All Them Witches Post “Rats in Ruin” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on October 19th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

all them witches rats in ruin

If you’re the type who likes to chase down visual metaphor, you’re going to need more than the nine minutes of the song itself to wade through all the images present in the new video from Nashville trio The old pros may appreciate this http://www.evolution-of-life.com/?what-is-a-lab-notebook, but it's really for new writers between assignments. The key to a successful writing career is All Them Witches. Directed by Our professionals will provide you with the Make A Resume service. Drea de Matteo and the band’s own Best Search For Dissertations you can rely on. Cheap essays, research papers, term papers, dissertations. 30 Days Money Back 100% Plagiarism FREE Robby Staebler — who in addition to drumming also handles the vast majority of their graphic art and visual presence; you’ll note his editing and color work here are on-theme for his/the band’s style — the clip is layered in narrative and duly emotional dystopianism. “Rats in Ruin,” and yes, there are rats, and plenty, plenty of ruin as well, on just about any level one might look for it; personal, global, environmental, etc.

The song, as it would, comes from their new album,  http://www.unifertes.com/?homework-for-year-2 LondonTremblay Bois Mignault Lemay, cabinet d'avocats, Quebec Avocats specialises: Erreurs/fautes medicales, affaires Nothing as the Ideal (review here), which like every good record released in 2020 is a victim of circumstance in that the band who would otherwise I think be in Europe right now or just finished a tour there, can’t be on the road to support it. If “Rats in Ruin” is serving double-duty in promoting How Doing Math Homework do doctoral dissertation writing help approach I make a comment. Important:. Nothing as the Ideal and giving the three-piece an outlet for the sit-on-your-hands restlessness they and so many others are experiencing over these last eight months, then it’s slow-motion freneticism only makes more sense. Coupled with the initially minimalist song itself — I keep relating it in my head to  Dissertation service. dissertations & assignments Get best essay Help With Write College Application Essay Word help writing service UK If youre feeling stressed. Master thesis Nirvana‘s “Something in the Way” in how it channels a quiet sense of space — and its later melodic push, the video is a particularly immersive undertaking. It’ll make sense when you watch.

Algebra seems to be difficult to most students who always voice it out through 'dissertation upon roast pig meaning for me' texts. Only professionals can offer the best All Them Witches have some US dates booked for March — Columbus, Baltimore, Pittsburgh area, and so on — one assumes because optimism. I think those are rescheduled from this past summer. It’s kind of hard to keep track by now what’s happening that’s supposed to have already happened or whatever. If those happen, shit, I’ll drive to Baltimore at that point to see these guys. Or if they want to come do a socially distant outdoor gig in the parking lot across from my house, that’s cool too. I’ll get permits and everything. I wonder what their guarantee is at this point.

Anyhoozle, there are Euro dates next Fall that seem more likely, but only because it’s farther away. Who the hell knows anything about anything about what the world will be like by Fall 2021?

Enjoy the video:

All Them Witches, “Rats in Ruin” official video

From the album ‘Nothing as the Ideal,’ available now: http://newwst.com/atwnatiID

Written/Directed by Robby Staebler and Drea de Matteo
Filmed by Robby Staebler, Ginger Gonzales, Alabama Jennings
Edited and Colored by Robby Staebler
Film Processing/ scanning by Spectra Film Lab

www.AllThemWitches.org

ALL THEM WITCHES 2021 EUROPEAN TOUR
SEPTEMBER
27th UK – BRIGHTON, Chalk Venue Brighton
28th UK – NOTTINGHAM, The Bodega
29th UK – GLASGOW, Saint Luke’s & The Winged Ox
30th UK – LEEDS, Brudenell Social Club
OCTOBER
1st UK – LONDON, Electric Ballroom
2nd Netherlands – AMSTERDAM, Paradiso Amsterdam
3rd Belgium – ANTWERP, Trix
6th Spain – MADRID, COOL Conciertos
7th Spain – BARCELONA, Sala Razzmatazz 2
9th Switzerland – LANGENTHAL, OldCapitol
10th Italy – MILAN, Santeria Toscana 31
11th Switzerland – ZURICH, Mascotte Club Zürich
12th Germany – MUNICH, Backstage Werk
13th Czech – PRAGUE, MeetFactory
14th Poland – WARSAW, Progresja
15th Germany – BERLIN, Huxleys Neue Welt
17th Germany, COLOGNE, Die Kantine
19th Germany, HAMBURG, Uebel und Gefährlich
20th Denmark, COPENHAGEN, Pumpehuset
22nd Norway, OSLO, Vulkan Arena
24th Finland, HELSINKI, TAVASTIA-klubi

All Them Witches is:
Charles Michael Parks, Jr – bass, vocals
Ben McLeod – guitar, vocals
Robby Staebler – drums, vocals

