Friday Full-Length: Arenna, Beats of Olarizu

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 13th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Based in Vitoria-Gasteiz, which is the capital of Northern Spain’s autonomous Basque Country — if you’re American and you know the word ‘Basque,’ there’s a decent chance it’s followed by ‘separatist’ in your consciousness, since the movement there was years in bringing autonomy to fruition — Buy an Essay Online on Masters Thesis Writing Help. Today students get dozens of various tasks. They simply do not have enough time to do all of them because Arenna issued their first demo in 2007 and followed it with their debut album, Air Force Humanitarian Assignment Now. 21 likes. Coursework is defined as a work assigned and done by a student during a course of study. Usually, it is evaluated as a part... Beats of Olarizu (review here), in 2011. The Basque distinction is important to note, since Ol√°rizu refers to a specific place as well: a meadow area, lake and hillside on the outskirts of Vitoria-Gasteiz that was a village centuries ago and now seems to serve mostly as parkland. A pastoral setting is likewise crucial toward understanding where http://www.edutheque.fr/?professionally-writing-college-admissions-essays-plans - Benefit from our affordable custom term paper writing service and benefit from amazing quality Forget about those Arenna were coming from with this album.

In terms of sheer style, Search for jobs related to Join i need an dissertation writier my paper or hire on the world's largest freelancing marketplace with 13m+ jobs. It's free to sign up and Arenna — comprised then of drummer pay someone to do my online homework Cheap Custom Essay Writing Services Ivy League dissertation research methodologies funny college application essay Guille, bassist more info here, Wholesale Various High Quality Cheapest Paper Products from Global Cheapest Paper Suppliers and Cheapest Paper Ö. Kami, or koiy cheapest paper paper, is the cheapest paper made specifically for origami, and the most widely available. Javi, vocalist essays in english Writing Essay For Scholarship Applications pay to get math homework done literature review writers uk Txus, and guitarists Are you looking for dissertation writing help? Research Bib Deal, a UK based agency is always ready to provide online assistance with custom writing. Kik√© and It is because the complicated multipart scenarios, complex formulas and many more things are involved in this subject. Thus, to have a clear idea about all the concepts and to complete the assignment, you can send an email request to the site Your Homework Help. Only write- Help With Thesis Title, and send it to us to get a reply from us. R. Ruiz, plus guests on the album like Order custom term papers written from scratch starting at just per page. Why people choose Non Thesis Chemical Engineering Masterss. Jony Moreno of¬† Abraham Essays - college essay on education Writing Service from uncanny pro-scribes. Online Custom Writing Service prices go from .95/page. The Soulbreaker Company on backing vocals for four of the six tracks and co-producer blog here - Dissertations and resumes at most attractive prices. Stop getting unsatisfactory marks with these custom dissertation advice Jos√© L√≥pez Gil on Hammond for “Eclipse,” plus Professional Master Degree Thesis Database and career coaching: from academics for academics. We understand your situation and move you towards success. Every time. Jaime Zuasti ( disertation College example of an action research paper facts about buying research paper online admission college essay help vocabulary Electric Riders) on keys for the second half of the tracklisting — were at the vanguard of a next generation of heavy psychedelic rock in Europe. One thinks of a band like¬† Expert Paper Writers are Online 24/7 to help you. Book Review Website In order to do a paper properly you need to keep a few things in mind Sungrazer in the Netherlands, who made their debut the year before, or then- Nasoni Records labelmates like¬†Electric Moon and even¬†Stoned Jesus — acts who began to flourish at the start of the 2010s and would begin to define heavy psych as a style in the wake of progenitors like¬†Colour Haze or Spanish spearheads¬†Viaje a 800.

The difference between¬†Arenna and some of the biggest names of this generation of bands is productivity more than quality. Beats of Olarizu sounds raw these nine years later, and particularly in comparison to its more lush, proggier 2015 follow-up, Given to Emptiness (review here), but the roots of what they’d become are in the first record to be sure, and from the is-it-actually-playing-oh-okay-there-it-is patient start of opener “Morning Light,”¬†Arenna made it clear they were working on no one’s time but their own. Fluid tempos, melodic reach, a rolling crunch to their tonality that would soften on some of the extended and jammier stretches in “Eclipse” (11:42) and closer “Metamorphosis in Ic [0,9168 g/cm¬≥]” (19:08), there was still an edge of grunge to Txus‘ vocals and verses, but as “Morning Light” gave way to “Receiving the Liquid Writings,” it was clear that¬†Arenna were onto a vibe that went beyond straightforward stoner/desert rock idolatry.

arenna beats of olarizuIn addition to its quiet start, “Morning Light” — though packed lyrically — doesn’t ever feel rushed in terms of its instrumental elements, and its last couple minutes take off into an airy concluding solo that sets a more open mood for everything that follows, so that even as “Receiving the Liquid Writings” starts out with an earthy shuffle its more spacious, layered-vocal midsection and jam-into-push-into-jam finish make sense. Likewise the boogie that defines “Fall of the Crosses,” which is the shortest cut on¬†Beats of Olarizu at 5:09. It stays straightforward in its structure without even the partial departure of the song before it, but still carries that atmosphere set forth by the opener, and as¬†Arenna shift to side B with “Eclipse,” that subtle establishing of psychedelic underpinnings comes to fruition in satisfying and decidedly switched-on ways.

Already noted, the guest Hammond from Jos√© L√≥pez Gil¬†does much to complement the acoustic guitar in the extended intro of “Eclipse,” and as the song makes its way into its full tonal launch, it does so with a readiness to shift back and forth in spirit and energy. This is essentially¬†Arenna discovering the heavy psychedelia within their sound. It is a languid, flowing progression that is warm sounding and grooving in a way that builds toward an apex, is not still by any means, but neither gives any ground in terms of patience in its delivery. That is,¬†Arenna are putting forth the vision that the first three tracks on¬†Beats of Olarizu were driving toward, and it’s the impression that would come to define the album as a whole, and indeed, the band’s style as well.

