Curse the Son Premiere “Novembre” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

curse the son novembre video

By now the narrative of 2020 being a crap year — period — should be well familiar. If you want to know just how deep that extends, consider a record like  The Schatz Group offers professional Dissertation Sur Le Role Du Romancier to individuals, businesses, nonprofit associations, law firms, marketing and public Curse the Son‘s  There are enough my link around the web. If you are wondering why you should choose our website to assist you in studying - click here! Excruciation (review here). It came out through  http://www.alvey.cz/?breath-eyes-memory-essay - No Fs with our top writing services. Get to know basic advice as to how to receive the greatest essay ever If you are striving to Ripple Music in June and is unquestionably the broadest ranging and most accomplished outing of the Connecticut-based band’s tenure, building on 2016’s  college writing services Philadelphia, Pennsylvania source. order report on marketing for money. Isolator (review here) while marking the second appearance of bassist  iWriter is the http://joyashoes.swiss/?algebra-homework-help-online I have come across for all my website content and article writing needs. Here is my iWriter review and video. Brendan Keefe alongside founding guitarist/vocalist  Are you seeking best Writing A Hypothesis For A Research Proposal in the UK, so that you can write a custom coursework solution to submit to your college or university? We Ron Vanacore, who this time acted as a writing partner and whose experience following a motorcycle accident and subsequent recovery formed much of the thematic basis for the album as a whole. As one might expect, it is not easy listening.

“Novembre” might be the best song  Julia Christianson Custom Essay Writing Service Review. You have a project that you want to bring to fruition. My goal is to help you achieve your goals in an Curse the Son have ever written. You’re not going to hear me say a bad word about really anything they’ve done along the way, from the earlier straight-up tone-and-riff-rolls of their first two records through this latest one — unless it’s a bad word like, “shit, this is pretty cool” — but the development of the melody in “Novembre” is just another league, as is the scope of its production.  I Need Help With My English Courseworks: Over 180,000 Helping Others Essays, Helping Others Term Papers, Helping Others Research Paper, Book Reports. 184 990 ESSAYS, term Keefe Need to this link? Do you find it difficult to write an essay for college? What about a research paper or a term paper? Why do you choose Vanacore and drummer  I Dissertation Length Philosophys - Online Term Paper Writing Service - We Provide Quality Essay Papers You Can Rely On Cheap Homework Writing Assistance - Get Help Robert Ives (making his first appearance) deep-dive into turmoil and a grueling, harrowing mindset, conveying sonic and emotional weight in kind in a way that  essay writing service au Who Can I Pay To Write My Research Papers access phd thesis british library english masters thesis proposal Curse the Son have hinted toward but never manifest to the degree they do in this one song.

Newsflash: doom band is miserable? Yeah, maybe there’s some of that happening here, but that’s not the end of the story by a longshot. If you missed  see here - Allow the professionals to do your essays for you. Use this company to receive your valid custom writing delivered on time Stop Excruciation either due to the pandemic or you were out protesting or you were fretting about the state of democracy worldwide, consider yourself invited to stream it at the bottom of this post. The video for “Novembre” is mostly atmospheric images — as opposed to band performance, that is — but it certainly gets the point across in terms of vibe. See the empty hallway above if you’re not sure what I’m talking about.

Enjoy:

Curse the Son, “Novembre” official video premiere

From the album ‘Excruciation’
Ripple Music (2020)
Available at http://cursetheson.com
Directed By: Ron Vanacore

Footage from:
‘The Horrors of Pennhurst Asylum’
‘Psychiatric Hospitals & Asylums in 1950’s’
‘Amazing Nature Scenery, Suns and Sunsets’

CURSE THE SON are:
Ron Vanacore – Guitars & Vocals
Brendan Keefe – Bass & Vocals
Robert Ives – Drums

Curse the Son, Excruciation (2020)

Curse the Son on Thee Facebooks

Curse the Son on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music website

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Curse the Son Post “Suicide by Drummer” Video; Excruciation out Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

curse the son

Connecticut’s Help With Assignments online from professional term paper writing service. All custom term papers are written from scratch by qualified writers! Curse the Son released their new album, 1984 Research Paper: Polished Paper is a trusted provider of Essay editing services online. Our essay editors & proofreader provide 24/7 service. Excruciation (review here), through Not confident that you are able to handle all those stages on your own? Then consider using our online http://www.brumovice.cz/?cdc-pays-dessay service Ripple Music, and their posting of the video below for opening track “Suicide by Drummer” at the end of the week is a bit of late promotional push that the record well earns. In a time where so much struggle is focused on outward factors, sociopolitical or otherwise, Excruciation focuses on inner and personal experience, drawing the listener into a tumult and turmoil that is at times exemplified by the riffs that seem to roll out of the speakers one after the other.

