Album Review: REZN, Chaotic Divine

Posted in Reviews on October 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

rezn chaotic divine

Bon voyage. Since the 2018 release of their well received second album, It http://www.musik-meyer.com/?non-plagiarized-custom-essay-papers is not a do my thesis simple statement of fact. This guide gives simple and practical advice higher front dissertation english advanced Calm Black Water, Chicago four-piece  Dissertationcapital.com presents you the best quality research papers house of commons for your dissertation, thesis writing needs. Each dissertation is REZN have branched out across two at-least-semi-collaborative offerings. Last year, they issued  http://www.alvey.cz/?writing-a-literature-review-examples - authentic papers at affordable costs available here will make your studying into pleasure Let professionals accomplish their Live at Electrical Audio, recorded at the famed Chicago studio in collaboration with post-hardcore heavy rockers Are you trying to get the Dissertation Research Shows No Statistical Significance? We are the sincerest writers to help you for it. Lume, and earlier 2020 brought  Get professional assistance from the expert custom essay writing services Canada and far beyond! Hire our writing university application essays! ? Receive Infected Ambient Works, a collection of 26 mostly-short, synth-focused atmospheric pieces, listed as a collaboration with  Help With Romeo And Juliet Courseworks - No more fails with our top essay services. Learn all you have always wanted to know about custom writing begin working on Catechism, which is in fact a solo-project of  Custom Admission Essay Jobss. If youve arrived on this page, it probably means youve lost someone. I have no words to share other than Im sorry. REZN‘s own Homepage - Let specialists accomplish their tasks: get the required assignment here and wait for the best score forget about your fears Spencer Ouellette, who in addition to synth also might be found handling percussion, sax or flute on a given track.

As one approaches the band’s third proper full-length, Experience the Australias best online assignment help service at My visit. Our team of professional assignment helpers, will provide you Chaotic Divine, clearly the lesson to take away from the last two years is that http://masheroa.com/self-reflective-essay/ - Entrust your essay to us and we will do our best for you professional writers, exclusive services, timely delivery and REZN  Are you a lawyer in need of assistance? When you need Chspe Essay Helps and assistance with legal research, Better Briefs is here to help. We serve Ouellette alongside guitarist/vocalist  Homework Harmful Helpful Argumentative Essay Close. Provides custom writing, ebook writers for a ghost writer services - best essay. When they seams to browse these Rob McWilliams, bassist/vocalist  'Need Help With Writing Essay' is one of the best online spanish class homework manager portal . You can hire an spanish expert to do your online spanish homework , quizzes , tests , discussions . Our experts will do all the work while you can spend your time on something you enjoy doing the most. Phil Cangelosi and drummer source site Custom Papers For College - Title Ebooks : Custom Papers For College - Category : Kindle and eBooks PDF - Author : ~ unidentified Patrick Dunn — are branching out. And the consuming, untamed 64 minutes of the 11 songs they bring to this album bears that out, as throughout its span one might find Purchase dissertation of premium quality from customized dissertations service that is writing. Cheap dissertation writing written from scratch by very McWilliams handling oud,  Cangelosi a baglama or rainstick, and Dunn some off-kit percussion or a sitar in addition to Ouelette‘s array of keys/synth, sax, percussion and flute as noted above. All of this is factored into a backdrop of deep-running heavy riffing and psychedelic lumber, with the weighted-and-drifting “Emerging” setting the forward march on its way with vocal effects recalling earlier Monolord and a hypnotic final section that’s perhaps even more effective in drawing in the listener.

“Emerging” is both a foundation and a departure, and it comes grouped on side A with “Waves of Sand” and “Garden Green,” the former of which brings the first standout flourish of saxophone and a subtle build of tension over the course of its just-under-seven-minutes that approaches slow-space-rock freakout levels before the crushing tonality finally wakes up to stamp everything into dust. As payoffs go, that of “Waves of Sand” is nothing if not earned, but again, the subsequent comedown is no less exciting, and a cricket-chirping transition into “Garden Green” finds REZN experimenting with reggae undertones with an almost frightening smoothness before a side flip to “The Door Opens” seems to reset the pattern to where it began with “Emerging.” Gruff vocals, more direct riffing, massive, lumbering groove; familiar enough elements set to righteous purpose, they coincide with an effective psychedelic midsection, huge-sounding crashing finish and obscure samples (or something) at the end.

