Quarterly Review: Amenra, Liquid Sound Company, Iceburn, Gods and Punks, Vouna, Heathen Rites, Unimother 27, Oxblood Forge, Wall, Boozewa

Posted in Reviews on July 14th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-fall-2016-quarterly-review

You’ll have to forgive me, what the hell day is it? The url says this is day eight, so I guess that’s Wednesday. Fine. That’s as good as any. It’s all just 10 more records to my brain at this point, and that’s fine. I’ve got it all lined up. As of me writing this, I still haven’t heard about my busted-ass laptop that went in for repair last Saturday, and that’s a bummer, but I’m hoping that any minute now the phone is going to show the call coming in and I’ll just keep staring at it until that happens and I’m sure that will be awesome for my already brutalized productivity.

My backup laptop — because yes, I have one and will gladly argue with you that it’s necessary citing this week as an example — is a cheapie Chromebook. The nicest thing I can say about it is it’s red. The meanest thing I can say about it is that I had to change the search button to a caps lock and even that doesn’t respond fast enough to my typing, so I’m constantly capitalizing the wrong letters. If you don’t think that’s infuriating, congratulations on whatever existence has allowed you to live this long without ever needing to use a keyboard. “Hello computer,” and all that.

Enough kvetching. Too much to do.

Quarterly Review #71-80:

Amenra, De Doorn

Amenra De Doorn

I’ve made no secret over the last however long of not being the biggest Amenra fan in the universe. Honestly, it’s not even about the Belgian band themseves — live, they’re undeniable — but the plaudits around them are no less suffocating than their crushing riffs at their heaviest moments. Still, as De Doorn marks their first offering through Relapse Records, finds them departing from their Mass numbered series of albums and working in their native Flemish for the first time, and brings Caro Tanghe of Oathbreaker into the songs to offer melodic counterpoint to Colin H. van Eeckhout‘s nothing-if-not-identifiable screams, the invitations to get on board are manifold. This is a band with rules. They have set their own rules, and even in pushing outside them as they do here, much of their ideology and sonic persona is maintained. Part of that identity is being forward thinking, and that surfaces on De Doorn in parts ambient and quiet, but there’s always a part of me that feels like Amenra are playing it safe, even as they’re working within parameters they’ve helped define for a generation of European post-metal working directly in their wake. The post-apocalyptic breadth they harness in these tracks will only continue to win them converts. Maybe I’ll be one of them. That would be fun. It’s nice to belong, you know?

Amenra on Facebook

Relapse Records website

 

Liquid Sound Company, Psychoactive Songs for the Psoul

Liquid sound company psychoactive songs for the psoul

A quarter-century after their founding, Arlington, Texas, heavy psych rockers Liquid Sound Company still burn and melt along the lysergic path of classic ’60s acid rock, beefier in tone but no less purposeful in their drift on Psychoactive Songs for the Psoul. They’re turning into custard on “Blacklight Corridor” and they can tell you don’t understand on “Who Put All of Those Things in Your Hair?,” and all the while their psych rock digs deeper into the cosmic pulse, founding guitarist John Perez (also Solitude Aeturnus) unable to resist bringing a bit of shred to “And to Your Left… Neptune” — unless that’s Mark Cook‘s warr guitar — even as “Mahayuga” answers back to the Middle Eastern inflection of “Blacklight Corridor” earlier on. Capping with the mellow jam “Laila Was Here,” Psychoactive Songs for the Psoul is a loving paean to the resonant energies of expanded minds and flowing effects, but “Cosmic Liquid Love” is still a heavy rollout, and even the shimmering “I Feel You” is informed by that underlying sense of heft. Nonetheless, it’s an acid invitation worth the RSVP.

Liquid Sound Company on Facebook

Liquid Sound Company on Bandcamp

 

Iceburn, Asclepius

iceburn asclepius

Flying snakes, crawling birds, two tracks each over 17 minutes long, the first Iceburn release in 20 years is an all-in affair from the outset. As someone coming to the band via Gentry Densley‘s work in Eagle Twin, there are recognizable elements in tone, themes and vocals, but with fellow founders Joseph “Chubba” Smith on drums and James Holder on guitar, as well as bassist Cache Tolman (who’s Johnny Comelately since he originally joined in 1991, I guess), the atmosphere conjured by the four-piece is consuming and spacious in its own way, and their willingness to go where the song guides them on side A’s “Healing the Ouroboros,” right up to the long-fading drone end after so much lumbering skronk and incantations before, and side B’s “Dahlia Rides the Firebird,” with its pervasive soloing, gallop and veer into earth-as-cosmos terradelia, the return of Iceburn — if in fact that’s what this is — makes its own ceremony across Asclepius, sounding newly inspired rather than like a rehash.

Iceburn on Facebook

Southern Lord Recordings website

 

Gods & Punks, The Sounds of the Universe

gods and punks the sounds of the universe

As regards ambition, Gods & Punks‘ fourth LP, The Sounds of the Universe, wants for nothing. The Rio De Janeiro heavy psych rockers herein wrap what they’ve dubbed their ‘Voyager’ series, culminating the work they’ve done since their first EP — album opener “Eye in the Sky” is a remake — while tying together the progressive, heavy and cosmic aspects of their sound in a single collection of songs. In context, it’s a fair amount to take in, but a track like “Black Apples” has a riffy standout appeal regardless of its place in the band’s canon, and whether it’s the classic punch of “The TUSK” or the suitably patient expansion of “Universe,” the five-piece don’t neglect songwriting for narrative purpose. That is to say, whether or not you’ve heard 2019’s And the Celestial Ascension (discussed here) or any of their other prior material, you’re still likely to be pulled in by “Gravity” and “Dimensionaut” and the rest of what surrounds. The only question is where do they go from here? What’s outside the universe?

Gods & Punks on Facebok

Abraxas on Facebook

Forbidden Place Records website

 

Vouna, Atropos

vouna atropos

Released (appropriately) by Profound Lore, Vouna‘s second full-length Atropos is a work of marked depth and unforced grandeur. After nine-minute opener “Highest Mountain” establishes to emotional/aural tone, Atropos is comprised mostly of three extended pieces in “Vanish” (15:34), “Grey Sky” (14:08) and closer “What Once Was” (15:11) with the two-minute “What Once Was (Reprise)” leading into the final duo. “Vanish” finds Vouna — aka Olympia, Washington-based Yianna Bekris — bringing in textures of harp and violin to answer the lap steel and harp on “Highest Mountain,” and features a harsh guest vocal from Wolves in the Throne Room‘s Nathan Weaver, but it’s in the consuming wash at the finish of “Grey Sky” and in the melodic vocal layers cutting through as the first half of “What Once Was” culminates ahead of the break into mournful doom and synth that Vouna most shines, bridging styles in a way so organic as to be utterly consuming and keeping resonance as the most sought target, right unto the piano line that tops the last crescend, answering back the very beginning of “Highest Mountain.” Not a record that comes along every day.

