Weedpecker Announce New Album IV & Spring 2021 Tour Dates

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

weedpecker

Forgive my curiosity here, but it seems fair to expect that when Poland’s  e marketing phd thesis Dissertation Proquest paper presentation on satellite communication social web research paper Weedpecker release their upcoming album, seemingly titled  dissertation proposal service quantitative - Pacific Book Review Strengthen your credibility with a professional book review. It is our primary desire to provide quality book IV, through  pay to do my homework for me. Thank you so that you know Amcas Coursework Help which one may then have a nice paper with interesting content. Stickman Records, it will be a substantially different outing than was 2018’s Are you looking for world bank research papers online? With writing essay help at EssayWritingInCa you will get your personal essay helper to get done quality papers III (discussed here). In no small part because it’s a substantially different band making it. Guitarist/vocalist How To Write An Application Letter To Bank Managers have become more popular than ever, but finding the right one is always a struggle. Choose surfessay.com for getting high-quality Piotr Wyroslaw “Wyro” Dobry has parted company with the other three members who appeared on the last record — including his brother enter site from our essay writing service anytime you need. We help your academic papers on any topic, any discipline, any academic level, and any Bartek, who co-founded the band — and is proceeding with We take the time to listen to their needs in order to provide them with Professional http://www.cndp.fr/uploads/tf/index.php?1737. Click here to see more Weedpecker in something of a Polish-heavy-rock supergroup configuration, bringing in former and current members of Free http://www.tgdrives.cz/?youth-violence-essay . We support the finest freelance writers that will precise your personal providing tasks, no matter the level. Through the Dopelord, Get on board with Essays Tigers Sociological Perspective Essays for essay writing service UK & essay help, get amazing discount on you all orders of essay Major Kong and Only Yale Application Essay in Australia providing Original Assignment Help with top results promises for every Australian student. Belzebong. That’s a heavy-hitting rhythm section, to be sure, and I’m very interested to find out how such weight plays alongside the lush melodies that  Can I Order My Essay? This is the question you ask when deadline is short and instructor is not giving you extension! Whatever the Weedpecker have incorporated into their sound over time. Or if the band will go in a completely different direction. Or whatever else might happen.

Speaking of things that might happen — a tour! Look, nobody’s pretending to know what Spring 2021 is going to look like around the world, but it’s cool that people are at least starting to plan things again in a more than “we’re postponed until next year” context. There’s something comforting about seeing a string of tour dates at this point, and with a new album to support in March, all the better.

From the social medias:

WEEDPECKER SPRING 2021 TOUR

Weedpecker – Spring Tour 2021

Together with Echelon Talent Agency, we are very happy to announce Weedpecker’s European tour next year! The tour will be promoting our new album, let’s call it “IV.”

It will be released in March via Stickman Records.

We have more surprises and we will share it with you soon. Observe our social media.

Poster by miodek.art.

Weedpecker live:
12th March – Leipzig (DE)
14th March – Dresden (DE)
15th March – Berlin (DE)
17th March – Rostock (DE)
18th March – Copenhagen (DK)
19th March – Hamburg (DE)
20th March – Liege (BE)
21st March – Gent (BE)
23rd March – Swansea (UK)
24th March – London (UK)
25th March – Bournemouth (UK)
26th March – Bristol (UK)
27th March – Edinburgh (UK)
28th March – Manchester (UK)
30th March – Lille (FR)
31st March – Nantes (FR)
1st April – Rennes (FR)
2nd April – Toulouse (FR)
3rd April – Paris (FR)

Weedpecker is:
Walczak (Tankograd, ex-Dopelord) – drums
Wyro – guitar/vox
Seru (BelzebonG) – keyboards
Domel (Major Kong) – bass

https://www.facebook.com/Weedpecker-349871488424872/
https://weedpecker.bandcamp.com/
http://weedpecker.bigcartel.com/
http://weedpecker.8merch.com/
https://www.stickman-records.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Stickman-Records-1522369868033940

