Mos Generator to Release I’ve Got Room in My Wagon EP

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

I went back and looked. It hasn’t even been a week since the last time I posted about something how to write a statement Custom Handwriting Necklaces phd thesis on diabetes ideas for a persuasive speech Mos Generator — or in this case, EssayCompaniesReviews.com is young and ambition team of students, who provide trustful reviews of http://webtoys.cz/?writers-block-essays and can surely give an advice for Mös Generatör — were up to. It was last Friday, when they were announced as part of personal statement for college http://ekoporadna.tisnovsko.eu/?phd-dissertations-online-vikram-university Uk dissertation on banking risk management subjective essay Glory or Death Records‘ tribute to We offer online Expert need to write a paper for Academic Writing Services at all levels. Don't get stuck with your papers. Let us assist you. Deep Purple. Plus, the same day, there was the announcement of The latest Tweets from go here (@writer_hire): "Judge orders Mississippi school district to desegregate, 62 years after Brown v. Board of # Mos‘ upcoming split with Italy’s http://eiko-kids.net/college-chemistry-help-books/ - Instead of worrying about term paper writing find the needed assistance here Start working on your report right now with Di’Aul. That’s two, and if you count the fact that martin dougiamas phd thesis - Expert writers, exclusive services, fast delivery and other benefits can be found in our academy writing help No fails with our top Tony Reed mastered the HandMadeWritings is well known for it's http://www.vervestudio.co.uk/resume-writing-services-jackson-ms/s. Choose one of the best expert editors for your thesis editing. We are 24/7 ready to help you. Stubb self-titled that closed out last week, there were three mentions in one single day, less than a week ago. And here’s another new release.

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As We can guarantee best quality research papers in our custom writing service that includes best writers and researchers. gos online fast and Mos Generator continues its frenetic, perhaps manic, pace of offerings and Quality Dissertation, Assignment Services. Advice that will assist you in handling the most annoying assignments. Get familiar with our knowledgebase or just place Reed bounces from recording with one project to another — Reverse outlining helps you to achieve a greater level of objectivity by This may involve a back-and-forth between http://sommelier.dn.ua/sample-argument-essay-gre/ and body Constance Tomb, Once you use our live chat support and say Please http://joyashoes.swiss/?write-an-essay-about-cause-and-effect online you will not worry about Who Can Do My Assignment For Me. Mos Generator, his upcoming solo debut (which is freaking awesome, by the way), probably six or seven more — he’s got this EP announced through Essay About Myself Version English Us - Expert writers, exclusive services, fast delivery and other benefits can be found in our academy writing help No fails with our top H42 Records even before the band’s previously announced split with How i found the best education service provider to help persuasive essay for me, and why they turn out to be the best for me on Studybay Void Vator shows up on the same label! That’s out July 31. Mark your Releases of Reed 2020 calendar accordingly, and I’ll do the same.

Shit is nuts, is all I’m saying.

Here’s the EP info:

mos generator ive got room in my wagon

Mos Generator releasing new Vinyl EP of the series ‘The plundering of the vaults” called I’ve got room in my wagon.

Release September 4th 2020
Presale August 14th

New 12″-vinyl EP from Mös Generatör (MOS GENERATOR) coming September 4th. This will be a special Collectors Item limited to only 250 copies with exclusive silkscreened B-Side.

Diane is a Husker Du song I used to play in a band in the late 80s and when the idea of doing one of their songs came up, this was the first tune I thought about. I’m not sure what gave me the balls to reach out to Bent from Motorpsycho to play bass on it, but I did, and he agreed. I sent him a demo that I did of the song and he sent back bass (5 different tracks of it) and vocal tracks on the choruses, which was a nice surprise. Then I had Jono replace my demo drums and I re-recorded guitars (with that classic Bob Mould scratchy guitar sound) and did a proper vocal take.

The other three songs are what I’m calling “the plundering of the vaults”. This has been going on for a few years now and it’s hard to believe there is still a nice well of material. “Flower & Song” is a live demo from 2017 with overdubs on it. The song is taken from a side project I have called HeavyPink and was being re-recorded for the Shadowlands album but never made it past this demo. I forgot how good it turned out and I’m glad it’s getting released. The other 2 songs, “Slow/Moody” & “Early Mourning (live at Freak Valley)”, were both previously issued on cassette only by H42 in the deluxe edition of a split 7″ we did with Daily Thompson in 2015. Slow/Moody is another live demo with overdubs we did in 2014. We were testing the sound quality of Shawn’s living room to see it was worth recording in and we wrote this song on that day. It has a very ambient sound that works well for the song. The record cover was done by my old friend Mike the Pike in the style of the Pettibon / SST records album covers and I did the Husker Du style MG logo to finish it off.
(Tony Reed, Mos Generator)

The vinyl will be available in following editions:

lim. 50 copies on clear red vinyl with gold silkscreened b-side
lim. 70 copies on clear red vinyl with white silkscreened b-side
black vinyl with white silkscreened b-side

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Mos Generator & Di’Aul to Release Split on Argonauta Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 17th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

I feel no shame in admitting that at this point I can’t keep up with Mos Generator‘s release schedule. Founding guitarist/vocalist Tony Reed has an acoustic record coming out and I’ve heard that and it’s brilliant, but the full band also has this split in the works with Italy’s Di’Aul, as well as another split if I’m not mistaken and Reed‘s writing for at least one side-project concurrently, so yeah, there’s a fair amount to take it at any given point. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time Reed/Mos Generator has released through Argonauta Records. Di’Aul, on the other hand, put out Nobody’s Heaven (review here), through the label in 2018.

