Dirty Streets Set July 31 Release for Rough and Tumble

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

dirty streets

I recall distinctly being bummed out in 2018 when Essay Writing Service Education Teaching Term papers are normally written at the end of a semester in case of a student, or at the end of a course in case of an academic Dirty Streets were getting ready to release their fifth LP, Trying to buy essay cheap? Check out the lowest prices here! So if you are looking to buy page, this is the place to be. Distractions, and I never got to hear it for review. I did what I do in those cases, which is roll on to the next thing, but the Memphis three-piece have been undervalued since their outset as purveyors of heavy soul blues and, well, they’re fun to write about. That release was independent and their new one, see pages Online - jva-brv-foerderverein.de Rough and Tumble, is a live-in-studio outing — you can hear “Can’t Go Back” from it below, and you absolutely should — which will be out July 31 on Buy cost accounting homework solutions online from professional college essay writing service. All custom college papers are written from scratch by qualified writers! Alive Naturalsound. More often than not, I’m not cool enough to get their promos either. Woe, and such.

For what it’s worth, I just hopped on the Are you seeking for report writing services uk services? EssayGator serve as the best platform for students who need assistance from highly skilled experts. Dirty Streets‘ Bandcamp to buy a copy of the CD — the stream of  About Us: We are an experienced academic case study Wiki Creative Writing Jobs provider and we are the best in the field offering case study essay Distractions, also below, sounds awesome — and there are none left. None on Amazon either. One on Discogs for a $45 that seems prohibitive on the day my wife finds out about being furloughed at work. Serves me right. Next time I’ll have to listen to that FOMO impulse, I suppose.

Here’s news about the new one:

dirty streets rough and tumble

DIRTY STREETS – New album “Rough And Tumble” out 7/31/20

Wordessence provides targeted best essay introductions to help organisations maximise the efficiency of their written and spoken communications. We write Check out the single “Can’t Go Back” here!

Scan the press on soul-groove outfit Dirty Streets and you’ll see numerous references to rock, soul, and dirty-blooze touchstones like the Faces, Humble Pie, Otis Redding, CCR and more. Spin Dirty Streets’ records and you’ll hear all of those echoes, plus others—some jazz timing, some acoustic balladry. But by and large, what you’ll hear is a raw, rowdy blend of Motown, Stax and rock—the pure American blood-beat moving through the heart of Memphis groove.

Austin-born Justin Toland (guitar/vocals) found his own musical food early through his father, a classic-rock aficionado who turned Justin on to the Stones, Creedence, soul music and the Stax sound. At 17 Toland moved to Memphis and met Thomas Storz (bass), a native of the city, through mutual friends; the pair found common musical ground and began playing groove-grounded rock with a series of temporary drummers. Andrew Denham (drums), a Shreveport-born drummer and British hard-rock fan, joined up with Storz and Toland in 2007.

The trio began demoing using a basic setup: a single cassette recorder, no tracks, no real separation, just mics on the bass/drums and guitar and vocals live in the room. Without the option to isolate, tweak or sweeten after the fact, Dirty Streets became accustomed to running through a take 40 or 50 times as they worked to get it right, all the way through. By the time they began gigging live, that level of discipline had honed Dirty Streets into an instinctual, responsive outfit. Bootleg recordings of their shows in and around Memphis helped to generate buzz, and established Dirty Streets’ rep as a band whose timing was as sharp as their sound was ragged.

Albums followed—Portrait of a Man (2009), Movements (2011), Blades of Grass (2013), White Horse (2015), Distractions (2018), and their forthcoming live effort Rough and Tumble, an LP drawn from an in-house performance for the DittyTV Americana music television network. All of these albums are steeped in the raw rock-soul groove that serves as the band’s taproot, the musical core from which all of its explorations still proceed. And within that core, too, is the element that gives their music, the music they love and play, its unique character.