Vouna on Facebook

Profound Lore website

 

Heathen Rites, Heritage

heathen rites heritage

One gets the sense in listening that for Mikael Monks, the Burning Saviours founder working under the moniker of Heathen Rites for the first time, the idea of Heritage for which the album is titled is as much about doom itself as the Scandinavian folk elements that surface in “Gleipner” or in the brief, bird-song and mountain-echo-laced finish “Kulning,” not to mention the Judas Priest-style triumphalism of the penultimate “The Sons of the North” just before. Classic doom is writ large across Heritage, from the bassline of “Autumn” tapping into “Heaven and Hell” to the flowing culmination of “Midnight Sun” and the soaring guitar apex in “Here Comes the Night.” In the US, many of these ideas of “northern” heritage, runes, or even heathenism have been coopted as expressions of white supremacy. It’s worth remembering that for some people it’s actually culture. Monks pairs that with his chosen culture — i.e. doom — in intriguing ways here that one hopes he’ll continue to explore.

Heathen Rites on Facebook

Svart Records website

 

Unimother 27, Presente Incoerente

Unimother 27 Presente Incoerente

Some things in life you just have to accept that you’re never going to fully understand. The mostly-solo-project Unimother 27 from Italy’s Piero Ranalli is one of those things. Ranalli has been riding his own wavelength in krautrock and classic progressive stylizations mixed with psychedelic freakout weirdness going on 15 years now, experimenting all the while, and you don’t have to fully comprehend the hey-man-is-this-jazz bass bouncing under “L’incontro tra Phallos e Mater Coelestis” to just roll with it, so just roll with it and know that wherever you’re heading, there’s a plan at work, even if the plan is to not have a plan. Mr. Fist‘s drums tether the synth and drifting initial guitar of “Abraxas…il Dio Difficile da Conoscere” and serve a function as much necessary as grooving, but one way or the other, you’re headed to “Systema Munditotius,” where forward and backward are the same thing and the only trajectory discernible is “out there.” So go. Just go. You won’t regret it.

Unimother 27 on Facebook

Pineal Gland Lab website

 

Oxblood Forge, Decimator

Oxblood Forge Decimator

Not, not, not a coincidence that Massachusetts four-piece Oxblood Forge — vocalist Ken Mackay, guitarist Robb Lioy, bassist Greg Dellaria and drummer/keyboardist Erik Fraünfeltër — include an Angel Witch cover on their third long-player, Decimator, as even before they get around to the penultimate “Sorcerers,” the NWOBHM is a defining influence throughout the proceedings, be it the “hey hey hey!” chanting of “Mortal Salience” or the death riders owning the night on opener “Into the Abyss” or the sheer Maidenry met with doom tinge on “Screams From Silence.” Mackay‘s voice, high in the mix, adds a tinge of grit, but Decimator isn’t trying to get one over on anyone. This blue collar worship for classic metal presented in a manner that could only be as full-on as it is for it to work at all. No irony, no khakis, no bullshit.

Oxblood Forge on Facebook

Oxblood Forge on Bandcamp

 

Wall, Vol. 2

wall vol 2

They keep this up, they’re going to have a real band on their hands. Desert Storm/The Grand Mal bandmates and twin brothers Ryan Cole (guitar/bass) and Elliot Cole (drums) began Wall as a largely-instrumental quarantine project in 2020, issuing a self-titled EP (review here) on APF Records. Vol. 2 follows on the quick with five more cuts of unbridled groove, including a take on Karma to Burn‘s “Nineteen” that, if it needs to be said, serves as homage to Will Mecum, who passed away earlier this year. That song fits right in with a cruncher like “Avalanche” or “Speed Freak,” or even “The Tusk,” which also boasts a bit of layered guitar harmonies, feeling out new ground there and in the acousti-handclap-blues of “Falling From the Edge of Nowhere.” The fact that Wall have live dates booked — alongside The Grand Mal, no less — speaks further to their real-bandness, but Vol. 2 hardly leaves any doubt as it is.

Wall on Facebook

APF Records website

 

Boozewa, Deb

Boozewa Deb

The second self-recorded outing from Pennsylvania trio Boozewa, Deb, offers two songs to follow-up on Feb. 2021’s First Contact (review here) demo, keeping an abidingly raw, we-did-this-at-home feel — this time they sent the results to Tad Doyle for mastering — while pushing their sound demonstrably forward with “Deb” bringing bassist Jessica Baker to the fore vocally alongside drummer Mike Cummings. Guitarist Rylan Caspar contributes in that regard as well, and the results are admirably grunge-coated heavy rock and roll that let enough clarity through to establish a hook, while the shorter “Now. Stop.” edges toward a bit more lumber in its groove, at least until they punk it out with some shouts at the finish. Splitting hairs? You betcha. Maybe they’re just writing songs. The results are there waiting to be dug either way.

Boozewa on Instagram

Boozewa on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Howling Giant, Rose City Band, The Tazers, Kavrila, Gateway, Bala, Tremor Ama, The Crooked Whispers, No Stone, Firefriend

Posted in Reviews on July 9th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-fall-2016-quarterly-review

You know what? We’re through the first week of the Quarterly Review as of this post. Not too bad. I feel like it’s been smooth going so far to such a degree that I’m even thinking about adding an 11th day comprised purely of releases that came my way this week and will invariably come in next week too. Crazy, right? Bonus day QR. We’ll see if I get there, but I’m thinking about it. That alone should tell you something.

But let me not get ahead of myself. Day five commence.

Quarterly Review #41-50:

Howling Giant, Alteration

howling giant alteration

Let the story be that when the pandemic hit, Nashville’s Howling Giant took to the airwaves to provide comfort, character and a bit of ‘home’ — if one thinks of live performance as home — to their audience. With a steady schedule of various live streams on Twitch, some playing music, some playing D&D, the band engaged their listenership in a new and exciting way, finding a rare bright point in one of the darkest years of recent history. Alteration, a crisp four-song/20-minute EP, is born out of those streamed jams, with songs named by the band’s viewers/listeners — kudos to whoever came up with “Luring Alluring Rings” — and, being entirely instrumental from a band growing more and more focused on vocal arrangements, sound more like they’re on their way to being finished than are completely done. However, that’s also the point of the release, essentially to showcase unfinished works in progress that have emerged in a manner that nobody expected. It is another example from last year-plus that proves the persistence of creativity, and is all the more beautiful for that.