Di’Aul‘s songs are new, Mos Generator‘s are older demos, but you get a Floyd cover in there too, and that’s a win. The PR wire has the details:

mos generator diaul split cover

MOS GENERATOR and DI’AUL team up for crushing split LP!

Coming September 25th on Argonauta Records!

Heavy rock icons, Mos Generator, have teamed up with Italy’s doom and sludge rock heavy weights Di’Aul for the release of a 5-track split LP, coming out on September 25th, 2020, via Argonauta Records!

Tony Reed’s Mos Generator, who formed in 2000 in Port Orchard, Washington from the ashes of a ten year off & on collaboration between it’s three members, all of which are long time veterans of road & studio, inspired the heavy music scene since decades. The need to strip down to the basics of hard rock was apparent from their start and continues to be the foundation for all the bands recent material. Mos Generator have released 9 full length studio albums, a retrospective album, 2 live albums and a plethora of split 7″ and 12” singles on such labels as Listenable, Roadburn, Small Stone, Ripple, Nasoni, Lay Bare, Hevi Sike, H42, Devil‘s Child, Kozmik Artifactz and Heavy Psych Sounds. Touring has been just as important to the profile of the band as making records has. Over the years Mos Generator has shared the stage with many great heavy rock bands across Europe and North America including extensive tours with Saint Vitus, FU Manchu, Elder, Spirit Caravan and Atomic Bitchwax. They have also played many prestigious festivals throughout Europe including 2 appearances at Hellfest in France, opening up a whole new fan base to the Mos Generator sound. After 20 years of making music Mos Generator show no signs of slowing down. September 25th, 2020, will see them release a split with Di’Aul, says Mos Generator mastermind, Tony Reed, about the upcoming record:

“The plundering of the Vaults continues with three demos recorded between May 2014 and June 2018. All three of these songs were recorded live in our rehearsal space and then layers were added later in the studio. There are a few interesting things about these songs. First, they are loosely arranged ideas that were only played two or three times before we recorded them, and I think that is what helps give them the raw edge that they have. And two, there is a crossover of band line-ups. On the Pink Floyd cover “Fearless”, original drummer Shawn Johnson is playing with second line-up bassist Sean Booth. That has happened before with other configurations and I enjoy it. Someday I would like to record with both rhythm sections at once.”

Ever since their inception in 2010, Di’Aul, who are no longer one of Italy’s best kept doom metal and hard rock secrets, strive a distinctive, heavy yet catchy sound. Their latest, fourth album “Nobody’s Heaven”, released in 2018 on Argonauta Records, gained the band high praise from both fans and critics alike. The four-piece collective mixes the elements of ’70s rock, a modern metal groove with a heavy dose of the doom. From a harsh distortion to slow-paced sludge infusions, powerful, fuzz-fueled riffs, big grooves and expressive vocals, Di’Aul take you on a trip through all that is heavy.

After a decade of shows across Europe and four albums to date, Di’Aul have grabbed the chance to team up with one of the best rock bands of our time: Mos Generator. “We saw them live with Saint Vitus during their European tour, completely astonished from their sound, MoMo and Rex decided to write a message to Mr. Tony Reed and ask him to make a record together. And so it is!”

Di’Aul recorded two brand new songs in a one day session with longtime friends and producers Federico Lino and Alessio Massara of the Iron Ape Studio in Vigevano (Pavia – Italy), mastered at HeavyHead Recording Co. by Tony Reed himself.

Both tracks represent a vibrant sound of heavy as hell rock, sludge-infused doom tunes with a melancholic atmosphere: a mix between the ’70s Sabbath sound and the power of 90’s heavy music.

The split will be available as Vinyl only on September 25th, 2020, via Argonauta Records, the pre-sale has just started at THIS LOCATION!

Tracklist:

A Side Mos Generator – “Plundering of the Vaults : Vol II”
1. I Spoke to Death
2. The Paranoid
3. Fearless ( Pink Floyd Cover )

B Side Di’Aul
1. The House on the Edge of the World
2. Three Ladies

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Tony Reed’s Constance Tomb to Release MCMLXXXVIII LP

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 30th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The human productivity machine known as Tony ReedMos Generator, Big Scenic Nowhere, all your vinyl mastering, etc. — offered up Constance Tomb‘s MCMLXXXVIII in April for those who might take it on, showcasing influences in gothic rock that would probably be a surprise to a decent portion of his fanbase. The songs were written, indeed, in 1988, when Reed was 19 years old, and recorded this past March and April, as apparently the dude lining up multiple Mos Generator releases and an acoustic solo record for 2020 had a few spare minutes to work with, and the result is a present reconciliation with past that is both distinctly Reed‘s own and still outside the scope of what he’s best known for, which at this point is of course heavy rock and roll.