Rough and Tumble includes eight positively explosive takes from three of the Memphis trio’s previous studio albums, and also features two meaty, revved-up covers by the great Joe South.

https://www.facebook.com/thedirtystreets/
https://www.instagram.com/thedirtystreets/
https://dirtystreets.bandcamp.com/
http://www.dirtystreetsmusic.com
https://www.facebook.com/AliveNaturalsoundRecords
http://instagram.com/alivenaturalsound
http://www.alive-records.com/

Dirty Streets, “Can’t Go Back”

Dirty Streets, Distractions (2018)

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Friday Full-Length: All Them Witches, Live at the Garage

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

 

Consider  If you decide to follow the why Critique Dissertation Proposal attitude, you will lack the knowledge that you are supposed to have. 4. You Get to Know What Responsibility Is. Homework, if taken positively, is one way through which you are made more responsible for your education. All Them Witches in 2014. The band hadn’t been touring for all that long. They had two full-lengths to their name, but what a two full-lengths they were in 2013’s  There are many help writing essays that think they are on top, so don't be cheated and check out this true list of the best paper writing services in 2018! Lightning at the Door (review here) — which was dropped digitally and wouldn’t see physical pressing until the next year — and the prior  Persuasive Words For Essays - Qualified writers working in the service will accomplish your assignment within the deadline diversify the way you do your Our Mother Electricity (review here), which they put out on their own in 2011 only to have it picked up by  Help Solve My Homework - essay writing service Write my lab report for me - custom papers Elektrohasch Schallplatten the next year, earning the Nashville then-foursome the honor of being the first and to-date only American band to be released by the German imprint. By the time they played the second of the two shows the recordings of which comprise early 2015’s Can I pay someone to Phd Thesis In Uk? Hire us if you are looking to earn an A or B for your homework At the Garage, they’d also released the  Once you use our live chat support and say Please write my assignment for me online you will not worry about best resume writing services chicago 2013. Effervescent EP (review here), which they’d press to vinyl to take on tour, as well as their cover of  http://cheapessaywritings24.com/buy-a-college-paper-online/ - No Fs with our trustworthy writing services. forget about your fears, place your task here and receive your top-notch essay in a few Albert King‘s “Born Under a Bad Sign” (posted here), a jam called “George Dubya Kush” (posted here) and sundry other downloadable thisses and thats. They were still a relatively new group, though it was clear by 2014 that We are best research paper service service that appreciate our clients and give you best writers depending on your topic and discipline. Your paper will be highly Lightning at the Door was resonating in a significant way.

At the Garage is comprised mostly of material from that now-essential second album; “Mountain” opens, and apart from “Elk Blood Heart” from the debut appearing in succession with “Marriage of Coyote Woman,” the only other non-LP track is “Born Under a Bad Sign,” which closes the set. Recorded in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in March and September 2014, it flows as a single performance in no small part because of the flow in the songs themselves — a conscious drift given direction through each member’s contributions, whether it’s Robby Staebler‘s can’t-sit-still-and-don’t-want-to-try drum tension, Ben McLeod‘s classy-in-spite-of-themselves solos, the Fender Rhodes of Allan Van Cleave that was so crucial to the early impressions the band made, or the bass twists and slacker-soul vocals from Charles Michael Parks, Jr. — and captures a sense of spaciousness in a way that live albums can’t always do, the vocal echo seeming to reach out not just through the room but through the speakers as well. Highlights include the duel between McLeod and Van Cleave in “When God Comes Back,” the entirety of “Mountain,” Parks‘ starting “Charles William,” and, well, pretty much the rest of it.