Howling Giant on Facebook

Blues Funeral Recordings website

 

Rose City Band, Earth Trip

Rose City Band Earth Trip

Vaguely lysergic, twanging with a non-chestbeating or jingoistic ’70s American singer-songwriter feel, Rose City Band‘s Earth Trip brings sentiment without bitterness in its songs, engaging as the title hints with nature in songs like “Silver Roses,” “In the Rain,” “Lonely Planes,” “Ramblin’ with the Day,” “Rabbit” and “Dawn Patrol.” An outlet for Ripley Johnson, also of Wooden Shjips and Moon Duo, the “band” isn’t so much in Rose City Band, but there is some collaboration — pedal steel here and there, as on “Ramblin’ with the Day” — though it’s very much Johnson‘s own craft and performance at the core of this eight-song set. This is the third Rose City Band long-player in three years, but quickly as it may have come about, the tracks never feel rushed — hushed, if anything — and Johnson effectively casts himself in among the organic throughout the proceedings, making the listener feel nothing if not welcome to join the ramble.

Rose City Band on Facebook

Thrill Jockey Records website

 

The Tazers, Dream Machine

The Tazers Dream Machine

Johannesburg, South Africa’s The Tazers are suited to a short-release format, as their Dream Machine EP shows, bringing together four tracks with psychedelic precociousness and garage rock attitude to spare, with just an edge of classic heavy to keep things grooving. Their latest work opens with its languid and lysergic title-track, which sets up the shove of “Go Away” and the shuffle in “Lonely Road” — both under three and a half minutes long, with nary a wasted second in them, despite sounding purposefully like tossoffs — and the latter skirts the line of coming undone, but doesn’t, of course, but in the meantime sets up the almost proto-New Wave in the early going on “Around Town,” only later to give way to the band’s most engaging melody and a deceptively patient, gentle finish, which considering some of the brashness in the earlier tracks is a surprise. A pleasant one, though, and not the first the three-piece have brought forth by the time they get to the end of Dream Machine‘s ultra-listenable 16-minute run.

The Tazers on Facebook

The Tazers on Soundcloud

 

Kavrila, Rituals III

Kavrila Rituals III

Pressed in an ultra-limited edition of 34 tapes (the physical version also has a bonus track), Kavrila‘s Rituals III brings together about 16 minutes of heavy hardcore and post-hardcore, a thickened undertone giving something of a darker mood to the crunch of “Equality” as guitars are layered in subtly in a higher register, feeding into the urgency without competing with the drums or vocals. Opener “Sunday” works at more of a rush while “Longing” has more of a lurch at least to its outset before gradually elbowing its way into a more careening groove, but the bridge being built is between sludge and hardcore, and while the four-piece aren’t the first to build it, they do well here. If we’re picking highlights, closer “Elysium” has deft movement, intensity and atmosphere in kind, and still features a vocal rawness that pushes the emotional crux between the verses and choruses to make the transitions that much smoother. The ending fades out early behind those shouts, leaving the vocals stranded, calling out the song’s title into a stark emptiness.

Kavrila on Facebook

The Chinaskian Conspiracy on Bandcamp

 

Gateway, Flesh Reborn

gateway flesh reborn

Brutal rebirth. Robin Van Oyen is the lone figure behind Bruges, Belgium-based death-doom outfit Gateway, and Flesh Reborn is his first EP in three years. Marked out with guest guitar solos by M., the four-track/25-minute offering keeps its concentration on atmosphere as much as raw punishment, and while one would be correct to call it ‘extreme’ in its purpose and execution, its deathliest aspects aren’t just the growling vocals or periods of intense blast, but the wash of distortion that lays over the offering as a whole, from “Hel” through “Slumbering Crevasses,” the suitably twisting, later lurching “Rack Crawler” and the grandeur-in-filth 12-minute closing title-track, at which point the fullness of the consumption is revealed at last. Unbridled as it seems, this material is not without purpose and is not haphazard. It is the statement it intends to be, and its depths are shown to be significant as Van Oyen pulls you further down into them with each passing moment, finally leaving you there amid residual drone.

Gateway on Facebook

Chaos Records website

 

Bala, Maleza

Bala Maleza

Admirably punk in its dexterity, Bala‘s debut album, Maleza, arrives as a nine-track pummelfest from the Spanish duo of guitarist/vocalist Anx and drummer/vocalist V., thickened with sludgy intent and aggression to spare. The starts and stops of opener “Agitar” provide a noise-rock-style opening that hints at the tonal push to come throughout “Hoy No” — the verse melody of which seems to reinvent The Bangles — while the subsequent “X” reaches into greater breadth, vocals layered effectively as a preface perhaps to the later grunge of “Riuais,” which arrives ahead of the swaggering riff and harsh sneer of “Bessie” the lumbering finale “Una Silva.” Whether brooding in “Quieres Entrar” or explosive in its shove in “Cien Obstaculos,” Maleza offers stage-style energy with clarity of vision and enough chaos to make the anger feel genuine. There’s apparently some hype behind Bala, and fair enough, but this is legitimately one of the best debut albums I’ve heard in 2021.

Bala on Facebook

Century Media Records website

 

Tremor Ama, Beneath

Tremor Ama Beneath

French prog-fuzz five-piece Tremor Ama make a coherent and engaging debut with Beneath, a first full-length following up a 2017 self-titled EP release. Spacious guitar leads the way through the three-minute intro “Ab Initio” and into the subsequent “Green Fire,” giving a patient launch to the outing, the ensuing four songs of which grow shorter as they go behind that nine-minute “Green Fire” stretch. There’s room for ambience and intensity both in centerpiece “Eclipse,” with vocals echoing out over the building second half, and both “Mirrors” and “Grey” offer their moments of surge as well, the latter tapping into a roll that should have fans of Forming the Void nodding both to the groove and in general approval. Effectively tipping the balance in their sound over the course of the album as a whole, Tremor Ama showcase an all-the-more thoughtful approach in this debut, and at 30 minutes, they still get out well ahead of feeling overly indulgent or losing sight of their overarching mission.