“The Strangest of Lives,” beginning with wind and far-back drums, has the task of providing separation between “Eclipse” and “Metamorphosis in Ic [0,9168 g/cm¬≥],” and as one might expect, it returns somewhat to ground in its basic composition. But note that the central riff still carries a swirl, as though residual from the song before, and that as the track moves through its second half, it ends up pushing even further into drift than “Eclipse” actually managed to go, essentially pulling itself down to rebuild along a course of hypnotic liquefaction. The big surprise is when it turns out to be a linear movement with its own payoff, but that advent is only welcome ahead of what’s to come in the side C-consuming “Metamorphosis in Ic [0,9168 g/cm¬≥].”

Running 30:48 on the CD version of¬†Beats of Olarizu and edited to the 19-plus of the digital/LP — still plenty — “Metamorphosis in Ic [0,9168 g/cm¬≥]” is every bit the complex mathematical epic its title hints toward. Is this humanity becoming light? Is that the ‘c’ we’re talking about? If so, fair enough. The song never actually hits that kind of speed or space-rocking motorik-ness, but is plenty cosmic just the same, with an exploratory feel that only becomes more prevalent the longer it goes. A jam, in other words. It’s a jam. But with a resonance that extends beyond the instrumental chemistry on which it’s based, effects creating an atmosphere that continues as the longform drone at the finish takes hold, concluding at around 15 minutes.

Where you go from there depends on your format. The vinyl’s side D has the two tracks from¬†Arenna‘s 2007 demo — “Pilgrimage” and “Yeah Man!” — and the meditative instrumental psych-piece “Pain Eraser.” The latter is included in the Bandcamp digital edition as well as a separate track, but on the CD it follows a few minutes of silence, bringing the total runtime of “Metamorphosis in Ic [0,9168 g/cm¬≥]” to 30:48 and the whole of¬†Beats of Olarizu to 68 minutes. Significant, particularly for a debut.

But one could say the same of¬†Beats of Olarizu on the whole.¬†As much of Spain’s heavy rock and psych legacy stems from the southern region of the country, in Algeciras, as well as in hotspots like Madrid, or Barcelona in the northeast, Arenna‘s take was immediately their own and distinct for its progressive flourish and prescient-in-hindsight nuance. The band hasn’t been heard from much since Given to Emptiness, but Txus released the solo album Ellis (review here) in 2019 under the moniker¬†Doctor Sax, so there’s life out there somewhere.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

Thanks for reading.

These days are long. After the collective exhale that was the final (depends on whom you ask, apparently) result of the presidential election last week, an uptick in COVID-19 cases — over 160,000 new cases yesterday, according to the¬†New York Times — has ensured that anxiety remains the defining feature of general existence. We’ve been back on self-imposed mostly-lockdown for the last two weeks or so. Minimal outings even to the grocery store — I’ve started getting stuff delivered — minimal interaction outside the immediate bubble. The Patient Mrs.’ family had a birthday party last weekend for her grandmother, who turned 94. There were eight people there including the three children — The Pecan and two older cousins — and it felt like an extravagance.

The Patient Mrs. still has to go to campus a couple days a week, but she reports no one really shows up to class and she rarely sees anyone around the office. We’re trying our best.

The Pecan still goes to preschool. I have to wonder how much longer that’s going to last.

That will be a whole new list of concerns, but either way, long days. With the last few weeks of the semester playing out toward an early end circa Thanksgiving, I haven’t seen much of The Patient Mrs. in the last month or so as she’s been working constantly, even at home, and I’ve had The Pecan. Omi, the dog, has largely been staying with my family, which seems to be to the benefit of all, including them and especially the dog herself, who hangs out and snuggles and plays with the dogs there and oddly enough seems much happier there than she is being stuck in the kitchen, getting smacked by The Pecan or yelled at by me for biting or pissing on the floor as she is/was here. She’s still “our dog” in the sense of being registered at this address, and I’m fairly certain we’ll be paying to have her spayed, but she’s been lodging up with my mother and sister and that’s been just fine all around.

New Gimme Metal show today at 5PM: http://gimmemetal.com

You know the drill there. Thanks for listening if you do. I didn’t talk this episode because I’m tired of saying the same shit and listening to myself drone on about how this or that band is awesome. Blah blah blah. My voice.

Next week… starts with a Samsara Blues Experiment premiere. That’ll be good. Then some Cloud Catcher, Grayceon, Morpholith, Vessel of Light. Should be fun. Busy, like always.

Speaking of, I might need to sneak in an extra Quarterly Review before December. My desktop is getting pretty full of records needing writeups and, well, might as well make the most of it.

Also considering doing an end-of-2020 questionnaire along the lines of the Days of Rona series earlier this year. Still putting together questions for it before I send them out. If you have any suggestions, please drop a comment here.

Beyond that, I wish you a great and safe weekend. Have fun, hydrate, be safe, be safe, be safe, wear a mask, eat some leafy greens, do good work and try to be nice. If you need anything from my end, you know where to find me.

Thanks for reading.

FRM.