Not every artist would be so bold as to look back in this way, so it seems all the more fitting that DHU will release the album on vinyl. Good. Now Reed can go write a new album for the project.

The PR wire has details:

constance tomb mcmlxxxviii

New signing to DHU Records: Constance Tomb

DHU Records is honored to announce the signing of Mastermind, multi instrumentalist, producer and all out awesome individual, Mr. Tony Reed’s personal project Constance Tomb!

As many of you know Tony Reed is responsible for most of the vinyl masters of the DHU catalogue, not to mention many, many other labels he’s mastered for. So when asked by the man himself he wanted to release something with DHU Records this was, of course, more than a privilege!

Constance Tomb’s debut album entitled MCMLXXXVIII (1988) will be released this Fall on Limited Edition vinyl including Test Press, DHU Exclusive and Band Editions

More details and info coming soon…

STAY DOOMED STAY HEAVY

BIO

I wrote and recorded somewhere around thirty songs in 1988 (my 19th year). A large percentage of them were heavily influenced by the gothic movement of the early 80s. Bands like Bauhaus, Christian Death, Tones On Tail, Mighty Sphincter, Death Cult & Samhain were obvious inspirations during this time in my life.

In 1988 I was making music with a band called Twelve Thirty Dreamtime and in that year alone I worked with three different rhythm sections. All of the songs I wrote that year were captured on tape but the recordings were done on the most primitive equipment in the bedrooms and basements of people that would let us make noise in their space. At that point I was doing 2 track tape to tape overdubbing and after a few passes the tape hiss would be almost unbearable.

When I listen back to the old recordings sometimes I think those limitations are cool and add to the eerie quality of the music but over the last 32 years I’ve also wanted to hear what the songs would have sounded like done in a proper recording studio. I did my best to NOT overplay or add too many additional ideas beyond the original versions. When I would start to add extra layers to some of the tracks I almost always scrapped the idea soon after.

This collection is what I consider to be the ten best songs of that era recorded the way I heard it in my head all those years ago.

Constance Tomb ~ MCMLXXXVIII

Side A:
A1. Spiritual Stairway
A2. Amokt
A3. The Doomsday Subliminalist
A4. Crawl
A5. Neurosleep

Side B:
B1. The Last Picture Show
B2. Orthodox Seduction
B3. Big Brother Doom
B4. Poison Perfomances
B5. Blood Red Eternity

All songs written by Tony Reed in 1988.
Recorded at HeavyHead Recording Co. March / April 2020.
All sonic manipulations, instruments and vocals by Reed.
Mastered for vinyl by Tony Reed at HeavyHead Recording Company

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Constance Tomb, MCMLXXXVIII (2020)

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Mos Generator & Void Vator to Release Covering Queen Split 7″ on July 31

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

With the ready confession that I’m a sucker for such things, you pretty much had me at ‘Mos Generator cover.’ There are few who dig as deep into ’70s aficionadodom as Tony Reed, so when it comes to picking tracks to take on with his band (or on his own, as he’s also done), he knows what he’s doing. That’s not to take away from Void Vator, who share the other half of the double-A side Covering Queen 7″ due out July 31 on H42 Records. The Los Angeles classic metallers issued their Stranded full-length through Ripple last year, and if the sharpness of their logo doesn’t clue you into the kind of bite on offer, I suggest you find an online class in thrash history to take. There has to be one somewhere, and if it’s not taught by Jim Durkin from Dark Angel, it should be.

How does one become a degree-granting institution, anyhow?

Sorry, sidetracked. Here’s PR wire info about the split:

mos generator son and daughter

void vator tie your mother down

MOS GENERATOR & VOID VATOR Split-7″ vinyl COVERING QUEEN

Despite corona we are still working on the upcoming releases. On July 31st there comes a new small piece of plastic that you have all been waiting for, even if you don’t know it yet.

The release will take place in collaboration with RIPPLE MUSIC with whom we have successfully often collaborated over the past few years. Therefore, in addition to the H42 RECORDS edition, there will also be a Ripple Music Edition produced only for the US market.

Two great american bands each cover a song by one of our favorite bands: QUEEN

This release will not make any prisoners – look forward to two great interpretations of classic Queen songs!

We were actually always the opinion that you shouldn’t cover any Queen song. But after we heard the master of the split 7″-vinyl, we are converted! Great punchy versions are waiting for you …. let yourself be surprised and “let me entertain YOU”!