Tremor Ama on Facebook

Tremor Ama on Bandcamp

 

The Crooked Whispers, Dead Moon Night

The Crooked Whispers Dead Moon Night

Delivered on multiple formats including as a 12″ vinyl through Regain Records offshoot Helter Skelter Productions, the bleary cultistry of The Crooked Whispers‘ two-songer Dead Moon Night also finds the Los Angeles-based outfit recently picked up by Ripple Music. If it seems everybody wants a piece of The Crooked Whispers, that’s fair enough for the blend of murk, sludge and charred devil worship the foursome offer with “Hail Darkness” and the even more gruesome “Galaxy of Terror,” taking the garage-doom rawness of Uncle Acid and setting against a less Beatlesian backdrop, trading pop hooks for classic doom riffing on the second track, flourishing in its misery as it is. At just 11 minutes long — that’s less than a minute for each inch of the vinyl! — Dead Moon Night is a grim forecast of things to come for the band’s deathly revelry, already showcased too on last year’s debut, Satanic Whispers (review here).

The Crooked Whispers on Facebook

Regain Records on Bandcamp

 

No Stone, Road into the Darkness

No Stone Road into the Darkness

Schooled, oldschool doom rock for denim-clad heads as foggy as the distortion they present, No Stone‘s debut album, Road into the Darkness, sounds like they already got there. The Rosario, Argentina, trio tap into some Uncle Acid-style garage doom vibes on “The Frayed Endings,” but the crash is harder, and the later 10-minute title-track delves deeper into psychedelia and grunge in kind, resulting in an overarching spirit that’s too weird to be anything but individual, however mmuch it might still firmly reside within the tenets of “cult.” If you were the type to chase down a patch, you might want to chase down a No Stone patch, as “Devil Behind” makes its barebones production feel like an aesthetic choice to offset the boogie to come in “Shadow No More,” and from post-intro opener “Bewitched” to the long fade of “The Sky is Burning,” No Stone balance atmosphere and songcraft in such a way as to herald future progress along this morose path. Maybe they are just getting on the road into the darkness, but they seem to be bringing that darkness with them on the way.

No Stone on Facebook

Ruidoteka Records on Bandcamp

 

Firefriend, Dead Icons

Firefriend Dead Icons

Dead Icons is the sixth full-length from Brazilian psychedelic outfit Firefriend, and throughout its 10 songs and 44 minutes, the band proffer marked shoegaze-style chill and a sense of space, fuzzy and molten in “Hexagonal Mess,” more desert-hued in “Spin,” jangly and out for a march on “Ongoing Crash.” “Home or Exile” takes on that question with due reach, and “Waves” caps with organ alongside the languid guitar, but moments like “Tomorrow” are singular and gorgeous, and though “Three Dimensional Sound Glitch” and “666 Fifth Avenue” border on playful, there’s an overarching melancholy to the flow, as engaging as it is. In its longest pieces — “Tomorrow” (6:05) and “One Thousand Miles High” (5:08) — the “extra” time is well spent in extending the trio’s reach, and while it’s safe to assume that six self-recorded LPs later, Firefriend know what they want to do with their sound, that thing feels amorphous, fleeting, transient somehow here, like a moving target. That speaks to ongoing growth, and is just one of Dead Icons‘ many strengths.

Firefriend on Facebook

Cardinal Fuzz store

Little Cloud Records store

 

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Quarterly Review: The Vintage Caravan, Oslo Tapes, Filthy Hippies, Dunbarrow, Djinn, Shevils, Paralyzed, Black Spirit Crown, Intraveineuse, Void Tripper

Posted in Reviews on July 7th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-fall-2016-quarterly-review

Day Three. The kinds of material covered have varied, but it’s been pretty good so far, which as you can probably imagine makes this whole process much, much easier. Today would traditionally be hump day, where we hit and surpass the halfway mark, but since this is a double-size Quarterly Review, we’re only a quarter of the way there. Still a long way to go, but I’ve got decent momentum in my head at this point and I’ve taken steps not to make the workload crushing on any given day (this mostly involved working last weekend, thanks to The Patient Mrs. for the extra time), so I’m not feeling overly rushed either. Which is welcome.

In that spirit, let’s get to it.

Quarterly Review #21-30:

The Vintage Caravan, Monuments

the vintage caravan monuments

To every sorrowful head who bemoans the state of rock and roll as being dead, who misses big songs, bands unafraid to groove, to engage their audience, to change things up and stay anchored to a vital spirit of the live experience, the answer is The Vintage Caravan. Monuments is the Icelandic trio’s follow-up to 2018’s Gateways (review here) and it opens with a righteous four-song mission-statement salvo from “Whispers” to “Dark Times” before mellowing out in “This One’s for You” and diving into the eight-minute centerpiece “Forgotten” — later answered by the more subdued but likewise proggy closer “Clarity” — before the hard-hitting shuffle renews on side B with “Sharp Teeth,” “Hell” and “Torn in Two” try to outdo each other in has-the-most-swagger and “Said & Done” sneaks in ahead of the finale to walk away with that particular title. Suitably enough. Momentum is almost a detriment to the proceedings, since the songs are worth individual attention, but among the classic tenets here is leave-’em-wanting-more, and The Vintage Caravan do, no question.

The Vintage Caravan on Facebook

Napalm Records website

 

Oslo Tapes, ØR

Oslo Tapes ØR

First thing to note? Oslo Tapes are not from Oslo. Or Trondheim, for that matter. Founded by Marco Campitelli in Italy, the band is a work of homage and exploration of ideas born out of a trip to Oslo — blessings and peace upon the narrative — and ØR, which is Norwegian for “confusing,” is their third album. It arrives loaded with textures from electro-krautrock and ’70s space modernized through to-day’s post-heavy, a breathy delivery from Campitelli giving a song like “Kosmik Feels” an almost goth-wave presence while the harder-landing “Bodø Dakar,” which follows, shifts with pointed rhythm into a textured percussion jam in its second half, with ethereal keys still behind. The shimmering psychedelia of “Norwegian Dream” comes paired with “Exotic Dreams” late in the record’s eight-track procession, and while the latter emphasizes Oslo Tapes‘ can-go-anywhere sensibility with horn sounds and vague, drumless motion, the hard dance in closer “Obsession is the Mother of All” really seems to be the moment of summary here. That must’ve been some trip.