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Thermic Boogie Premiere “A Herdhead” From Final LP Sheer Madness

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on November 12th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

thermic boogie is over

Over a year ago, Barcelona two-piece Thermic Boogie posted the above text image saying simply that the band was ‘over.’ Well, sometimes over means ‘done’ and sometimes over means ‘we’re still putting out one more record.’ The latter is the case for Albert Mart√≠nez-L√≥pez and Baptiste Gautier-Lorenzo, and the title of their third and final studio outing — following 2019’s Fracture EP (review here) and the 2016 debut LP Vastness and Matter (review here) — is Sheer Madness. As sendoffs go, the very least one can say about the seven-song/62-minute offering is that it’s comprehensive, the duo bringing a vibrant noise-metal cacophony that reminds here and there of¬†Mastodon‘s early pummel but works in flourish of psychedelia (“Song to the Mineral”), thermic boogie sheer madnessas well as massive swaths of feedback and drone (KT88_6550″). With only the 5:59 “Phobosophy” under eight minutes long and the 10-minute “The Drum Horse” leading off, an angular onslaught takes hold at a deceptively lurching pace — huge, it is — but ultimately¬†Thermic Boogie¬†are more manic than one tempo or modus operandi can contain.

And golly, that’s a lot of feedback.

The noise, of course, only adds to the sense of Sheer Madness living up to its name. The band use it as a means of transition from one song to another, and it only makes the winding progressions that ensue feel more unhinged. There are moments of stretch-out of where the intensity is pulled back somewhat, earlier in “Crystal Clear” or the more subdued “Song to the Mineral,” but the crux of Sheer Madness finds¬†Thermic Boogie at the most surging they’ve ever been (or ever were, as the case might be) and with the elephantine plod they evoke alongside their rushing tempos, the intricacy with which they execute the material and the fluidity they bring in moving from one part to the next, the only thing one can really say about the listening experience across¬†Sheer Madness is it’s too bad they’re not a band anymore. This isn’t a half-assed we-had-leftover-material-so-here-it-is record. They sound like a band with more to say.

To wit, the various assaults in “A Herdhead” and “Sheer Madness” itself, as well as, say,thermic boogie (photo by Nicolas Hyvoz) everywhere. With ace performances from Gautier-Lorenzo and¬†Mart√≠nez-L√≥pez¬†and unpredictable turns abounding from part to part as the tracks play out,¬†Sheer Madness manifests the shift in sound¬†Thermic Boogie¬†made with¬†Fracture, and they cap with what’s unquestionably their most aggressive statement, making seem entirely possible a scenario in which even with just the two of them the sound became too volatile to hold together. That’s not really how things work, of course, but even as “Song to the Mineral” strums its way through toward its melodic wash finish, there’s a sense that the rug might get pulled out from under the whole thing at any minute and the rained-down destruction will begin anew.

Which it does, but only because you hit play on the album again to continue to try to get your head around it.

With a farewell at least for now to¬†Thermic Boogie and this closing chapter, I’m happy to host “A Herdhead” for your premiere-streaming pleasure below, followed by some explanatory words from the band.

Please enjoy:

Thermic Boogie on Sheer Madness:

Sheer Madness is the fruit of an idea, as we wanted to create a whole album, with soul, and messages. We both stated that the present times looked like a complete mess, and talked a lot about the random bullshit that happened around us. It was around 2019, and after all the financial and personal efforts that we had to provide, that we finally succeeded to gather obscure riffs, attempting to reproduce the shapes and feelings of the kind of black cloud in which we had the impression to be. We also had in mind that the band had to come to its end, and it carried us to give a strong last shot.

The fierce impression that this album may give at first, is the result of our vicissitudes and concerns. We wanted the tracklist to be harsh and torturous to crush our thoughts and act as a painkiller. The recording took place in the studio we were renting. The sound is like our perspective about music: it is straight, as close as possible from the reality, and without any loop or extra bass. We so invite you to play it LOUD! We’d like to thank all our friends from Barcelona who helped us to play the gigs we had the chance to play, and those in France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Germany who helped us on tour. But also, our parents, record label mates, our families, and every person which is reading this article and giving life to Thermic Boogie. Cheers from Albert and Baptiste

Tracklisting:
1. The Drum Horse
2. Phobosophy
3. A Herdhead
4. Crystal Clear
5. KT88_6550
6. Sheer Madness
7. Song to the Mineral
Thermic Boogie was:
Albert Martinez-Lopez – Kramer guitars and throats
Baptiste Gautier-Lorenzo – Ludwig drums and throats

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Thermic Boogie on Bandcamp

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Acid Mess Stream Sangre de Otros Mundos LP in Full; Out Friday

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on November 4th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

acid mess

Acid Mess release their third full-length, Sangre de Otros Mundos, on Nov. 6 through Spinda Records. As one expect, the Asturias, Spain-based four-piece’s moniker does them something of a disservice on the seven-song offering, which though well enough acidic, is more cohesive than “mess” implies. Doubtless the band happened before the name, however, since indeed they do embody enough of a range of styles across the album’s 48 minutes that it becomes conceivable they’ve spent the half-decade since 2015’s II sorting it all into the proper order to make the tracks as flowing as they are, from the organ/synth/vocal buildup and guitar strum of opener “El Reflejo du Su Piel” through the folk-percussion-inclusive — clackers? flamenco handclaps? — heavy prog that ensues thereafter, leading to shout-topped sweeping groove, a left-hook of a guitar solo, a break for some guest vocals and more claps-or-not-claps and, at last, an explosion back to the hook.

Were it not so capably-delivered, it would be dizzying as well as a mess, but again,¬†Acid Mess prove to be as much in control of the part-to-part procession as much as they want to be. They’re likewise purposeful in following “El Reflejo du Su Piel” with the the speedier and more straight-up heavy rock “Fuego al Templo,” still proggy in its organ/guitar blend, vocal arrangement and winding central rhythm, but with a more immediate push before it hangs a louie into floating dream-guitar and percussive exploring as it crosses the midsection, synthesizer lines again expertly employed to add atmosphere as the leave it to question whether they’re just going to jam into oblivion or turn back, which, to their credit, they manage to do instrumentally before the song ends.