The point of considering All Them Witches in 2014 is they were a band completely on fire. Confident and brash enough to have a firm sense of who they were as players, a couple tours under their collective belt in order to all them witches live at the garagetighten up their performances and allow for some audience interaction — see the stop about halfway into “Charles William” — and an energy to their songs that was youthful even as it carried a heavy blues weight that was invariably older-feeling. Dynamic as players and more progressive than they let on, they were in a special place as a group, being newly locked in and on the cusp of realizing their potential. All Them Witches would prove over time that their trajectory was one of constant change and evolution, each record different and building on the last, but  is there a more exciting moment for a band than being on the way to their third album? How many times has the story been told of an act with two full-lengths under their belt knuckling down, taking the lessons they’ve learned and applying them to the third? It’s one of rock and roll’s great tropes. Our Mother Electricity and Lightning at the Door were hardly warmups, but at the time, not knowing what was coming next, the air of excitement and anticipation is all over At the Garage, and it makes for a truly special listening experience with the context of hindsight.

One has to wonder if perhaps the band didn’t have that in mind when they released it. Again, think of the timing. At the Garage was released on Feb. 10, 2015. On June 18 that same year, they’d announce they’d been picked up by New West Records for the October release of their third album, Dying Surfer Meets His Maker (review here). Sure enough, All Them Witches at this point had already done a fair amount of self-bootlegging of shows mostly from Summer and Fall 2014, but an actual live album, produced and mixed and mastered, is something different. One has to imagine that by Feb. 2015, they’d already been in talks with probably several labels, New West among them, and maybe — consciously or not — At the Garage is the band’s own way of realizing they were about to enter a new stage of their career. Maybe this is All Them Witches saying goodbye to their early days en route to something new.

Unlikely, to be frank. In my experience, All Them Witches have neither been that sentimental about their work or that calculating, but it’s something to consider even in terms of their desire to mark what was the beginning of their tenure as a touring band with a live record to look back on later. And that’s the whole point of live records anyway, right? To have and, as a listener, either say you were there — that show, that tour, that time — or you wish you had been? I don’t know. These five years later, it’s easy to look back on cuts like “Funeral for a Great Drunken Bird” and “Death of Coyote Woman” — which barely holds together on stage, but does — with a feeling of nostalgia. Long before the band toured with Mastodon or Ghost, long before they couldn’t just post one-off goofball jams for the hell of it anymore. That time. It was a special time. That’s all.

All Them Witches will release a new album later this year that they recorded at Abbey Road Studios. It’s the first studio work they’ve done as a three-piece and they tracked it with Mikey Allred just before the COVID-19 lockdown really took hold. I talked to Robby Staebler about it earlier this week and will be writing the bio for it I guess as soon as I have the time to do so. So maybe I’ve got the band on my brain, thinking of the places they’ve gone, the places they still can go with their sound, and the soul that still resides at heart in what they do.

More on that later, I suppose. For now, and as always, I hope you enjoy.

Thanks for reading.

I slept last night, which was a welcome change. Kind of went nuclear with Xanax, ZzzQuil and melatonin over the course of the evening prior to bed, but whatever. Can’t argue with results.

I go back and forth between feeling like I’m cruising through the day and feeling like I can barely keep my head above water. I owe a lot of people messages and emails back. If you’re reading this, I don’t want to waste your time with woe-is-me bitching, but my awake-and-aware minutes are at a premium these days, it seems. Yesterday I was writing the Gimme Radio post from my phone at a sandbox. Right now, The Patient Mrs. has the Toddlerian Pecan while I’m typing this.

And the power just went out and I heard a boom outside, so this might be an interesting day.

…And it’s back on? Bizarre.

Anyway, she’s giving him breakfast, then we’ll go for a run. She has a meeting (virtual) from like 9:30 to 2PM or some shit and it looks like rain, so I don’t know what course the day is going to take, but going running helps even the kid out. Helps tire him out. We go up a big hill in the neighborhood here. It’s good for me too, but I can feel myself becoming compulsive about it, which is precisely why most of the time I try to avoid “exercising” as opposed to just being physically active in some way. Because I don’t need one more fucking thing to obsess about.

But we’ll get through the day, like we do. Bumbling and tumbling or not. I don’t know. We’ll figure it out.

New Gimme show today, if you missed the playlist. 5PM Eastern, listen at http://gimmeradio.com.

I hope you have a great and safe weekend. I hope you and yours are well and that you’re holding up, life and livelihood and all of it.