Oslo Tapes on Facebook

Pelagic Records on Bandcamp

 

Filthy Hippies, Departures

filthy hippies departures

Clocking in at 15 tracks and 77 minutes of deeply varied cosmic fuckery, from the motorik push of “Your Are the Sun” to the ’90s Britgaze stylizations of “Mystified” to the twanging central guitar figure of “The Air is Poison” and onward into the blowout kosmiche echo “Sweet Dreams and Nicotine” and chic the-underground-is-actually-made-of-velvet “Like a Halo” ahead of the Hawkwind-on-ludes “I’m Buggin’ Out,” Filthy HippiesDepartures at very least gets points for having the right title. Departs from everything. Reality, itself, you. The whole nine. The good news is the places it goes have a unifying element of grunge laziness woven throughout them, like Filthy Hippies just rolled out of bed and this material just happened — and maybe that’s how it went — and the journey they make, whistling as they go on “Among the Wire” and ending up in the wistful wash of “Empty Spaces” is a joy to follow. Heady. More purposeful than it’s letting on. Not a minor investment, but not a minor reward either.

Filthy Hippies on Facebook

Mongrel Records website

 

Dunbarrow, III

Dunbarrow III

Long since in command of their aesthetic, Norway’s Dunbarrow embark on III, their third long-player, with a full realization of their purpose. Recorded by the five-piece in Spring 2020 and left to gestate for a year’s time, it’s having been unearthed is suitable to the classic doom vibe wrought throughout the eight tracks, but Dunbarrow‘s sound is more vintage in structure than production at this point, and the shifting balance between ‘then’ and ‘now’ in what they do imagines what might’ve been if self-titled era Witchcraft had retained its loyalty to the tenets of Sabbath/Pentagram while continuing to grow its songcraft, such that “Worms of Winter” both is and is decidedly not “Snowblind,” while “Lost Forever” embarks on its own roll and “Turn in Your Grave” makes for an organ-laced folkish highlight, fitting in its cult atmosphere and setting up the rawer finish in “Turns to Dust.” This is who Dunbarrow are, and what they do, they do exceedingly well.

Dunbarrow on Facebook

Blues for the Red Sun Records on Facebook

 

Djinn, Transmission

Djinn Transmission

The year is 2076. The world’s first Whole Earth parliament has come together to bask in the document Transmission, originating in Gothenburg, Sweden, at the behest of an entity known only as Djinn and respected purveyor Rocket Recordings. It is believed that in fact Transmission and its eight component freak jazz psychedelia tracks were not written at the time of their first release some 55 years earlier, but, as scholars have come to theorize after more than a half-century of rigorous, consistent study, it is a relic of another dimension. Someplace out of place, some time out of time as humanity knows it. So it is that “Creators of Creation” views all from an outsider’s eagle eye, and “Urm the Mad” squees its urgency as if to herald the serenity of “Love Divine” to come, voices echoing up through the surcosmic rift through which Djinn sent along this Transmission. What was their purpose? Why make contact? And what is time for such creatures? Are they us? Are we them? Are we alone? Are we “Orpheus?” Wars have been fought over easier questions.

Djinn on Bandcamp

Rocket Recordings website

 

Shevils, Miracle of the Sun

shevils miracle of the sun

Their third album, ShevilsMiracle of the Sun renews the band’s collaboration with producer Marcus Forsgren, which obviously given the sound of the record, was not broken. With a tidy 10 songs in 32 minutes, the Oslo-based four-piece deliver a loyal reading of heavy hardcore riffing minus much of the chestbeating or dudely pretense that one might otherwise encounter. They’ve got it nailed, and the break as “Monsters on TV” squibblies out is a forceful but pleasant turn, especially backed by the pure noise rock of “Scandinavian Death Star.” The band plays back and forth between heft and motion throughout, offering plenty of both in “Wet Soaking Wet” and “Ride the Flashes,” hitting hard but doing more than just hitting at the same time. Topped with fervent shouts, Shevils feels urgent in manner that to my ears recalls West Coast US fare like Akimbo, but is nonetheless the band’s own, ranging into broader soundscapes on “No More You” and anti-shred on “It Never Ends,” the only two cuts here over four minutes long. No time to screw around.

Shevils on Facebook

Shevils on Bandcamp

 

Paralyzed, Paralyzed

paralyzed paralyzed

If they haven’t been yet — and they may have — it’s entirely likely that by the time I’m done writing this sentence some record label or other will have picked up Paralyzed to release their self-titled debut album on vinyl. The Bamberg, Germany-based four-piece bring classic heavy metal thunder to still-Sabbathian doom rock, casting their lot in with the devil early on “Lucifer’s Road (My Baby and Me),” which feels like as much a statement of aesthetic purpose as it does a righteous biker riff. It’s by no means the sum-total of what’s on offer in a more extended piece like “Prophets” or side B’s rumble-and-roll-plus-wah-equals-doom “Mother’s Only Son,” but the brash fare they bring to light on “Green Eyes” and the post-lizard king-turns-Purple spirit of “Golden Days” tie in well with the toss-your-hair-in-the-wind, how’d-that-hole-get-in-my-jeans spirit of the release on the whole. They start instrumental with the eponymous “Paralyzed,” but vocals are a focus point, and as they round out with the rawer “Parallel,” their command of ’70s heavy is all the more evident. They signed yet? Give it another minute, if not.

Paralyzed on Facebook

Paralyzed on Bandcamp

 

Black Spirit Crown, Gravity

Black Spirit Crown Gravity

Admittedly, I’m late to the party on Black Spirit Crown‘s 2020 debut full-length, Gravity, but as one will when in orbit, it’s easy to be pulled in by the record. The Ohio-based two-piece of Dan Simone (vocals, guitar, theremin, dulcimer) and Chris Martin (vocals, keys & programming, bass) — plus guitar spots from Joe Fortunato (Doomstress, ex-Venomin James) — flourish over longform progressive heavy rock pieces like “Doomstar” and “Orb,” both over eight minutes, and the 21:10 closing title-track, which well earns having the album named after it for its consuming balance between aural weight, darkness of atmosphere and tone, and breadth. Before the last several minutes give way to droning noise, “Gravity” counterbalances the metallic underpinning of “Saga” and the rush of the penultimate “Teutates,” its patience singular even among the other longer cuts, balanced in alternating fashion with the shorter. Peppered-in growls make the proceedings less predictable on the whole, and feel like one more strength working in favor of these complex compositions.