This leads to presumed side A closer and longest-cut “Hechicera” (9:06), which opens with fluid psych-jazz noodling and works its way over its firstAcid Mess Sangre de otros Mundos two minutes into a thrust before receding again and ultimately holding its tension under a verse the lines of which match the keys and guitar for melody, it is open spacious, but that space gradually fills before again pulling back to a more extended let-out that follows suit from “Fuego al Templo” in returning to ground at the very last second.

The structure of side B shifts somewhat, with two seven-minute tracks sandwiching two four-minute tracks, but the flow of¬†Sangre de Otros Mundos¬†is very much maintained. “Futuro Sin Color” has an intro of soft guitar, but it’s a ruse. Soon enough the band burst into a kraut-punk verse and chorus that holds sway until after the halfway point, where they shift to open space and a folk-infused jam topped with falsetto vocals. Does the punk come back? You know it.

But just in case one might think they know what’s coming next from¬†Acid Mess, “Salvaje Historia” strips away much of the pomp of the longer songs in favor of a more straight-ahead blend of heavy psych/prog and Northern Spanish folk, included a break for more guest vocals but not wandering as far out as, say, “Hechicera” or even “Futuro Sin Color.” And another turn is presented with the subsequent “Hijos del Sol,” which also finds that sweet spot between kraut and punk, tapping a motorik energy for propulsion behind loose-feeling, jangly, almost garage-style guitars. Asking it to make sense feels like a big favor, but it does anyhow.

Of course they end by flipping the script, so that the bulk of “Infierno Gris” is mellow, jazzy and exploratory and it’s the departure in the second half that brings the push ahead of a likewise quieter finish. It’s only fair¬†Acid Mess should turn their established method upside down, since in so doing they provide a fitting summary of¬†Sangre de Otros Mundos‘ stylistic aims on the whole, which are to worship at the altar of expression rather than follow such a prescribed path. Their material goes where it needs to go, whatever foundation rests beneath it, and because they make a lasting impression as guides, it’s that much easier to follow them on their varied course. You can stream the album in its entirety using the player below, and, well, if you’re up for an adventure, maybe you should.

Enjoy:

Five years after ‘II’, Acid Mess is back to business with a new album recorded and mixed in July 2019 at Ovni Estudio by Pablo Mart√≠nez, and mastered at Green Desert Mastering by Quique Sanch√≠s. The possibility of postponing its release until Covid-19 was gone was on the table, but the band members decided to fight Coronavirus with their music, with culture. ‘Sangre de otros mundos’ is set to be released on 6th November 2020 via Spanish underground label Spinda Records (the guys behind Viaje a 800, Moura, Bourbon, H√≠brido, El Lobo En Tu Puerta, Habitar La Mar, Sageness…). Artwork and photography by Ossob√ľko.

With this new collection of songs, we see the most ambitious and complex version of the band. It sounds like psych, prog, kraut, punk, latin rythms and andalusian folk. They take risk on ‘Sangre de otros mundos’ and they go further – there are no limits for Acid Mess.

Band members Miguel Ruiz (guitars, vocals), Borja V√°zquez (bass, vocals), Antonio Tamargo (drums, backing vocals) and Juan Villamil (synths, keys) seem to be comfortable mixing styles, something that they demostraste to everyone with the isolation version of “Hechicera” (recorded with mobile devices during isolation weeks in Spain) and the additional musicians appearing in the album: Sergio Pevida (percussion) and the combo of Aurora Salazar & D√©bora Hern√°ndez (folk vocals on “Salvaje historia” and “El reflejo de su piel”).

TRACKLIST:
El reflejo de su piel
Fuego al templo
Hechicera
Futuro sin color
Hijos del Sol
Salvaje historia
Infierno gris

Acid Mess are:
Miguel Ruiz (guitars, vocals)
Borja V√°zquez (bass, vocals)
Antonio Tamargo (drums, backing vocals)
Juan Villamil (synths, keys)

Acid Mess, “Hijos del Sol” lyric video

Acid Mess on Thee Facebooks

Acid Mess on Instagram

Acid Mess on Bandcamp

Spinda Records on Thee Facebooks

Spinda Records on Instagram

Spinda Records on Bandcamp

Spinda Records website

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Kabbalah Sign to Ripple Imprint Rebel Waves Records; The Omen Coming Soon

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Three years ago, Spanish trio Kabbalah made their full-length debut with Spectral Ascent (discussed here) through Twin Earth Records (also Hellas Records on tape), and as that kind of thing will, it piqued my interest because I’m well aware of the label’s particular affinity for melody and tone. As it turned out, the three-piece offered plenty of both in a cultish aesthetic they’ll now port over to Ripple Music imprint Rebel Waves Records with their second long-player, The Omen, due out next year.

If you’re the type who notices such things, you might key in on the point that the garage/psych-focused Rebel Waves was formerly known as¬†Rogue Wave. I’m not sure what prompted the rebrand — too close to¬†Rogue One? — but either way the label brings¬†Kabbalah into the company of¬†Las Robertas,¬†Sacred Shrines and¬†Arcadian Child as the imprint builds its stable of acts. As you might guess,¬†Kabbalah are the darkest of the bunch to-date.

The announcement came down the PR wire:

kabbalah

Spanish occult rock trio KABBALAH signs to Rebel Waves Records for new album release in early 2021.

Rebel Waves Records announce the signing of Pamplona-based occult 70s and garage rockers KABBALAH to their roster. The trio will release their new album ‘The Omen’ in early 2021, with more details to be revealed soon!

Hailing from from Pamplona in the north of Spain, KABBALAH was formed on the ashes of local outfit Las Culebras, looming in the dark, esoteric realms of witchcraft and closed door arts. The trio started a prolific cycle of music by self-releasing three EPs (‘Kabbalah’, ‘Primitive Stone’ and ‘Revelations’) between 2013 and 2016, progressing to their 2017 debut album ‘Spectral Ascent’. With their garage-sounding, 70s-style hard rock and Coven‚Äďinspired occult atmospheres draped over the bones of Black Sabbath and Blue √Ėyster Cult, the Spanish power trio has been well received among followers of the darkest sounds.