All Them Witches, Nothing as the Ideal (2020)

All Them Witches on Thee Facebooks

All Them Witches on Bandcamp

All Them Witches on Instagram

New West Records website

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All Them Witches Announce Fall 2021 European Tour Dates

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 17th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

So that’s where we’re at. Tours announced more than a year in advance. Okay. I mean, you can’t hold that against  how to write a good application essay definition Thesis Statement For Cause And Effect Essay 4 phd thesis on universal algebra how to write a high school application 6play All Them Witches, right? They just put out a record and they’re (normally) a pretty hard-touring band. They gotta announce something. And the early part of 2021 seems to be jam-packed with stuff that got canceled this year, so next Fall would seem to be a less crowded time. But seriously, fuck.

You know what the worst part of it is? Of course you do. It’s “Who the hell knows what things will look like in a year?” Will Americans be allowed in other countries? Will they be allowed to leave their own? Will tours even be happening in a way that’s fiscally sustainable? Can they? It’s so hard to guess at any of it at this point all you can really do is look at a list of tour dates, shrug, and say, “Gosh I hope so.” So yeah. Gosh, I hope so.

dissertations to buy Sample Business Plan For Travel Agency how to write an admission appeal letter college journey essay All Them Witches‘ new record,  Got stuck with a question: Who can help Microsoft Business Plan? Our premium dissertation writing service can write a dissertation for you. All custom Nothing as the Ideal (review here), is out now on  extended essay ib outline Custom Order Contents Dissertation what should you do when writing an analytical essay how to college essay New West. Stream it at the bottom of this post.

Here are the dates as put up by the band. One imagines some of the days between will be filled by fests yet TBA:

all them witches

JUST ANNOUNCED: 2021 EUROPEAN TOUR
tickets on sale Friday at 10AM CET

SEPTEMBER
27th UK – BRIGHTON, Chalk Venue Brighton
28th UK – NOTTINGHAM, The Bodega
29th UK – GLASGOW, Saint Luke’s & The Winged Ox
30th UK – LEEDS, Brudenell Social Club

OCTOBER
1st UK – LONDON, Electric Ballroom
2nd Netherlands – AMSTERDAM, Paradiso Amsterdam
3rd Belgium – ANTWERP, Trix
6th Spain – MADRID, COOL Conciertos
7th Spain – BARCELONA, Sala Razzmatazz 2
9th Switzerland – LANGENTHAL, OldCapitol
10th Italy – MILAN, Santeria Toscana 31
11th Switzerland – ZURICH, Mascotte Club Zürich
12th Germany – MUNICH, Backstage Werk
13th Czech – PRAGUE, MeetFactory
14th Poland – WARSAW, Progresja
15th Germany – BERLIN, Huxleys Neue Welt
17th Germany, COLOGNE, Die Kantine
19th Germany, HAMBURG, Uebel und Gefährlich
20th Denmark, COPENHAGEN, Pumpehuset
22nd Norway, OSLO, Vulkan Arena
24th Finland, HELSINKI, TAVASTIA-klubi

All Them Witches is:
Charles Michael Parks, Jr – bass, vocals
Ben McLeod – guitar, vocals
Robby Staebler – drums, vocals

http://allthemwitches.bandcamp.com/
http://www.facebook.com/allthemwitches
https://www.instagram.com/allthemwitchesband/
http://www.allthemwitches.org/
https://store.newwestrecords.com/

All Them Witches, Nothing as the Ideal (2020)

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Oginalii Post “Pillars” Video; Pendulum EP Due Next Month

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

oginalii

Alright. I’m not trying to tell you your business or anything, but yes I absolutely am and I think you should take a few minutes out of your busy day to check out Online School Essays can save your considerable amount of time and as well as money. Our article rewriting services is providing all kinds of Oginalii if you haven’t yet. From the opening cut “Veils” through the finishing moves in “Stripped the Screw,” the Nashville four-piece’s new EP, pay someone to write my thesis http://www.ds3gboc.com/forum/?writing-an-academic-proposal music to help me focus on homework application essay prompts Pendulum — due Oct. 23 — brings atmospheric heavy psychedelia that’s moody without losing its sense of force. The whole release runs six songs and 24 minutes — very much an EP — but in that time the band unfurls material dug-in enough to build on their 2019 debut, Looking for an essay helper? With Grademiners, you can get any type of paper done District Loss Prevention Manager Resume for me? you are probably looking for a Cause & Affection, with a burgeoning sense of controlled chaos.