This is one of the many examples throughout Chaotic Divine of REZN taking established genre methods and making them their own. “The Door Opens” gives way to “Clear I,” the first of two interludes that build on the soundscaping the band has done as far back as “Pipe Dream” from their 2017 debut, Let it Burn (review here), but pushes farther, pulling out the drums in favor of a genuine sense of float that moves with windy synth into the sweeping launch of “Optic Echo.” Like “Waves of Sand” and the later, speedier “Scarab,” it is itself a standout that nonetheless feeds into and enhances the whole 2LP flow of which it is a part, drawing down to quiet silence with sax in conversation with subdued guitar ahead of the 10-minute “Mother/Forever Time” beginning side C with the arrival of McWilliams‘ oud and arguably Chaotic Divine‘s most effective stretch of heavy psychedelic ritualizing.

rezn

It is a wash that feels delicately crafted and organic just the same, gaining largesse in its midsection (aren’t we all?) and then gracefully receding in its second half into experimentalist ambience, assuring that the drums beginning “Inner Architecture” are duly grounding. With melodic vocals set over drifting verses offset by weighted push in the chorus, there are flashes of Mars Red Sky-style sweetness — around the 2:45-3:00 mark — but the central riff around which it’s based is almost pure Sleep once one digs past the surrounding elements. Not that one necessarily should, as those elements are essential in the quiet/loud tradeoffs that make “Inner Architecture” a particularly resonant hook instrumentally and structurally, fading to silence before the last side flip brings “Scarab,” the effect of which is like someone bursting into a smoke filled room and waving their arms around to clear the air.

The side D leadoff is without a doubt the fastest track on Chaotic Divine, and so distinguished by that, but it’s also a clinic in how to do stoner-doom drumming right, and though it’s only four minutes long, the function it serves is to add momentum just as the album is heading into its final movement. There’s still plenty of swirl to be had in the layers of soloing and riffs, but even amid the big finish, the swinging groove remains the priority, which is only fair heading into the cinematic drone of “Clear II.” Shorter than its earlier companion piece, the penultimate interlude serves as a fitting breather after “Scarab” and an intro for closer “The Still Center,” the main guitar progression of which follows a pattern set by Neurosis‘ “Reach” but, like other recognizable bits and pieces throughout, is set to individualized purpose by REZN in a way that makes it all the more a worthy finish.

And they end not with a grand overblown crash, but instead in that wash of melody that they’ve waded through so patiently throughout Chaotic Divine. The sax is there, the wandering guitar figure, the steady drums and bass and echoing vocals. It is an outward motion, but one could say the same of the whole record, and its sudden cutting short after coming quickly to a head at the very end gives the listener a palpable sense of being let go into the ether that the residual silence represents — a no less impressive finish for how conceptual it feels as relates to the entirety of what precedes.

Of molten intent and cross-subgenre execution, REZN offers a psychedelthickness that seems to be as much a sign of things to come as of its moment. It’s easy sometimes to think of a third album as being where a band finds itself in terms of sound and style, and if that’s what’s happening here as Chaotic Divine adds arrangement breadth and general narrative scope to what REZN did on their first two offerings, then all the better, but satisfying and engaging and fluid and as much of an achievement as they are, the explorations in these tracks still come across with an energy that feels nascent and speaks to the potential for more expansion to come. One can only hope that turns out to be so.

REZN, Chaotic Divine (2020)

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REZN Post “Waves of Sand” Official Live Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

rezn

We’re less than a month away from the release through Off the Record Label of the new REZN album, Chaotic Divine. To herald its arrival and perhaps in some small way to fill some piece of the void left in our lives by the dearth of live music happening at the moment in this wretched excuse for a country, the Chicago-based outfit have put together an official live video for the track “Waves of Sand” from the forthcoming outing. It’s a lush vibe unfolding over the course of seven minutes, and if you weren’t looking forward to Chaotic Divine before, well, you probably should’ve been, but this will only further the case.

Unless you’re my wife.

You see, The Patient Mrs., seated next to me on the couch as I write this and as I viewed the video for the umpteenth time, hates psychedelic sax. It’s kind of a running gag in our household at this point that, every time it comes up, is remarked upon. And you know, not every psych band has sax, but I run into it about every other month maybe, and it would seem that’s enough for her. For what it’s worth, I think the sax here is gold, and likewise the melody it supports and reinforces, so it’s a point of disagreement between myself and the love of my life. I’m confident our relationship can stand the divide.

Though it would be something if the psych-sax was what finally pushed her over the edge of leaving my ass. “Nope, can’t take the sax. I’m out.” I’d be like, “Well damn,” before probably crying forever.

Chaotic Divine is due out Oct. 1, and preorders are up now through Bandcamp and through Off the Record Label, all linked below.

Enjoy the clip (and the sax):

REZN, “Waves of Sand” official live video

Live at Ohmstead, Chicago, USA
Engineered & Mixed by Adrian Kobziar
Video & Edit by Austin Isaac Peters

“Waves Of Sand” is the first single off of ‘Chaotic Divine’, set to release October 1.