I could go on about the record, how it blows the roof off what Curse the Son have done before, the writing collaboration between guitarist/vocalist/founder Ron Vanacore and bassist/vocalist Brendan Keefe bringing new complexity and melodic reach in collaboration with producer Eric Lichter (who also participated instrumentally and on vocals), drummer Robert Ives, and guest vocalist/guitarist Joetown (who takes lead in both regards on CD bonus closer “Phoenix Rising”). I could, but hell, I already reviewed the album, and you can hear the whole thing for yourself with the Bandcamp stream at the bottom of this post, so don’t let me spoil it. Suffice it to say that Excruciation stands among 2020’s most welcome arrivals. See you at list time, boys.

Enjoy the video below, followed by more from the PR wire and that album stream:

Curse the Son, “Suicide by Drummer” official video

From the album ‘Excruciation’
Ripple Music
Release date: June 12, 2020

Vinyl, CD and Digital Download available at:
http://cursetheson.com
http://ripplemusic.com

Produced and Edited by : Todd Rawiszer
Live footage : Steve Wytas & Brandon J. Rashan

New Haven’s doom rock warriors CURSE THE SON unleash a second video taken from their dark and genre-defying fourth album ‘Excruciation’, available Friday 12th June on Ripple Music.

Marking their great return, their 2020 full-length ‘Excruciation’ was recorded at Dirt Floor studios in August 2019, produced by Eric Lichter.

CURSE THE SON are:
Ron Vanacore – Guitars & Vocals
Brendan Keefe – Bass & Vocals
Robert Ives – Drums

Curse the Son, Excruciation (2020)

Curse the Son on Thee Facebooks

Curse the Son on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music website

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Album Review: Curse the Son, Excruciation

Posted in Reviews on June 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Curse The Son Excruciation

Curse the Son records do not happen every day, and for those who have or those who haven’t followed the trajectory of the Connecticut-based outfit over the years as founding guitarist/vocalist Ron Vanacore has seen lineups come and go and years pass at an ever-increasing pace, their catalog only really tells part of the tell of everything they’ve been through. That’s especially the case with Excruciation, which is the band’s second offering through Ripple Music behind 2016’s Isolator (review here), and fourth overall, with their prior two long-players being 2012’s Psychache (review here) and 2011’s Klonopain (review here).

If you notice there a decreasing rate of releases, from one year between the first two records to four between each the second and the third and the third and the fourth, lineup shifts account for part of it. Vanacore brought in bassist Brendan Keefe on Isolator and Keefe returns on the nine-song/49-minute Excruciation with an even deeper level of contribution to the songwriting — even going so far as to take on vocal and guitar duties apart from those already fulfilled by Vanacore in addition to handling the low end.

Songs like “Novembre,” the twang-inflected blues blowout that is the penultimate “Devil Doctor Blues,” and the call and response that emerges in the standout chorus of “Worry Garden” would seem to be examples of the greater level of musical conversation particularly between the two players, and many of Excruciation‘s overarching themes — almost universally based around various turmoils and distraught/despairing feelings; it’s by no means a “happy” record on its face (or lack of a face, if you’re looking at the cover art) — are reportedly derived from Keefe‘s experience being involved in and eventually recovering from the trauma of a motorcycle accident in late-2018. Though the album ends on a hopeful note with the classic metal-tinged wailing vocals of and uptempo groove of “Phoenix Risin’,” the message of going through hell to get to that point isn’t at all lost on the listener. Tough times meeting with heavy riffs; this is the stuff upon which doom is made, and Curse the Son are well in their element in this sphere.

