latter, and to back my case up I’ll cite the flow between each of its four component tracks. The Austin, Texas, post-metallic four-piece save their most virulent chug and deepest tonal weight for the final two cuts, “Wind” and “Ash,” but the stage is well set in “Ghost” and “Rope” as well, and even when one song falls into silence, the next picks up in complementary fashion. Shades of Isis in “Rope,” Swarm of the Lotus in the more intense moments of “Ash,” and an overarching progressive vibe that feels suited to the Pelagic Records oeuvre, one might think of Zyclops as cerebral despite their protestations otherwise, but at the very least, the push and pull at the end of “Wind” and the stretch-out that comes after the churning first half of “Rope” don’t happen by mistake, and a band making these kinds of turns on their first outing isn’t to be ignored. Also, they’re very, very heavy.

Zyclops on Thee Facebooks

Zyclops on Bandcamp

 

Kairon; IRSE!, Polysomn

Kairon IRSE Polysomn

It’s all peace and quiet until “Psionic Static” suddenly starts to speed up, and then like the rush into transwarp, Kairon; IRSE!‘s Polysomn finds its bliss by hooking up a cortical node to your left temple and turning your frontal lobe into so much floundering goo, effectively kitchen-sink kraut-ing you into oblivion while gleefully hopping from genre to cosmic genre like they’re being chased by the ghost of space rock past. They’re the ghost of space rock future. While never static, Polysomn does offer some serenity amid all its head-spinning and lobe-melting, be it the hee-hee-now-it’s-trip-hop wash of “An Bat None” or the cinematic vastness that arises in “Altaïr Descends.” Too intelligent to be random noise or just a freakout, the album is nonetheless experimental, and remains committed to that all the way through the shorter “White Flies” and “Polysomn” at the end of the record. You can take it on if you have your EV suit handy, but if you don’t check the intermix ratio, your face is going to blow up. Fair warning. LLAP.

Kairon; IRSE! on Thee Facebooks

Svart Records webstore

 

Slow Draw, Quiet Joy

slow draw quiet joy

The second 2020 offering from Hurst, Texas’ Slow Draw — the one-man outfit of Mark “Derwooka” Kitchens, also of Stone Machine Electric — the four-song Quiet Joy is obviously consciously named. “Tightropes in Tandem” and closer “Sometimes Experiments Fail” offer a sweet, minimal jazziness, building on the hypnotic backwards psych drone of opener “Unexpected Suspect.” In the two-minute penultimate title-track, Kitchens is barely there, and it is as much an emphasis on the quiet space as that in which the music — a late arriving guitar stands out — might otherwise be taking place. At 18 minutes, it is intended to be a breath taken before reimmersing oneself in the unrelenting chaos that surrounds and swirls, and while it’s short, each piece also has something of its own to offer — even when it’s actively nothing — and Slow Draw brims with purpose across this short release. Sometimes experiments fail, sure. Sometimes they work.

Slow Draw on Thee Facebooks

Slow Draw on Bandcamp

 

Might, Might

might might

It took all of a week for the married duo of Ana Muhi (vocals, bass) and Sven Missullis (guitars, vocals, drums) to announce Might as their new project following the dissolution of the long-ish-running and far-punkier Deamon’s Child. Might‘s self-titled debut arrives with the significant backing of Exile on Mainstream and earns its place on the label with an atmospheric approach to noise rock that, while it inevitably shares some elements with the preceding band, forays outward into the weight of “Possession” and the acoustic-into-crush “Warlight” and the crush-into-ambience “Flight of Fancy” and the ambience-into-ambience “Mrs. Poise” and so on. From the beginning in “Intoduce Yourself” and the rushing “Pollution of Mind,” it’s clear the recorded-in-quarantine 35-minute/nine-song outing is going to go where it wants to, Muhi and Missullis sharing vocals and urging the listener deeper into doesn’t-quite-sound-like-anything-else post-fuzz heavy rock and sludge. A fun game: try to predict where it’s going, and be wrong.