Black Spirit Crown on Facebook

Black Spirit Crown on Bandcamp

 

Intraveineuse, Chronicles of an Inevitable Outcome

intraveineuse chronicles of an inevitable outcome

Parisian instrumentalists Intraveineuse make a strong statement with their 32-minute/single-song debut EP, Chronicles of an Inevitable Outcome, the feeling of aftermath — regret? — permeating the goth-doom atmosphere coming through in tectonically-dense riffs as well as the piano that offsets them. France would seem to have a post-Type O Negative standard-bearer in Hangman’s Chair, but to discount Intraveineuse on that basis is to miss out on the flowing, immersive progression the band emit on this already-sold-out tape, working in three distinct movements to find their own place within the style, building momentum gradually until the last payoff cuts itself short, as if to emphasize there’s more to come. Hopefully, anyhow. EP or LP, debuts with this kind of scope are rare and not to be overlooked, and though there are stretches where one can hear where vocals might go, Intraveineuse ably steer “Chronicles of an Inevitable Outcome” through its various parts with natural-sounding fluidity.

Intraveineuse website

Intraveineuse on Bandcamp

 

Void Tripper, Dopefiend

Void Tripper Dopefiend

Grim, gritty and ghastly, Void Tripper is the debut full-length from Brazil’s Void Tripper, comprised of five tracks marked by the shared/alternating vocals of guitarists Mário Fonteles and Anastácio Júnior. The former gurlges on opener “Devil’s Reject” while the latter complements with a cleaner take on the subsequent “Burning Woods,” setting up the back and forth that plays out in the remaining three tracks, “Hollow,” “Satan & Drugs” and “Comatose.” With the lumbering bass and drums of Jonatas Monte and Gabriel Mota, respectively, as the thickened foundation beneath the riffs, there are shades throughout of Electric Wizard and other acts to be heard, but it’s Sabbath-worshiping sludge one way or the other, and Void Tripper willingly head into that void with a dense fog preceding them and a bleak mood that does nothing if it doesn’t feel suited to our times. Riffy disaffection writ large. You wouldn’t call it groundbreaking, but you’d nod the fuck out.

Void Tripper on Facebook

Abraxas on Facebook

 

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Projeto Trator Stream Live in Leipzig; Live Album out July 2

Posted in audiObelisk on June 25th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

Projeto Trator (Photo by Murai)

Brazilian duo Projeto Trator‘s Fall 2019 European tour took them to Belgium, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Poland, and Germany. Not necessarily in that order, but not necessarily not; they covered a lot of ground. On July 2, they’ll release Live in Leipzig through Crocodilo Discos, capturing their Sept. 18 show at Kopfsalat Gästeservice. In the company of the genre-blending Umbilichaos, guitarist/vocalist Paulo Ueno and drummer Thiago Padilha made their way through famed venues and festivals like Drugstore in Berlin, Psych Umami in the Czech Republic, and Sommafest in Rietschen, Germany, among others. It looked like a good run when it was announced, and there were still a bunch more dates they were hoping to fill in.

The Leipzig show was one of those, and somehow, listening to Live in Leipzig‘s 13-song/51-minute stretch, that seems fitting. Projeto Trator are not by any means a new band. They have three studio full-lengths under their belt — the latest of them, Humanofobia, came out in 2016 — and a slew of splits and EPs and other live records, so there’s plenty of documentation of their work going back to 2007, but Live in Leipzig presents a particularly chaotic vision of who they are as a unit, whether that’sProjeto Trator Live in Leipzig the space rocking noisefest of “Tambores de Sangue” or the slower swirl of “Vermes,” feedback and effects and a cosmic lurch echo that would bring a smile to the face of Sons of Otis themselves all coming together in how-resilient-is-your-P.A. fashion, extreme in its way but still listenable if you’re willing to give yourself over to it.

Their set starts with a jam and ends with a jam, and in between, tempests like “Você Não é o Seu Emprego” and “Absurdos” bring High on Fire-style sub-two-minute raging to the berth of longer, wider avalanches in “No Orbita do Medo” and post-jam opener “A Foice” — they close with “A Valsa” ahead of that last jam, and though the translations “a sickle” and “a waltz” are a fun pairing, it wouldn’t seem symmetry between them was the point — and along the way, “Rua dal 7 Facadas” and the where-did-they-find-even-more-distortion-from “Rato Morto” cast an identity of brutal and exploratory psychedelic muck, willing to pummel as well as groove, and unwilling to compromise its purpose to be gentler on the ear. It’s easy to imagine that, if you were at Kopfsalat Gästeservice that night, you might’ve felt the volume in your chest had you been standing in front of the stage. The arguments for doing so are manifold here.

Projeto Trator released their latest studio EP, Corifeu, in March 2020, and if the punker underpinnings weren’t clear on Live in Leipzig — they were — then certainly the four-songer should help get the point across. I’ve included that stream from the band’s Bandcamp near the bottom of the post, as well as a video from the Leipzig show, in case you should find yourself wondering how two humans could conjure such a wash of noise.

Only one way to find out.

Enjoy:

Projeto Trator, Live in Leipzig official premiere

“Live in Leipzig” is the new audio live record coming from the Brazilian heavy sludge duo Projeto Trator. The recording was made in 2019 in their European tour at Kopfsalat Gästeservice in Leipzig, Germany where the band performed 15 shows in 6 countries. The band show us all our powerful psychedelic sludge wall in 13 noisy tracks from different releases of the band.

The material will be released officially in July, 2

SETLIST:
1 – Opening Jam
2 – A Foice
3 – Tambores de Sangue
4 – Na Rua das 7 Facadas
5 – Vermes
6 – Na Órbita do Medo
7 – Não Me Provoque
8 – Você Não é o Seu Emprego
9 – Rato Morto
10 – Delírios do Dr. Lilly
11 – Absurdos
12 – A Valsa
13 – Finishing Jam

Credits:
Recorded by: Murai
Mixing/Mastering by: Paulo Ueno
Cover art by: Jonathan “Jow” Rissi

PROJETO TRATOR is:
Paulo Ueno – guitar and vox
Thiago Padilha – drums

Projeto Trator, Corifeu (2020)

Projeto Trator, “A Foice” Live in Leipzig, Germany, Sept. 18, 2019

Projeto Trator website

Projeto Trator on Facebook

Projeto Trator on Instagram

Projeto Trator on Bandcamp

Crocodilo Discos on Facebook

Crocodilo Discos on Instagram

Crocodilo Discos on Bandcamp

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Weedevil Premiere Two-Song The Death is Coming EP