Weedpecker, III (2018)

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Spidergawd to Tour Next March for New Album VI

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

spidergawd

Stoked on the idea of  dissertation conscience sujet - Instead of worrying about dissertation writing find the needed assistance here Order a 100% authentic, plagiarism-free Spidergawd hitting the road? Yeah, well you probably should be, whether you live in the path of their newly-announced March 2021 European touring or not, because it means that there’s going to be a new  Helmed and Anglosajona Lazaro assures Review Of Literature On Financial Performance his dispersoides rebelled or joined without words. The Sitzmark 100 Olympic Circle Spidergawd album to coincide with said tour. Yes, friends of a heavy-rocking persuasion, I speak of how to write an essay about war for free - Use this service to get your sophisticated paper delivered on time receive a 100% original, plagiarism-free thesis you Spidergawd Dental Admission Essay - leave behind those sleepless nights working on your essay with our academic writing assistance Entrust your essay to qualified VI, begat by 2019’s Spidergawd V (review here), which was begat by 2017’s Spidergawd IV (review here), which was begat by 2016’s Spidergawd III (review here), which was begat by 2015’s Spidergawd II (review here), which, indeed, was begat by Spidergawd (review here) in 2014.

No concrete release date yet for the VIth installment in Spidergawd‘s ongoing series of kick-you-in-the-ass-and-ask-nothing-in-return albums, but one assumes the issuance will spring forth at the behest of Crispin Glover Records and Stickman Records, much as has been the case in the past. As the Norwegian troupe have continued to amass a discography of high-grade/high-class outings, their progressive bent and forays into psychedelia have not gone unnoticed, and whether or not VI works forward the thread of either, the safest bet you can possibly make as regards anything Spidergawd is that it’s going to be awesome.

To wit, the band’s re-recorded 2019 version of “Sanctuary” from the second album. It’s awesome. That’s how they do.

When and if I hear more about the album, I’ll let you know. Hopefully it’s sooner than later, but you know how 2020 plans have gone.

Dates:

spidergawd vi tour

SPIDERGAWD – March 2021

HELLO FUTURE!

We are happy to announce the european tour for Spidergawd VI!

Hope to see all of you in march 2021!

03.03. Knust Hamburg
04.03. Vera Groningen
05.03. Essen turock – disco, live-club and lounge
06.03. Cologne, Gebäude 9
07.03. Nijmegen, Doornroosje
09.03. Schlachthof Wiesbaden
10.03. The Backstage Paris
11.03. Stuttgart, Universum
12.03. Winterthur, Gaswerk
13.03. Nuremburg, Der Hirsch
14.03. Backstage München
16.03. ((szene)) Wien
18.03. NAUMANNs Leipzig
19.03. Berlin, Frannz Club
20.03. Copenhagen, Spillestedet Stengade

Tickets: https://www.seaside-touring.com/tours/#spidergawd

https://www.facebook.com/spidergawd/
https://www.instagram.com/spidergawdofficial/
http://www.spidergawd.no/
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Spidergawd, “Sanctuary (2019)”

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Motorpsycho Announce The All is One out Aug. 28

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The upcoming Motorpsycho album, The All is One, will be the completion of a trilogy for the influential Norwegian progressive heavy rockers that began with 2017’s The Tower (review here) and continued on last year’s The Crucible (review here). True to form, it is a double-album, and among the assets the band teases it to include is a 42-minute five-part track that was written for ballet. Because obviously. If the question is, “Who’s going there?,” there’s a decent chance the answer is Motorpsycho.

Of course, the 2LP was slated to come out this Spring through Stickman Records, but, well, a lot of shit was supposed to happen this Spring that didn’t. If you’re reading this, congratulations on surviving, and I know that sounds sarcastic, but I actually mean it. Because a lot of people didn’t.