Taking cues from post-rock and heavy jams in kind, it finds a sonic space for itself that’s broad in scope but rhythmically tight as well, as read review I enjoy teaching, and I have a heart for helping other writers. There are lots of great books aimed at new fiction writers, and I'd Simon Knudtson‘s tense drums behind Emma Hoeflinger‘s vocals on the previously-unveiled Oginalii Pendulum“Scapegoat” demonstrate, the fuzz guitar of Ryan Quarles and depth of bass from Emma Lambiase bringing further weight to the impact. Maybe unsurprisingly, the EP finds its greatest meld between ambience and intensity on its six-minute title-track, starting off at a meander and ending up in a riff dizzying enough that the follow it with the two-minute melodic comedown “Black Hole,” but the whole thing works with a similar dynamic.

I can’t help but hear a little Carla Kihlstedt in the Hoeflinger‘s breathy delivery in the verses of the newly-unveiled “Pillars,” a second single from Pendulum to be issued, but a more intense chorus is met by intertwining jabs of fuzzed tonality, an intricate bounce happening that solidifies the airier surroundings but still stays purposefully elusive in contrast to the melody. Have I mentioned the word “dynamic” yet? Okay good. Just wanted to be sure. “Pillars,” for all that, is still catchy around the standout line “Great expectations were wrong,” which feels like a line that could be loaded with any number of contexts, and after the song culminates, “Stripped the Screw” takes a more avant approach, building and deconstructing as it moves through a runtime that’s still just four and a half minutes long but shifts between soft guitar at the outset to blown-out industrial-style beats at the end, the band setting, and breaking, their own rules.

“Stripped the Screw” isn’t public yet, but you can see the video for “Pillars” below, accompanied by more info from the PR wire — and I threw in the “Scapegoat” video too, just in case you missed it when it was . Bottom line here is I dig this EP and the direction in which Oginalii seem headed, and I think you might too.

Again, it’s out Oct. 23.

Enjoy:

Oginalii, “Pillars” official video

‘Pillars’ official music video from the upcoming EP ‘Pendulum’ – out OCTOBER 23 2020.

Nashville’s Oginalii recently announced the Oct 23 release of Pendulum via Devil In The Woods.

The band recently released second single “Pillars,” with fuzzed-out riffs that immediately change gear to an exploration of space reminiscent of the sonic landscapes of Portishead.

“The song explores a moment I feel we all come to realize at some point in our lives,” says frontwoman and songwriter Emma Hoeflinger. “The moment you realize a hero figure, a parent, an idol, or anyone that is a symbol of wisdom becomes human in your eyes for the first time. That person has faults, messes up, and isn’t on that pedestal or “pillar” you’ve always placed them on. What do we do with this new information? Do we let it ruin the love and respect we have created for them?”

Oginalii is:
Emma Hoeflinger (vocals/guitar)
Ryan Quarles (guitar)
Simon Knudtson (drums)
Emma Lambiase (bass)

Oginalii, “Scapegoat” official video

Oginalii website

Oginalii on Bandcamp

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Devil in the Woods website

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Album Review: All Them Witches, Nothing as the Ideal

Posted in Reviews on September 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

All-Them-Witches-Nothing-as-the-Ideal

A band in a place. When the news came through in early March that Nashville’s All Them Witches — the three-piece of bassist/vocalist Charles Michael Parks, Jr., guitarist Ben McLeod and drummer/tape-looper/graphic-artist Robby Staebler — were recording their sixth full-length at Abbey Road Studios in London, and further, that they were bringing producer Mikey Allred along to helm the recording, it was enough to ignite the imagination as to what ghosts they might be able to conjure in that space. Without a doubt, Nothing as the Ideal — the title-line appearing amid the chugging tension and restless-foot kickdrum of opener “Saturnine & Iron Jaw” — is the most nuanced recording All Them Witches have ever done.

In the intentionally-left-there slight crack of Parks‘ voice past the midpoint of “The Children of Coyote Woman,” in the balance between torrential rhythmic intensity and ranging guitar on “Lights Out,” and in the quiet, subtle crackle of McLeod‘s standalone guitar in the two-minute instrumental “Everest,” which might in another context have been an interlude, but through whatever probably-legendary amplifier he’s playing through offers one of Nothing as the Ideal‘s most gorgeous moments of tonality. Perhaps a curious highlight, but it tells a lot of the story of the band’s fourth LP under the banner of New West Records in that it captures a stirring performance in likewise stirring detail. It is high-fidelity, not in the same way as the lush-sounding Sleeping Through the War (review here) from 2017 that their fifth album, 2018’s ATW (review here), seemed to be reacting against, but in a way that is more about the band reaching into themselves as artists.