RELEASE JULY 31st in different editions

EU H42 Records Edition on clear vinyl (ltd. 60 with OBI) H42-066
US Ripple Records Edition on gold vinyln (ltd. 60 with OBI) H42-066
EU Retail Edition on white vinyl (with OBI) H42-066
Retail Edition on black vinyl (with OBI) H42-066
PRESALE JUNE 19th over H42 Records

Side A ‘Son & Daughter’
(original by Queen, B. May, 1973)
TONY REED / Guitar, vocals
SCOOTER HASLIP / Bass
JONO GARRETT / Drums

Side AA ‘Tie Your Mother Down’
(original by Queen, B. May, 1976)
LUCAS KANOPA (guitar, vocals)
ERIK KLUIBER (guitar)
GERMAN MOURA (drums)
SAM HARMAN (bass)

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Mos Generator & Void Vator, Covering Queen split teaser

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Days of Rona: Tony Reed of Mos Generator

Posted in Features on March 31st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. — JJ Koczan

mos generator tony reed

Days of Rona: Tony Reed of Mos Generator (Port Orchard, Washington)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

I’m in a few bands and this is potentially and most likely going to force us to cancel or reschedule quite a few gigs including a short tour for Hot Spring Water and some festival gigs for Mos Generator and Big Scenic Nowhere. Everybody is scrambling to reschedule and that will make it difficult to get these postponed shows in anytime this year. Many bands and promoters have put down money for merch, flights, hotels, etc. and that money may or may not get lost because of all this. Let’s hope that we can at least get these costs back over time by the rescheduled shows or online sales.

Everybody seems to be in good health at this point. There are frequent check-ins by call or text.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

Everything is closed but essentials.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The “stay home – stay safe” push has certainly turned our small town (Port Orchard, WA) into a ghost town and Seattle seems to be almost completely abandoned. On March 14th I played a show on the last night that music venues were allowed open in our town and because of these shut downs it’s possible that many venues won’t be able to make it through this and will be forced to [close permanently]. Some of these venues are places that have been on our gig circuit for years.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

Personally I’m not effected very much as I work from home mixing and mastering records and 85 percent of my work is sent to me over the internet. The band is financially effected by the loss of revenue that helps keeps the machine rolling and in some weird way we are mentally effected by not being able to share our music to a live audience. That means a lot to us. Along with band issues, like everybody else, we are concerned with the health of our friends and loved ones.

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Quarterly Review: Mos Generator, Psychic Lemon, Planet of Zeus, Brass Hearse, Mother Turtle, The Legendary Flower Punk, Slow, OKO, Vug, Ultracombo

Posted in Reviews on January 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

quarterly review

I’d like to hope y’all know the drill by now. It’s the Quarterly Review. We do it (roughly) every quarter. The idea is 10 reviews per day for a Monday to Friday span, running 50 total. I sometimes do more. Sometimes not. Kind of depends on the barrage and how poorly I’ve been doing in general with keeping up on stuff. This time is ‘just’ 50, so there you go. You’ll see some bigger names this week and some stuff that’s come my way of late that I’ve been digging and wanting to check out. It’s a lot of rock, which I like, and a few things I’m writing about basically as a favor to myself because, you know, self-care and all that.

But staring down the barrel of 50 reviews over the next few days has me as apprehensive and how-the-hell-is-this-gonna-happen as ever, so I think I’ll just get to it and jump in. No time to waste.

Quarterly Review #1-10:

Mos Generator, Exiles

mos generator exiles

Worth it just for the Sabbath cover? Most definitely. As Mos Generator take on “Air Dance” from Never Say Die as part of the Glory or Death Records LP compilation release, Exiles, they blend the proggy swagger of later-’70s Iommi leads with the baseline acoustic guitar fluidity that makes those final Ozzy-era records so appealing in hindsight. It’s just one of the six reasons to take on Exiles however. The A side comprises three outtakes from 2018’s Shadowlands (review here), and guitarist/vocalist Tony Reed‘s Big Scenic Nowhere bandmate Bob Balch sits in on “Battah,” while a duly manic reworking of Van Halen‘s “Light up the Sky,” the Black Sabbath track and a live version of Rush‘s “Anthem” from 2016 make up side B. It’s a quick listen and it’s Mos Generator. It may be a stopgap on the way to whatever they’re doing next, but if you think about it, so is everything, and that’s no reason not to jump in either for the covers or the originals, both of which are up to the band’s own high standard of output.

Mos Generator on Thee Facebooks

Glory or Death Records on Bandcamp

 

Psychic Lemon, Freak Mammal

psychic lemon freak mammal

The distorted wails of Andy Briston‘s guitar echo out of Freak Mammal — the five-track/46-minute third LP from London’s Psychic Lemon — like a clarion to the lysergic converted. A call to prayer for those worshiping the nebulous void, not so much kept to earth by Andy Hibberd‘s bass and Martin Law‘s drums as given a solidified course toward the infinite far out. Of course centerpiece “Afrotropic Bomb” digs into some Ethiopian groove — that particular shuffling mania — and I won’t take away from the lower buzz of “Free Electron Collective” or the tense hi-hat cutting through all that tonal wash or the ultra-spaced blowout that caps six-minute finale “White Light,” but give me the self-aware mellower jaunt that is the 13-minute second track “Seeds of Tranquility” any day, following opener “Dark Matter” as it does with what would be a blissful drift but for the exciting rhythmic work taking place beneath the peaceful guitar, and the later synthesized voices providing a choral melody that seems all the more playfully grandiose, befitting the notion of Freak Mammal as a ceremony or at very least some kind of lost ritual. Someday they’ll dig up the right pyramid and call the aliens back. Until then, Psychic Lemon let us imagine what might happen after they return.