Posted in audiObelisk on June 15th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

weedevil (photo by Ivan Shupikov)

São Paulo-based doom rocking four-piece Weedevil present their new two-songer The Death is Coming tomorrow through Abraxas. Though it only runs about 12 minutes long, there’s no lack of punch in either “The Death is Coming” or the accompanying “Hi! I’m Lucifer” — the exclamation point in the title there bringing me more raw joy than I can possibly express in written language. They roll and they groove and Fabrina Valverde‘s vocals make a strong presence from the outset of the first verse, diving into modern cultistry via classic heavy blues, backed by the formidable tonality of Dani Plothow‘s bass and Caio Caraski‘s guitar and the crash and thick-popping snare of Flávio Cavichiolli‘s drums. It’s not a new formula, by any stretch of the imagination, and right up to the dual-layer soloing in “Hi! I’m Lucifer,” the Sabbath vibes run rampant, but if you’ve got a problem with that, there’s the door.

For the band, The Death is Coming follows up on the plague-era single “Follow the Smoke,” weedevil the death is comingwhich was released last Fall and indeed was leading toward the riff-filled land. Some of that sense of Sleepy lumber shows up in “The Death is Coming,” and some of the chug in “Hi! I’m Lucifer,” but as if in answer to their earlier-2020 self-titled EP, which boasted some more stoner-rocking vibes in “The Illusionist” and “Icarus,” the band has grown darker and meaner in the subsequent months, at least if these songs are anything to go by. Could just be bleak times calling for heavy groove, but for Weedevil, who feel set on an inexorable course toward a debut full-length, the balance of the mix that they lock in on the newer tracks as compared to those still barely just 12 months old is telling in terms of their overarching progression.

As to where it all might lead, well, I hear great things about the Abyss of Lovecraftian Horror Riffage this time of year, if they might care to visit? One way or the other, this is the sound of a band finding their sound.

Enjoy:

With a life history that already had a potentially breathtaking birth the Brazilian stoner/doom band Weedevil started their journey in 2019 with the release of the single “Morning Star” and a subsequent participation in the renowned SIM SP with the well-known Swedish band Asteroid touring in Brazil. In May/2020 the band released their well-received debut EP via Abraxas Records and now the band brings us the powerful “The Death Is Coming”.

As always guided by the magnetic and engaging voice of Fabrina Valverde, the quartet completed by Flávio Cavichiolli (drums), Caio Caraski (guitar) and Dani Plothow (bass), all high-capacity musicians, brings us with “The Death is Coming” a great foreshadowing of his upcoming debut album. Recorded, mixed and mastered at Bay Area Studio in São Paulo in the month of April the release presents the band’s possible creative peak and most mature moment. With two well-crafted and striking compositions that immediately attract the listener, featuring Fabrina’s vocals at their best and with a full-bodied instrumental section, the Psychedelic, Doom and even Occult Rock aspects are precisely evoked inviting the listener to immersion and referencing names like Windhand, Purson, Acid King and others.

“The Death is Coming” will be released digitally in June, 16 through Abraxas Records.

Weedevil are:
Fabrina Valverde- Vocals
Caio Caraski- Guitars
Flávio Cavichiolli- Drums
Dani Plothow- Bass

Weedevil on Facebook

Weedevil on Instagram

Weedevil on Bandcamp

Abraxas on Facebook

Abraxas on Instagram

Abraxas on YouTube

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Desert Druid and the Acid Caravan Sign to DHU Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 14th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

desert druid and the acid caravan

Ably-monikered Brazilian trio Desert Druid and the Acid Caravan have signed on to release their debut EP, The VVitch, through DHU Records. The cover art and info for the release are below, and I don’t have a release date as yet, but you the video for the title-track was posted here earlier and you can see it below as well — isn’t that convenient — and the four songs will come on a one-sided 12″ mastered by Tony Reed with art on the B-side. For a second there, I looked at the press release and thought they had a 20-minute track called “Silkscreen,” which would be fun, but alas. Probably etched? I don’t know. Sounds neato either way. And by “neato” I mean heavy and doomed and “that way lies madness” and all that kind of fun stuff.

You might recall Ruidoteka Records had the tape of The VVitch out. So far as I know that’s still happening as well.

Behold:

desert druid and the acid caravan the vvitch

New Signing to DHU Records: Desert Druid and the Acid Caravan

DHU Records is excited to announce the signing of Brazilian Doomers DESERT DRUID AND THE ACID CARAVAN!

“Formed in early 2020 in the city of Sorocaba / SP by three musicians who have known each other for over a decade, the band Desert Druid and the Acid Caravan seek to bring to their sonority elements of classic bands from the Heavy Metal and Doom Metal genre, adding a few splashes of Stoner Rock.

Recorded at Covil Studio in Sorocaba in 2020, “The VVitch” is the Debut EP of the trio formed by F. Klinger (bass / vocals), P. Nass (guitar) and E. Lisboa (drums) and consists of four tracks where 70s Hard Rock, Doom Metal and Stoner intertwine in an atmosphere of dark and the obscure, inviting the listener on a journey through dense riffs coupled with clean & ethereal vocals, lyrically tapping into occult & horror movie themes and aesthetics. The title track can be streamed at Bandcamp and the video can be seen at YouTube”

DHU Records will release The VVitch on a Single Sided 12″ record w/ silkscreened B side. Pre orders + release date to be confirmed.

The VVitch is mastered for vinyl by Tony Reed at HeavyHead Recording Co.

Test Press, DHU Exclusive & Band Editions will be available

“SO COME THE VVITCH!”

Side A:
A1. The VVitch
A2. Total Madness
A3. Mistress of the Black Heart
A4. Witching Hour

Side B: Silkscreen

Recorded at Covil Studio in Sorocaba in 2020
Produced and mixed by F. Klinger
Mastered for vinyl by Tony Reed at HeavyHead Recording Company
Artwork by Desert Druid

Desert Druid and the Acid Caravan
F. Klinger (bass / vocals)
P. Nass (guitar)
E. Lisboa (drums)

www.facebook.com/desertdruidofficial
www.desertdruidandtheacidcaravan.bandcamp.com
www.instagram.com/desertdruidofficial
https://www.facebook.com/DHURecords/
https://www.instagram.com/dhu_records/
https://darkhedonisticunionrecords.bandcamp.com/
darkhedonisticunionrecords.bigcartel.com/

Desert Druid and the Acid Caravan, “The VVitch” official video

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Melissa Stream Debut Album Devil’s Mask in Full

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on May 19th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

melissa

Melissa release their debut album, Devil’s Mask, today. I think as of this post, actually. The record and the São Paulo-based group are both new, bringing together vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Melissa Rainbow with Dirty Grave bandmates in drummer Henrique Lima guitarist Pedro Barros along with bassist Anderson Vaca (also of PESTA), and after deciding to forge ahead with the project in January of this year, Rainbow wrote and recorded the 41-minute seven-tracker between then and March. It’s May, and again, today’s the release date. There is no substitute for efficiency.

