Quarterly Review: Carlton Melton, Crown, Noêta, Polymerase, Lucid Sins, Hekate, Abel Blood, Suffer Yourself, Green Dragon, Age Total

Posted in Reviews on July 5th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-fall-2016-quarterly-review

This will be a two-week Quarterly Review. That means this Monday to Friday and next Monday to Friday, 10 releases per day, totaling 100 by the time it’s done.

Me? I’m taking it one week, one day, one album at a time. It’s the only way to go and not have it seem completely insurmountable. But we’ll get through it all. I started out with the usual five days, and then I went to seven, then eight, and at that point I felt like I had a pretty good idea where things were headed. The last two days I filled up just at the end of last week. Some of it is I think a result of quarantine productivity, but there’s a glut of relevant stuff out now and some of it I’m catching up on, true, but some of it isn’t out yet either, so it’s a balance as ever. I keep telling myself I’m done with 2020 releases, but there’s one in here today. You know how it goes.

And since you do, I won’t delay further. Thanks in advance for reading if you do.

Quarterly Review #1-10:

Carlton Melton, Night Pillers

carlton melton night pillers

Rangey mellow psych collected together with the natural shimmer of a Phil Manley (Trans Am) recording and a John McBain master, the new mini-LP from Mendocino medicine makers Carlton Melton is a 31-minute, five-song meditative joy. To wit, “Safe Place?” Is. “Morning Warmth?” Is, even with the foreboding march of drums behind it. And “Striatum,” which closes with interplay of keys and fuzzy leads and effects, giving a culminating seven-minute wash that doesn’t feel like it’s pushing far out so much as already gone upon arrival, indeed seems like a reward for any head or brain that’s managed to make it so far. Opener “Resemblance” brings four minutes of gentle drone to set the mood ahead of “Morning Warmth” — it might be sunrise, if we’re thinking of it that way — and centerpiece “High Noon Thirty” bridges krauty electronic beats and organic ceremony that feels both familiar and like the band’s own. They may pill at night, but Carlton Melton have a hell of a day here.

Carlton Melton on Facebook

Agitated Records website

 

Crown, The End of All Things

Crown The End of All Things

Weaving in and around genres with fluidity that’s tied together through dark industrial foundations, Crown are as much black metal as they are post-heavy, cinematic or danceable. “Gallow” or the earlier “Neverland” call to mind mid-period, electronica-fascinated Katatonia, but “Extinction” pairs this with a more experimental feel, opening in its midsection to more unsettling spaces ahead of the dance-ready finish. There’s nothing cartoonish or vamp about The End of All Things, which is the French outfit’s fourth album in 10 years, and it’s as likely to embrace pop (closer “Utopia”) as extremity (“Firebearer” just before), grim atmospherics (“Nails”) or textured acoustics (“Fleuve”), feeling remarkably unconcerned with genre across its 45 entrancing minutes, and remarkably even in its approach for a sound that’s still so varied. It’s not an easy listen front to back, but the challenge feels intentional and is emotional as much as cerebral in the craft and performance.

Crown on Facebook

Pelagic Records on Bandcamp

 

Noêta, Elm

Noêta elm

Swedish duo Noêta offer their second record for Prophecy Productions in Elm, comprising a deceptively efficient eight songs and 38 minutes that work in atmospheres of darker but not grim or cultish folk. Vocalist Êlea is very much a focal point in terms of performance, with Andris‘ instrumentals forming a backdrop that’s mournful on “Above and Below” while shimmering enough to bring affirmation to “As We Are Gone” a short while later ahead of the electrified layering in “Elm” and the particularly haunted-feeling closer “Elm II.” “As I Fall Silent” is a singularly spacious moment, but not the only one, as “Fade” complements with strings and outward-sounding guitar, and some of Elm‘s most affecting moments are its quietest stretches, as “Dawn Falls” proves at the outset and the whispers of “Elm” reaffirm on side B. Subdued but not lacking complexity, Noêta‘s songs make an instrument of mood itself and are pointedly graceful in doing so.