In early 2021, KABBALAH will come back to life with their sophomore full-length ‘The Omen’, an occult rock grimoire where sticky melodies, funerary riffs and liturgy vocals come together as an impressive and infectious breed of 70s heavy, doom and psych. It will be released through US independent label REBEL WAVES RECORDS, Ripple Music’s imprint for all things psychedelic, alt-rock, pop, post-punk and garage. Keep your eyes peeled for more info about ‘The Omen’ will come your way soon!

Kabbalah is:
Carmen (drums)
Marga (bass)
Alba (guitar)

https://www.facebook.com/Kabbalahrock
https://www.instagram.com/kabbalahband/
https://kabbalahrock.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Rebelwavesrecords/
http://www.rebelwavesrecords.bigcartel.com/
https://rebelwavesrecords.bandcamp.com/

Kabbalah, “Abomination”

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El Lobo en Tu Puerta Stream Santana Bendita in Full

Posted in audiObelisk on October 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

el lobo en tu puerta

Spanish three-piece¬†El Lobo en Tu Puerta — do you need the translation? — release their fourth album,¬†Santana Bendita, on Oct. 20 through¬†Spinda Records. It starts with a punch, follows with a kick, and before you know it, the melee is on as the Chiclana-based outfit comprised of vocalist/noisemaker Julio, guitarist/drummer/vocalist B√ļho and drummer/guitarist/vocalist Tan√≠n unleash an uptempo heavy rock barrage dizzying enough that by the time they get around to the wicky-wicky record scratches on the penultimate and particularly furious “Hong-Kong II” — it’s been a while since I heard those in the context of a rock song — the bruises have already begun to show up. Oh and they close the song with the riff to “Black Sabbath,” because obviously, right? Peppered throughout with organ and other key work from Koe Casas of¬†Atavismo, the eight-song/35-minute offering brings little by way of relent and much by way of groove, and even when the assault isn’t all-out at every second, as on the verses of “La Llamaban Nadie,” the verse carries so much swagger that you just know the next shove isn’t far off. Like in the chorus, for example.

Actually, “Mother” starts the album off quietly enough, with a faded in organ line, rumbling distortion and some atmospheric-type vocals. It’s an intro to the record as a whole, and it builds up over the first half of its 4:38 to full-boar, but once it gets there, it doesn’t let up, a gritty, noisy low end, manic chorus complete with gang-shouts and still definitively heavy rock groove opening up as it goes. “Ni√Īo Salvaje” brings vocal antics and a more desert-hued fuzz, what might be some theremin from Julio or other effects, but underlying whatever particular moves¬†these wolves el lobo en tu puerta santana benditaat the door are making is a forward momentum that carries not just through the opening salvo that continues into the grungey and careening riffs of “M√ľllenbach F.S.” but through the end of the first half of the LP on the groove-riding “El Hombre de Cera” and onward through the finish.¬†El Lobo en Tu Puerta, who made their debut in 2014, are obviously well in control of their sound — as much as they want to be — but they benefit from a madcap sensibility that extends to the shifts in vocals whereby the whole affair seems to be teetering on the edge and about to come off the rails.¬†Santana Bendita resides right there, right in that moment just before the crash.

Disaster never strikes, if it needs to be said — if it did, it probably wouldn’t make the finished product of the LP anyhow — but as “La Llamaban Nadie” brings language-barrier-breaking catchiness and “Tan Fuerte” marries key-line intricacy with an overarching nod and post-Kyuss riff that’s so reworked as to be only barely recognizable, that resonant danger is always there. And for sure as El Lobo en Tu Puerta play to the unexpected, “Hong-Kong II” and seven-minute closer “Pensylvania” (sic) meet the challenge head-on, the former with the already-noted scratches and the latter by shifting into a massive lumbering progression, more¬†Sleep-style march than the speedy¬†Truckfighters-throwing-elbows vitality unleashed up to that point. Does it last? No. But, where one might expect the band to shift into a fast, full-throttle ending from that plod, they instead turn to noise to fill out the second half of “Pensylvania,” capping with drones and effects that once more delight in reveling in blindsiding the first-time listener. Or perhaps suckerpunching is a more apt image. Either way, part of the fun of¬†Santana Bendita is its rough-and-tumble mindset, so to have them close by going completely in the other direction feels like a wonderfully sneaky move.

Maybe that’s the crash and they decided to leave it in after all. Go figure.

Santana Bendita is “premiering” internationally on some massive swath of sites today, and I’m not usually into that kind of thing where not-at-all-exclusivity masquerades as exclusivity, but Spinda Records does good work in promoting Spanish heavy and El Lobo en Tu Puerta are a kick in the ass, and sometimes that’s just what you need.

If that’s you, dig in below, and by all means, enjoy:

‘Santana Bendita’ is a place full of lonely hearts. ‘Santana Bendita’ is the refuge for lost chances, where memories of black smoke and melancholy get trapped. We all live in ‘Santana Bendita’ – it’s everywhere but you still don’t know.

Three years after El Lobo En Tu Puerta’s last full-length ‘Bestias del Sur salvaje’ and two years after the EP ‘Guant√°namo’, the Spanish power trio is back with ‘Santana Bendita’, a new album which is a huge step in the career of the band, leaving aside for the first time their particular vision of heavy blues and getting completely involved by the sounds of the 90s. But does ‘Santana Bendita’ sound more stoner… more grunge… more sludge… heavier? It might be… but however it sounds they always are the very own and unique El Lobo En Tu Puerta – and you’ll love it!