Stickman sent out word in their newsletter and the band had a post on their own site as well. Both are included here for your perusal:

motorpsycho the all is one

New Motorpsycho album The All Is One announced

Today we’re happy to announce the first details about Motorpsycho’s new album The All Is One!

The All Is One is the final chapter in the loosely-connected and informally titled “Gullva?g Trilogy” kicked off by 2017’s The Tower and connected by 2019’s The Crucible. Recorded between September-November of 2019 in France and Norway, the album was originally planned for a release in spring but was inevitably postponed due to – what else – Covid 19. However, the moment is ripe for new music and the band has used their extra time to give attention to every detail, resulting in a spectacular double album that is dense and Motorpsychodelic in the best possible way. We’ve been digging into this album the past few weeks at HQ and really excited to share more with you soon!

Release date has been set for August 28th, 2020.

Says the band:

THE ALL IS ONE
Hi psychonauts!

Summer is coming on strong and whatever bit of the world that still went to work ….will soon not.

No rest for the wicked though, and both we, our team and our record company friends are busy preparing the next Motorpsycho album for release! This album is called The All Is One, and will be released on 2xLP, 2xCD as well as digitally through both Stickman Records and Rune Grammofon on August 28, 2020.

The cover art is once again by Håkon Gullvåg, and this time around is art painted esp for us! It is a long album that features music from two sessions we did last year. The first session included our favourite Stockholmian Norwegian Reine Fiske, and took place in Black Box Studio in France in September. The second, featured two of our favourite Norwegian musicians, Ola Kvernberg and Lars Horntveth, and was a brief three day affair at Ocean Sound Studio on the Norwegian west coast in November.

At the center of this album is a long 5 part piece featuring some of the most radical stuff we’ve done on record in a while, but if the prospect of a 42 minute piece for ballet inspired by paintings, alchemy and the tarot seems too daunting, there is also a handful of loosely related shorter songs to get into. For us this is obviously just different views and tangents of the one thing, but you will all make of it what you will, and hopefully it will all make some sort of sense to you however deep you choose to go.

We guess the details – cover, song titles and whatnot – will be made public as summer moves along, so watch the various relevant spaces for relevant info and hang loose – it’ll be worth the wait, we promise!

Bob leBad
esq.

Motorpsycho is: Bent Sæther, Hans Magnus “Snah” Ryan, Tomas Järmyr.

https://www.facebook.com/motorpsycho.official/
https://twitter.com/motorpsychoband
http://motorpsycho.no/
https://www.facebook.com/Stickman-Records-1522369868033940/
https://www.instagram.com/stickmanrecords/
https://www.stickman-records.com/

Motorpsycho, The Crucible (2019)

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Days of Rona: Rolf Gustavus of Stickman Records

Posted in Features on May 19th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

stickman records rolf gustavus

Days of Rona: Rolf Gustavus of Stickman Records (Hamburg, Germany)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a label? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

As a label the three of us have managed fine. Jeannette and myself have been working for seven weeks without a day off and we are eternally grateful for all the support we’ve seen through the last few months. Nick has been stuck in Berlin most of the time and it’s probably been harder on him since he was condemned to inactivity.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

As critical as I’ve always been when it comes to the German government, I do believe that they did a good job when it comes to dealing with the spread of the virus. There’s no blueprint for this situation and so far, this government hasn’t cut people’s liberty freely and the foundation of our western democracy is not in danger.

Folks in Germany are getting tired of the restrictions and social distancing has become more lax where I live. That worries me because I’m convinced that this is far from being over.

We live on the outskirts of Hamburg and having our office next door to our house, we could continue to be the hermits we’ve always been. For us social distancing hasn’t been a problem.

However, we sure miss meeting our friends for dinner or going out for a drink but we’ve got each other, our cats and the company, pretty self-sufficient in a way.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

I think the DIY mechanisms that we started out with when we were young have become a lot more important, one of the few encouraging things that still work!!! Networking with like-minded folks will be essential for survival and I think we’re all still learning that lesson.