Might on Thee Facebooks

Exile on Mainstream website

 

Brimstone Coven, The Woes of a Mortal Earth

brimstone coven the woes of a mortal earth

Following a stint on Metal Blade and self-releasing 2018’s What Was and What Shall Be, West Virginia’s Brimstone Coven issue their second album as a three-piece through Ripple Music, calling to mind a more classic-minded Apostle of Solitude on the finale “Song of Whippoorwill” and finding a balance all the while between keeping their progressions moving forward and establishing a melancholy atmosphere. Some elements feel drawn from the Maryland school of doom — opener the melody and hook of “The Inferno” remind of defunct purveyors Beelzefuzz — but what comes through clearest in these songs is that guitarist/vocalist Corey Roth, bassist/vocalist Andrew D’Cagna and drummer Dave Trik have found their way forward after paring down from a four-piece following 2016’s Black Magic (review here) and the initial steps the last album took. They sound ready for whatever the growth of their craft might bring and execute songs like “When the World is Gone” and the more swinging “Secrets of the Earth” with the utmost class.

Brimstone Coven on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music website

 

All Are to Return, All Are to Return

all are to return all are to return

Take the brutal industrial doom of Author and Punisher and smash it together — presumably in some kind of stainless-steel semi-automated contraption — with the skin-peeling atmosphere and grueling tension of Khanate and you may begin to understand where All Are to Return are coming from on their debut self-titled EP. How they make a song like four-minute centerpiece “Bare Life” feel so consuming is beyond me, but I think being so utterly demolishing helps. It’s not just about the plodding electronic beat, either. There’s some of that in opener “Untrusted” and certainly “The Lie of Fellow Men” has a lumber to go with its bass rumble and NIN-sounding-hopeful guitar, but it’s the overwhelming sense of everything being tainted and cruel that comes through in the space the only-19-minutes-long release creates. Even as closer “Bellum Omnium” chips away at the last remaining vestiges of color, it casts a coherent vision of not only aesthetic purpose for the duo, but of the terrible, all-gone-wrong future in which we seem at times to live.

All Are to Return on Bandcamp

Tartarus Records website

 

Los Acidos, Los Acidos

Los Acidos Los Acidos

I saved this one for last today as a favor to myself. Originally released in 2016, Los Acidos‘ self-titled debut receives a well-deserved second look on vinyl courtesy of Necio Records, and with it comes 40 minutes of full immersion in glorious Argentinian psicodelia, spacious and ’60s-style on “Al Otro Lado” and full of freaky swing on “Blusas” ahead of the almost-shoegaze-until-it-explodes-in-sunshine float of “Perfume Fantasma.” “Paseo” and the penultimate “Espejos” careen with greater intensity, but from the folksy feel that arrives to coincide with the cymbal-crashing roll of “Excentricidad” in its second half to the final boogie payoff in “Empatía de Cristal,” the 10-song outing is a joy waiting to be experienced. You’re experienced, right? Have you ever been? Either way, the important thing is that the voyage that, indeed, begins with “Viaje” is worth your time in melody, in craft, in its arrangements, in presence and in the soul that comes through from front to back. The four-piece had a single out in late 2019, but anytime they want to get to work on a follow-up LP, I’ll be waiting.

Los Acidos on Thee Facebooks

Necio Records on Bandcamp

 

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Opium Warlords Set Dec. 4 Release for Nembutal; Stream “A Heavy Heart”

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 2nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The headline that Sami Albert Hynninen, otherwise known as Albert Witchfinder of erstwhile Finnish traditionalists Reverend Bizarre, is making a “return to doom-laden heavy metal” is nothing if not compelling. And indeed, the new Opium Warlords, titled Nembutal opens with “A Heavy Heart,” which runs 19 minutes long and moves from Sabbath processionalism to some of the rawest and, frankly, best done Cathedral worship I’ve ever heard. It does not, however, speak for the entirety of the record, which still boasts plenty of the experimentalist/drone/out-of-genre-go-anywhere-free-jazz with which the project has most become associated. No complaints for the weirdness, the otherworldly ambience, or indeed, the doom that pervades. Dude’s never been interested in making it easy for anyone.

If you can’t get behind that mentality, the challenge throughout Nembutal, as through most of what Hynninen does with Opium Warlords will likely prove too much. I don’t think it matters. I’m talking to myself here anyway and I dig this, so whatever.