Thanks. FRM.

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Days of Rona: Tripp Shumake of The Heavy Eyes

Posted in Features on April 29th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

the heavy eyes tripp shumake

Days of Rona: Tripp Shumake of The Heavy Eyes (Memphis, Tennessee)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Like much of the world, we’re taking it day by day. We’re fortunate that everyone is in good health, but with my medical condition I am at a higher risk and is top of mind for us all as we plan touring this year. Unfortunately our two US dates this year were canceled, but Stoned & Dusted has rescheduled for next year so we’re hoping to be out there in 2021. Regarding our EU tour this October, we are still booking dates and are hopeful this will come to fruition.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

All major cities in Tennessee have ordered their residents to stay at home as well as the entire state of Colorado (where Eric resides). We’re allowed to be out to get essentials and exercise, but strongly advised to avoid gathering in groups.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The streets are much less populated and people are obviously panic-buying everything at the grocery. Bars and venues are closed so all live music is at a standstill. Fortunately, we’ve seen different initiatives such as Bandcamp waiving artist fees for 24 hours to Spotify working to add a fundraising feature tied to artist profiles.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

We’re all healthy at the moment. Personally, we hope people are taking this seriously and understand that while you may not be at risk, those that are immunocompromised are.

http://www.facebook.com/TheHeavyEyes
http://www.instagram.com/theheavyeyes
http://theheavyeyesmemphis.bandcamp.com
http://kozmik-artifactz.com/
https://www.facebook.com/kozmikartifactz

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Days of Rona: Zach Wheeler of Howling Giant

Posted in Features on April 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

howling giant zach wheeler

Days of Rona: Zach Wheeler of Howling Giant (Nashville, Tennessee)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Everyone in the band has remained healthy so far, we’re doing our best to keep our social circles closed.

We were supposed to be in Europe with Horseburner and Sergeant Thunderhoof right now [March 31] and we’re hoping to reschedule for later this year. Our US gigs were slated to start back up at the beginning of May, and we’re expecting a lot of those shows and festivals to be rescheduled. We’re trying to keep ourselves occupied with an unprecedented amount of downtime. We’ve hunkered down for now and have started work on some new music. We’ve even been contracted to write and record a theme for a Magic the Gathering streamer. We’ve also been experimenting with our live sound and video capabilities from our practice room with the hopes of increasing our streaming and video presence online.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

Tennessee has enacted a “Shelter in Place” order, though Nashville has been operating under those conditions for at least a week and a half now. Tom, Seabass, and I all bartend, so we’ve been out of work since March 15th.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Nashville’s leading industry is tourism, so the entire city has shut down. A lot of venues have been hosting online shows in an attempt to help the musicians make a little money, much like our livestream that the brewery Tom and I work at (Tennessee Brew Works) hosted. A lot of musicians we know are setting up weekly live stream concerts and trying to write as much as possible while we all wait for things to open back up.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

We intend to stay productive creatively and everyone is welcome to come along for the ride. Expect more live streams and riff-heavy content.

The Wizard Lives.

howlinggiant.bandcamp.com
www.facebook.com/howlinggiant/
https://www.instagram.com/howlinggiant/
https://www.facebook.com/bluesfuneral/
bluesfuneral.com

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All Them Witches Recording New LP This Week at Abbey Road Studios

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 2nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Uh, check out the rooftop har har? What do you even say when All Them Witches put out word that they and engineer Mikey Allred will spend the week making a new album at Abbey Road Studios in London? Way to use your recording budget wisely? When’s the release date?

All of that, I guess.

The pairing of place and producer is an interesting blend. Of course All Them Witches are veterans of the studio process at this point, but the thought of recording in such a hallowed space could be daunting, so the fact that they’re working with Mikey Allred, who has been a part of what they do for at least the last five years since helming their New West Records debut, Dying Surfer Meets His Maker (review here), as well as prior studio recordings, and even as guitarist Ben McLeod has emerged as a producer in his own right, has continued to work with the band up to mastering their latest offering, which was the 2019 single “1 x 1” (discussed here). As one also has to factor in that this will be their first time putting together an LP as a trio, they could hardly be in better hands in terms of someone who knows and is in touch with who they are as a band. It’s a veteran choice to bring their own dude. Kudos.