At the same time, as they also welcome drummer Robert Ives for his first studio appearance with them, Curse the Son also use the increased amount of collaboration as a means to expand the parameters of their sound. Rest assured, the foundation of Excruciation is still in the depth of tone and the manner in which the riffs lead the way through the songs, but the key difference between this album and what the three-piece brought to their earlier outings is that the balance between “riff” and “song” has changed, and it’s the former serving the latter to a greater degree than they’ve ever put to record before.

Their melodies, especially on vocals, are richer, their progressions are more varied, and there’s more atmosphere throughout Excruciation that ties the material together in exciting and dynamic ways. Vanacore and Curse the Son have never had a problem busting out memorable hooks — IsolatorPsychache and Klonopain were full of them — and so is this album. The uptempo circa-’75 Sabbathian jumper that is opener “Suicide by Drummer” makes its presence felt first with a key change in the vocals in the first verse and thereby signals the greater range through which the band will work across the record that follows.

curse the son

Ives brings suitable swing there and adds to the downward-moving march of the subsequent “Disaster in Denial,” the later harmonies of which payoff a potential Curse the Son seemed to tease on Isolator as the first effort with Keefe backing Vanacore on vocals, but there’s no question Curse the Son are a stronger band for what the bassist(-plus) brings to the proceedings throughout these tracks. Playing off Vanacore‘s familiar rolling riffs and echoing verses, a song like the sprawling “Novembre” touches ground that wouldn’t have even seemed possible for Curse the Son four years ago, hitting on notions of layering and melody-construction that are surprising and thrilling in like measure.

And though “Novembre” arguably pushes farthest in that regard, it’s by means the only instance. “Worry Garden”‘s backing vocals, the grunge-style brooding of the title-track, the pure Alice in Chains-style showing in “Infinite Regression” and the kick-into-payoff of “Black Box Warning” — all of this and more feeds into the notion of Curse the Son as a more dynamic and aesthetically broad unit than they’ve ever been.

The big irony of Excruciation, then, is that as much misery as it’s conveying, the record itself is a complete victory. Even as it rounds out with “Devil Doctor Blues,” drawing to mind some of Geezer‘s earlier slide work, and “Phoenix Risin'” showing off a fist-up-heavy-metal vocal soar that’s a kind of who-knew-they-had-it-in-’em? moment in itself — those verse lines get a little repetitive, but hell’s bell’s, repetition is the point — Excruciation sees Curse the Son pursuing new avenues of expression, and though by modern standards, the album is on the longer end of a single LP at 49 minutes, the songwriting around which it’s based and the riffs from which these songs take their shape more than justify the journey the listener undertakes from front end to back, emotionally grueling as that might be at times.

Tracked over a period of months beginning in August 2019 and culminating in a mix completed in January 2020, Excruciation is the second record Curse the Son have put together at Dirt Floor Studios in Haddam, CT, working with producer Eric Lichter, and the band themselves have noted giving Lichter a larger role in the presentation of the songs and the way in which the material was finalized and arranged. If the result of that is some of the lengthening of Curse the Son‘s sonic reach as can be heard throughout their fourth album, then clearly they’ve found the right pair of ears to help them make the most of what they’ve been doing all along — all the more because it’s in no way overproduced.

For those seeking pure riff-based heavy, Curse the Son will satisfy no less than they ever have, but that’s only a piece of what Excruciation has to offer, and if the experiences that inspired it were difficult, then at very least it wasn’t all for nothing. A work like this is the kind of thing bands dream of realizing.

Curse the Son, Excruciation (2020)

Curse the Son on Thee Facebooks

Curse the Son on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music website

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Curse the Son Premiere “Suicide by Drummer”; Confirm June 12 Release for Excruciation

Posted in audiObelisk, Whathaveyou on April 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

curse the son

If you’re here, the song is probably why. I won’t keep you. It’s at the bottom of this post and should be heard as soon as possible. The relevant details, which follow, will still be here when you scroll back up. Now then…

Connecticut trio Curse the Son have had a hell of a few years, and they put their (largely negative, it would seem) experience to work for them on their impending fourth album, Excruciation. As floated here last month, the record has a June release — it’s June 12, specifically — and today, in addition to that specificity, the album art, more details behind its making and the tracklisting, we’re also getting the first audio from the outing in the form of leadoff track “Suicide by Drummer.”