Here’s to “the end of pain and the end of mankind” as per the PR wire:

Opium Warlords Nembutal

Opium Warlords: “Nembutal”, new album from Albert Witchfinder (Reverend Bizarre)

Albert Witchfinder (Reverend Bizarre) returns to doom-laden heavy metal with the fifth Opium Warlords album NEMBUTAL. Whereas the first four Opium Warlords albums were a brute depiction of psychoses, their fifth offering NEMBUTAL is a sweaty return to a crystal clear existence after a most severe depression. It is a beautiful, multi-layered journey through a broken mind, inner suffering, and slow recovery; clean like a spring rain or autumn morning. It takes you on a trip that will leave you shaken, but purified.

Sami Albert ”Witchfinder” Hynninen (Reverend Bizarre, The Candles Burning Blue, The Puritan, Tähtiportti, KLV, Spiritus Mortis) has in his lifetime, produced hours of devastating, violent, extremely heavy, but at same time strangely serene music. NEMBUTAL is easily one of the more pure gemstones, ultimate in several different opposites; beauty, ugliness, heaviness, floating ambience, progressive structures, minimalism, light, darkness, remorse, vengeance. You have to experience it to really understand.

The record is a joyful vision of death and apocalypse. The end of love, the end of pain and the end of mankind.

On its moments NEMBUTAL is as Metal as it can get, but most of the time it goes beyond any categorization, even beyond rock music. Still, constantly remaining heavy and striking, like a horse whip in the hand of the iron master.

“This might be the best album I have produced so far… but then again my idea of music is completely fucked up.” – Sami Hynninen

Released by Svart Records on December the 4th 2020.

Jewelcase CD
Limited to 500 on black double vinyl
with lyric/photo booklet

NEMBUTAL:
I: A Heavy Heart
II: Threshold Of Your Womb
III: The Destroyer Of Filth
IV: Sarah Was Nineteen Years Old
V: Solar Anus
VI: Early In The Morning The Body Of The Girl Was Found
VII: Perspiring Princess
VIII: Xanadu

Written, arranged, and produced by Sami Albert Hynninen
Co-produced by Jouni Leppikangas
Performed by Sami Albert Hynninen and Erkki Virta

http://www.facebook.com/OpiumWarlords
https://opiumwarlords.bandcamp.com/
www.svartrecords.com
www.facebook.com/svartrecords
www.youtube.com/svartrecords
https://www.svartrecords.com/

Opium Warlords, “A Heavy Heart”

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DÖ Post ‘Transmissiön From the Cult Vessel’ Live Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 29th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

do

Standing astride the galactic neutral zone between heavy rock riffing and harsher-biting sludge fare, Finnish three-piece offer up the live set ‘Transmissiön From the Cult Vessel’ as they look to shift from their second full-length, 2019’s Astral Death Cult, toward a new EP release. Running just under 50 minutes, the clip was presumably shot in their rehearsal space — maybe a cargo container or some other kind of vessel? — and it features the three-piece crowded around each other, but for that, it’s shot with surprising professionalism. I count at least five different cameras at work, and transitions between one shot, title cards for the songs and the next are laced with intermittent effects that bring color and personality to the proceedings. Add to that the sound of the thing is full and seems to have been captured to a board and properly mixed, and for falling into the category of “band in rehearsal room” videos, it’s got quite a bit to offer someone bold enough to take it on.

Their new EP is to be called Black Hole Mass, fitting with the band’s we’re-a-death-cult aesthetic (fair enough; what doesn’t feel like a death cult these days, amirite?), and will according to the info below see release sometime before the next two months finally bring an end to this wretched year and push us inexorably into the next one. Take it whenever it comes. They give a taste of Black Hole Mass by airing “Gravity Sacrifice” near the end of the set. The track starts out with a duly moody float and builds with thudding toms over its first couple minutes. The line “Let us begin!” brings the crushing riffery that feels inevitable by the time they get there, and as it unfurls with a lumber that sounds like the charred resin of Bongzilla, “Gravity Sacrifice” both fits in with the older material that surrounds — earlier, they destroy “Kylmä” from 2016’s Tuho, and they finish with the feedback-and-sample-plus-raw-bludgeon that is “Beyond the Cosmic Horizon,” which also closed out Astral Death Cult — and serves as a highlight unto itself. I won’t profess to know the release plan for Black Hole Mass, but “Gravity Sacrifice” would seem to make their intention toward spatial destruction plain to hear.