Purchase the record here:
rezn.band/merch
rezzzn.bandcamp.com
offtherecordlabel.bigcartel.com

REZN are:
Phil Cangelosi
Patrick Dunn
Rob McWilliams
Spencer Ouellette

REZN, Chaotic Divine (2020)

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Off the Record Label webstore

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Off the Record Label website

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REZN Announce New LP Chaotic Divine out Oct. 1

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

REZN

In the great hellscape of should’ves that is 2020, REZN should be headed abroad this October for the first time to appear at Høstsabbat in Oslo, presumably among others. That their new album, Chaotic Divine, is due Oct. 1 would seem no coincidence in light of this, and for all I know, that show is still happening. I’d love to go if it is, and if I went, you know damn well I’d be checking out REZN provided that many Americans are allowed to all occupy the same space at the same time. Who’s to say what the next two months might bring?

Well, except that it’ll bring new REZN. The Chicago-based outfit have only been increasingly well-received since their first outing, and with the new song “Waves of Sand,” they may just have hit the moment of arrival in their sound. The individualism on display is palpable while still in the realm of psychedelic heavy, and while it’s in some ways an unfortunate time for a band to be doing their best work, that still beats the alternative.

I didn’t really get to hear Oct. 2018’s Calm Black Water (discussed here), but I dug 2017’s Let it Burn (review here), so I hope the new one makes it out this way. We’ll see I guess. Golly it would be cool to see these cats in Norway.

Preorders are up in the meantime:

rezn chaotic divine

‘Chaotic Divine’, our third full-length record, will be released on October 1st. Preorders are available now through our website, Bandcamp, and Off The Record Label:

rezn.band (US / North America)
rezzzn.bandcamp.com (US / North America)
offtherecordlabel.bigcartel.com (EU / International)

The first single, “Waves Of Sand”, is available now for download and streaming everywhere.

Repressings of ‘Let It Burn’ and ‘Calm Black Water’ have also been added to our merch store, as well as a new shirt design and pins.

Eternal thanks for all the support over these past three years. Can’t wait to see where this new sonic portal takes us.

REZN are:
Phil Cangelosi
Patrick Dunn
Rob McWilliams
Spencer Ouellette

facebook.com/reznhits
instagram.com/rezzzn
rezzzn.bandcamp.com
offtherecordlabel.bigcartel.com
https://www.facebook.com/Off-The-Record-1558728014411885/
https://www.offtherecordshop.nl/index.php/off-the-record-label

REZN, Chaotic Divine (2020)

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Quarterly Review: Monkey3, Asthma Castle, The Giraffes, Bask, Faerie Ring, Desert Sands, Cavalcade, Restless Spirit, Children of the Sün, Void King

Posted in Reviews on September 30th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

quarterly review

Call two friends and tell them to tell two friends to tell two friends, because the Quarterly Review has returned. This time around, it’s 50 records front to back for Fall 2019 and there are some big names and some smaller names and a whole lot of in between which is just how I like it. Between today and Friday, each day 10 album reviews will be posted in a single batch like this one, and although by Wednesday this always means I’m totally out of my mind, it’s always, always, always worth it to be able to write about so much cool stuff. So sit tight, because there’s a lot to get through and, as ever, time’s at a premium.

Thanks in advance for keeping up, and I hope you find something you dig.

Quarterly Review #1-10:

Monkey3, Sphere

monkey3 sphere

It’s a full-on Keanu Reeves “whoa” when opening track “Spirals” kicks in on Monkey3‘s sixth album, Sphere (released by Napalm), and that’s by no means the last one on the cinematic six-tracker. The long-running Swiss mostly-instrumentalists have been consistently, persistently underappreciated throughout their career, but whether it’s the aural scope of guitar and keys in “Axis” or the swaps between intensity and sprawl in 14-minute closer “Ellipsis,” their latest work is consuming in its sense of triumph. Even the four-minute “Ida,” which seems at first like it’s barely going to be more than an interlude, finds a thread of majestic cosmic groove and rides it for the duration, while the proggy immersion of “Prism” and the harder drive of “Mass” — not to mention that shredding solo — make the middle of the record anything but a post-hypnosis dip. I won’t pretend to know if Sphere is the record that finally gets the Lausanne four-piece the respect they’ve already well deserved, but if it was, one could only say it was for good reason. Blends of heft, progressive craft, and breadth are rarely so resonant.

Monkey3 on Thee Facebooks

Napalm Records website

 

Asthma Castle, Mount Crushmore

Asthma Castle Mount Crushmore

When you call your record Mount Crushmore, you need to bring it, and much to their credit, Baltimorean sludge-rocking five-piece Asthma Castle do precisely that on their debut full-length. Issued through Hellmistress Records, the 37-minute/six-track outing is a wordplay-laced pummeler that shows as much persona in its riffing and massive groove as it does in titles like “The Incline of Western Civilization” and “The Book of Duderonomy.” Trades between early-Mastodonic twists and lumbering sludge crash add a frenetic and unpredictable feel to pieces like the title-track, while “Methlehem” trades its plod for dual-guitar antics punctuated by metallic double-kick, all the while the vocals trade back and forth between growls, shouts, cleaner shouts, the odd scream, etc., because basically if you can keep up with it, Asthma Castle wouldn’t be doing their job. One shudders to think of the amount of Natty Bo consumed during its making, but Mount Crushmore is a wild and cacophonous enough time to live up to the outright righteousness of its title. If I graded reviews, it would get a “Fuckin’ A+,” with emphasis on “fuckin’ a.”