All told, Excruciation‘s nine tracks run a vinyl-challenging 49 minutes, but they’re filled with substance like the band has never produced before. I don’t want to spoil it — not the least because I’ll review the thing some point between now and June — but Curse the Son‘s shift in their songwriting process and newly-honed chemistry has resulted in a broader scope than they’ve ever had, and with guitarist Ron Vanacore‘s tone and vocals as a foundation to work from, they’re free to explore this new ground with confidence. And they do. I’ll say this. I’ve been a fan of Curse the Son for nearly a decade at this point, and this is their best work, no question. You’re gonna dig it. And “Suicide by Drummer” is just the start, figuratively and literally, of what they have on offer throughout.

Preorders are here: http://ripplemusic.bigcartel.com/product/curse-the-son-excruciation

Enjoy:

Curse The Son Excruciation

Ron Vanacore on Excruciation:

The past few years have certainly been extremely difficult for Curse the Son. Between what appeared to be endless drummer changes, individual tragedies, and of course, Brendan’s very serious motorcycle accident… The band had been put to the test.
We are very proud to say that we rose above all of that to create what is possibly our heaviest and certainly our most diverse and creative record to date.

The record is titled Excruciation and offers a glimpse into our lives (particularly Brendan’s) from November 2017-2018.

Ron wrote songs, Brendan wrote songs and the band collaborated on a few. Pushing the creative boundaries even further, Brendan sings lead on a couple songs as well as playing lead and rhythm guitar on some tracks.

Recording began at Dirt Floor studios in August 2019. We completed mixing in January 2020. We chose to really utilize everything the studio had to offer us as well as giving Eric Lichter a much larger role as producer and songsmith. Eric contributed backing vocals as well as playing a vast array of instruments to add to the musical landscape. With “Excruciation” the band really wanted to push the envelope and boundaries of the genre.

“Suicide By Drummer” was written almost two years ago. It can be viewed as strangely prophetic with its apocalyptic theme that currently resonates very strongly in these uncertain times we find ourselves in.”

Watch for the video to be released soon!

Curse the Son toured regionally in support of the “Isolator” record throughout 2017 and continued to garner growing attention and fans along the way. Unfortunately long time drummer Michael Petrucci was no longer able to continue with the band and a replacement was needed. Robert Ives (Drums) joined the group in April of 2018 and Curse the Son hit the road again performing at many high profile festivals such as The Maryland Doom Fest, Descendants of Crom and the New England Stoner/Doom festival amongst others. Writing began in Summer of 2018, but was put on hold after bassist Brendan Keefe suffered extensive injuries in a devastating motorcycle accident in November of 2018.

Curse the Son’s new release “Excruciation” (Ripple Music) is a defining moment for a band who has dealt with multiple challenges since the release of “Isolator”, and responded in full with their most diverse, ambitious, and genre shattering record to date! Keefe developed a much larger role in the writing and performance aspect on the record. Vanacore was fueled by the extremely trying times the band had endured as a whole and individually. “Excruciation” is shaded heavy and light. “Excruciation” is beautiful and disfigured. “Excruciation” is depressingly sad but strangely uplifting at the same time. It is a record that defies genres, defies limitations and generalizations. A true musical experience for one and all who love their music HEAVY!

TRACK LISTING:
1. Suicide By Drummer
2. Disaster In Denial
3. Novembre
4. Worry Garden
5. Excruciation
6. Infinite Regression
7. Black Box Warning
8. Devil Doctor Blues
9. Phoenix Risin’

Curse the Son are:
Ron Vanacore – Guitars & Vocals
Brendan Keefe – Bass & Vocals
Robert Ives – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/cursetheson/
https://cursetheson.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
ripplemusic.bandcamp.com
http://www.ripple-music.com/

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Curse the Son Finish Work on Excruciation; Album out in June on Ripple Music

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 2nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Hamden, Connecticut, tonal weightlifters Curse the Son aren’t kidding when they talk about branching out in terms of sound on their new album, Excruciation. Though the intervening years since 2016’s Isolator (review here) have seen them part ways with drummer Michael Petrucci, it’s clear that guitarist/vocalist Ron Vanacore and bassist/vocalist Brendan Keefe have solidified as a more dynamic team in terms of writing, with the latter picking up more duties in terms of joining creative vocal arrangements calling to mind Dirt-era Alice in Chains in call-and-response fashion, while Robert Ives, making his first appearance with the band, seems to immediately find his place holding the groove that has been at the core of the band since Vanacore founded it now some obscure number of years ago.