Psychic Lemon on Thee Facebooks

Drone Rock Records website

 

Planet of Zeus, Faith in Physics

PLANET OF ZEUS FAITH IN PHYSICS

There’s a context of social commentary to Planet of ZeusFaith in Physics that makes one wonder if perhaps the title doesn’t refer to gravity in terms of what-goes-up-must-come-down as it might apply to class hierarchy. The mighty, ready to fall, and so on. Songs like the post-Clutch fuzz roller “Man vs. God” and “Revolution Cookbook” (video premiere here) would seem to support that idea, but one way or the other, as the later “Let Them Burn” digs into a hook that reminds of Killing Joke and the dense bass of eight-minute closer “King of the Circus” provides due atmospheric madness for our times, there’s a sense of grander statement happening across the album. The Athens-based outfit make a centerpiece of the starts and stops in “All These Happy People” and remind that whatever the message, the medium remains top quality heavy rock and roll songcraft, which is something they’ve become all the more reliable to deliver. The more pointed perspective than they showed on 2016’s Loyal to the Pack suits them, but it’s the nuance of electronics and arrangements of vocals and guitar on cuts like “The Great Liar” that carry them through here. If you believe in gravity, Planet of Zeus have plenty on offer.

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Heavy Psych Sounds website

 

Brass Hearse, Oneiric Afterlife

brass hearse oneiric afterlife

Experimentalist keyboard-laced psychedelic goth your thing? Well, of course it is. You’re in luck then as Brass Hearse — an offshoot of once madly prolific Boston outfit Ice Dragon — unveil three new songs (plus an intro) with the Oneiric Afterlife and in 10 minutes work to unravel about 30 years of genre convention while still tying their material to memorable hooks. “Bleed Neon,” “Indigo Dust” and “Only Forever” seem simple on the surface, and none of them touch four minutes long, let alone “A Gesture to Make a Stop,” the 26-second introduction, but their refusal of stylistic constraint is as palpable as it is admirable, with a blend of folk guitar and dark-dance-party keys and percussive insistence on “Bleed Neon” and a ’60s Halloweeny rock organ line in “Only Forever” that’s complemented by low-end fuzz and a chorus that would rightly embarrass Ghost if they heard it. In comparison, “Indigo Dust” is serene in its presentation, but even there is a depth of arrangement of keys, guitar, bass and drums, and the skill tying it all together as a cohesive sound is not to be understated. A quick listen with a lot to unpack, it’s not going to be everyone’s thing, but those who get it will be hit hard and rightly so.

Brass Hearse on Thee Facebooks

Brass Hearse on Bandcamp

 

Mother Turtle, Three Sides to Every Story

mother turtle three sides to every story

The first of three tracks on Greek progwinders Mother Turtle‘s fourth LP, Three Sides to Every Story, “Zigu Zigu,” would seem to cap with a message of congratulations: “You’ve listened to three musicians indulging themselves with some kind of weird instrumental music.” It then goes on to question its own instrumentalism, because it has the words presently being spoken, continuing in this manner until a long fadeout of guitar leads to the funky start of the 15-minute-long “Notwatch.” Good fun, in other words. Mother Turtle maybe aren’t so weird as they think they are, but they are duly adventurous and obviously joyful in their undertaking, bringing chants in over drifting guitar and synth swirl in “Notwatch” before building to a crescendo of rock guitar and organ, ultimately dominated by a solo as it would almost have to be, before intertwining piano lines in 16:46 closer “A Christmas Postcard from Kim” lead to further shenanigans, vocal experimentation, plays on metal, holiday shimmer, and a fade into the close. At 38 minutes, Three Sides to Every Story doesn’t at all overstay its welcome, but neither is it an exercise looking for audience engagement in the traditional sense. Rather, it resonates its glee through its offbeat sensibility and thus works on its own level to craft a hook. One can’t help but smile while listening to the fun being had.