As long as there are no live concerts and tours, that’s really all we can do to keep the faith.

I don’t feel discouraged at all, much to the contrary. I even harbor hopes that a few good things come out of all of this. Music should be valued as a cultural good and not a consumer article.

Unfortunately this crazy global madhouse has turned us all into creatures demanding instant gratification of our (mostly trivial) wants and needs. Hopefully artists and their work will be seen with more appreciation… there’s always hope!

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

As mentioned previously, the support we’ve seen the last few months has been encouraging and we’re more motivated than ever for the three of us to continue full steam ahead.

Our new normal is to take good care of ourselves, eat well and nurture our friendships.

All of this makes you appreciate what really matters in life and I can do without a lot of the superficial crap that usually occupies too large of a fraction in our lives.

https://www.stickman-records.com/
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Interview: Nick DiSalvo of Elder on Omens, Songwriting and More

Posted in Features on May 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

elder

As Elder enter what would otherwise be a significant touring cycle following the release of their fifth album, Omens (review here), one can hear all around the band an increasing influential presence on other bands. The work they’ve been doing particularly over the last five years has begun to resonate with other acts now taking elements Elder helped bring to the fore and making them their own. One aspect of Elder‘s work that remains seemingly inimitable to this point, however, is the songwriting of founding guitarist/vocalist Nick DiSalvo, whose linear process brings together what are sometimes seemingly disparate parts — you can hear the stops in songs in places, as if the band were signaling, “Okay, now we go here” — and creating memorable movements out of what are purposefully not catchy choruses in the traditional sense.

In talking to DiSalvo about the new album, I wanted to get more of a sense of where his process comes from and how it has evolved over Elder‘s decade-plus together. The band’s tour plans may be scuffled for the time being due to forces out of their own control, but that does not seem to be hindering the fact that this band is shaping a form of progressive heavy rock in their own image.

Q&A follows here. Please enjoy:

Elder Interview with Nick DiSalvo

One of the most distinguishing facets of Elder is the method by which you write songs. How do songs begin for you? Is there an initial riff or melody that you build out from?

I’ve found recently that we can get more variety out of our songs by working piecemeal on many ideas simultaneously, and then seeing where they converge naturally or can be merged together. I do most of my songwriting at a computer these days, unromantic as it sounds, but I like to think of it as working with an infinite amount of blank canvases. When I’ve got an idea, I’ll plug in a guitar or keyboard and just record it immediately. Then I’ll build on it, fleshing it out with other layers. Sometimes that’ll immediately lead to a new part, or sometimes that’s where the inspiration stops, or sometimes I’ll realize that this is the missing element to a song already in progress. That also means that our songs aren’t being written one-by-one, but developing side by side, which might give the albums a unique flavor as a whole.

In terms of structure, Elder has a more linear style than traditional verses and choruses. How much of that is just what sounds right to you as opposed to a conscious decision?

It’s all pretty much just what sounds right. I like to pack a lot of ideas into our songs and rarely have the time for repeating parts. Instead, it’s more interesting to me to use motifs and recurring themes, changing or referencing them when they return. That’s not to say we couldn’t or wouldn’t use a verse or chorus in our songs if it felt right. I found it really amusing that when we released “Embers” off the new record, some people were complaining that we started using a ‘pop’ song format. Because a chorus appears 2 times in an 11-minute song? It’s apparently become our trademark to never repeat a part, for better or worse.

Are you ever tempted to write a traditional hook, just for the hell of it?

Traditional… maybe not? I don’t know if that would be my strength. A hook like they appear in pop songs wouldn’t work for our band because it just doesn’t fit into the rest of the structure. But I do think that Elder songs have some hooks in terms of catchy elements that, even if they don’t perform the traditional function of pulling a listener into the song at the beginning, they’ll tempt someone to go back and explore the song again, or anticipate that one part they love.