Or vibe, and Devil’s Mask has plenty of that. Billed by Rainbow and the band that bears her name as “slow heavy music” rather than doom or doom metal in the outright, the fare throughout is raw, but not at all without atmosphere for that. Opener “Perfect Soulmate” opens backed by a duly thickened chug, but has intertwining layers of guitar stretched across, and the vocals add a murky sense of foreboding. Drums and bass are tasked with keeping a mostly straightforward rhythm, but there’s room for flourish there too, and as the longest song of the album (immediate points), the leadoff feels designed to draw the listener into the lurking horror that awaits in the rest of what follows, beginning with the crawl of “Buried in a Body,” which feels more forward in its structure butmelissa devil's mask still ends up in a swirling cascade of cultish incantations. Initial single “Swallowed by Blame” follows and reaffirms the otherworldly brooding in its more open midsection topped with multi-layer chants, building its way back up to the lumbering guitar and keyboard figure from whence it came, a curtain of mist drawing around as centerpiece “The Fire Eats” gets underway with its own patient consumption.

There’s a touch of grunge in the guitar progression of “The Fire Eats” — thinking Dirt-era Alice in Chains particularly — but the keys in the early and late going draw it together with “Swallowed by Blame” before, and while it’s “I, the Witch” that makes the most individual impression on Devil’s Mask as both the catchiest and most outwardly tonally weighted track, even that has both its layer of noise and keyboards well in check for the theatricality that arises amid the march of its second half, which, as ever, is directed downward, graveward, into a sonic abyss of the band’s own making. That leaves only the title-track to close out, and whatever grim gods have been invoked up to now, “Devil’s Mask” has its own presence, careening and raw and Lovecraftian and Hammer Horror all the while, a vague malevolence of low end circa two minutes in leading to the next round of layered vocals, some clean, some growled, some wailing, that accompany what in other contexts would simply be a Sabbath-style riff. Like the rest of Devil’s Mask, in Melissa‘s hands, that progression is twisted and repurposed like so much ethereal goo, turned hypnotic in its way and cut suddenly as if to preface another round of darkness on the horizon.

Given the pace with which Melissa‘s debut album happened, a quick sequel wouldn’t necessarily surprise, but what comes through clearest in this first offering is the sense of exploration of atmosphere and intertwining parts and layers to create a mood, songs as performance pieces even when recorded. It is doom, it is cultish, but Devil’s Mask pushes at the same time against convention, and is all the stronger for it. Whatever these impulses might lead to going forward, and when, the potential in the project comes from its immediate drive toward finding an individualized niche for itself. As to how far Melissa might continue to dig into that niche, that’s entirely up to them.

By all means, stream the album below and hear for yourself.

Enjoy.

Melissa is a Slow Heavy project by Melissa Rainbow (Dirty Grave, Mães Morrendo, Enxofre). Born in January 2021. Cult to slow heavy music.

Devil’s Mask is Melissa’s debut album, mixing heavy and slow riffs with gloomy melodies. Lyrics express a walk through a private hell surrounded by a veil of dramatic terror. Ode to Doom Metal with morbid environment in a psychedelism in dark tones.

Composed and recorded between January and March 2021

Record/mix homemade by Melissa Rainbow
All lyrics and music by Melissa

DEVIL’S MASK tracklisting:
1. Perfect Soulmate
2. Buried in a Body
3. Swallowed by Blame
4. The Fire Eats
5. I, The Witch
6. Pulse
7. Devil’s Mask

Melissa on Thee Facebooks

Melissa on Instagram

Melissa on Bandcamp

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Melissa to Release Debut Album Devil’s Mask; New Single out Today

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 13th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

melissa

Formed just this past January, Brazilian four-piece Melissa will present their debut album, Devil’s Mask, next week. I’ll be streaming it — I think? — so this post is really just something of a heads up for that, but the first single from the thing is out today, and whether or not the subsequent stream is happening, “Swallowed by Blame” is a fascinating blend of goth atmosphere, raw doom and other cult-derived heavy. The band is fronted by Melissa Rainbow of Dirty Grave and finds her joined by that band’s drummer Henrique Lima and guitarist Pedro Barros, as well as newcomer bassist Anderson Vaca, also of Pesta. The record is formative but aware of where it wants to go, and loaded with potential in its level of craft. It’s not an entirely unfamiliar sound, but a fascinating one just the same. You might dig it.

So stay tuned for more on that, and in the meantime, here’s release info and whatnot below, courtesy of the PR wire:

melissa devil's mask

Slow heavy music project MELISSA release debut single and announce album “Devil’s Mask”

Brazilian “slow heavy music” project MELISSA release first single “Swallowed by Blame” and announce debut album “Devil’s Mask”

In this May 13 the Doom-guided project MELISSA release their debut single “Swallowed By Blame”, part from their first studio álbum “Devil´s Mask”. Born in January and described simply as “Slow Heavy Music”, the project Melissa is a new work of Melissa Rainbow, the mind and heart behind bands like Dirty Grave, Enxofre and Mães Morrendo, all of them travelling through the paths of heavy music and touchin genres like Doom, Death Metal and Grunge.

Completed by their DIRTY GRAVE’S bandmates Henrique Lima (drums) and Pedro Barros (guitar) and the bass player Anderson Vaca (PESTA), the new project walk through the Doom Metal, Postpunk, Gothic and other sonorities, with the debut álbum “Devil’s Mask” due to May, 19 release in Bandcamp featuring seven dense and blazing tracks.

DEVIL’S MASK tracklisting:
1. Perfect Soulmate
2. Buried in a Body
3. Swallowed by Blame
4. The Fire Eats
5. I, The Witch
6. Pulse
7. Devil’s Mask

https://www.facebook.com/melissadoommetal/
https://www.instagram.com/melissa_doomed/
https://melissadoom.bandcamp.com/

Melissa, “Swallowed by Blame”

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