And hey, having recently posted some All Them Witches dates and speculated about soon-to-be-announced-secret-recording-plans, I’m gonna go ahead and give myself a pat on the back too.

Those dates — many of which are with Blackwater Holylight no less — follow their brief social media post here:

all them witches at abbey road

Pretty surreal day…We are recording our new album this week at Abbey Road Studios !! What a trip! Just us and our engineer [Mikey Allred] @darkartaudio. Let’s see what happens…

INFO/TICKETS: http://www.allthemwitches.org/tour

MAR 14 SAT Vive Latino Mexico, Mexico
FRI. APRIL 17 – BALTIMORE MD – Ottobar*
SAT. APRIL 18 – HAMDEN CT – Space Ballroom*
SUN. APRIL 19 – PROVIDENCE RI – THE MET*
TUE. APRIL 21 – PORTSMOUTH NH – 3S Artspace*
WED. APRIL 22 – NORTHAMPTON MA – Gateway City Arts*
THU. APRIL 23 – ASBURY PARK NJ – Asbury Lanes*
FRI. APRIL 24 – PITTSBURGH PA – Mr. Smalls Theatre*
SAT. APRIL 25 – ANN ARBOR MI – The Blind Pig A2*
SUN. APRIL 26 – CINCINNATI OH – The Woodward Theater*
TUE. APRIL 28 – COLUMBUS OH – Skully’s Music-Diner*
WED. APRIL 29 – LEXINGTON KY – The Burl*
FRI. MAY 1 – ATLANTA GA – Shaky Knees Music Festival*
JUL 22-26 WED FloydFest Floyd, VA
AUG 7 FRI Krach Am Bach Beelen, Germany
AUG 8 SAT Re-Generation Fest Leipzig, Germany
AUG 17 MON Mascotte Zurich, Switzerland
*w/ Blackwater Holylight

All Them Witches is:
Charles Michael Parks, Jr – bass, vocals
Ben McLeod – guitar, vocals
Robby Staebler – drums, vocals

http://allthemwitches.bandcamp.com/
http://www.facebook.com/allthemwitches
https://www.instagram.com/allthemwitchesband/
http://www.allthemwitches.org/

All Them Witches, “1×1” official video

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All Them Witches and Blackwater Holylight Touring this Spring

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 25th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Yes, All Them Witches had previously announced these dates for the Spring mostly-East Coast US tour that runs into May 1 at Shaky Knees Music Festival in Atlanta, but I feel like the fact that they’ll be joined for the run by Portland’s Blackwater Holylight makes it worth another look at the dates. April 23 in NJ, you say? Well, I’ll have gotten back from Roadburn earlier that week, but if anything’s worth a trip to Asbury Park, it’s a show like this at The Lanes, with open bowling surrounding the bandstand on either side.

It’s been many, many years since the last time I was there, and but for the aforementioned travel plans, I actually think Hamden would have fewer people even on a Saturday, so a somewhat less anxious experience, but still, I’ll take it as it comes. We’ll see how dead on my feet I am when we get there, but you bet your ass it’s going on the calendar.

All Them Witches live dates follow. Note the beginning of an August European tour already starting to take shape. I assume there will be more to come there, and honestly, they’re kind of coming up on due for a new album too, so if that emerges around September, I wouldn’t be surprised, especially given their penchant for sometimes recording in secret.