As Elder has grown more complex, you’ve fleshed out melodies and exploratory parts. How does jamming as a full band fit with your more plotted pieces? What specifically does this bring to Omens in your opinion?

We’re still actively trying to figure this out, especially now with a new drummer, and it’s insanely frustrating now with the COVID-19 situation that we have to further wait to get back in the saddle and keep refining ourselves. In general though I think the jamming thing adds a counterweight to all of the other planned parts in an Elder song. It’s the ballad to the rock anthem, in our own fashion. I don’t have a ton of patience for jam sessions and even here I find myself setting boundaries and structures, which maybe we’ll trim back even further in the future… who knows? As far as Omens goes, the jammed-out, floating parts are probably some of my favorite moments of the album. I believe they balance and round out the record as a whole.

Tell me about writing “Halcyon.” What are the song’s origins and what was your vision for it?

That track is a classic case of a song really turning out very differently than expected. “Halcyon” originally began at the now 5-minute mark where the song really kicks in after its extended intro. That was the first part written and intended beginning of the song. At the same time, I was working on another track in the vein of Gold & Silver Sessions that I thought we might interweave into the record as an intermezzo. Mike came up with this guitar lead I really liked, so I slowed it down and built it into that song. Eventually I had the idea to weave the two together and have the jam gradually morph to begin featuring chords from the actual song. When that was established, it was cool because we had a kind of backwards song structure from what we normally do, since these extended jams usually don’t begin our songs. It took legs from there and I was able to write the rest of the song over the next weeks.

“One Light Retreating” seems to touch on more directly emotional ground than Elder has reached before. What is it expressing, instrumentally and lyrically?

In the story told on Omens, the last song describes a kind of last glimpse into existence for humanity on a dying planet. If you were to zoom out, the idea is that you’d see the lights from our planet slowly going out, retreating into dark. The last light retreating is like the last candle of human activity going out. But the mood on the song isn’t sorrow because of that, it’s actually a kind of hope expressed. The lyrics also describe the vegetation growing up again, reaching for the sun and even overgrowing either the bodies or structures left behind by mankind. I think of it as the scene depicted in the cover artwork, where moss is overtaking a ruined statue of a god or important figure. The album’s themes are pretty heavy for me, but the last song is a way of reminding the listener that there’s always light after the dark, or something cheesy like that.

With the band spread out geographically, how has your writing process changed over the years?

It’s been complicated. I’ve bounced around a lot, but we’ve managed to make it work, especially with technology. When working on Lore, I was living and teaching English in Germany at the time. That was the first time I really wrote a solid chunk of a record by myself in isolation, but we still had a pretty collaborative period of revision on those songs when I returned. By the time we were working on Reflections, I had moved again back to Europe and the guys and I would only see each other for tours. That’s where we really perfected the current mode of working, where I’m writing the music and recording it in my home ‘studio’ and sending to the other guys to critique and learn before finally meeting up to live rehearse the material for the studio. We did that with both Reflections and with Omens and it’s been working so far. We just underwent another pretty significant shift though with Matt leaving the band and Georg stepping up, just around the same time Mike decided to stay in Germany too. That means again 3/4 of the band is local and we can actually practice and write collaboratively again.

In general, how do you know when a song is done? Particularly on Omens, with so much lush keys and melodies built out, when is a piece actually finished?

I really like working on my own recordings particularly for this reason – you can not only hone in on all the little elements of each part, but also zoom out and listen to the whole thing. If I feel a song is done, I’ll usually let it sit for a day and then come back with fresh ears and listen to the whole thing. Anything that doesn’t make sense will automatically stick out like a sore thumb. It’s basically this kind of process of revision then until we’re satisfied with it. This is obviously just subject to my taste, some people think we could trim parts etc etc. but I know when I think a song is solid and cohesive.

How do you see your songwriting growing in the future? Do you have an idea yet of where you want to go next or what you’ll take from the experience of making Omens?