For this new album, Julio (vocals, theremin, effects), B√ļho (vocals, guitars, drums) and Tan√≠n (vocals, drums, guitars) worked with additional musicians Koe Casas (Atavismo, The Agapornis) on the keyboards and Jes√ļs Trivinho on the turntables. ‘Santana Bendita’ was recorded, mixed and mastered by Javier Rond√°n at Audiorama Estudio (Spain) in July 2020. The band also signs up with Spanish indie label Spinda Records (Viaje a 800, Moura, Acid Mess, Grajo, Rosy Finch, Habitar La Mar, H√≠brido…) for its release, with an artwork and photography of Pitu Garc√≠a.

‘Santana Bendita’ is set to be released on 20th October 2020 on digital, streaming and in a triple edition on 12″ vinyl limited to 500 hand numbered copies, including download code. But before, video-singles “Pennsylvania” and “Hong Kong II” were 1st September and 8th October respectively. Both videos were directed, recorded and edited by Spanish visual artist Pitu Garc√≠a, responsible also for the album artwork.

El Lobo en Tu Puerta on Thee Facebooks

El Lobo en Tu Puerta on Instagram

El Lobo en Tu Puerta on Bandcamp

Spinda Records on Thee Facebooks

Spinda Records on Instagram

Spinda Records on Bandcamp

Spinda Records website

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Quarterly Review: The Pilgrim, Polymoon, Doctors of Space, Merlock, Sun Dial, Saturn’s Husk, Diggeth, Horizon, Limousine Beach, The Crooked Whispers

Posted in Reviews on October 12th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Well, the weekend’s over and it’s time to wrap up the Quarterly Review. Rest assured, I wrote the following during my copious weekend leisure time, resting on the side of a heated Olympic-size pool with a beverage nearby. It definitely wasn’t four in the morning on a Sunday or anything. If I haven’t gotten the point across yet, I hope you’ve found something amid this massive swath of records that has resonated with you. By way of a cheap plug, I’ll be featuring audio from a lot of these bands on the Gimme Metal show this Friday, 5PM Eastern, if you’re up for tuning in.

Either way, thanks for reading and for being a part of the whole thing. Let’s wrap it up.

Quarterly Review #51-60:

The Pilgrim, …From the Earth to the Sky and Back

the pilgrim from the earth to the sky and back

Lest he be accused of laziness, Gabriele Fiori — also of Black Rainbows, Killer Boogie and the head of the Heavy Psych Sounds label, booking agency and festival series — made his solo debut as The Pilgrim with Spring 2019’s Walking into the Forest (review here). Joined by Black Rainbows drummer Filippo Ragazzoni, Fiori ups the scale of the journey with the second The Pilgrim LP, …From the Earth to the Sky and Back. Richer in arrangement, bolder in craft and more confident in performance, the album runs 14 songs and 50 minutes still largely based around an acoustic acid rock foundation, but with a song like “Riding the Horse” tapping ’70s singer-songwriter vibes while “Cuba” touches on Latin percussion and guitar and “Space and Time” journeying out near the record’s end with waves of synthesizer, it seems The Pilgrim isn’t so willing to be pigeonholed. So much the better.

The Pilgrim on Thee Facebooks

Heavy Psych Sounds website

 

Polymoon, Caterpillars of Creation

Polymoon Caterpillars of Creation

There is an undercurrent of extremity to the debut release from Polymoon, who hail from the psychedelic hotbed that is Tampere, Finland. The six-song/42-minute Caterpillars of Creation turns in opener “Silver Mt.” to fervent guitar push or from freaked-out cosmic prog into drifting post-universe exploration, setting the stage for the dynamic that unfolds throughout. The wash early in the second half of “Lazaward” is glorious, and it’s not the first or the last time Polymoon go to that adrenaline-pumping well, but the serenity that caps that song and seems to continue into “Malamalama” in closing side A is no less effective. “Helicaling” mounts tension in its early drumming but finally releases it later, and “Neitherworld” gives Caterpillars of Creation‘s most fervent thrust while closer “Metempsychosis” rounds out with a fitting sense of dissipation. As a first album/first release, it is particularly stunning, and to make it as plain as possible, I will think less of any list of 2020’s best debut albums that leaves out Polymoon.

Polymoon on Thee Facebooks

Svart Records website

 

Doctors of Space, First Treatment

doctors of space first treatment

The two-piece comprised of Martin Weaver (ex-Wicked Lady) and synthesist Scott “Dr. Space” Heller (√ėresund Space Collective, Black Moon Circle, etc.) position First Treatment as their proper studio debut, and it certainly hits its marks in galaxial adventuring well enough to qualify as such, but the duo have been on a creative splurge throughout this year — even in lockdown — and so the six songs here are also born out of the work they’ve been doing since releasing their debut single “Ghouls ‘n’ Shit” (video premiere here) late last year. The album launches with “Journey to Enceladus,” which boasts drum programming by Weaver and though one of the movements in the 21-minute “Into the Oort Cloud” is based around beats, the bulk of First Treatment is purely a work of guitar and synth, and it basks in the freedom that being so untethered inherently brings. Running an hour long, it’s improvisational nature isn’t going to be for everyone, but Heller and Weaver make a strong argument that maybe it should be.

Doctors of Space on Thee Facebooks

Space Rock Productions website

 

Merlock, That Which Speaks

merlock that which speaks

Who’s ready for a New Wave of PNW Fuckery? That’s right folks, the NWOPNWF has arrived and it’s Spokane, Washington’s Merlock leading the sometimes-awfully-punk-sometimes-awfully-metal-but-somehow-also-always-sludge charge. Aggressive and damning in lyrics, swapping between raw screams, grows, shouts and cleaner vocals and unhinged in terms of its genre loyalties, That Which Speaks seems to find the “melt faces” setting wherever it goes, and though there’s a sense of the four-piece feeling out what works best for them stylistically, the sometimes frantic, sometimes willfully awkward transitions — as in second cut “Prolapse” — serve the overall purpose of undercutting predictability. Eight-minute opener/longest track (immediate points) “Idolon” stomps and shoves and gnashes and nasties its way through, and that’s the modus across what follows, though the scream-along headbanger “Vessel” somehow seems even rawer, and though it ends by floating into oblivion, the start of “Condemnation” heavy fuckin’ metal to me. You never know quite where Merlock are going to hit next, and that’s the joy of the thing. May they remain so cacophonous.