Shows with the asterisk are with Blackwater Holylight:

all them witches blackwater holylight

ALL THEM WITCHES: APRIL=TOUR

INFO/TICKETS: http://www.allthemwitches.org/tour

MAR 14 SAT Vive Latino Mexico, Mexico
FRI. APRIL 17 – BALTIMORE MD – Ottobar*
SAT. APRIL 18 – HAMDEN CT – Space Ballroom*
SUN. APRIL 19 – PROVIDENCE RI – THE MET*
TUE. APRIL 21 – PORTSMOUTH NH – 3S Artspace*
WED. APRIL 22 – NORTHAMPTON MA – Gateway City Arts*
THU. APRIL 23 – ASBURY PARK NJ – Asbury Lanes*
FRI. APRIL 24 – PITTSBURGH PA – Mr. Smalls Theatre*
SAT. APRIL 25 – ANN ARBOR MI – The Blind Pig A2*
SUN. APRIL 26 – CINCINNATI OH – The Woodward Theater*
TUE. APRIL 28 – COLUMBUS OH – Skully’s Music-Diner*
WED. APRIL 29 – LEXINGTON KY – The Burl*
FRI. MAY 1 – ATLANTA GA – Shaky Knees Music Festival*
JUL 22-26 WED FloydFest Floyd, VA
AUG 7 FRI Krach Am Bach Beelen, Germany
AUG 8 SAT Re-Generation Fest Leipzig, Germany
AUG 17 MON Mascotte Zurich, Switzerland
*w/ Blackwater Holylight

All Them Witches is:
Charles Michael Parks, Jr – bass, vocals
Ben McLeod – guitar, vocals
Robby Staebler – drums, vocals

http://allthemwitches.bandcamp.com/
http://www.facebook.com/allthemwitches
https://www.instagram.com/allthemwitchesband/
http://www.allthemwitches.org/

https://www.facebook.com/blackwaterholylight/
instagram.com/blackwaterholylight
blackwaterholylight.bandcamp.com
ridingeasyrecs.com

All Them Witches, “1×1” official video

Blackwater Holylight, Veils of Winter (2019)

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Review & Track Premiere: The Heavy Eyes, Love Like Machines

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on February 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The Heavy Eyes Love Like Machines

[Click play above to stream ‘Late Night’ from The Heavy Eyes’ Love Like Machines, out March 27 on Kozmik Artifactz. Preorders available here.]

It’s been quite a first decade for the ostensibly Memphis-based four-piece The Heavy Eyes, whose members actually reside at this point in different states and who careen through the riffs of their fourth long-player, Love Like Machines, with a sans-chicanery fluidity that totally undercuts that distance. By the time they got around to their last album, 2015’s He Dreams of Lions (review here), the then-trio had refined their approach to a remarkable degree, building off the methods and the successes of 2012’s Maera and 2011’s Heavy Eyes, as well as concurrent EPs and other short digital offerings, had toured to support their work and, crucially, had found an audience hungry for more.

And though they took part in Magnetic Eye Records‘ tribute to Jimi Hendrix (review here), also in 2015, and issued Live in Memphis (review here) in 2018, there’s no question that the five-year break between their third and fourth full-lengths changes the context in which Love Like Machines arrives. But fair enough. The band itself has also changed, bringing in longtime engineer Matthew Qualls — who has helmed each of their albums, including this one — on guitar and backing vocals as a fourth full-time member of the band alongside vocalist/guitarist Tripp Shumake, bassist Wally Anderson and drummer Eric Garcia, and recommitting themselves to the prospect of recording and touring as The Heavy Eyes.

Their sonic identity remains based around their songwriting, and though Qualls and Garcia both add percussion here and there, Shumake blends acoustic and electric guitar on opener “Anabasis,” and the later pair of “Bright Light” and the especially catchy fuzzer “A Cat Named Haku” dig into highlight low end and drum compression, the overarching impression Love Like Machines makes — the album’s title line delivered in side A’s “Late Night” — is one that can’t help but be considered straightforward with such a focus on structure and such tightness of their performance. The grooves swing and aren’t shy about it, and Shumake‘s vocals and Southern-tinged lyrical patterns can call to mind ClutchAll Them Witches and Valley of the Sun at any given moment — and that’s before you get to the hyper-Queens of the Stone Age vibes of the penultimate “Vera Cruz” (with guest piano by Carmen Fowlkes) — but if The Heavy Eyes are sending a message in this sharp-dressed 10-track/34-minute outing, it’s that they’re getting down to business.