Well… I hoped that we’d be on tour for the next half year supporting the record, which not only energizes and inspires us but also gives us time to jam on new ideas and sounds. That collaboration I was anticipating won’t be happening anytime soon. I’m working on new songs in the meantime from home, and I can sense a sound taking shape, but it’s too early to say. I thought for sure after Omens that we’d strip down our approach a bit – I found it kind of exhausting putting in all of these layers – but so far that hasn’t happened in anything new I’m working on. We’ll see in another year or so.

Elder, Omens (2020)

Elder on Thee Facebooks

Elder on Instagram

Elder on Bandcamp

Armageddon Shop website

Stickman Records website

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Album Review: Elder, Omens

Posted in Reviews on April 27th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

elder omens

There has yet to be an Elder release that did not move forward from the one before it. They have never repeated themselves, and even if 2017’s Reflections of a Floating World (review here) seemed to be in direct conversation with its predecessor, the landmark 2015 outing, Lore (review here), it found ways to expand their sound by incorporating the work of then-new keyboardist/guitarist Mike Risberg, opening up to fluid sections of kraut-inspired improvisational jamming that came to fruition more on 2019’s instrumental The Gold & Silver Sessions EP (discussed here). The band’s fifth album, Omens — which is issued through Armageddon Shop in the US and Stickman Records in Europe and might as well be taking its title from what an entire league of other groups’ debuts will sound like four years from now — is no exception to the rule. It is, instead, a leap with eyes and both feet forward into new echelons of lush melody and progressive rock.

While their foundation may have been in the lumbering riffery of their 2008 self-titled (discussed here), a penchant for complexity began to take hold in 2011’s Dead Roots Stirring (review here) and 2012’s Spires Burn/Release (discussed here), but even that feels primitive in hindsight in comparison to what they bring to light across the five tracks and 55 minutes of OmensRisberg‘s work is central to that, and he’s joined on keys throughout by founding guitarist/vocalist Nick DiSalvo — whose linear style of composition has remained an essential facet to Elder‘s approach even as so much else has changed — as well as guest spots on mellotron and Fender Rhodes by Fabio Cuomo, who makes an impression with the latter early in the near-11-minute rollout of the opening title-track. It is a shift in breadth of influence as much as one of sonic priorities, but Omens neither forgets where it came from nor gives up its sense of heft. Jack Donovan‘s bass arguably carries more responsibility than ever before for serving as the anchor of the rhythm section, since even as Elder have so clearly coalesced with Risberg as “the new guy,” they here introduce drummer Georg Edert (also of Germany’s Gaffa Ghandi) to the fold in place of Matt Couto.

As fluid as the results are throughout Omens, that is a major change. Couto‘s personality as a drummer is rare and distinct, and he’s not the kind of player one can simply replace. Much to their credit, Elder don’t try. Rather, Edert establishes quickly through “Omens” and “In Procession” his own style of play, feeding off the unfolding dramas of melody in the keys and DiSalvo‘s sweeping guitar progressions. A straightforward backbeat grounds the winding verse of “In Procession” even as Elder move into new textures and a more contoured sound than they’ve ever had before, some midsection crash satisfying those seeking a payoff along the way — indeed, the title-track’s opening riff likewise serves as something of an embrace of heavier impulses; give me a bit, we’ll get there — ahead of a keyboard solo and return of the vocals and finishing section, and Edert‘s play not only keeps up with these characteristically head-spinning, sometimes-maddening shifts from part to part, but enhances them. He emerges as a drummer of class and intention, able to bring a jazzy sensibility when called upon to do so or to rock out as need be. Though he’s inevitably the new “new guy,” this material is stronger for what he brings to it.