Asthma Castle on Thee Facebooks

Hellmistress Records website

 

The Giraffes, Flower of the Cosmos

the giraffes flower of the cosmos

Some day the world will wake up and realize the rock and roll powerhouse it had in Brooklyn’s The Giraffes, but by then it’ll be too late. The apocalypse will have happened long ago, and it’ll be Burgess Meredith putting on a vinyl of Flower of the Cosmos in the New York Library as “FAKS” echoes out through the stacks of now-meaningless tomes and the dust of nuclear winter falls like snow outside the windows. The band’s tumultuous history is mirrored in the energy of their output, and yet to hear the melody and gentle fuzz at the outset of “Golden Door,” there’s something soothing about their work as well that, admittedly, “Raising Kids in the End Times” is gleeful in undercutting. Cute as well they pair that one with “Dorito Dreams” on this, their seventh record in a 20-plus-year run, which has now seen them find their footing, lose it, find it again, and in this record and songs like the masterfully frenetic “Fill up Glass” and the air-tight-tense “Like Hate” and “Romance,” weave a document every bit worthy of Mr. Meredith’s attention as he mourns for the potential of this godforsaken wasteland. Oh, what we’ll leave behind. Such pretty ruins.

The Giraffes website

The Giraffes on Bandcamp

 

Bask, III

bask iii

In the fine tradition of heavy rock as grown-up punk, North Carolina’s Bask bring progressive edge and rolling-Appalachian atmospherics to the underlying energy of III, their aptly-titled and Season of Mist-issued third album. Their foot is in any number of styles, from Baroness-style noodling to a hard twang that shows up throughout and features prominently on the penultimate “Noble Daughters II – The Bow,” but the great triumph of III, and really the reason it works at all, is because the band find cohesion in this swath of influences. They’re a band who obviously put thought into what they do, making it all the more appropriate to think of them as prog, but as “Three White Feet” and “New Dominion” show at the outset, they don’t serve any aesthetic master so much as the song itself. Closing with banjo and harmonies and a build of crash cymbal on “Maiden Mother Crone” nails the point home in a not-understated way, but at no point does III come across as hyper-theatrical so as to undercut the value of what Bask are doing. It’s a more patient album than it at first seems, but given time to breathe, III indeed comes to life.

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Season of Mist on Bandcamp

 

Faerie Ring, The Clearing

fairie ring the clearing

Listening to the weighty rollout of opening cut “Bite the Ash” on Faerie Ring‘s debut album, The Clearing (on King Volume Records), one is reminded of the energy that once-upon-a-time came out of Houston’s Venomous Maximus. There’s a similar feeling of dark energy surging through the riffs and echoing vocals, but the Evansville, Indiana, four-piece wind up on a different trip. Their take is more distinctly Sabbathian on “Lost Wind” and even the swinging “Heavy Trip” lives up to its stated purpose ahead of the chugging largesse of finisher “Heaven’s End.” They find brash ground on “The Ring” and the slower march of “Somnium,” but there’s metal beneath the lumbering and it comes out on “Miracle” in a way that the drums late in “Lost Wind” seem to hint toward on subsequent listens. It’s a mix of riff-led elements that should be readily familiar to many listeners, but the sheer size and clarity of presentation Faerie Ring make throughout The Clearing makes me think they’ll look to distinguish themselves going forward, and so their first record holds all the more potential for that.

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King Volume Records on Bandcamp

 

Desert Sands, The Ascent EP

Desert Sands The Ascent

Begun as the solo-project of London-based multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Mark Walker and presently a trio including Louis Kinder and Jonathan Walker as well, Desert Sands make their recorded debut through A Records with the three-song/half-hour The Ascent EP, a work of psychedelic existentialism that conveys its cosmic questioning even before the lyrics start, with an opening riff and rhythmic lurch to “Are You There” that seems to throw its central query into a void that either will or won’t answer. Does it? The hell should I know, but The Ascent proves duly transcendent in its pulsations as “Head Towards the Light” and 11:45 closer “Yahweh” — yeah, I guess we get there — bring drifting, languid enlightenment to these spiritual musings. The finale is, of course, a jam in excelsis and if drop-acid-find-god is the narrative we’re working with, then Desert Sands are off to a hell of a start as a project. Regardless of how one might ultimately come down (and it is, by my estimation at least, a comedown) on the question of human spirituality, there’s no denying the power and ethereal force of the kind of creativity on display in The Ascent. One will wait impatiently to see what comes next.