Noêta on Facebook

Prophecy Productions website

 

Polymerase, Unostentatious

Polymerase Unostentatious

Unostentatious, which is presumably not to say “humble,” may or may not be Polymerase‘s debut release, but it follows on from several years of inactivity on the part of the Philippines-based mostly-instrumentalist heavy psych trio. The band present four duly engaging and somewhat raw feeling jams, with a jump in volume as “Lightbringer//Lightgiver” picks up from “A Night with a Succubus” and opener “The Traveler” and a final touch of thickened, fuzzy sludge in the rolling “Green is the Color of Evil,” which closes at a lurch that comes across at significant remove from the title-hinted brightness of the song just before it. Uneven? Maybe, but not egregiously so, and if Polymerase are looking to give listeners an impression of their having a multifaceted sound, they most assuredly do. My question is over what span of time these tracks were recorded and what the group will do in moving forward from them, but I take the fact that I’m curious to find out at all as a positive sign of having interest piqued. Will hope for more.

Polymerase on Facebook

Polymerase on Bandcamp

 

Lucid Sins, Cursed!

lucid sins cursed

Lucid indeed. The band’s self-applied genre tag of “adult AOR” is more efficient a descriptor of their sound than anything I might come up with. Glasgow’s Lucid Sins released their acclaimed debut, Occultation, in 2014, and Cursed! is the exclamatory seven-years-later follow-up, bringing together classic progressive rock and modern cult heavy sensibilities with a focus on songwriting that’s the undercurrent from “Joker’s Dance” onward and which, as deep as “The Serpentine Path” or the title-track or “The Forest” might go, is never forgotten. To wit, the penultimate “By Your Hand” is a proto-everything highlight, stomping compared to the organ-prog “Sun and the Moon” earlier, but ultimately just as melodic and of enviable tonal warmth. Seven years is a long time between records, and maybe this material just took that long to put together, I don’t know, but I had no idea “cult xylophone” was a possibility until “The Devil’s Sign” came along, and now I’m not sure how I ever lived without it.

Lucid Sins on Facebook

Totem Cat Records store

 

Hekate, Sermons to the Black Owl

Hekate Sermons to the Black Owl

Australia’s history in heavy rock and roll is as long as that of heavy rock and roll itself and need not be recounted here, except to say that Hekate, from Canberra and Sydney, draw from multiple eras of it with their debut long-player, Sermons to the Black Owl, pushing ’70s boogie over the top with solos on “Carpathian Eagle” only after “Winter Void” and “Child of Black Magick” have seen the double-guitar-and-let’s-use-both four-piece update nascent doom vibes and “Burning Mask” has brought a more severe chug to the increasingly intense procession. A full production sound refuses to let the quick eight-tracker be anything other than modern, and though it’s only 28 minutes long, the aptly-titled “Acoustic Outro” feels earned atmospherically, even down to the early-feeling cold finish of “Cassowary Dreaming.” The balance may be then, then, then, and now, but the sense of shove that Hekate foster in their songs gives fresh urgency to the tenets of genre they seem to have adopted at will.

Hekate on Facebook

Black Farm Records store

 

Abel Blood, Keeping Pace with the Elephants

Abel Blood Keeping Pace with the Elephants

One does not evoke elephantine images on a heavy record, even on a debut release, if aural largesse isn’t a factor. New Hampshire trio Abel Blood — guitarist/vocalist Adam Joslyn, bassist Ben Cook, drummer Jim DeLuca — are raw in sound on their first EP, Keeping Pace with the Elephants, but the impact with which they land “The Day that Moby Died” at the outset is only encouraging, and to be sure, it’s not the thickest of their wares either. “Enemies” already pushes further, and as centerpiece “UnKnown Variant” would seem to date the effort in advance, it also serves the vital function of moving the EP in a different, more jangly, grungier direction, which is a valuable move with the title cut following behind, its massive cymbals and distorted wash building to a head in time for the nine-minute finale “Fire on the Hillside” to draw together both sides of the approach shown throughout into a parabolically structured jam the middle-placed surge of which passes quickly enough to leave the listener unsure whether it ever happened. They’re messing with you. Dig that.

Abel Blood on Facebook

Abel Blood on Bandcamp

 

Suffer Yourself, Rip Tide

Suffer Yourself Rip Tide

Begun in 2011 by guitarist/vocalist Stanislav Govorukha and based in Sweden by way of Poland and the Ukraine, death-doom lurchbringers Suffer Yourself are not strangers to longer-form material, but to my knowledge, “Spit in the Chasm” — the opening and longest track (immediate points) on their third record, Rip Tide — is the first time they’ve crossed the 20-minute mark. Time well spent, and by that I mean “brutally spent,” whether its the speedier chug that emerges from the willful slog of the extended piece’s first half or the viciously progressive lead work that tops the precise, cold end of the song that brings final ambience. Side B offers two shorter pieces in “Désir de Trépas Maritime (Au Bord de la Mer Je Veux Mourir),” laced with suitably mournful strings and a fair enough maritime sense of gothic drama emphasized by later spoken word and piano, and the brief, mostly-drone “Submerging,” which one assumes is the end of that plotline playing out. The main consumption though is in “Spit in the Chasm,” and the dimensions of that fissure are significant, figuratively and literally.