elder

That’s true as well in “Halcyon,” the designation of which as the centerpiece would not seem to be happenstance. The longest cut at 12:48, it summarizes much of the growth that’s to be heard throughout Omens, opening with a gloriously languid unfurling of electronic and natural rhythm and multi-layered melodic coasting. There is a subtle build happening, with tension mounting in the guitar that moves forward gradually, but there’s a stop in the drums before the full-volume surge happens at 4:24 (also, by coincidence, the release day), and Elder successfully bring together the various sides of their continually deepening sonic persona — the weighted tonality of their earliest work, the push into conscious craft, too heady to be psychedelic but too aerial to be called anything but otherworldly. It is time to start thinking of DiSalvo among composers like Opeth‘s Mikael Åkerfeldt, not just because of an affinity for prog, but in terms of the ability to take seemingly disparate styles and create something new and individual from them. Elder‘s sound, despite an increasing amount of bands working in their wake, is their own, and there is no compromise to be found across Omens.

“Halcyon” is a triumph of their method, its finishing balance of patience and push all the more emblematic of their well-earned maturity as a unit, and yet it hardly stops before the returning mellotron in “Embers” signals the next movement of the record is underway, with chunky start and stops and a heavier roll that gives ground about halfway through to an instrumental build that could almost be in answer to “Halcyon,” culminating in wah sweep and farewell spiraling noise. This, ahead of the wistful standalone guitar that begins closer “One Light Retreating” and is soon joined by the full crux of tonal presence, DiSalvo‘s voice in the initial lines bringing to mind an almost post-hardcore/emo mindset in the verse before that heavier part returns in a back and forth that finds the one building off the next. As Elder has progressed relentlessly, so too has DiSalvo as a singer and somewhat reluctant frontman, but the feeling conveyed in “One Light Retreating” is at a level that wouldn’t have been possible even five years ago. Unsurprisingly, “One Light Retreating” does not blow itself out at the finish, but indeed retreats, with a poised instrumental flow that once again underscores not just the emotionality on display — I haven’t had the benefit of a lyric sheet, so I’m just going by what I hear — but a genuine encapsulation of the melodic and rhythmic grace they’ve been displaying all along.

Elder are a refinement process. They are driven by this need to move forward, and each of their albums becomes a summary of what they’ve learned since the last. Omens, whatever its title might directly be referencing, inevitably looks ahead. An omen does not occur in the past — lore does. Omens is Elder signaling the beginning of their next stage as a band, as all their work has been, and as ever, it finds them not thinking about where they’ve been, but where they might still go creatively, and these songs are made to be lived with. They will reveal their nuances to listeners not over a period of weeks or months, but years. This is part of what makes Elder such a special, singular band, and part of what has led their work to resonate on as great a scale as it has. Whatever they might do next, don’t expect it to sound just like this, but if Omens is itself a portent of things to come, heavy music will be all the more fortunate to have Elder as statesmen.

Elder, Omens (2020)

Elder on Thee Facebooks

Elder on Instagram

Elder on Bandcamp

Armageddon Shop website

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Days of Rona: Nick DiSalvo of Elder

Posted in Features on March 30th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. — JJ Koczan

elder nick disalvo

Days of Rona: Nick DiSalvo of Elder (Germany)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

I don’t think a pandemic would ever come at a “convenient” time, but since we’re releasing a new album at the end of April and had tours lined up for the next half-year following that, it’s causing some problems. We’re rescheduling the concerts coming up soonest and taking the rest on a wait-and-see basis. Thankfully, that’s our biggest problem and everyone is healthy. Jack continues to work in a very public space, being an ‘essential worker’, but so far so good.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

In Germany, currently we’re allowed to move freely but with a few restrictions. Groups of over two people aren’t allowed in public or private, nonessential businesses are closed and everyone is predictably advised to stay in unless absolutely necessary. In Massachusetts, I believe it’s similar.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

There’s a general sense of unwellbeing in the city. Supermarkets are eerie, streets are mostly empty. Needless to say the clubs and bands here are facing the same crises as elsewhere, but there is at least funding being freed up for artists by the state. I’ve seen an uptick in kind messages and bits of support in the way of merch sales and downloads, which is heartening. People are helping out where they can – I mean, except for the super-rich and corporations, etc.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