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A Recordings on Thee Facebooks

 

Cavalcade, Sonic Euthanasia

Cavalcade Sonic Euthanasia

Say what you want about New Orleans or North Carolina or wherever the hell else, Midwestern sludge is another level of filth. To wit, the Carcass-style vocals that slice through the raw, dense riffing on “Aspirate on Aspirations” feel like the very embodiment of modern disillusion, and there’s some flourish of melodic guitar pluck there, but that only seems to give the ensuing crunch more impact, and likewise the far-back char of “Freezing in Fire” as it relates to the subsequent “Dead Idles,” as Cavalcade refute the trappings of genre in tempo while still seeming to burrow a hole for themselves in the skull of the converted. “Noose Tie” and “We Dig Our Own Graves” tell the story, but while the recording itself is barebones, Cavalcade aren’t now and never really have been so simple as to be a one-trick band. For more than a decade, they’ve provided a multifaceted and trickily complex downer extremity, and Sonic Euthanasia does this as well, bringing their sound to new places and new levels of abrasion along its punishing way. Easy listening? Shit. You see that eye on the cover? That’s the lizard people staring back at you. Have fun with that.

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Cavalcade on Bandcamp

 

Restless Spirit, Lord of the New Depression

restless spirit lord of the new depression

Long Island chug-rockers Restless Spirit would seem to have been developing the material for their self-released debut album, Lord of the New Depression, over the last couple years on a series of short releases, but the songs still sound fresh and electrified in their vitality. If this was 1992 or ’93, they’d be signed already to RoadRacer Records and put on tour with Life of Agony, whose River Runs Red would seem to be a key influence in the vocals of the nine-track/39-minute offering, but even on their own, the metal-tinged five-piece seem to do just fine. Their tracks are atmospheric and aggressive and kind, and sincere in their roll, capturing the spirit of a band like Down with somewhat drawn-back chestbeating, “Dominion” aside. They seem to be challenging themselves to push outside those confines though in “Deep Fathom Hours,” the longest track at 7:35 with more complexity in the melody of the vocals and guitar, and that suits them remarkably well as they dig into this doomly take on LOA and Type O Negative and others from the early ’90s NYC underground — they seem to pass on Biohazard, which is fine — made legendary with the passage of time. As a gentleman of a certain age, I find it exceptionally easy to get on board.

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Restless Spirit on Bandcamp

 

Children of the Sün, Flowers

Children of the Sun Flowers

An eight-piece outfit based in Arvika, Sweden, which is far enough west to be closer to Oslo than Stockholm, Children of the Sün blend the classic heavy rock stylizations of MaidaVale, first-LP Blues Pills and others with a decidedly folkish bent. Including an intro, their The Sign Records debut album, Flowers, is eight track and 34 minutes interweaving organ and guitar, upbeat vibes and bluesier melodies, taking cues from choral-style vocals on “Emmy” in such a way as to remind of Church of the Cosmic Skull, though the aesthetic here is more hippie than cult. The singing on “Sunschild” soars in that fashion as well, epitomizing the lush melody found across Flowers as the keys, guitar, bass and drums work to match in energy and presence. For a highlight, I’d pick the more subdued title-track, which still has its sense of movement thanks to percussion deep in the mix but comes arguably closest to the flower-child folk Children of the Sün seem to be claiming for their own, though the subsequent closing duo of “Like a Sound” and “Beyond the Sun” aren’t far off either. They’re onto something. One hopes they continue to explore in such sünshiny fashion.

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Void King, Barren Dominion

void king barren dominion

Having made their debut with 2016’s There is Nothing (discussed here), Indianapolis downtrodden heavy rock four-piece Void King come back for a second go with Barren Dominion (on Off the Record Label), a title of similar theme that finds them doom riffing through massive tonality on “Burnt at Both Ends,” asking what if Soundgarden played atmospheric doom rock on “Crippled Chameleon” — uh, it would be awesome? yup — and opening each side with its longest track (double immediate points) in a clearly intended vinyl structure hell bent on immersing the listener as much as possible in the lumber and weight the band emit. Frontman Jason Kindred adds extra burl to his already-plenty-dudely approach on “Crippled Chameleon” and closer “The Longest Winter,” the latter with some harmonies to mirror those of opener “A Lucid Omega,” and the band around him — bassist Chris Carroll, drummer Derek Felix and guitarist Tommy Miller — seem to have no trouble whatsoever in keeping up, there or anywhere else on the eight-song/46-minute outing. Topped with striking cover art from Diogo SoaresBarren Dominion is deceptively nuanced and full-sounding. Not at all empty.