Suffer Yourself on Facebook

Aesthetic Death website

 

Green Dragon, Dead of the Night

Green Dragon Dead of the Night

High order Sabbathian doom rock from my own beloved Garden State, there’s very little chance I’m not going to dig Green Dragon‘s Dead of the Night, and true to type, I do. Presented by the band on limited vinyl after digital release late in 2020, the four-song, 24-minute outing brings guitarist/vocalists Zach Kurland and Ryan Lipynsky (the latter also adding keys and known for his work in Unearthly Trance, etc.), bassist Jennifer Klein and drummer Herbert Wiley to a place so dug into its groove it almost feels inappropriate to think of it as a peak in terms of their work to-date. They go high by going low, then. Fair enough. “Altered States” opens with a rollout of fuzz that miraculously avoids the trap sounding like Electric Wizard, while “Burning Bridges” murks out, “The Sad King” pushes speed a bit will still holding firm to nod and echo alike, and “Book of Shadows” plunges into effects-drenched noise like it was one of the two waterslides at the Maplewood community pool in summertime.

Green Dragon on Facebook

Green Dragon on Bandcamp

 

ÂGE TOTAL, ÂGE TOTAL

ÂGE ? TOTAL

The kind of record that probably won’t be heard by enough people but will inspire visceral loyalty in many of those who encounter it, the self-titled debut from French collaborative outfit Age Total — bringing together members from Endless Floods out of Bordeaux and Rouen’s Greyfell — is a grand and engrossing work that pushes the outer limits of doom and post-metal. Bookending opener “Amure” (14:28) and closer “The Songbird” (16:45) around the experimentalist “Carré” (4:06) and rumbling melodic death-doom of “Metal,” the album harnesses grandiosity and nuance to spare, with each piece feeling independently conceived and enlightening to musician and audience alike. It sounds like the kind of material they didn’t know they were going to come up with until they actually got together — whatever the circumstances of “together” might’ve looked like at the time — and the bridges they build between progressive metal and sheer weight of intention are staggering. However much hype it does or doesn’t have behind it, Age Total‘s Age Total is one of 2021’s best debut albums.

Endless Floods on Facebook

Greyfell on Facebook

Soza Label on Bandcamp

 

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Black Hatch Premiere “Salty/Sweet” Video; One More Bite Out Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on March 24th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

black hatch

New Hampshire heavy punks Black Hatch released their third full-length, One More Bite, late last month through King Pizza Records. The record is the follow-up to 2016’s Kill the Buzz Kill and their 2015 self-titled, and if you want to chart the growth of the band, an easy way to go is to take a look at the places you can’t rock. To wit, on the debut, it was “Can’t Rock in School.” On the second record, “Can’t Rock in Church.” On the new album, it’s “Can’t Rock on the Clock,” i.e., at work. So here we are. Are Black Hatch more mature as a unit than they were six years ago? Inevitably, yes, but that doesn’t mean they’re not still driving through One More Bite‘s 11 tracks with full-on punker brashness and a willingness to, say throw around a bunch of junk food, to make their point.

In the video for album opener “Salty/Sweet,” they do precisely that, and in doing so, they bring to mind the addictive nature of corporate “big food,” and the engineering that’s gone into addicting America to things like potato chips and other well-branded stuffs — read Michael Moss — but of course the cravings the band is describing are applicable to more than just eating, and so is addiction, so make of it what you will. Throughout songs like “Old Blood Road,” the dare-to-slow-down-a-little “Doomed” and “Fear and Hate,’ they rage and rage and gnash, but there’s a control to what’s happening as well, a plan that comes through in rhythmic changes, the structural foundations of the material and the intertwining of leads and riffs, evoking chaos but not giving in to it wholly and having the whole thing fall apart.