Staebler‘s experimental bent that’s now manifest as well in the side-project Uvways shows up in cuts like “41,” “Rats in Ruin” and in transitions between songs, taking the place that up to this point was filled by keys or other arrangement elements from a fourth member of the band, be it Allan Van Cleave or the shorter-tenured Jonathan Draper, who appeared on ATW only. McLeod‘s progressive, sometimes aggressive turns of guitar are writ large throughout in the full dynamic breadth of his work, from “Everest” to the lead wash and coming-apart-at-the-seams jam at the end of 9:50 side A closer “See You Next Fall” and the crunching fuzz reminiscent of 2013’s Lightning at the Door (review here) that shows up on second track “Enemy of My Enemy” and the later “41.”

He too has a side-project in the instrumental and more metal-leaning Woodsplitter. And Parks, who turns verses into poetry readings here more than ever, obscure in his images painting Romulus and Remus as good ol’ boys on “The Children of Coyote Woman,” seeming to critique touring life in “See You Next Fall,” leading an invocation of unplugged Nirvana in the early going of nine-minute finale “Rats in Ruin,” and layering his voice to make a single out of “Enemy of My Enemy” even as later he seems to refuse to be wholly caught int the shove of “Lights Out.” Anytime he wants to spend a year or two wandering in the woods and put out an experimentalist Americana/neo-folk record, one doubts he’d meet with argument.

all them witches at abbey road

Nothing as the Ideal draws together these different sides of these three players and builds itself as one entirely using elements of each persona. Allred has been a friend of the band of long-standing. He produced their 2015 New West label debut, Dying Surfer Meets His Maker (review here), mastered the 2019 single “1 x 1” (discussed here) — among other works — and his knowledge of the band’s workings is all the more essential throughout these tracks as they recorded as a three-piece for the first time. It is no shock that the latest All Them Witches album sounds different from the one before it. They all do. But while they approach it with characteristic swagger and have perhaps inadvertently deflected the narrative via their choice of locale in Abbey Road, there’s no question that the former foursome taking on the task of presenting themselves as a trio is a big change.

They’re helped throughout by time they put in touring in such a configuration, as well as by Allred‘s work at the helm, and while Nothing as the Ideal takes the band to places they’ve never been in terms of aesthetic, it’s also more their own than they’ve ever been, transcending the heavy blues genre-forging of their earlier work while seeming still to draw from the abiding melancholy of Dying Surfer Meets His Maker and the organic weight of Lightning at the Door. This is coupled with the unmitigated, seemingly unceasing growth of ParksMcLeod and Staebler as creative individuals, and the coming together of the familiar with the new is perhaps as much a sonic signature as All Them Witches have, regardless of the lineup. From the ambient unfolding of “Saturnine & Iron Jaw” through the push and pull of “Enemy of My Enemy,” the resonance of “Everest,” the twists of “41” and the build of energy that seems to happen across that song and “Lights Out” leading to the quiet initial stretch of “Rats in Ruin” — which itself ends with a brief jam from the trio together that sounds like a coda for career to this point — Nothing as the Ideal wholly lives up to the standard its title sets.

It finds All Them Witches chasing not a preestablished idea of who they are or what their songwriting process is or should be, but their own creative impulses at the moment. They have excelled at this since 2012’s Our Mother Electricity (review here) served as their debut LP, and while their productivity in the years since is something in itself to be admired — six albums in eight years, along with EPs, live releases and countless digital one-offs, etc. — the expressionist aspects of their work, the continuing progression of their craft and the memorable impression their songs make all comes together on Nothing as the Ideal in what feels like an act of self-defiance as much as one of self-definition. As recognizable a band as they’ve become, one never knows what shape All Them Witches might take as they move forward. The fact that they’re still so rife with potential six albums into their career can only emphasize how special a band they truly are.

All Them Witches, Nothing as the Ideal (2020)

All Them Witches on Thee Facebooks

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All Them Witches on Instagram

New West Records website

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Here’s the Bio I Wrote for All Them Witches’ Nothing as the Ideal

Posted in Features on August 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Every now and again I get lucky and I do a bio like this, turn it in, and word comes back and it’s all, ‘hey that’s awesome all set on this end thanks here’s some cash.’ This was not one of those cases. I also wrote the bio for All Them Witches‘ 2018 album, ATW (review here), but still, this was a different story to tell and wanted to be told in a different way. The band had things they wanted to say. The label had things they felt needed to be said. And I had a few points as well to get across about Nothing as the Ideal, which is out Sept. 4 on New West Records, whether it was about their making an album as a three-piece for the first time, their ongoing progression, tape-loop experimentation, or the simple fact that they recorded at frickin’ Abbey Road. There’s usually a fair amount to talk about with these guys, but this time around it seems like even more so.

But we got there, which is what matters. In the end, I went through a couple of drafts, interviewed Robby Staebler and Ben McLeod both, then ended up completely scrapping what I had and starting over. That, of course, was the final version. It was my favorite too.