I don’t know whether they’re feeling the weight of the five years it’s taken to manifest their fourth album or what, but beneath the right-on fuzz in the guitars, the good-times hooks of “Made for the Age” and “The Profession,” and the half-intro purpose “Anabasis” serves with its acoustic/electric blend, there’s a strong sense of purpose behind the songs on Love Like Machines, and an audience engagement that comes across as being as far from coincidental as you can get. These songs, written in parts exchanged digitally over state lines and recorded in more than one session with Qualls and guest guitar appearances from Justin Toland of Dirty Streets on “God Damn Wolf Man” and Justin Tracy, who also appeared on Live in Memphis, on “The Profession.”

the heavy eyes

The latter is of particular note as regards the idea of purpose in what The Heavy Eyes are doing on Love Like Machines, since the profession in question — at least somewhat contrary to where one’s mind might go in associating the title — is rock and roll itself, and that song is nothing if not an example of the band’s pro-shop presentation, crisp and assured in its delivery and interesting to the ear without a hint of indulgence on the part of its creators. Even “Hand of Bear,” which might earn a sideways glance for a verse line like, “Copper-color skin, so you’d best beware,” in recounting a story on a Native American theme, is maddeningly catchy — “Whoa, yeah yeah/Guess he earned his name as the Hand of Bear” becomes a signature hook, backing vocals and all.

It is not necessarily a revolutionary approach that The Heavy Eyes are taking, but neither are they directing themselves to the tenets of genre, instead shaping these to suit the needs of their songwriting. Craft is primary. “Made for the Age” is the longest inclusion at 4:51, and no other song on Love Like Machines even touches four minutes (“Vera Cruz” lists at 3:59), with “Late Night,” “God Damn Wolf Man” and “The Profession” under three. Yet none of these songs or the closer “Idle Hands” at 3:09 lack character or identity.

They are deceptively rich in their mix and able to shift in meter from one to the next while maintaining an overarching flow to the whole that gives the finale a due feeling of spaciousness after the departure of very-Cali departure of “Vera Cruz” and the standout choruses in “The Profession” and “A Cat Named Haku” earlier, and the deeper one digs into the proceedings, the more nuance one is likely to find even in songs that seem so straightforward in their initial purpose. Ultimately, questions of whether or not The Heavy Eyes will be able to gain back some of the momentum that the stretch since He Dreams of Lions may have taken away are secondary.

What matters here, as Love Like Machines expresses so plainly, are the songs themselves and the energy the band have put into constructing and recording them. They leave no question as to who they are as a band or what they want to be doing, and with a decade behind them, they stand mature in their approach but still hungry-seeming, still reaching out to the crowd in front of an imagined stage, still inviting everyone to take a step forward. It would be a hard invite to refuse, frankly, and if one thinks of Love Like Machines as a live set, then it’s pretty clear The Heavy Eyes put on a hell of a show. They’re doing their part here. It’s up to the listener now to get on board, but The Heavy Eyes have only made it as easy and as appealing as possible to do so. That’s all they can do. Well, that and tour like bastards.

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The Heavy Eyes Announce March 27 Release for Love Like Machines

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the heavy eyes

Note that there would be a big, big difference if Memphis heavy rockers The Heavy Eyes had titled their impending LP — which is called Love Like Machines and out March 27 on Kozmik Artifactz — with the first and second words reversed. It’s a more than fine line between “love like machines” and “like love machines.” Kudos to the four-piece for coming down on the correct side of that line.