As one would hope and expect, the record’s a hoot and the vibe is go. “Salty/Sweet,” a deadly and perpetually tempting combination tricking our lizard brains into survival mode, puts it more succinctly than that, and is to be commended for it. I wouldn’t know personally, but there’s much to be said for just getting to the point of the thing, and Black Hatch do that well.

So here goes. Enjoy:

Black Hatch, “Salty/Sweet” official video premiere

Black Hatch on “Salty/Sweet”:

“Salty/Sweet is about always needing one more bite and being run by your cravings. While shown in a comedic light here, it was/is a true vice. Special guest appearance from Bella the cat. The amount spent on food used in this vid was matched a few times over and donated to a local charity. Hope everyone is doing okay out there!”

Black Hatch ‘One More Bite’ available now via King Pizza Records: https://bit.ly/3vyUF70

You’re smoked up and down to that last little bit and you just need ONE MORE BITE. Well, Black Hatch is here to give it to ya! Stoned but not alone, get all your buds together for a dip into this house show in cassette form. Pass it around and dig into the thick, thick fuzz. You can’t shake it off, so don’t even try.

Limited ed. of 100 black (hatch) cassettes. Comes w/ digital download.

Black Hatch, One More Bite (2020)

Black Hatch on Thee Facebooks

Black Hatch on Instagram

Black Hatch on Bandcamp

King Pizza webstore

King Pizza Records website

King Pizza Records on Thee Facebooks

King Pizza Records on Instagram

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Review & Track Premiere: Scissorfight, Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on November 28th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Scissorfight Doomus Abruptus Vol 1

[Click play above to stream ‘Where Eagles Drink’ from Scissorfight’s new album, Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1. Album is out Dec. 6 through Salt of the Earth Records with preorders here.]

From some bands, a line like, “Shut up and watch the flame get higher,” might be a pithy social commentary or a statement of humanity’s inaction to avert climate catastrophe. In Scissorfight‘s “Caveman Television,” rest assured, it’s about people who talk too much around a campfire. Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 is the seventh full-length from the just-came-from-the-forest-already-drunk-and-looking-to-fight New Hampshire four-piece, and a landmark for the simple fact of its existence.

It arrives some 13 years after their last album, Jaggernaut, and some 18 after their arguable pinnacle in 2001’s Mantrapping for Sport and Profit (discussed here) — there were several short releases between those two as well, including splits with Cave In and Pelican and three other EPs: Potential New Agent for Unconventional Warfare (2002), Deathchants, Breakdowns and Military Waltzes Vol. 2 (2003) and Victory over Horseshit (2005) — and follows a 2016 revamping of the band that included founding bassist Paul Jarvis and founding guitarist Jay Fortin extending the group’s by-then-legendary fuckall-and-fuck-off attitude to recruiting a new vocalist and drummer to round out the lineup.

Issued through Salt of the Earth Records, the 2016 comeback EP, Chaos County (review here), tested the waters and found them mercifully free of giardia (look it up), and the band’s positive response extended to the live arena as well, with Doug Aubin‘s formidable presence as a frontman and Rick Orcutt‘s work behind the kit helping propel them to Europe as well as through regional shows around New England — their long-established stomping ground.

Particularly after Chaos County, a full-length was an inevitable next step, and Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 (also on Salt of the Earth) brings the AubinFortinJarvis, and Orcutt incarnation of Scissorfight to a new level in reestablishing the band’s approach. It’s got nine tracks and an LP-ready 39-minute run. Its songs are tight in structure and swing like a right arm throwing a suckerpunch, and they’re heavy like, well, like fucking Scissorfight are heavy. There’s no mistaking that sound.

In some ways, it’ll be the next album that tells the tale of their return as a working band rather than one making a comeback, but if I call Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 business as usual for Scissorfight, I only mean it as a compliment. Whether it’s the woodsy sounds starting “Caveman Television” at the outset, or the anthemic “Rock and/or Die” playing off the Granite State motto “Live free or die,” or centerpiece “Where Eagles Drink” entering direct conversation with “Blizzards Buzzards Bastards” and “New Hampshire’s Alright if You Like Fighting” from the aforementioned 2001 album while laying the band’s ethic out in admirably plain language for the chorus: “Born on a mountain/Raised in a cave/Drinkin’ and fightin’/All I crave.”

scissorfight

Theirs is a battery of downtuned stomp and aggro burl, and they’ve always done it at their own level. Subtly clever and unsubtle in shoving you down a rhythmic flight of stairs, tying itself to the wooded northern Appalachians of their home with New England’s we-get-two-weeks-of-summer high altitude bad attitude, Scissorfight willfully and defiantly retain their core elements on Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1. That is, while the EP proved it could be done, this is the point at which Scissorfight say with no equivocation they are Scissorfight and, true to character, they don’t give a shit if you’re along for it, the ride’s going either way.