And here it is:

all them witches

All Them Witches – Nothing as the Ideal bio

From the brimming light of the lead guitar on opener “Saturnine & Iron Jaw” to the mellow grunge unfolding in the finale “Rats in Ruin,” Nothing as the Ideal is a signature All Them Witches release, which of course means it sounds like nothing they’ve ever done before.

The Nashville trio thrive on contrast. Now six records deep into a tenure that began in 2012, they are unremittingly forward-looking, and while signature elements can be found throughout Nothing as the Ideal – from guitarist Ben McLeod’s prog-tinged explorations to the slacker-soul vocals of bassist Charles Michael Parks, Jr., to the restless energy and rhythmic nuance in Robby Staebler’s drum patterns – it is also their most experimental work to-date.

But contrast is the key: Tape loops coincide with unplugged minimalism. They recorded it in a strange place with a familiar producer. It’s their heaviest album marked by their broadest atmospheres, intimate and pummeling. It is unquestionably theirs even as it will no doubt engender ownership in anyone who hears it.

Nothing as the Ideal might forever be known as “the album All Them Witches made at Abbey Road.” Fair enough. You don’t record in a legendary studio surrounded by mics The Beatles used, sitting on the bench where John Lennon tracked the acoustic guitar for “A Day in the Life” without acknowledging that history. There’s no getting away from it.

Where Nothings as the Ideal triumphs, however, is in making that space and that history the band’s own. Working with Mikey Allred, who previously produced 2015’s New West label debut, Dying Surfer Meets His Maker, and has done other mixing and mastering along the way, All Them Witches not only did justice to the moment they were capturing – the sheer adventure of being there, doing that thing – but answered the call of their inspiration as they always do.

It wasn’t supposed to be that way. The idea was to take time, do it themselves. But after spending the early part of 2019 constructing a studio in a church outside Nashville where Staebler was living and writing, writing, writing, the band came up against the deadline of a 35-date European arena tour with Ghost and had the single “1×1” to show for it. They put that song out, did a video, and after the tour, redirected their purposes. With the momentum of playing every night behind them, Nothing as the Ideal at last began to take shape.

Abbey Road might not have been the plan, but with the harder deadline of recording dates locked in, All Them Witches were able to focus more clearly. It wasn’t about applying pressure, but about doing what best served the songs. With Allred as the trusted party at the helm, they succeeded in crafting a defining moment for who they are as a band, with each player’s personality coming together to create a fluidity that is unique unto them.

Whatever they’ve done in the past, whatever they’ll do next, Nothing as the Ideal epitomizes the literal and figurative journey All Them Witches have made, and it is to be treasured all the more for that.

All Them Witches, “Lights Out”

All Them Witches, “The Children of Coyote Woman” official video

All Them Witches, “Saturnine & Iron Jaw”

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New West Records website

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Album Review: Dirty Streets, Rough and Tumble

Posted in Reviews on August 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

dirty streets rough and tumble

The thing about Dirty Streets is they’re really, really good. This poses a peculiar kind of challenge when it comes to writing about the Memphis three-piece, because when it comes right down to it, what more do you really need? After some five studio albums, the heavy-blues-soul rockers present Rough and Tumble through Alive Naturalsound with 10 tracks and an unassuming sub-35-minute runtime, live-recorded for Ditty TV in Memphis, shot and recorded straight through as a set. And you know what? It’s really good. They’re a really good band. There you go.

One recalls being taken aback by the clearheaded professionalism of their second record, Movements (review here), in 2011, and the simple truth of the matter is they’ve never wavered from the standard they set there or even on 2009’s debut, Portrait of a Man. Founded by guitarist/vocalist Justin Toland and bassist Thomas Storz with Andrew Denham on drums before they even set about recording that first album — formative, grittier than they’d wind up, but still headed in the direction they went — the band seem to have always known their purpose in terms of writing classic heavy blues and soul songs, and Rough and Tumble highlights not just the chemistry that their maturity has wrought across the last decade-plus, but the effectiveness of the craft that’s driven them all along.

As players, there is not one single member of Dirty Streets — sometimes also The Dirty Streets — who, if you put them in another band, wouldn’t be very likely to be the best player in that band. Denham‘s strutting snare pops on “Take a Walk,” for example. The F-U-N-K funk in Storz‘s bassline on “Think Twice” from 2015’s White Horse (review here), and Toland‘s follow-the-guitar vocal melody at the outset on “Good Pills” from that same record, leading the shuffle and initial kick of energy to get things rolling — each one of them brings something special to what they do. Further, each one makes the band stronger. I won’t deny Toland is a significant presence here and throughout the band’s history — I said as much just the other day — but as Rough and Tumble plays out, it’s not just about him, or just about Storz, or Denham. It’s all three; how they communicate as players and how they convey the material that comprises this utter joy of a set.