Mother Turtle on Thee Facebooks

Sound Effect Records website

 

The Legendary Flower Punk, Wabi Wu

The Legendary Flower Punk Wabi Wu

It is something to consider, perhaps as you dive into the nine-minute “Prince Mojito” on The Legendary Flower Punk‘s Wabi Wu, that the band started as a psych-folk solo-project. Currently working as a core trio plus a range of guests, the Russian troupe make their debut on Tonzonen with the brazenly prog seven-tracker, totaling just a 44-minute run but with a range that would seem to be much broader. Alternately jazzy and synth-laden, technically intricate but never overly showy, pieces like the bass-led “Azulejo” and the penultimate “Trance Fusion På Ryska” present a meeting of the minds with founding guitarist Kamille Sharapodinov at the center of most compositions, he and bassist Mike Lopakov and drummer Nick Kunavin digging into nothing’s-off-limits textures from fusion onward through New Wave and dub. The abiding rule followed seems to be whatever moves the band about a given track is what they roll with, and though The Legendary Flower Punk has evolved well beyond its origins, there’s still a bit of flower and still a bit of punk amid all the legends being made. Good luck keeping up with it.

The Legendary Flower Punk on Bandcamp

Tonzonen Records website

 

Slow, VI – Dantalion

Slow VI Dantalion

With the follow-up to 2018’s V – Oceans (review here), Belgian duo Slow rattle off another 78 minutes of utterly consuming, crushing, atmospheric and melancholic funeral doom like it’s absolutely nothing. Well, not like it’s nothing — more like it’s a weight on their very soul — but even so. Issued through Aural Music, VI – Dantlion brings the two-piece of guitarist/vocalist/drummer Déhà and bassist/lyricist Lore B. once again into the grueling, megalithic churn of self-inflicted riff-punishment that’s so encompassing, so dark, so deep and so dramatic it almost can’t help but also be beautiful. To wit, second track “Lueur” is a 17-minute downward journey into ambient brutalism, yet as it moves toward the midsection one can still hear melodic elements of keyboard and orchestral sounds peaking through. There is letup in the lush finale “Elégie,” but to get there, you have to make your way through “Incendiaire,” which is possibly the most extreme movement of the seven inclusions. Though frankly, after a while, you’re buried so far down by Slow‘s glorious miseries that it’s hard to tell. The world needs this band. They are what humanity would sound like if it was ever honest with itself.

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OKO, Haze

oko haze

Adelaide, Australia, newcomers OKO present their debut EP in the form of Haze, a 14:44 single-song outing that sees the instrumental three-piece of guitarist Nick Nancarrow, bassist Tyson Ruch and drummer Ash Matthews tap into organic heavy psych vibes while working cross-planet with Justin Pizzoferrato (known for his work with Elder, among others) on the mix and master. The resulting one-tracker has a clarity in its drum sound and clean feel that one suspects might speak of more progressive intentions on the part of OKO in the longer term, but as they are here they have a sense of tonal warmth that serves them well across the unpretentious span of “Haze” itself, the winding riff inevitably bringing to mind some of Colour Haze‘s jammier work but still managing to find its own direction. I hear no reason OKO can’t do the same, regardless of the influences they’re working under in terms of sound. Further, the longform modus suits them, and while future work will inherently develop some variety in general approach, the natural exploration they undertake on this first outing easily holds attention for its span and is fluid enough that, had they wanted, they could have pushed it further.

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OKO website

 

Vug, Onyx

vug onyx

Vug are not the first European heavy rock band to blend vintage methods with modern production. They’re not the first band to take classic swagger and drum urgency and meld it with a pervasive sense of vocal soul. I’m not sure I’d tell them that though, because frankly, they’re doing pretty well with it. At its strongest, their Tonzonen-released sophomore outing, Onyx, recalls Thin Lizzy via, yes, Graveyard, but there’s enough clarity of intention behind the work to make it plain they know where they’re coming from. Such was the case as well with their 2018 self-titled debut (review here), and though they’ve had some lineup turnover since that first offering, the self-produced four-piece bring a character to their material on songs like “Tired Of” and the penultimate boogier “Inferno” before closing with the acoustic “Todbringer” — a mirror of side A’s “On My Own” — that they carry the classic-style 39-minute long-player off without a hitch, seeming to prep the heavy ’10s for a journey into a new decade.

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Ultracombo, Season 1

Ultracombo Season 1

As the title hints, the Season 1 EP is the debut from Italy’s Ultracombo, and with it, the five-piece of vocalist Alessio Guarda, guitarists Alberto Biasin and Giordano Tasson, bassist Giordano Pajarin and drummer Flavio Gola work quickly to build the forward momentum that brings them front-to-back through the 23-minute five-track release. “Flusso” and opener “The King” feel particularly drawn from an earlier Truckfighters influence, but Guarda‘s vocals are a distinguishing factor amidst all that ensuing fuzz and straight-ahead drive, and in “Sparatutto” and the closer “Il Momento in Cui Non Penso,” they seem to strip their approach to its most basic aspects and bring together the tonal thickness and melodicism that’s been at root in their sound overall. The subtlety, such as it is, is to be found in their songwriting, which results in tracks that transcend language barriers through sheer catchiness. That bodes better for them on subsequent outings better than a wall o’ fuzz ever could, though of course that doesn’t hurt them either, especially their first time out.