The all-out headspin of second cut “Dumpfight” is a raw punk-derived slammer in its first half, and when it breaks at about two minutes in, Aubin warns of the riff that follows, “Oh shit. Here it comes.” Thanks for the heads up. The image of collecting a swollen jaw is inescapable as the salvo that began with “Caveman Television” continues through “Dumpfight” and into “Coagulus” and “Rock and/or Die” as the record heads through a midsection that would be a beer gut were it not still so able to move.

While there’s little loss of momentum as “Coagulus” makes a grower hook of the line, “All in the name of the hunt” and its title in telling tales of bear traps and other foresty threats, “Rock and/or Die” is singularly catchy and outdone only by the subsequent “Where Eagles Drink,” with its made-for-the-stage call and response in the verse — not the only one on the record, but still a standout — though even “Piss in the Wind”‘s chorus is a masterclass in how to craft fare for drunken singalongs.

The back third of Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 — let’s just call it the “ass-end” to keep with the mood of the release — is comprised of three final songs between five and six minutes long. With acoustic twang, “The Battle of (Mudhole Mountain)” leads off this final turn, followed by the fuzz-bass led post-industrial ode to the Merrimack Valley “Lead Venom” and closer “Whatcha Get,” which actually pulls back on some of the immediacy that’s been so prevalent throughout Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 at its outset, but is soon enough given over to the sharpest-edged riff of the album and a chorus that feels especially pointed in remarking “That’s whatcha get for saying ‘never again’.”

And I guess that’s really the core of what the album is all about. From a certain distance, one has to chuckle at the ballsiness in a band releasing their first record in over a decade and including “abrupt” in the name of it, but ballsy is what Scissorfight do and, to one degree or another, have always done, so it’s fitting in that regard if no other. They end with more noise from the woods to leave off with a sense of completion, and while inevitably the conversation around Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 is still the fact that their lineup has changed, that feeling of being complete is no minor consideration, and it extends to the band itself.

Once again in keeping with the spirit of the album and Scissorfight generally, I’ll say it as plain as I can: I was a fan of Scissorfight with Iron Lung up front. Like, a big fan. Those old records are earthshakers and I wouldn’t tell you otherwise. I don’t know what the impact of Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 will be, how far it will reach or what the overall reception will be, but if you’ve ever been on board with Scissorfight, and you can’t get on board with this, it isn’t their fault.

Scissorfight on Thee Facebooks

Scissorfight on Instagram

Scissorfight website

Salt of the Earth Records webstore

Salt of the Earth Records on Thee Facebooks

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Scissorfight Open Preorders for Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1; Playing Stoned to Death 4

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 16th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

scissorfight

Welp, if fuckin’ Scissorfight are doing anything, you know there’s gonna be trouble. The fabled Granite State Destroyers have titled their new album, Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1, and you know, seeing as it’s their first full-length in 13 years, calling it ‘Vol. 1′ — as if to imply there’s a follow-up coming any minute now — feels pretty ambitious. Being somewhat familiar with fuckin’ Scissorfight, however, I’m inclined to think that’s the joke. Either way, Salt of the Earth Records has the release out Dec. 6 and preorders have been up for the better part of a month, but frankly, I was waiting to write about it until I actually heard the thing — I can be kind of a stickler that way sometimes — and now that I have, well, let’s just say I’m gonna have a hard time ever writing the word band’s name without the word “fuckin'” in front of it again.

Because fuckin’ Scissorfight.

I’ve locked in a premiere for the opening track sometime in I guess the next month and a half, so stay tuned for that, and if you’re in the band’s native New England region, which they stalk like the low-toned collective mountain skunk ape that they are, they’ll play Stoned to Death 4 next weekend in Vermont and they’ve got release shows in New Hampshire and a gig in Maine. If you live south of Massachusetts, basically you’re fucked. I bet they could tour Europe though if they wanted. Just saying.

No music from Doomus Abruptus Vol. 1 yet, but like I said, keep an eye out. Fuckin’ Scissorfight. Apparently this is their first album on vinyl. Who the hell knew?