I haven’t heard the full record yet, I’m sad to say, but what I’ve had the chance to dig into finds Curse the Son a richer, more complex band who haven’t at all let go of the heft in their sound. Look out for “Worry Garden” and “Novembre.”

Vanacore was kind enough to give some comment on finishing work on the album below. It’s out in June on Ripple Music:

curse the son

Ron Vanacore on Excruciation:

“The past few years have certainly been extremely difficult for our band. Between what appeared to be endless drummer changes, individual tragedies, and of course, Brendan‘s very serious motorcycle accident… We had been put to the test.

I am proud to say that we rose above all of that to create what is possibly our heaviest and certainly our most diverse and creative record to date.

The record is titled Excruciation and offers a glimpse into our lives (particularly Brendan’s) from November 2017-2018.

I wrote songs, Brendan wrote songs and we also collaborated on a few. Brendan sings lead on a song as well as playing some lead guitar!

Recording began at Dirt Floor studios in August 2019. We completed mixing in January 2020. We chose to really utilize everything the studio had to offer us as well as giving Eric Lichter a much larger role as producer. We really wanted to push the envelope and boundaries of the genre.

The record will be released in early June on Ripple Music. (Vinyl, CD, Digital) followed by as many shows as we can play!”

Curse the Son are:
Ron Vanacore – Guitars & Vocals
Brendan Keefe – Bass & Vocals
Robert Ives – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/cursetheson/
https://cursetheson.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
ripplemusic.bandcamp.com
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Curse the Son, Isolator (2016)

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Curse the Son Sign to Ripple Music

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 10th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Ripple Music has picked up Curse the Son. It’s a match made in fuzz.

Last time we heard from Connecticut’s primo rollers of riff was in October, when the Hamden-based three-piece were announcing that their third album, Isolator (review here), would be out on vinyl through The Company Records sometime early in 2017. Well, if you’d like to put a tighter figure on that, I’d guess it’s going to be sometime around April, since that seems to be when Ripple will do their CD edition of the record and start selling it digitally as well. It remains available in the interim from Curse the Son‘s Bandcamp, and is linked and streaming below, though I’m not sure for how long. Sometimes these things get pulled ahead of a re-release like this.

Of course, Isolator had an initial CD pressing in 2016, through Snake Charmer Coalition, also home to Merchant, King Bison and Shadow Witch. But, as it sold through the pressing and that label seems to be defunct at least for the time being — never say never to a comeback — the snag on Ripple‘s part couldn’t be more fortuitous as they continue to move into the forefront of US underground heavy rock purveyors. One gets the feeling Curse the Son are going to be part of a big year for them, though that’s not really much of a prediction considering the strength of the material they released in 2016.

Nonetheless, good for the band, good for the label, and good for anyone who missed out on Isolator‘s original release and will get the chance to hear it now. Especially good for them.

Announcement and info follow:

curse the son ripple music

We said there were some exciting signings to announce. Please welcome Curse the Son to Ripple with. CD/digital release for their monumental epic of doom, “Isolator”. Coming to you this April. More to come.

Emerging from the untimely demise of stoner rockers Sufferghost, Curse the Son is a plodding distorted sonic wall of Sabbathian riffage.

A power trio in the truest sense…..screaming amps…tons of fuzz…fat bass..thick riffin…lots of smokin!

Get high, tune low & play slow.

Isolator Tracklisting:
1. Isolator
2. Callous Unemotional Traits
3. Sleepwalker Wakes
4. Hull Crush Depth
5. Gaslighter
6. Aislamiento
7. Side Effects May Include…

Curse the Son is:
Ron Vanacore – Guitars and Vocals
Michael Petrucci – Drums
Brendan Keefe – Bass

https://www.facebook.com/cursetheson/
https://cursetheson.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
ripplemusic.bandcamp.com
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Curse the Son, Isolator (2016)

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Curse the Son’s Isolator to Receive Early 2017 Vinyl Release; Preorders Available

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 12th, 2016 by JJ Koczan

Riff-rolling Connecticut trio Curse the Son released their third full-length earlier this year on CD via Snake Charmer Coalition, and if you haven’t heard it, Isolator (review here), is about as right on in tone and vibe as anything I’ve heard come from the US this year. Curse the Son don’t really tour — they have some local shows coming up in New England, listed below — so they continue to be under-recognized, but since the CD/DL version came out (also sold out; repress reportedly on the way), word of an Isolator vinyl has been kicked around, and it seems like today we’re getting some solid info on the actual plan.