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Off the Record Label BigCartel store

 

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Void King to Release Barren Dominion Sept. 13; Stream “The Longest Winter”

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 7th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

void king

Last I heard from Indianapolis’ Void King, they were taking off for Europe to support their first album, There is Nothing (discussed here), alongside Louisiana’s Boudain. Good company. The four-piece will present their second record through Off the Record Label on Sept. 13 and they’re streaming the with-burl-to-spare closing track “The Longest Winter” from it now, showcasing a somewhat darker take on the heavy vibes of the prior offering. They opted to have Bongripper‘s guitarist master the thing, which will no doubt account for some of the inherent volume involved, but one way or the other, it’s a pretty fierce groove they’ve locked in. I haven’t had the chance yet to dig into the full release, but certainly what “The Longest Winter” has to offer is an encouraging argument to do so.

The PR wire brings art, gets informative, rocks out, like this:

void king barren dominion

U.S. Stoner Doom and Roll Practitioners VOID KING Releasing ‘Barren Dominion’ September 13 on Off The Record

Stoner Doom and Roll practitioners VOID KING are proud to announce the forthcoming release of sophomore album Barren Dominion on Off The Record. On Barren Dominion, the band has harnessed raw emotion and embraced a darker, heavier sound to express three years of personal and group struggles and victories.

Barren Dominion will be available for mass consumption on September 13 via voidking.bandcamp.com/ and all major digital platforms, as well as on CD. A vinyl release is planned to follow at a later date.

“At the heart of it, this record is who we are. Jason and I have been through some pretty trying times in the last couple of years and managed to rise above it all”, says guitar player Tommy Miller. “I wouldn’t go so far to call this a concept record, but there is a theme running through the entire thing.”

Barren Dominion was recorded with Bloomington, IN artist Niko Albanese, and mastered by Dennis Pleckham of Comatose studios and guitarist for the band BONGRIPPER. “We needed people working on this record that understood not just the sound that we were going for, but also the vibe that we wanted to hit. Dennis and Niko really hit that perfectly on both fronts”, says drummer of VOID KING, Derek Felix. “We talked a lot about making sure that this record was massive. Between recording the drums in an empty warehouse and having the guitar player from BONGRIPPER master the record, I would say that this album is exactly what we were looking for.”

Track Listing:
1. A Lucid Omega
2. Leftover Savages
3. Burnt At Both Ends
4. of Whip And Steed
5. Temples Made of Bone
6. Learning From The Ashes
7. Crippled Chameleon
8. The Longest Winter

Album Credits:
Recorded/Mixed – Niko Albanese
Mastering – Comatose Studios
Album Art – Soares Artwork

VOID KING is:
Derek Felix – Percussion
Chris Carroll – Bass
Jason Kindred – Vocals
Tommy Miller – Guitar

http://voidking.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/voidkingband/
https://www.offtherecordshop.nl/

Void King, “The Longest Winter”

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REZN Announce New Album Calm Black Water Due Oct. 10

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 10th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

rezn

After an encouraging debut in 2017’s Let it Burn (review here), Chicago psych-of-stone riffers REZN are back on the quick with a second album. Titled Calm Black Water, the new offering is set for issue on vinyl through Off the Record Label in the Netherlands (see also Stone Machine Electric), and will be pressed in three different versions all totaling 500 copies. The same imprint stood behind a vinyl edition of the first record that’s nearly sold out, so they’ll have preorders open for Calm Black Water a month in advance. Plenty of time ahead of the Oct. 10 release.

In order to give a bit of a glimpse — not too much of a glimpse, but you know, a teaser — the band have a clip posted from the track “Quantum Being,” and while the mere use of the word “quantum” in a title makes one want to compare them to YOB, the song has more in common with earlier Windhand or Electric Wizard at their foggiest, and as it rolls out a lurching, nodding groove, it only bodes well in terms of sonic largesse for whatever else the record might hold in terms of overarching atmospheric breadth/crush. I look forward to finding out.

Like the song snippet, their announcement was quick and to the point:

rezn calm black water

REZN has conjured another sonic gateway. Entitled ‘Calm Black Water’, the new full-length record embodies a deep-sea journey to the center of your mind.

Limited to 500 copies worldwide via Off The Record Label, ‘Calm Black Water’ will be available on vinyl in three exclusive colors: Blue/Clear/Black, Purple/Clear/Black, and 180g Black.

Listen to a preview of the track “Quantum Being” here.

Preorders for vinyl open September 10th and the digital/physical release date is set for October 10th, available here:
US/Canada: rezzzn.bandcamp.com
International: offtherecordlabel.bigcartel.com

Prepare your consciousness for the abyss.