Here’s info from the band and Salt of the Earth:

Scissorfight Doomus Abruptus Vol 1

IT IS FINALLY TIME. Decades in the making… The FIRST Scissorfight album to be released on vinyl is upon us!

Preorders start Friday 9/27 Release Date: Friday 12/06

-SCISSORFIGHT “Doomus Abruptus Vol 1” Extremely Limited Edition Hand Numbered Autographed Test Pressings Only (15) Available. Own some history. -$50
-SCISSORFIGHT “Doomus Abruptus Vol 1” -Black Vinyl (Blue Collar Edition)- -$25
-SCISSORFIGHT “Doomus Abruptus Vol 1” Digipak CD -$12

Preorder at: https://www.saltoftheearthrecords.com/music

Track Listing:
Caveman Television
Dumpfight
Coagulus
Rock And/Or Die
Where Eagles Drink
Piss In The Wind
The Battle Of (Mudhole Mountain)
Lead Venom
Whatcha Get

Produced, Recorded, and Mixed by Benny Grotto At Mad Oak Studio (Allston MA). Mastered By Alan Douches West West Side Music.

Scissorfight live:
Sat Oct 26th, The Stone Church, Brattleboro VT (Stoned to Death 4)
Wed Oct 30th, Dover Brickhouse, Dover NH
Sat Nov 9th, Genos Rock Club, Portland ME – Tickets
Fri and Sat Dec 6 and 7, The Shaskeen, Manchester NH

https://www.facebook.com/Scissorfight2016/
https://www.instagram.com/scissorfight2019/
http://scissorfight.com/
https://saltoftheearthrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/SaltOfTheEarthRec/
https://www.saltoftheearthrecords.com

Scissorfight, Live at Geno’s Rock Club, Portland, ME, May 5, 2019

Scissorfight, “Unfinished Business” official video

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Scuzzy Yeti Sign to Salt of the Earth Records; New Album Ruined Due Later This Year

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 9th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Recent veterans of the New England Stoner and Doom Fest, Troy, New Hampshire’s Scuzzy Yeti have been snagged by Salt of the Earth Records for the impending release of their second album, Ruined. Not to put too fine a point on it, but we’re more than halfway through 2019 already and they’re still working on the album, so I think it might be 2020 before this one gets out — because delays happen, like life — but the five-piece’s earthy grooves as displayed on their 2017 self-titled debut (review here) make them a solid fit for the label, and I’ve little doubt that when it’s delivered, the new album will likewise deliver. I give them bonus points right out of the gate for calling it Ruined. Suits the self-aware humor of the band well.

They were in the studio at Sonelab in Easthampton, MA, doing vocals, and I’m not sure if there are overdubs or what for after, but if it’s vocals being done, then it’s a safe bet that at least the basic tracks are already down. Progress is being made, is what I’m getting at.

Here’s announcement from Salt of the Earth via the PR wire:

scuzzy yeti

SCUZZY YETI signs with SALT OF THE EARTH RECORDS!

SALT OF THE EARTH RECORDS is proud as all hell to announce the addition of stoned to the bejeezus heavy ass fuzzrockers, SCUZZY YETI to the family! SCUZZY YETI plays heavy handed mountain rock that nods to 70s progressive riffing, tripped out psychedelia and hard hitting blues. And they do it with unrivaled passion. The band is currently hard at work on songs for their Salt Of The Earth Records debut, “Ruined”, Set for a fall/winter 2019 release on vinyl / CD / digital formats.

SCUZZY YETI played a mind blowing set at this years New England Stoner and Doom Festival, making many fans, and foreshadowing tracks from their upcoming release.

“We are SO stoked to be joining this family of high heaters, and riff worshipers! This is where we belong” – Joshua Wyatt Trumbull (Drums)

“We are psyched and honored to be working with Scott and SALT OF THE EARTH RECORDS on our debut album. The bands on their roster are unique and heavy as Hell. We think it will be a perfect match.” – Jason Lawrence (Guitar)

“Wait till you hear, see, and feel what these guys are creating! Unbelievable!! These guys are truly the Scuzz Of The Earth.” – Scott Harrington (Guy @ Label)

https://www.facebook.com/scuzzyYeti/
https://www.instagram.com/scuzzyyetiofficial
https://scuzzyyeti.bandcamp.com/
www.facebook.com/SaltOfTheEarthRec
www.saltoftheearthrecords.com