It goes without saying that the actual-universe is currently awash in virtual performances, and I recognize that not everybody has 50 minutes to spare in their busy day/life to sit down and watch a trio plunder through a set — sad as a fact like that is to acknowledge. Still, if you get the chance to check out any or all of ‘Transmissiön From the Cult Vessel,’ which was put up two days ago, I don’t think you’ll regret it. And that is exactly why I’m posting it here.

Please enjoy:

DÖ, ‘Transmissiön From the Cult Vessel’

At the end of September 2020 a mysterious signal was detected all around the world. The source of the signal was revealed to be the astral death cult DÖ.

The content of the signal was a live performance recording called “Transmissiön from the Cult Vessel”. It includes songs from various releases, some of which the band haven’t played at gigs in ages, and naturally ever with this lineup.

But the most interesting part is the new eerie song called “Gravity Sacrifice”, one of the three songs that will be unleashed on an EP called “Black Hole Mass” later this year. For the astral death cult i.e. the band, the EP will be a passage ritual to a new level of consciousness, as they have begun to gravitate towards more evolved expression and higher spheres with the new lineup. More info about the EP will follow.

But now, dive into darkness with this cosmos rumbling performance.

Setlist:
-Cosmic Communion
-Kylmä
-For the Worms
-Atmosfear
-Astral Death
-Gravity Sacrifice – Song premiere
-Beyond the Cosmic Horizon

DÖ is:
Big Dog (Guitar)
Deaf Hank (Vox & Bass)
Joe E. Deliverance (‘E’ stands for ‘Epic’) (Drums & Vox)

DÖ, Astral Death Cult (2020)

DÖ on Thee Facebooks

DÖ on Instagram

DÖ on Bandcamp

Lay Bare Recordings website

Lay Bare Recordings on Thee Facebooks

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Onségen Ensemble Sign to Svart Records for New Album FEAR: Video Posted

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

ONSEGEN ENSEMBLE

Prog as fuck and a fair shade darker than was their self-released 2018 album, Duel (review here), the new single from Oulu, Finland’s Onségen Ensemble arrives with the formidable countryman backing of Svart Records and heralds the arrival of their third full-length, FEAR, sometime before the end of 2020. The band, as announced last December, hit the studio in February with producer Jamie Gomez Arellano at London’s famed Orgone Studios, and you can hear the results in the breadth of “Stellar,” for which there’s a video streaming at the bottom of this post. Sounds deep, and calls to mind some of Finnish psych’s more extreme fare, the quiet moments of Dark Buddha Rising stretched in another direction, perhaps.

Would you be surprised if I said I was looking forward to hearing more? Probably not if you clicked that review link above. These guys hooking up with Svart only makes sense — I said as much in that review — and if their path has taken them to someplace more grim for the LP as a whole — and there’s no guarantee it has; their sound is plenty diverse — then all the more so.

The following came down the PR wire in the reaches of morning:

ONSEGEN ENSEMBLE fear maybe cover

ONSÈGEN ENSEMBLE and SVART RECORDS announce a worldwide partnership for the band’s upcoming album. New single out!

What happens when the prog-oddity ONSÈGEN ENSEMBLE and ORGONE STUDIOS’ world-class producer JAIME GOMEZ ARELLANO huddle up in the studio to record the band’s third album FEAR? The odds are that you’ll be mesmerized. The full-length album will be released by SVART RECORDS in late 2020.

Onségen Ensemble is a group of musicians from northern Finland. Being faithful to its own purpose, the spiritual home of Onségen keeps its doors open for everyone to enter. FEAR takes you to a mystical trip with excursions into wonderfully cinematic and flamboyant landscapes.