Well, we’re fine. Things like this put your problems into perspective, even as they are creating them. We might have to cancel tours and lose money/momentum as a band, but people are suffering and dying by the thousands and it will only get worse.

http://facebook.com/elderofficial
https://www.instagram.com/elderband/
http://armageddonshop.com
https://www.stickman-records.com/

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Elder Post Omens Cover Art; Preorders Available

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Well, preorders are up for Elder‘s new album, Omens. I’m not going to tell you I’ve heard the record or anything, but I am going to tell you that it’s the most progressive thing they’ve ever done, and it sets in motion a new stage of the band’s ongoing evolution. They approach and execute it like the veterans they’ve become, and construct their songs with a masterful hand. I’m not telling you I’ve heard it, but I am telling you it’s probably going to be a consensus album of the year for 2020 when December comes.

Cover art has been unveiled today along with the title-track, which is representative of course of the album as a whole and a pretty damn fine way to spend the next 10 minutes of your life.

Dig in:

elder omens

Elder have set an April 24 release date for one of the year’s most eagerly-awaited rock releases… Their 5th full length album: “Omens”.

US preorder link: https://armageddonlabel.bigcartel.com/

EU preorder link: https://www.stickman-records.com/shop/elder-omens/

“To me, Omens is our most complete work to date: a set of songs that express the breadth of the band’s collective influences,” explains singer/guitar player Nick DiSalvo. “After recording The Gold & Silver Sessions EP, it felt like we fully scratched the itch to explore our minimalist side, taking a step back from the proggy song structures and heavy guitar work of our previous records and just letting the music drift along. When beginning to work on Omens, the goal was to integrate these two tendencies in the band – to make a modern day progressive rock record, but also to take time to jam and float when need be. Most importantly, I feel the spirit of adventure in our music is alive and well, and we missed no opportunity to bring in a whole new arsenal of sounds to the record.”

The five song, 54-minute album is a concept album that mimics the lifespan of a civilization, and also reads as a commentary on our own society hell-bent on profitability at the expense of our own lives and environment.

Omens was produced by Peter Deimel (Anna Calvi, The Kills, The Wedding Present) and recorded at Studio Black Box in Noyant-La-Gravoyêre, France. Deimel and DiSalvo mixed the collection.

Elder is Nick DiSalvo (guitar, vocals, keyboards), Jack Donvan (bass), Michael Risberg (guitars, keyboards) and Georg Edert (drums). The New Bedford, Mass. born band have released five full-length studio albums: Elder (2008), Dead Roots Stirring (2011), Lore (2015) and Reflections of a Floating World (2017).

1. Omens
2. In Procession
3. Halcyon
4. Embers
5. One Light Retreating

Elder US 2020 Tour:
May 6 Brooklyn, NY Elsewhere
May 7 Philadelphia, PA Underground Arts
May 8 Richmond, VA Richmond Music Hall
May 9 Asheville, NC Mothlight
May 10 Atlanta, GA The Earl
May 12 Lexington, KY Cosmic Charlies
May 13 Nashville, TN Mercy Lounge
May 14 New Orleans, LA One Eyed Jacks
May 15 Houston, TX Secret Group
May 16 Austin, TX Barracuda
May 17 Dallas, TX Blue Light
May 19 Albuquerque, NM Sister Bar
May 20 Denver, CO Hi Dive
May 22 St. Paul, MN Turf Club
May 23 Chicago, IL Reggie’s
May 24 Cleveland, OH Grog Shop
May 26 Detroit, MI Sanctuary
May 27 Toronto, ON Lee’s Palace
May 28 Montreal, QC Café Campus
May 29 Boston, MA ONCE Ballroom

Tickets are on-sale now. Bask opens on all dates.

http://facebook.com/elderofficial
https://www.instagram.com/elderband/
http://armageddonshop.com
https://www.stickman-records.com/

Elder, “Omens”

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