Scuzzy Yeti, Scuzzy Yeti (2017)

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Dust Prophet Post Video for New Single “Revolutionary Suicide”

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 14th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

You had me at the bassline, which, since the bassline (plus some hi-hat) is the first thing you hear in the track means you pretty much had me immediately. New Hampshire newcomers Dust Prophet have made public their second single following up on this past Fall’s “The Big Lie” (posted here), and “Revolutionary Suicide” touches on cultish themes via lyrics delivered through catchy rhythm and rampant melody that seems only to indicate their readiness to take on a broader release, be it a debut EP or album. The production on “Revolutionary Suicide” is clean to a point almost asking for some muck for its doomly vibe to wallow in, but I wouldn’t hold a band being clear in their delivery against them, especially on a self-released single — let alone their second — and the song remains rooted in the quality of the band’s performance, which wants for nothing.

Likewise too their social media presence. They’re all over the place. I always have to admire that kind of thing, because I suck at it so very, very much — duh, here’s a picture of my baby; duh, here’s a review I posted; duh — but Dust Prophet have it down when it comes to engaging their audience, and as I think you can hear in the track below, that extends to their songwriting. Good to hit ’em on multiple levels.

Dig it:

dust prophet

Dust Prophet is proud to release: Revolutionary Suicide

We are very proud to bring you our newest single, Revolutionary Suicide. You have a few different options for listening and downloading it:

You can listen & download Revolutionary Suicide for FREE by one of the following options:

By using our Bandcamp page. In addition to downloading Revolutionary Suicide can also subscribe to our Bandcamp page and stay up-to-date on our new releases and newsworthy events.

(Although it’s a free download, you can choose to pay $1 or so if you want to support us by using the “Name Your Own Price” option).

You can also stream Revolutionary Suicide on our YouTube channel. You can access that by going HERE. Please “Like” the video and feel free to subscribe to our channel, as we’ll be adding much more content and music in the upcoming weeks.

Dust Prophet is:
Heather Lynn- Vocals.
Otto Kinzel- Guitar.
Sarah Wappler- Bass; Keyboards.
Marc Brennan- Drums.

https://www.facebook.com/dustprophet
https://www.instagram.com/dustprophet/
https://twitter.com/DustProphet
https://dustprophet.bandcamp.com/
https://dustprophet.com/

Dust Prophet, “Revolutionary Suicide” official video

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KYOTY Premiere Live at 3S Video; Live Album out Friday

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 12th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

kyoty

This week, New Hampshire heavy post-rock instrumentalists KYOTY will release the new live album, Live at 3S, through Deafening Assembly. The six-track outing captures a show the three-piece played on Aug. 3, 2018, at the 3S Artspace in I-guess-gentrifying downtown Portsmouth, NH, and the accompanying video was shot by Treebeard Media. The screen comes down behind Nathaniel Parker Raymond, Nick Filth and Rob Brown quickly as they begin their half-hour set, and the sense of atmosphere and range is almost immediate from those initial crashes, but as “L” from their 2017 split with SEA (discussed here) and as the forceful strums of “Via” and punctuated exploration “Carcer” from 2015’s Geomancy I take hold, they only begin to flesh out further the textures and progressive ambience of the set’s beginning. A wash of effects surges forward intermittently as intensity picks up and recedes, but even the quiet moments are given a sustained tension through the adrenaline surge one can easily see in the clip below, despite the dim lighting.

Those inclined to suss out influences will find Russian Circles comparisons well enough met by “Carcer” — if not by the actual band, whose moniker is an acronym for Keep Your Opinions to Yourself — and before they kyoty live-at-3s-fullclose with the resonant tones of “14,” which opened their 2012 debut, Undiscovered Country of Old Death and Strange Years in the Frightful Past — which was remixed, rearranged and remastered last year into Remanufactured Realm of Ancient Annihilation (get it?) — they unfurl “Populus,” which its anxious starts and stops and an ensuing buildup toward a massive payoff. By then, a telltale Sunn crackle can be heard from the amps, but the drift into “14” is clean and they hold down the end of the set with vitality that undercuts the notion of such atmospheric material being in any way staid or overly academic in its execution. They may not have a frontman out there plugging the t-shirts at the merch table, but KYOTY obviously have no trouble making arguments in their own favor regardless.