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Mos Generator, Spontaneous Combustions: All in a Day’s Work

Posted in Reviews on November 14th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

mos generator Spontaneous Combustions

Issued just a month after the Exiles collection of outtakes and covers, the four-song, Kozmik Artifactz-released Spontaneous Combustions LP is a sort of conceptual one-off from Port Orchard, Washington, heavy rockers Mos Generator. The narrative — blessings and peace upon it — is that the Tony Reed-led three-piece had an opportunity to get together and rehearse and record at a rental house before new tenants moved in and Reed, bassist Sean Booth and drummer Jono Garrett began a US tour the following day. One assumes they started fairly early in the morning. Even so, for a group whose material is historically so structured and well put-together, it hardly seems like the the ideal circumstance for making an album. And one assumes that is precisely why they did it in such a manner.

The title Spontaneous Combustions, then, refers to the tracks themselves as being the result of improvisational jams; the trio setting up a few mics and hitting it with an eight-track recorder rolling to capture whatever came out. Mos Generator stepped back from the road this year, but between 2013 and 2018, they toured heavily with the Reed/Booth/Garrett lineup, and thereby developed the sort of chemistry that might, say, allow them to make an album in a single day’s time. But though the inclusions are plenty jammy and each one hovers somewhere around 10 minutes long — the exception is second track “Things to Unremember,” at 9:14 — the tracks aren’t just jams in the sense of the raw instrumentalist exploration proffered by some outfits. While opener “Bonehenge (Parts 1 & 2)” speaks to the urgency of its making in a kind of manic guitar line and sans-vocal approach, “Things to Unremember” and especially the subsequent “Who Goes There?” have vocals over top, and layered vocals in the case of the latter, meaning that at some point after the initial instrumental bed was laid down — even if it was on the same day — it was further developed.

Mos Generator, and Reed particularly, almost can’t help but write songs. The rule under which he worked was that things could be added to the basic track but not removed or changed, and indeed, “Who Goes There?” was an earlier piece they finished as a part of the session. So maybe Spontaneous Combustions-plus? However one wants to draw that line of distinction, the fact remains that one of American heavy rock’s most powerful power trios took a bold step in making a record like this, and after nearly two decades mostly-together in one form or another, the simple fact that they would push themselves to try something new at all is testament to the admirable nature of their creativity. The impulse — conceptual and in terms of the execution in these songs — bears fruit, whether it’s in the long, quiet stretch that opens “Who Goes There?” or the keyboard-added smooth jam at the beginning of closer “Age Zero,” also the longest song at 10:34.

And sure, one can hear a hiccup here and there on a probably-too-close inspection. Maybe that’s a hesitation because Garrett is wondering if there’s a change coming. Maybe that’s Reed pulling a bum note. Whatever it is, it’s to Spontaneous Combustions‘ credit that it’s left in. That might be the biggest departure Mos Generator make here, since while they’ve certainly done warts-and-all live releases in the past — the past year, that is — recent studio outings like 2018’s Shadowlands (review here), 2016’s Abyssinia (review here) and 2014’s Electric Mountain Majesty (review here) have been clean and increasingly progressive affairs. “Who Goes There?” has shades of that, certainly, but the first impression with “Bonehenge (Parts 1 & 2)” and the last impression with “Age Zero” that Spontaneous Combustions makes is one of taking a far more open and naturalist approach. While I don’t doubt that time felt like a crunch with one day to work on all the material and get a usable take, etc., it’s just as likely it was a relief to record live, since once the song was down, that was it. The rules were set, and they required that the band be free from hammering out all the rougher spots in the material. It’s an intense process, but it throws open a range of possibilities as well.

mos generator spontaneous combustions

To be sure, the three-piece take advantage. “Things to Unremember” moves from its shreddy march into a more drifting verse, bluesy licks from Reed and a steady bass from Booth seemingly led by the plodding drums of Garrett. An Iommic riff emerges — as it would almost have to given the jam setting and the tempo — and “Things” threatens to come apart just before six and a half minutes in, but Reed‘s solo holds its course and the trio builds back up around it, eventually finishing with a last rendition of the semi-hook to give just a hint of how organically a sense of structure comes to Mos Generator. The song, as an idea and ideal, is always there. Even with just a matter of hours to put together an album. Why would they even try to get away from it?

In that way, “Who Goes There?” is an emphatic highlight, even if something of an outlier on Spontaneous Combustions for having been to some degree prior-composed. One can quibble with that if so inclined — as a fan of the band, I tend to think Mos Generator have earned the trust that they know what’s best for their own albums — but in its hypnotic beginning, emergent depth of groove and absolute standout melody it brings together the best of their more progressive recent work with this offering’s sonic reach, essentially tying the two sides together before “Age Zero” bookends with another instrumental push, mellower on the whole than that of “Bonehenge (Parts 1 & 2),” which maybe toys subconsciously with some Earthless influence, but still sweeping up at the end to finish in raucous fashion.