This constantly evolving ensemble was born in 2004 followed by two mini-cd releases Hiukkavaara Sessions (2005) and HottoïzzoH (2007). The debut album Awalaï was released in 2016 and the sophomore effort Duel in 2018.

New single ‘Stellar’ out now:
https://youtu.be/SKrkvaTDMp4
https://open.spotify.com/track/5IB4EtVBttj21wZyhgZyZ5?si=CJNTZM4NSha9lE4d0pvTlA
https://onsgenensemble.bandcamp.com/track/stellar

Onségen Ensemble, generation twenty-twenty – personnel in FEAR:
Pasi Anttila, Heikki Häkkilä, Esa Juujärvi, Merja Järvelin, Sami Lehtiniemi, Samuli Lindberg, Joni Mäkelä, Niina Vahtola and Mikko Vuorela.

https://www.facebook.com/onsegenensemble/
https://onsgenensemble.bandcamp.com/
http://www.onsegen.com/
www.svartrecords.com
www.facebook.com/svartrecords
www.youtube.com/svartrecords

Onségen Ensemble, “Stellar” official video

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Deep River Acolytes Sign to Argonauta Records for Alchemia Aeterna Release

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 19th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

deep river acolytes

It’s been two weeks since the last Argonauta Records signing, so it’s good to know that at least some facets of existence are managing to return to normal after what I’ve called ‘corona-season’ is over. Seems like an ambitious designation to me, particularly for those of us in the US, but though Italy got hit hard initially by the firelung plague, Argonauta is back up and running, picking up acts and putting out albums. Flashes of life in the before-time. I keep waiting for more European tour announcements to start showing up again and give me a whole new working definition for “bittersweet.”

Now then, on to Finland’s Deep River Acolytes. You might recognize their hometown of Oulu as a psychedelic hotbed, but these guys are on a different trip. Their quizzically-titled Alchemia Aeterna album will be released through Argonauta this Fall. It’s the band’s third full-length overall, and falls in with a darker take on straight-up heavy in the newly-unveiled “Under Her Spell.” That the band was once called Deliverance doesn’t particularly surprise me, but neither does the fact that they changed that name, no doubt because the association to C.O.C.‘s landmark album didn’t capture the entirety of their sound. Or they stopped being Jon Voight fans.

To the PR wire:

deep river acolytes Alchemia Aeterna

DEEP RIVER ACOLYTES Sign Worldwide Deal With ARGONAUTA RECORDS

and share first single from upcoming album!

“Alchemia Aeterna” coming out October 30th!

Hailing from Oulu, Finland, heavy rock / metal act Deep River Acolytes has announced the signing with Italy’s powerhouse label Argonauta Records, who will proudly release the band’s third full-length album on October 30th 2020!

Deep River Acolytes, who formed in 2011 and were previously known as Deliverance, play a heavy rock and doom metal sound combined with black metallish riffs and bluesy vocals. Following several demos, live recordings, an EP plus two highly acclaimed full-length albums and several captivating shows to date, they gained the attention by cult underground label Argonauta Records.

The band comments: “We’re proud of our collaboration with Argonauta Records concerning our new album ‘Alchemia Aeterna’, and we highly appreciate Gero and all at Argonauta Rec. for working hard despite these plague ridden times. Stay heavy, stay possessed, get the album!

Their upcoming opus, “Alchemia Aeterna”, has a rough edge and live feeling all the way, and is not afraid to cross genres of the doom, metal, hard rock, black metal and the blues. The album was recorded at the Anvil Road Studios in 2019 by Ari Rajaniemi, mixed by Antti Lindholm at Boat Island Studios and was mastered at Enormous Door by Jack Control in 2020. Today, Deep River Acolytes have unleashed a first track taken from their new album, stream “Under Her Spell” here.

“Alchemia Aeterna” Tracklisting
1. At The Crossroads
2. Under Her Spell
3. Caught Somewhere Out of Time
4. The River Deep
5. Veriurut
6. Cemetery Earth

https://www.facebook.com/deepriveracolytes/
https://deepriveracolytes.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/ArgonautaRecords/
https://argonautarecords.bandcamp.com/
www.argonautarecords.com

Deep River Acolytes, “Under Her Spell”

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