REZN are:
Phil Cangelosi
Patrick Dunn
Rob McWilliams
Spencer Ouellette

facebook.com/reznhits
instagram.com/rezzzn
rezzzn.bandcamp.com
offtherecordlabel.bigcartel.com
https://www.facebook.com/Off-The-Record-1558728014411885/
https://www.offtherecordshop.nl/index.php/off-the-record-label

REZN, “Quantum Being” teaser

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Void King and Boudain Touring Europe this Month

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 3rd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

You’re just going to have to take my word for it when I say I don’t mean this as condescendingly as it might sound: but I think it’s fucking awesome that Void King and Boudain are teaming up for European tour dates. Seriously. If either band winds up seeing this post, good for you guys. Way to live the fucking dream, get off your asses and make it happen.

The Indiana and Louisiana-based acts will head out beginning in Den Haag on Oct. 26 and make their way around Belgium and Germany en route to Kampen, back in the Netherlands, for the Off the Record Festival on Nov. 4. No question the fest is the occasion/impetus behind the tour, since both bands head abroad supporting 2016 releases that came out through Off the Record Label, and while it’s not the longest run, and they’re not the biggest bands in the world, for every US-based group I’ve ever had talk to me about how perfect life would be if only they could get over to Europe and do shows, it’s awesome to see two bands actually putting it together like this. Warms my heart. I mean it.

Info from the PR wire:

void-king-boudain-tour-poster

VOID KING / BOUDAIN to Launch European Tour in October

Indiana’s VOID KING and Louisiana’s BOUDAIN will embark on a European Tour in late October. The Stoner Rock Double Threat will perform in The Netherlands, Germany, and Belgium, including Kampen’s (NL) Off The Record Festival. Tour dates are below.

Oct. 26 – The Hague, Netherlands @ Vereniging de vinger
Oct. 27 – Wommelgem, Belgium @ JH Wommel
Oct. 28 – Antwerp, Belgium @ Kid’s Rhythm ‘n Blues Kaffee
Oct. 29 – Osnabrük, Germany @ Dirty Dancing
Nov. 2 – Gouda, Netherlands @ StudioGonz
Nov. 3 – Arnhem, Netherlands @ Brigant
Nov. 4 – Kampen, Netherlands @ Off The Record Festival

If there is nothing, as we have long suspected, then let the Void take us there. Let the volume of the oncoming storm compel us forward, into what can only be considered to be our one true calling; to praise the riff.

Void King is:
Derek Felix – drums
Chris Carroll – bass guitar.
Jason Kindred – voice.
Tommy Miller – electric guitar.

BOUDAIN’s Way of the Hoof is a storm of Space, Pork, and Riffs! Recorded at SpaceLab 420 studios, the follow-up to the band’s 2013 EP is perfect for anyone who enjoys the kind of groove that makes you want to smoke out, grill out, and chill with the swine.

Boudain is:
Brian Lenard – guitar
Chris Porter – bass/vocals
David Karakash – guitars
Stephen Jester – drums

http://voidking.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/voidkingband/
twitter.com/_VoidKing
https://boudain.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/boudainla/
https://twitter.com/Boudainmusic

Void King, There is Nothing (2016)

Boudain, Way of the Hoof (2016)

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Stone Machine Electric, Vivere: Dormiendo Somniare

Posted in Reviews on February 27th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

stone-machine-electric-vivere

Last Spring, Texas duo Stone Machine Electric — who by my estimation remain underrated as only a non-touring band can — self-released their second long-player in the form of Sollicitus es Veritatem (review here). The timing on that is important. It was May, and as a grueling primary season wound down, the US presidential election was beginning to take shape as a contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. The Hurst-based two-piece acknowledged these current events in the cover art, which depicted a rat in a suit and a telling red tie standing in front of an audience of sheep, with his arm raised in front of a building burning with a giant skull behind it. Not subtle in visual metaphor, and the translation from Latin of the title — “nightmares are reality” — was correspondingly blunt.

Among what passes for a left-leaning contingent in the States, it would be difficult to see Sollicitus es Veritatem as anything other than prescient in hindsight. Songs like “Dreaming” had a bent of social commentary that never came at the expense of the liquidity of Stone Machine Electric‘s jamming, which has been central to their appeal over the last half-decade-plus, across offerings like the 2015 The Amazing Terror EP (review here), 2014’s Garage Tape (review here), their 2013 self-titled debut (review here) and their 2010 demo, Awash in Feedback (review here). Working frequently in the studio with Kent Stump of Wo Fat, guitarist/vocalist William “Dub” Irvin and drummer/thereminist Mark Kitchens (also synth and backing vocals) have developed a sound able at once to convey straightforward heavy roll and an echo of unpredictability, so that the listener never quite knows when they might take off and just where they might be headed on a given track.