Cuts come from as far back as the slide-infused “Itta Benna” off Portrait of a Man, and after “Good Pills,” the trio shift into two covers of ’70s Americana-ish singer-songwriter Joe South in “Tell the Truth” and the more twang-inflected “Walk a Mile in My Shoes,” the hooks of both tracks blending almost seamlessly with those of the original songs that follow as “Itta Benna” leads into “Can’t Go Back” from 2018’s Distractions, the band’s latest studio LP. That particular pairing highlights the point above — while Dirty Streets have certainly grown as a band and the sound of their records bears that out from one into the next, the underlying aesthetic mission has been steady all along. One way or the other, new material or old, originals or covers, Dirty Streets are locked in. That’s really all there is to it. They’ve never operated any other way. At this point, I don’t think they could if they wanted to.

dirty streets

Among their albums, Movements and 2013’s Blades of Grass (review here) — the latter of which was their first for Alive Naturalsound — are unrepresented, and the focus is rightly on Distractions as the most recent outing. “Can’t Go Back” leads into “Think Twice” smoothly, the start-stops of the latter’s verses opening into a fluid and memorable chorus, with Denham moving to the crash to drive a solo section ahead of a final runthrough of the hook later on. Structurally sound, perfectly paced, mellow but heavy, it’s nothing less than Dirty Streets at their best. By this point in the proceedings, the vibe is set and TolandStorz and Denham are absolutely on a roll, which only makes the arrival of “Take a Walk” with its funky wah guitar and push of drums all the more welcome.

Understand, it’s not a flawless performance throughout Rough and Tumble in the sense of a live album that’s been overdubbed and worked on in the studio. But would you really want that? What Rough and Tumble presents instead is Dirty Streets as they are, and frankly, that’s plenty. I’m not sure either they or the record live up to moniker or title — they’re not particularly dirty and the songs are hardly rough — but there’s no question Dirty Streets are in their element performing live like this. It’s worth noting that the two longest tracks on Rough and Tumble are “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” (5:10) and “Itta Benna” (4:11). A cover and a song from their first LP. The rest of what surrounds is on either side of three minutes long.

That includes, tellingly, the closing salvo of “Trying to Remember,” “The Voices” and “On the Way.” The bookends come from Distractions, and “The Voices” from White Horse, but the meatier riff of “Trying to Remember” picks up from “Take a Walk” and carries that energy forward in more winding fashion in a transition to something of a comedown at the end of the set, as “The Voices” and “On the Way” are both acoustic. This was likely done with the video presentation in mind, but it works surprisingly well on the live album too, making it so that there’s not so much a big-rock-finish or blowout at the end, but a more pastoral feel in line with the country-soul they’ve shown elsewhere. Denham moves to a shaker rather than the full kit, and even though none of the final three tracks is over three minutes long, they still manage to make some of the most striking impressions of Rough and Tumble as a whole.

So you see the dilemma. It’s not that one would want to rag on Dirty Streets or offer some non-constructive critique of what they do. Far from it. However, “golly this band is good” doesn’t exactly cut it as hard analysis either. But they are, and what they do continues to defy the notion that stylistic achievement requires high-minded progressive genre blends — nothing against them — or anything more than an organic conversation between players. Dirty Streets have their roots and they know it, but they’re their own band and one can only be thankful for that.

Dirty Streets, “Walk a Mile in My Shoes” (Joe South cover)

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Finding Comfort in Live Music When There Isn’t Any

Posted in Features on August 12th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Bands and festivals have begun to announce 2021 dates and all that, but let’s be realistic: it’s going to be years before live music is what it once was. Especially in the United States, which is the country in the world hardest hit by the ol’ firelung in no small part because of the ineptitude of its federal leadership, an entire economic system of live music — not to mention the venues, promotions and other cultural institutions that support it on all levels — needs to be rebuilt from the ground up. It isn’t going to be just as simple as “social distancing is over and we can all crowd into the bar again.” Maybe not ever.

You’ve likely seen a band do a live stream at this point, even if after the fact, and I have too. Not the same as a real-life gig, duh, but if it helps raise some funds and keeps creative people working on something and gives an act a way to connect with its audience, you can’t call it bad. I’ve found, though, that with the dearth of live music happening and the nil potential that “going to a show” will happen anytime soon, I’ve been listening to more and more live albums.

This, in no small part, is because there are plenty to listen to. Some groups attempting to bring in cash either for themselves or relevant causes have put out live records in the last few months and made use of the downtime that would’ve otherwise been given to actually being on a stage or writing together in a room or whatever it might be. It’s been a way for a band to not just sit on its collective hands and wonder what the future will bring. When so much is out of your own control, you make the most of what you’ve got.

In that spirit, here’s a quick rundown of 10 recent live outings that I’ve been digging. If you’ve found you’re in the need of finding comfort in live music and whatever act you want to see isn’t doing a stream just this second, maybe you can put one of these on, close your eyes, and be affected a bit by the on-stage energy that comes through.