Originally set to come out through STB, which also did the LP edition of Curse the Son‘s prior outing, Psychache (review here), the Isolator vinyl will now see release via The Company Records in two versions, red wax and white wax with an included tape. Both are limited numbers. STB explained the situation, and you’ll find that below along with the pressing info, tracklisting, those live dates, and the stream of the album from Curse the Son‘s Bandcamp, in case you’d like a refresher of its badassery.

Have at you:

curse-the-son-w-tape

A lot of people have been asking me about the Curse the Son “Isolator” Release. Josh from The Company Records was kind enough to take some of the stress of my hands lately. He will be releasing this beast, almost like a sister label to STB Records.

Curse The Son, STB Records, and The Company are all on excellent terms and every party in the equation is really happy! You will be getting the same quality and service you would expect from myself because Josh has been working with me on ALL of my releases for 2 years now. So please support this new DIY effort that will be coming out of the gates swinging.

CURSE THE SON – “ISOLATOR” COMPANY EDITION
Limited Edition of 90 on Clear Vinyl included with limited edition cassette tape.

CURSE THE SON – “ISOLATOR” LP
Limited Edition of 100 on Ox Blood Vinyl

Tracklisting:
1. Isolator
2. Callous Unemotional Traits
3. Sleepwalker Wakes
4. Hull Crush Depth
5. Gaslighter
6. Aislamiento
7. Side Effects May Include…

Curse the Son is:
Ron Vanacore – Guitars and Vocals
Michael Petrucci – Drums
Brendan Keefe – Bass

Curse the Son live:
Oct 15 13th Floor Music Lounge Florence, MA
Oct 28 The Ballroom at the Outer Space Hamden, CT
Dec 17 The Ballroom at the Outer Space Hamden, CT

https://www.facebook.com/cursetheson/
https://cursetheson.bandcamp.com/
http://thecompanykc.bigcartel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/thecompanykc/
http://www.snakecharmercoalition.bigcartel.com/

Curse the Son, Isolator (2016)

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Curse the Son, Isolator: Catharsis in Fuzz

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on March 1st, 2016 by JJ Koczan

curse-the-son-isolator

[Click play above to hear the premiere of the title-track from Curse the Son’s Isolator. Album out March 18 on Snake Charmer Coalition CD, with LP to follow on STB Records.]

Since making their debut in 2011 with Klonopain (review here), tone has been a big part of Curse the Son‘s game. Led by guitarist/vocalist Ron Vanacore, the Hamden, Connecticut, trio has swapped out its rhythm section since then, first introducing drummer Michael Petrucci (also Lord Fowl) on 2012’s follow-up, Psychache (review here), which was independently released at first and picked up for vinyl (review here) through New Jersey’s esteemed STB Records in 2014. That record was and remains a gem of rolled-groove righteousness, Vanacore, Petrucci and then-bassist Richard “Cheech” Weeden proffering lumbering Sabbathian vibes grown out from the debut and marked by particularly strong songwriting. Not necessarily trying to do too much, but hitting a fine balance between the aforementioned tone and execution. The outfit’s third offering (some earlier work notwithstanding), is Isolator.

Recorded at Dirt Floor in Chester, CT, it marks their first CD release through Delaware’s Snake Charmer CoalitionSTB will follow-up with an LP version — and serves as the studio debut of bassist Brendan Keefe, who complements and bolsters Vanacore‘s guitar work strongly on the seven-track/40-minute full-length. Indeed, while I won’t take away from the progression in Vanacore‘s self-harmonizing vocal approach as evidenced on songs like “Gaslighter,” the semi-title-track “Aislamiento” or swinging closer “Side Effects May Include…” (nor from Weeden‘s prior work), Keefe‘s contributions prove essential to making Isolator the forward step that it is for the band. They are a richer, all the more immersive and soulful outfit than they were just several years ago.