Their Bandcamp page is a trove of churning progginess ripe for digging in, and I won’t tell you not to do that, but on the occasion of the release Friday of Live at 3S, I’m happy to be able to host the video shot by Treebeard of the entire set — i.e., the visual accompaniment of the entire live record. With the audio mixed by Filth and the level of performance taking place, I think you’ll agree it’s worth sticking around for the whole gig. I’ve been through it five or six times at this point and no regrets.

Some comment from the band follows.

Please enjoy:

KYOTY, Live at 3S Artspace, Portsmouth, NH 08.03.18

KYOTY on Live at 3S:

We decided to make the video when we realized that a lot of the live footage of us online was either outdated or not great quality (probably because we tend to play in the dark, haha). We figured it was worth setting up something for ourselves to share a better vision of our live performance. Having toured with SEA, we were friendly with Steve and were fans of his video work so it seemed only natural that we work with him and Treebeard.

Initially it was going to just be a live video for which Nick Filth (our guitarist) was going to mix the audio. But we were all so happy with the performance and the tracks provided by Adam Preston Cissell that it seemed worth releasing in its own right. I think we all felt it was such a good, honest portrayal of our sound as a band that we had to put it out. Nick Filth mixed and mastered the audio for the final release.

KYOTY performing live at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, NH on August 3, 2018.
Album available here: https://kyoty.bandcamp.com/album/live-at-3s

Sound & lights by Nick Lemoyne and Alex Bourne.
Audio mixed & mastered by Nick Filth.

Tracklisting:
1. —
2. L
3. Via
4. Carcer
5. Populus
6. 14

KYOTY is:
Nick Filth
Nathaniel Parker Raymond
Rob Brown

KYOTY on Thee Facebooks

KYOTY on Instagram

KYOTY on Bandcamp

KYOTY website

Treebeard Media website

Deafening Assembly on Bandcamp

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Dust Prophet Post New Single “The Big Lie”

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 23rd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

I live in New England. I’ve lived in New England for just over half a decade. I can’t claim to be a lifer and I don’t think I’ll stay there forever, or at least not where I am now. It’s not perfect. People care way more about sports than they do about art. The food isn’t great. The weather sucks. Blah blah blah. I give New England a lot of flack, but I’ll give it one thing. When it comes to an anti-religious standpoint, as the epicenter of the Catholic priest child abuse scandal in the US, New England as a legitimate gripe. That’s not to say anyone else doesn’t — rest assured, they all fucking do, apparently all the way around the planet — but yeah.

Obviously I don’t know the history of anyone in Manchester, New Hampshire’s Dust Prophet in that regard, and I wouldn’t speculate, but even as a general attitude, I get it. You don’t have to have been raped by a priest to say fuck those rapey priests. So when they come along with their debut single “The Big Lie” and lyrics like “Your god’s an empty song/Every right is a wrong,” the position seems to me well justified.

As regards the song though — it’s the first thing Dust Prophets have put out and dig the arrangement on the vocals and the inclusion of keys in the melody. I’m not one to bet on direction given one track, but they seem to have an idea of where they want to be sound-wise, and a pro-shop recording to showcase that. “The Big Lie” is streaming at the bottom of this post. Here’s info culled from social media and the PR wire:

dust prophet the big lie

DUST PROPHET – “THE BIG LIE”

Escape the haze and enter the reality…

Dust Prophet are a 4 piece Stoner-rock/Progressive/Psychedelic-Rock band based in Manchester, New Hampshire. The band consists of Heather Lynn (Vocals); Otto Kinzel (guitar); Sarah Wappler (bass & organ); & Marc Brennan (drums). Our debut single, The Big Lie, is out NOW.

The Big Lie is the first track released by NH based stoner-rock band Dust Prophet. Heavy riffs; Haunting vocals; Fuzzy tones; Weird sounds; Monstrous beats.Take our hand and walk through the smoke…

Mixed by Glenn Smith at Amps vs. Ohms
Mastered by Nicholas Zampiello at New Alliance East.

Dust Prophet is:
Heather Lynn- Vocals.
Otto Kinzel- Guitar.
Sarah Wappler- Bass; Keyboards.
Marc Brennan- Drums.

https://www.facebook.com/dustprophet
https://www.instagram.com/dustprophet/
https://twitter.com/DustProphet
https://dustprophet.bandcamp.com/
https://dustprophet.com/

Dust Prophet, “The Big Lie”

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