Thanks as always for reading, and thanks to Tim Burke, Vania Yosifova, and Chris Pojama Pearson for adding their suggestions when I asked on social media. Here we go, ordered by date of release:

Arcadian Child, From Far, for the Wild (Live in Linz)

arcadian child from far for the wild

Released Jan. 24.

Granted, this one came out before the real impact of COVID-19 was being felt worldwide, but with the recent announcement of Arcadian Child‘s next studio album coming out this Fall, including From Far, for the Wild (Live in Linz) (discussed here) on this list seems only fair. The Cyprus-based four-piece even went so far as to include a couple new songs in the set that’ll show up on Protopsycho as well this October, so it’s a chance to get a preview of that material as well. Bonus for a bonus. Take the win.

Kadavar, Studio Live Session Vol. 1

kadavar studio live session

Released March 25.

Germany began imposing curfews in six of its states on March 22. At that point, tours were already being canceled, including Kadavar‘s European run after two shows, and the band hit Blue Wall Studio in Berlin for a set that was streamed through Facebook and in no small part helped set the pattern of streams in motion. With shows canceled in Australia/New Zealand and North America as well, Kadavar were hoping to recover some of the momentum they’d lost, and their turning it into a live record is also a part of that, as is their upcoming studio release, The Isolation Tapes.

Øresund Space Collective, Sonic Rock Solstice 2019

Øresund Space Collective Sonic Rock Solstice 2019

Released April 3.

Of course, I’m perfectly willing to grant that Sonic Rock Solstice 2019 (review here) wasn’t something Øresund Space Collective specifically put out because of the pandemic, but hell, it still exists and that enough, as far as I’m concerned. As ever, they proliferate top notch psychedelic improv, and though I’ve never seen them and it seems increasingly likely I won’t at the fest I was supposed to this year, their vitality is always infectious.

Pelican, Live at the Grog Shop

pelican Live at The Grog Shop

Released April 15.

Let’s be frank — if you don’t love Pelican‘s music to a familial degree, it’s not that I think less of you as a person, but I definitely feel bad for you in a way that, if I told you face-to-face, you won’t find almost entirely condescending. The Chicago instrumentalists are high on my list of golly-I-wish-they’d-do-a-livestream, and if you need an argument to support that, this set from Ohio should do the trick nicely. It’s from September 2019, which was just nearly a year ago. If your mind isn’t blown by their chugging progressive riffs, certainly that thought should do the trick.

SEA, Live at ONCE

sea live at once

Released June 19.

Also captured on video, this set from Boston’s SEA finds them supporting 2020’s debut album, Impermanence (review here) and pushing beyond at ONCE Ballroom in their hometown. The band’s blend of post-metallic atmosphere and spacious melody-making comes through as they alternate between lumbering riffs and more subdued ambience, and it makes a fitting complement to the record in underscoring their progressive potential. The sound is raw but I’d want nothing less.

Sumac, St Vitus 09/07/2018

sumac st vitus

Released July 3.

Issued as a benefit to Black Lives Matter Seattle and a host of other causes, among them the Philadelphia Womanist Working Collective, this Sumac set is precisely what it promises in the title — a live show from 2018 at Brooklyn’s famed Saint Vitus Bar. I wasn’t at this show, but it does make me a little wistful to think of that particular venue in the current concert-less climate. Sumac aren’t big on healing when it comes to the raw sonics, but there’s certainly enough spaciousness here to get lost in should you wish to do so.

YOB, Pickathon 2019 – Live From the Galaxy Barn

YOB Pickathon 2019 Live from the Galaxy Barn

Released July 3.

They’ve since taken down the Bandcamp stream, but YOB’s Pickathon 2019 – Live From the Galaxy Barn (review here) was released as a benefit for Navajo Nation COVID-19 relief, and is an hour-long set that paired the restlessness of “The Lie that is Sin” next to the ever-resonant “Marrow.” Of all the live records on this list, this is probably the one that’s brought me the most joy, and it also inspired the most recent episode of The Obelisk Show on Gimme Metal, which jumped headfirst into YOB‘s catalog. More YOB please. Also, if you haven’t seen the videos of Mike Scheidt playing his guitar around the house, you should probably hook into that too.

Dirty Streets, Rough and Tumble

dirty streets rough and tumble

Released July 31.

If you’re not all the way down with the realization that Justin Toland is the man when it comes to heavy soul and blues guitar, Dirty Streets‘ new live record, Rough and Tumble, will set you straight, and it won’t even take that long. With the all-killer bass and drums of Thomas Storz and Andrew Denham behind, Toland reminds of what a true virtuoso player can accomplish when put in a room with a crowd to watch. That’s an important message for any time, let alone right now. These cats always deliver.