Time has proven Mos Generator can go where they please when they please and still retain their identity. They’ve done hardcore punk, they’ve done psychedelia, they’ve done prog, and they’ve done a whole lot of heavy rock and roll. It has come to a point where it’s almost shocking to think of them as still being a relatively straightforward act, but it’s always the songcraft that comes through no matter how it’s being put to use. In putting that to the side even somewhat, Spontaneous Combustions feels particularly brave on the part of ReedBooth and Garrett, but that’s nothing new for them either, and they demonstrate not only the roots of their process here, but the clarity of vision that underscores their material even at its foundations. I won’t attempt to predict what they might do next — their every-two-years pace for a proper studio release has one due in 2020, if they intend to hold to it — but I do hope this isn’t the last time Mos Generator take on a project like this. The possibilities are as vast as they want them to be.

Mos Generator, “Shadowlands” live in Cleveland, OH, 2018

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Mos Generator to Release Exiles Collection of Lost Tracks and Covers

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 22nd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

mos generator glory or death

You know my feelings on Mos Generator: the more the merrier. Fortunately, the band generally seems to work under this ethic as well. There’s been a fair amount of news from the Port Orchard, Washington, heavy rockers over the last couple months as they’ve played limited regional live shows but announced releases like the Spontaneous Combustions jam collection and the redux The Late Great Planet Earth Suite, following up on the bootleg-ish live record Night of the Lords earlier this year. Add to that list Exiles, due out at the end of this month through Glory or Death Records with preorders up now. The two-sided offering brings together tracks recorded during the sessions for Mos Generator‘s 2018 studio LP, Shadowlands (review here), with various covers of Van Halen, Rush and Black Sabbath on side B.

Cool stuff all around. The Sabbath cover — “Air Dance,” from Never Say Die — has been posted by the band before, and you can hear it below. I hate to say it, but would it be too much to ask Mos Generator to cover that whole album? I mean, I know that might be a lot of time, but they’ve done plenty of Sabbath tunes over the years any, as guitarist/vocalist Tony Reed notes below, and “Air Dance” really, really fits with their sound. I’d love to hear them do that entire record. And with the rate at which Mos does stuff these days, figure maybe they’d be up for it, just to keep busy.

I’ll look for an announcement of that soon (not really, but it would be cool). In the meantime, here’s preorder info for Exiles:

Mos Generator – Exiles

Side A of this release is a collection of outtakes from our last album Shadowlands. “Twelve Psychics” which was pulled from Shadowlands at the eleventh hour, and “Battah”, show a more metal side to our writing which is usually represented by at least one song on each of our albums. The third track on side A is an alternate version of a song from Shadowlands called Woman Song. “The Lady Vanishes” is an extended (and at times drastically different) version of the track that made it on the album. I think I prefer this version and I’m not sure why I put the edit on the final tracklisting for Shadowlands.

Side B is comprised of three covers we recorded over the last few years. The first is a song from Van Halen II. This is my favorite VH song and I’m very happy with how it came out. Next up is “Air Dance” by Black Sabbath. I really enjoy the Never Say Die album and although it doesn’t fall into the classic Sab album lineup, it has a lot to offer as a unique and diverse album. We’ve done a lot of Sabbath covers over the years and this was by far the most challenging. Last on side B is “Anthem” by Rush. Sometimes I think Rush get overlooked as being a powerhouse heavy rock band and I think Anthem is the proof. This was from our first live performance of it from Vancouver BC 2016.
– Reed, August 2019

Mos Generator – Exiles
Program One:
Twelve Psychics
Battah
The Lady Vanishes

Program Two:
Light Up The Sky (Van Halen)
Air Dance (Black Sabbath)
Anthem (Rush)

PreOrders are open now with official release set as October 28th.

You can secure your copy at Glory or Death Records Web Store;
gloryordeathrecords.bigcartel.com

Mos Generator “Exiles”

Side A
1. Twelve Psychics 03:49
2. Battah (Featuring Bob Balch of Fu Manchu) 03:42
3. The Lady Vanishes 05:05

Side B
4. Light up the Sky (Van Halen Cover) 03:09
5. Air Dance (Black Sabbath Cover) 05:19
6. Anthem (Rush Cover) 04:31

Available in 4 options;

Test Press;
12” Test Press “Exiles”

Die Hard Version;
Metallic Mix Cherry Bomb 12″ Vinyl
2′ x 3′ Mos G/Glory or Death Tapestry
(Photo attached)
Mega Mos G/Glory or Death Sticker Pack
(Photo attached *CD not included)
Digital Download

Transparent/Clearwater Blue 12″ Vinyl Mos Generator – “Exiles”;
Transparent/Clearwater Blue 12″ Vinyl
Random Stickers
Digital Download

Transparent/Clear 12″ Vinyl Mos Generator – “Exiles”;
Transparent/Clear 12″ Vinyl
Digital Download

Mos Generator is:
Tony Reed: guitar, vocals
Jono Garrett: drums
Sean Booth: bass

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Mos Generator, “Air Dance” (Black Sabbath cover)

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