That ability is a big part of why I call them underrated above, and it’s writ large over Vivere, their new live CD recorded June 3, 2016, at the Doublewide in Dallas and issued through Off the Record Label. As the Latin title — the infinitive form of the verb meaning “to live” — hints, the six-song/40-minute set is intended as a complement to Sollicitus es Veritatem, and it very much functions on that level. Its longer tracks, opener “I am Fire,” “Dreaming,” “PorR” and the finale “I am Fire (Slightly Burned)” all come from Sollicitus es Veritatem, and with the proximity of one to the other, another mixdown by Stump, and the general live feel that Irvin and Kitchens bring to their material, there’s no shortage of commonality between Vivere and its studio predecessor. Particularly for someone who’s grown to be a fan of the band and hasn’t been fortunate enough to see them play live — as I have and haven’t — the draw should be obvious.

For others, the question becomes what does Vivere have to offer that Sollicitus es Veritatem doesn’t? Fair ask. For one thing, like the studio counterpart, it’s the most cohesive Stone Machine Electric live outing yet. Their last one, 2013.02.07 (recorded, clearly, in 2013), was performed as a trio with Mark Cook on warr guitar, and caught them in the midst of a series of lineup shifts before they settled on the Dub/Kitchens duo as their seemingly permanent configuration. I don’t think I’m giving away state secrets in saying they work best in this form, and that shows itself from the nodding “I am Fire” onward here. It’s not uncommon for a live album to represent a band’s stage presence well — there are very few that are truly “warts and all” — but something else Vivere does is mirror the immersive listening experience of Sollicitus es Veritatem in how one song plays into the next via two short, seemingly-improvised transitional pieces: “Mindless Meanderings” and “Invented Passages.”

Though these are quick courses run at 2:54 and 2:42, respectively, and the broader impression of Vivere is found in moments like Dub‘s execution of the hook in “Dreaming” — the lines “Hustlers ain’t in the alley/They’re runnin’ the global scene/They’ll take you down/And take you further/Oh, how I wish I was dreaming” standing out as something of a centerpiece and summary of the set as a whole, let alone the track itself — and the raucous uptick provided at the end by “I am Fire (Slightly Burned),” on which Kitchens joins in a vocal call and response, both “Mindless Meanderings” and “Invented Passages” are crucial to the flow of Vivere. The first arrives between “I am Fire” and “Dreaming,” and gives Stone Machine Electric an even more atmospheric space in which to work, shifting via guitar lead and drum fills between the one longer song and the other without stopping. They are a band of few words, it seems.

Amid an initial hum at the outset of “I am Fire,” Dub says, “Yeah, we don’t talk. We’re just Stone Machine Electric,” and over a closing bed of synth drone in the ending of “I am Fire (Slightly Burned),” he follows up with “We’ve been Stone Machine Electric…” and something else only semi-intelligible, but other than that, they move from song to song without stopping. Accordingly, “Invented Passages” rises from the end of “Dreaming” with a bit of rhythmic push from Kitchens and a winding riff to accompany but hits the brakes well in time to start the familiar drift of “PorR,” which tops 13 hypnotic minutes riding that progression — down from over 14 for the studio version — and builds to an apex of thud, rumble and slow-motion riffing that moves via feedback into “I am Fire (Slightly Burned)” feeling both practiced and unforced; the closer picking up after about a minute and providing Vivere‘s final movement, which turns to brief cacophony just before ending in a way that seems only to re-suggest the improvisational elements at root in their creative approach.

The reinforcement thereof is another aspect of Vivere that shines through especially in its following Sollicitus es Veritatem, which was arguably the most song-based outing from Stone Machine Electric to-date. Still, this is the part where I say that one doesn’t need to have heard the studio album to appreciate the live one. A cliché, and probably only half-true, but valid when considering the molten nature of the band’s execution in either sphere. One of the joys of following Dub and Kitchens over their years together has been the way in which one release has always fed into the next — the debut into the first live album and Garage Tape into The Amazing Terror into Sollicitus es Veritatem — and Vivere adds to that line, acknowledging what they’ve done before and using it as a basis for moving forward.

What makes it even more engaging, though, is that the songs themselves do the very same thing on a meta-level, and are reshaped and recontextualized by this performance on this given night. One expects that as Stone Machine Electric put more distance between themselves and their second full-length headed perhaps toward a third, the evolution of their ideas will likewise continue, and the multi-tiered fluidity they’ve thus far shown will reach its next stage. That’s the hope, anyhow. But though their heavy psychedelia is often tinged with a darker, brooding sensibility, and Sollicitus es Veritatem certainly had its air of cynicism, I hear nothing on Vivere to make me think that core vibrancy will dull anytime soon. And who knows? If the live album turns out to be as predictive as its predecessor, we might all just survive these curious times in which we’ve found ourselves.

Stone Machine Electric, Vivere (2016)

Stone Machine Electric on Thee Facebooks

Stone Machine Electric on Twitter

Stone Machine Electric on Bandcamp

Off the Record Label website

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