Amenra, Mass VI Live

amenra mass vi live

Released Aug. 7

Look, I’m not gonna sit here and pretend I’m the biggest Amenra fan in the world. I’m not. Sometimes I feel like they follow too many of their own rules for their own good, but there’s no question that live they’re well served by the spectacle they create, and their atmospherics are genuinely affecting. And I know that I’m in the minority in my position, so for anyone who digs them hard, they put up this stream-turned-record wherein they play a goodly portion of 2017’s Mass VI, and even as the self-professed not-biggest-fan-in-the-world, I can appreciate their effort and the screamy-scream-crushy-crush/open-spaced ambience that ensues.

Electric Moon, Live at Freak Valley Festival 2019

Electric Moon Live at Freak Valley Festival 2019

Releasing Sept. 4.

Yeah, okay, this one’s not out yet, but sometimes I’m lucky enough to get things early for review and sometimes (on good days) those things happen to be new live records from Germany psychonauts Electric Moon. The Always-Out-There-Sula-Komets are in top form on Live at Freak Valley Festival 2019 as one would have to expect, and they’re streaming a 22-minute version of “777” now that rips so hard it sounds like it’s about to tear a hole into an alternate dimension where shows are still going on so yes please everyone go and listen to it and maybe we’ll get lucky and it’ll really happen. The magic was in you all along.

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Oginalii Post “Spacegoat” Video; Pendulum EP out Oct. 23

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

oginalii

Nashville-based heavy psych/post-rockers Oginalii released their debut album, Cause and Affection in April 2019, following the 2017 EP The Grey and a handful of digital singles that would soon enough appear on the record. On Oct. 23, the four-piece, melodic and contemplative on the full-length, will offer up the new Pendulum EP, which they tout as having a heavier sound. Fairly enough so, for it having been recorded earlier this year during the pandemic lockdown — the PR wire calls it “quarantine season,” and I like that — and if indeed the release pushes Oginalii toward darker and weightier fare, the video for “Scapegoat” finds them maintaining the atmospheric sensibility of Cause and Affection, which certainly had plenty of heft by the time it got to the thud and roll of its nine-minute title-track, while offsetting it with such claustrophobia.

I’ll readily admit to not being familiar with Oginalii before the “Scapegoat” video came through. If I had the chance to hear the album last year, I have no digital paper trail of that contact, but whatever. I’m glad to dig in now, and already in listening to it, I’m looking forward to what Pendulum might bring in terms of overall impact. For now, it’s a cool video and a right-on vibe in the song that’s equal parts troubled and hypnotic, and Oginalii — it’s so hard not to double the ‘l’ instead of the ‘i’ when typing that; the moniker is “my friend” in Cherokee — earning its dark color scheme and deeper, foreboding shadows. I look forward to hearing what a song called “Black Hole” by this band sounds like.

Info from the PR wire follows the clip beow, including an explanatory quote from guitarist/vocalist Emma Hoeflinger.

Please enjoy:

Oginalii, “Scapegoat” official video

The tumult of 2020 fueled the creation of Pendulum, the newest record from Nashville, Tennessee’s Oginalii. Created in part during the quarantine season, Pendulum stands in stark contrast to the band’s well-received debut Cause & Affection. While that album hinted at darker themes and tones, Pendulum swings all the way into the darker and bleaker side of life. Oginalii will release Pendulum on Oct 23 via the esteemed, newly resurrected Devil In The Woods label.

“I began writing the base of the song during a really odd time in my life where a lot of difficult changes and events were happening around me,” says front-woman and songwriter Emma Hoeflinger. “I felt like some of the people closest to me were beginning to fall out of my reach. One of the main themes of this record is the understanding of the way people change around you and thus, you change as well. The women in my family and the women around me were beginning to change, and it scared the hell out of me. I wanted to hold them all as close as I could, but I realized that I was suffocating them as well as myself by trying to control what wasn’t necessarily something bad. If I want to be someone worthy of these people around me I also have to rise, change, and grow with them. That’s where the chorus came from. I kept trying to come up with something clever, and something that had ‘meaning’. However, sometimes you just need to scream and yell out to the people around you and let go. You have to let go instead of getting swallowed up by your own control.”

Pendulum Track List
1 – Veils
2 – Scapegoat
3 – Pendulum
4 – Black Hole
5 – Pillars
6 – Stripped the Screw

Oginalii is:
Emma Hoeflinger (vocals/guitar)
Ryan Quarles (guitar)
Simon Knudtson (drums)
Emma Lambiase (bass)

Oginalii, Cause and Affection (2019)

Oginalii website

Oginalii on Bandcamp

Oginalii on Instagram

Oginalii on Thee Facebooks

Devil in the Woods website

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