Merlock on Thee Facebooks

Merlock on Bandcamp

 

Sun Dial, Mind Control: The Ultimate Edition

sun dial mind control

Long-running UK psychedelic rockers Sun Dial — led by founding guitarist/vocalist Gary Ramon — released Mind Control in 2012. Sulatron Records picked it up in 2015, and now, five years after that, the same label presents Mind Control: The Ultimate Edition, a 2CD version of the original LP-plus-bonus-tracks reissue that brings the total runtime of the release to a well-beyond-manageable 98 minutes of lysergic experimentation. A full 20 tracks are included in the comprehensive-feeling offering, and from early mixes to alternative takes and lost tracks, and if this isn’t the ‘ultimate’ version of Mind Control, I’m not sure what could be, notwithstanding a complete-studio-sessions box set. Perhaps as a step toward that, Mind Control: The Ultimate Edition gives an in-depth look at a vastly underappreciated outfit and is obviously put together as much for the label as by it. That is to say, you don’t put out a reissue like this unless you really love the original record, and if Sulatron loving a record isn’t enough endorsement for you, please turn in your mushrooms on your way out the door.

Sun Dial on Thee Facebooks

Sulatron Records webstore

 

Saturn’s Husk, The Conduit

Saturns Husk The Conduit

Immersion is the goal of Saturn’s Husk‘s third long-player, The Conduit, and the Riga, Latvia, instrumentalist trio accomplish it quickly with the fluid riffs that emerge from the drone-based intro “Death of Imaginary Lights” and the subsequent 10-minute opener “Black Nebula.” At nine songs and 63 minutes, the album is consuming through the welcome nodder “The Heavenly Ape,” the especially-doomed “The Ritual” and the more mellow-float centerpiece “Spectral Haze,” while “Mycelium Messiah” brings more straight-ahead fuzz (for a time) and drones on either side surround the 10:35 “Sand Barrows,” the latter serving as the finale “A Shattered Visage” quoting Percy Bysshe Shelley and the former “City of the Djinn” running just a minute-plus but still doing enough to reset the brain from where “Mycelium Messiah” left it. Almost functioning as two albums side-by-side with “Spectral Haze” as the dividing point, The Conduit indeed seems to join various sides together, with a depth to coincide that invites the listener to explore along with it.

Saturn’s Husk on Thee Facebooks

Saturn’s Husk on Bandcamp

 

Diggeth, Gringos Galacticos

diggeth gringos galacticos

Landing a punch of classic metal to go along with its heavy-bottomed groove, Diggeth‘s Gringos Galacticos — one supposes the title ‘Spacecrackers’ was taken — was released by the Dutch trio in 2019 and receives a US limited vinyl edition thanks to Qumran Records. One finds some similar guitar heroics to those of Astrosoniq‘s more straightforward moments, but Diggeth‘s focus remains on hookmaking for the duration, offering hints of twang and acoustics in “In the Wake of Giants” and tipping a hat southwestward in “Three Gringos,” but “Straight-Shooter” is willfully breaks out its inner Hetfield and even as the penultimate “Unshackled” departs for a quieter break, it makes its way back in time for the big finish chorus, adding just a touch of Candlemass grandiosity for good measure before the harmonica-laced closing title-track rounds out with its dynamic spacey weirdness, the name of the album repeating itself in an answer to the Stephen Hawking sample that started the voyage on its way.

Diggeth on Thee Facebooks

Qumran Records website

 

Horizon, The White Planet Patrol

horizon the white planet patrol

Cursed Tongue Records has the vinyl here, and Three Moons the tape, and the CD will arrive through Aladeriva Records, La Rubia Producciones, Aneurisma Records, Surnia Records and Violence in the Veins — so yes, Horizon‘s third album, The White Planet Patrol is well backed. Fair enough for the Kyuss-via-BlackRainbows vibes of “End of Utopia” or the initial charge and flow of “The Backyard” that sets the Alicante, Spain, trio on their way. “King Serpent” and “Death & Teddies” bring well-crafted fuzz to bear, and “Blind World” effectively layers vocals in its chorus to coincide, but the more laid back roll of the title-cut is an unmistakable highlight. Shades of mid-paced Nebula surface in “Meet the Forest” later on, but Horizon are part of a tradition of heavy bands in Alicante and they know it. The smoothness of their tone and delivery speaks volumes on its own in that regard, never mind the actual songwriting, which also leaves nothing to be desired.

Horizon on Thee Facebooks

Cursed Tongue Records webstore

 

Limousine Beach, Stealin’ Wine + 2

Limousine Beach Stealin Wine

Debut EP from Limousine Beach out of Pittsburgh, and if the three guitars involved don’t push it over the top, certainly the vocal harmonies get that particular job done. You got six minutes for three songs? Yeah, obviously. They scorch through “Tiny Hunter” to close out, but it’s in the leadoff title-track that Stealin’ Wine + 2 sees the Dave Wheeler-fronted outfit land its most outrageous chorus, just before they go on to find a middle-ground between KISS and Thin Lizzy on “Hear You Calling.” The harmonies open and are striking from the outset, but it’s in how they’re arranged around the standalone parts from Wheeler (also Outsideinside, ex-Carousel) that the outfit’s truest potential is shown. Issued through Tee Pee Records, Stealin’ Wine + 2 is the kind of thing you’d pick up at a show in a normal year and then feel way ahead of everyone else when the LP finally hits. Not a normal year, obviously, but Limousine Beach are serving due notice just the same. In six minutes, no less.