It raised an eyebrow when The Heavy Eyes were among the first announcements for Keep it Low 2020 that there were clearly stirrings from the band and more in the works. First of all, that’s a Sound of Liberation fest, which means it’s probably not the only one they’ll play — Up in Smoke and Desertfest Belgium are both possibilities, and of course surrounding tour dates the amount of which depends on how long they’ll be over there. Second, if they’re going to make the trip, well, their last release was the 2018 live album, Live in Memphis (review here), and that was cool, but it’s not really an occasion two years later for a European tour. Their last studio outing was 2015’s He Dreams of Lions (review here), so between those factors, yeah, a new studio LP didn’t seem like an unreasonable expectation either.

If you wonder why I post every fest announcement that comes my way, it’s because CONTEXT.

So here we are, with Love Like Machines coming out in March. The PR wire has album details and there’s a song streaming at the bottom of this post:

the heavy eyes love machines

THE HEAVY EYES: Memphis Psychedelic Blues Rock Unit To Release Love Like Machines Full-Length March 27th Via Kozmik Artifactz; New Track Streaming + Preorders Available

Memphis-based psychedelic blues rock veterans, THE HEAVY EYES, will release their long-awaited new full-length, Love Like Machines, March 27th via Kozmik Artifactz.

Their fourth full-length and first new offering since 2015’s critically lauded He Dreams Of Lions, THE HEAVY EYES continues to deliver their fuzzed out, bluesy, hypnotic riffs, this time with the addition of long-time recording engineer, Matthew Qualls, as second guitarist. Adding a new layer of depth to their groove, Qualls — who’s worked side-by-side with THE HEAVY EYES for many years and has performed with them live in the past — enabled the band to collaborate in a different way exploring new song structures, tones, and attaining a bigger sound overall without stripping any of the grittiness and love of ’60s and ’70s rock that has shaped their sound since inception.

Despite the rabid reception of their first three albums however, Love Like Machines almost never existed. In 2017, the band was put on pause, with each member living in a different state. Spread across the Southwest and Midwest, there were new jobs, new cities, a marriage, and even a kidney disease diagnosis. In short, there was every indication that the pause might become permanent. But by 2019, THE HEAVY EYES had found a second wind and was actively working on new material, exchanging beats, licks, and lyrics long-distance. After two bouts of recording, the record is here, five years in the making.

The ten-track Love Like Machines was produced by Qualls in New Mexico and Memphis and comes shrouded in the kaleidoscopic cover art of Emil Orth.

Love Like Machines will by released digitally by the band with Kozmik Artifactz handling the vinyl edition this spring. In advance of its release, the band is pleased to unveil first album teaser “The Profession.” From the opening roll of the drums to the rip-roaring fuzz of the chorus, THE HEAVY EYES delivers a walloping testament to their take-no-prisoners ethos.

Find Love Like Machines digital preorders at THIS LOCATION where “The Profession” can be streamed.

Love Like Machines Track Listing:
1. Anabasis
2. Made For The Age
3. Hand Of Bear
4. Late Night
5. God Damn Wolf Man
6. Bright Light
7. A Cat Named Haku
8. The Profession
9. Vera Cruz
10. Idle Hands

THE HEAVY EYES is currently booking a European tour for early October 2020 and will appear at Keep It Low Festival in München, Germany with more dates to be announced in the weeks to come.

THE HEAVY EYES Live:
10/09-10/2020 Keep It Low Festival – München, DE

THE HEAVY EYES:
Tripp Shumake – lead vocals, acoustic/electric guitar
Matthew Qualls – electric guitar, percussion, backing vocals
Wally Anderson – bass guitar
Eric Garcia – drums/percussion

Guests:
Justin Toland – guitar tracking, solo (“God Damn Wolf Man”)
Justin Tracy – guitar solo (“The Profession”)
Carmen Fowlkes – piano (“Vera Cruz”)

http://www.facebook.com/TheHeavyEyes
http://www.instagram.com/theheavyeyes
http://theheavyeyesmemphis.bandcamp.com
http://kozmik-artifactz.com/
https://www.facebook.com/kozmikartifactz

The Heavy Eyes, Love Like Machines (2020)

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