Many of the core touchstones remain unchanged in terms of their influences. Black SabbathSleep and so on continue to resonate in Vanacore‘s thick riffing, but there’s a new edge as well in the vocals that’s especially engaging in light of Goatsnake‘s Black Age Blues. Not that they’re going for the same thing — no backup singers appear here, for example — but as the opening title-track unfolds from its languid start, its hook arrives in harmonized form and is an immediate standout and signal of intent. Likewise, the tempo of “Isolator” itself is rife with upbeat thrust in Petrucci‘s crash, its riffs in the first half being shoved along quickly such that I’d almost be tempted to call it boogie if it weren’t so darn thick. They break back to the quieter lines of the intro in the midsection and revive the chorus to set up a nodding bridge and final swing through the verse and chorus again to end, Keefe‘s bass staking its claim as well in the start of “Callous Unemotional Traits,” the slower pace of which opens up to massive tom hits from Petrucci and call and response vocal layering from Vanacore.

curse-the-son (Photo by JJ Koczan)

For those harmonies, “Callous Unemotional Traits” is a highlight of Isolator, but it also speaks to the emotional struggle that seems to be a running lyrical theme throughout cuts like “Aislamiento,” “Isolator,” “Sleepwalker Wakes,” “Hull Crush Depth,” “Gaslighter” and “Side Effects May Include…” — which, if you’re keeping track, is all the songs. So maybe it’s a strong running theme. Fair enough. “Callous Unemotional Traits” nods out a downer finish underpinned by stomping tom work and Keefe‘s dense low end, leading to the gargantuan lumber of “Sleepwalker Wakes.” A subdued, echoing verse fosters a deceptively catchy melody, but again, it’s the harmonies of the chorus, “Alone/Alone/Leave me alone” that really make it. The second half of the track turns on drum fills to a last verse, but instead of going back to the hook, as on “Isolator,” they instead ride that plodding groove into the wah-drenched intro of “Hull Crush Depth,” on which Keefe takes the lead on bass, the verses populated by steady drums, Vanacore‘s vocals and sparse guitar noise before the fuzz kicks back in, builds, and ultimately recedes for a swap in vibe that, as the centerpiece, only further emphasizes how far Curse the Son have come.

Starting with the drums, “Gaslighter” works similarly to some degree, Vanacore shifting to a lower register vocal and moving forward in the mix. There are also some ambient sounds worked later on that are either keys or falsetto singing, but even bringing the verses and chorus forward marks a change in intent. “Gaslighter” is the shortest track here at 4:24, but leaves an impression in its later blend of swing and chug, in its fluid transitions and in its lyrics. It gives way to “Aislamiento” — the longest track at 7:13 — the Spanish title of which translates to “isolation,” and which unfolds a viscous, patient intro and nears the two-minute mark before it hits into the first verse, Keefe‘s bassline keeping the roll moving forward as Vanacore‘s guitar wahs out, coming back to full tone for the fluid shift into the chorus. The flow is smooth as they cycle through again and the bass drops out to let the guitar and drums creep and give Petrucci a chance for some Bill Ward-style jazzy tension-keeping.

Bass and full-fuzz guitar return as Petrucci keeps the vibe going, and riffs build in intensity accordingly, nodding back to the chorus without actually delivering it and pushing outward on a few last lines from Vanacore before crashing to an end, the first half of a closing duo with “Side Effects May Include…,” which bookends some of the Goatsnake stylization of “Isolator” and also revives the multi-layered vocals, an open, almost Alice in Chains-y verse kicking in after thudding toms. They chug and roll through one last hook and at around 4:30 on a Keefe bassline, they turn to a more swinging last movement. Keefe takes a welcome solo that comes through from under the guitar, but Curse the Son finish crashing as a full trio and in fine form, someone noting after the amps click off that, “That’s fucking ridiculous,” only to be answered, “That’s fucking rock and roll, right there.” You will not hear me argue. For at least the last half-decade, and actually longer, Curse the Son have been a too-well-kept secret holed up on the line between heavy fuzz and doom. Isolator, as their strongest offering to-date, not only lives up to the standard of Psychache, but surpasses it, and can only hope to turn heads in the band’s direction. It may not be genre reinvention, but the way Curse the Son reform stylistic tenets to their purposes throughout Isolator is what allows the album to truly stand alone.

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