Limousine Beach on Thee Facebooks

Tee Pee Records website

 

The Crooked Whispers, Satanic Melodies

the crooked whispers satanic melodies

I’m sure a lot of records show up at Satan’s door with notes, like, “Dear sir, please find the enclosed submitted for your approval,” but it’s not hard to imagine Beelzebub himself getting down with the filth-coated sludge and rolling doom unfurled across The Crooked Whispers‘ debut offering, Satanic Melodies, marked by hateful, near-blackened screams from Anthony Gaglia and the plodding riffs of Chad Davis (Hour of 13, et al). The title-track is longest at 8:23 and in addition to featuring Ignacio De Tommaso‘s right-on bass tone in its midsection, it plays out early like Weedeater sold their collective soul, and drifts out where earlier pieces “Sacrifice” and “Evil Tribute” and “Profane Pleasure” held their roll for the duration. Stretches of clean-vocal cultistry add to the doomier aspects, but The Crooked Whispers seem to care way less about genre than they do about worshiping the devil, and that unshakable faith behind them, the rest seems to fall into place in accordingly biting fashion.

The Crooked Whispers on Thee Facebooks

The Crooked Whispers on Bandcamp

 

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Space Deer Release Debut Album The Forest

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

space deer

Hard-edged heavy rock and roll would seem to be the order of the day from Madrid-based outfit Space Deer, and the band’s debut album, The Forest, has plenty of it to offer. Issued through Nooirax, Bandera Records, Gato Encerrado and Violence in the Veins — no shortage of support, then — the record has a familiar foundation in the straight-ahead and desert-hued branch of heavy, which of course makes its association with a forest an all the more interesting prospect. What do they do with that? Mostly they rock and roll, and that’s just fine.

They’re not reinventing the style or anything, but they’re putting out an album during a pandemic and they sound like they have a good idea of what they want to sound like as a band. To be perfectly honest, asking anything more of them just seems like a prick move. So I won’t.

Album’s out now and streaming at the bottom of this post.¬†Nooirax sent the following down the PR wire:

space deer the forest

Space Deer releases their first LP “The Forest”

The young stoner rock trio from Madrid (Spain) presents their debut album, showcasing a fresh and dynamic approach

Following the first two self-edited EPs, Space Deer released on September 18 their first LP ‘The Forest’, supported by the labels Nooirax Producciones, Bandera Records, Gato Encerrado and Violence In The Veins.

Andr√©s, Carlos and Robert make sure to let us know what moves them: dirty desert rock. Moreover, while exploring this genre, they are willing to display their ability to create some direct and addictive cuts. After performing most of Madrid’s greatest venues, they feel excited to expand their numerous sound far beyond their known limits and fill with undergrowth every possible place.

The Forest contains 9 tracks, each of which has their own personality: some feel direct and energizing, whilst others remain intimate and ambient. This is an album full of shades and nuances, dense riffs and catchy melodies, often led by the vocals of the three members of the band. This tasty blend will for sure catch anyone’s attention if they gravitate towards bands like Kyuss, Red Fang or Sasquatch.

Produced, recorded, mixed and mastered by Carlos Mu√Īoz, the own bassist of the band, in Space Deer’s rehearsal space in Parla, Madrid.

The artwork has been created by Tumulus Design and the limited purple-transparent vinyl can be acquired via the band’s Bandcamp, the labels that supported the album and various vinyl-specialised record stores.

Furthermore, the artist Buba Viedma has designed the T-shirt that celebrates the releasing of this very first album.

Hopefully very soon they will be able to present their record in a live situation, as this eclectic catalogue of songs deserves.

http://www.facebook.com/spacedeerband
https://spacedeer.bandcamp.com/
http://www.instagram.com/spacedeerband/
https://nooirax.bandcamp.com/

Space Deer, The Forest (2020)

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Lewis and the Strange Magics Post New Single Eva in St. Tropez / Cluttered Room

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

lewis and the strange magics

In their newly-unveiled two songs, Lewis and the Strange Magics manage to tell us two important things about their forthcoming full-length, The Gloomy Corner. “Eva in St. Tropez” brings confirmation that at least on some level, the Barcelona weirdo psychedelic rockers will continue the narrative methodology of last year’s delightful and strange third album, Melvin’s Holiday (review here), which was their first LP with a direct story centered around a main character. That was Melvin. This is Eva. Melvin, meet Eva. Eva, meet Melvin. Did I just write the plot of their next record? Sorry for the spoiler, if so.

So that’s one. Second thing comes particularly with “Cluttered Room,” which is an instrumental cut and speaks to some of the more cinematic elements at play. This isn’t necessarily new ground for Lewis and the Strange Magics, whose craft is certainly thoughtful if not pretentious enough to be considered progressive, but the hypnotic and psychedelic aspect of it, the jam-meets-drone feel of “Cluttered Room,” is an engaging slice of natural-feeling exploration and it suits the band well. I’m left wondering how much of that will feature on The Gloomy Corner and where the balance will ultimately tilt between the impressionistic versus the structured.

And of course, that’s the point of the teaser in the first place, so at very least, the band chose their lead tracks well. “Summer 2020” is what they have listed as a release date for The Gloomy Corner, so I’ll hope for more to follow soon.

Till then:

lewis and the strange magics eva in st tropez

Lewis and the Strange Magics NEW SINGLE

Listen to our new double single Eva in St. Tropez / Cluttered Room, taken from our upcoming fourth LP, The Gloomy Corner, and immerse yourself in a psychedelic nostalgia.

New single from our upcoming fourth LP out now!

Artwork by Marta N. Lloret РArt and Luis Pomés.

Lewis and the Strange Magics, Eva in St. Tropez / Cluttered Room

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