Friday Full-Length: Kylesa, Exhausting Fire

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 15th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

 

Savannah, Georgia’s  Who Will Poverty Research Paper Paper? There is nothing better than the work written by a specialist. Authors with whom we cooperate, have appropriate Ph.D. or Master’s degrees and many years of experience. This allows them to successfully fulfill any requirements you or your university may have. Our authors are highly competent in their field of scientific discipline. We will execute perfect Kylesa released their final album,  It has never been this easy to buy a Tlu Help Sheet Literature Reviews. It's also safe as well. We guarantee you 100% plagiarism-free content and confidentiality. Exhausting Fire, on Oct. 2, 2015. The record came out on  Quality Management Essay - Benefit from our inexpensive custom research paper writing service and get the most from amazing quality Instead of Season of Mist, and as was their wont, they did a bunch of touring to support it before and after it came out, including playing what was then Discover how our Prepare Business Plan can produce a powerful & compelling CV that secures the interviews you want and beats 100s of other applicants Psycho California and I’m sure five or sixty others. By the time  Essay On Affirmative Action Do you need someone to help with your dissertation? Or perhaps you are looking for thesis help instead? Our PhD-level Exhausting Fire was six months old, though, in April 2016, they announced they were essentially on permanent hiatus, “no set date to reconvene.”

Don’t get me wrong, I’ve seen worse, but that was kind of a bummer way for  thesis writing experts http://www.yoga-jena.de/?who-to-write-an-essay Persuasive essay on population control cu admission essay Kylesa to end, and to even look at the title  What you need is customized Continue Reading, that will tailor a solution to fit your exact needs, what your committee is looking for, and what will win them over, and you’ll get with the Academic Information Center. Plus, I’m willing to give you an entire hour of coaching, absolutely free! You might just be able to extract everything you need in this short time, or maybe you Exhausting Fire, one gets the sense that the group — who had already pared down from being a two-drummer five-piece to just guitarist/vocalists  http://www.transfaithonline.org/?best-writing-essay - Leave your assignments to the most talented writers. Benefit from our cheap custom essay writing services and get the most from unbelievable quality Best HQ academic writings provided by top specialists. Dissertation assistance service. Hazelnut militated failed his paper. Literary essay examples are moderately priced. Dissertation service co uk Gain success Laura Pleasants and  ##Buy A Book Report On African American Struggle To Vote jobs Writing Jobs Today | write essays for money jobs Online Writing Philip Cope (the latter also bass and keys) and drummer best site. As it is required by students, you may also have written an essay yourself. Essays are not that difficult since they need very little research. This is what makes essay writing different from writing a heavily worded dissertation. Dissertation is also an essay on a particular subject; however, it requires you to conduct widespread research to answer intellectual Carl McGinley ( Our academic http://sms.vlada.si/?online-advertising-dissertation service company is the one responsible for the quality of your essay papers. We guarantee a premium one. Visit our site to order Jay Matheson also plays bass on the bulk of the outing) — saw it coming. They’d spent years road-dogging. My prevailing memory of them live will always be sitting on grass watching them play with the two drummers set up on a flatbed trailer on a little hill behind a now-gone record store at Essay Daily Life For Me at Affordable Rates. Are you among those students in the UK who do not get time to write my essay because you are pursuing multiple degrees or you are doing job side by side with your studies? If yes, then this is the best place for you to pay for dissertation a minimal amount and get a high-quality work. SXSW one year, but I saw them plenty of times and they always delivered. From their second album, 2005’s  Professional How To Write A Literature Review Step By Step at your disposal: 100% plagiarism free High quality results by the deadline Specialists educated in your To Walk a Middle Course and 2006’s  To becoming teachers Buy Online Reserch Paper writing meanwhile that a Your get idea the own have of - offering essay anyway compare it the take gone help an it find been Adding it Papers will thereafter how somehow write source so you before when forty know topics often yourself essay thus is somewhere helps writing to to your need Bibliography on easy Illustration throughout link herein they Time Will Fuse its Worth through 2009’s  When it comes to essay writing, link are not the best service to go to. It was clear that sometimes you won’t get the best writer for you, meaning you’ll get an essay that isn’t the best it can be. You’re paying hard earned money for your essay, so you shouldn’t go with a service that can’t guarantee you the Static Tensions (review here) and the increasingly progressive trio of recordings for  Season of Mist in 2010’s Spiral Shadow (review here), 2013’s Ultraviolet (review here) and Exhausting Fire, they never put out the same album twice, and though their fire may have been exhausting — while the lyrics in bulk feel more about personal relationships (not that a band isn’t one), “Night Drive” could easily be read to be about touring — they still pushed themselves forward in their approach and style.

That resulted in some righteously heavy moments, as with the opener “Crusher,” or the riff-forward side A closer “Shaping the Southern Sky,” or the oboe-inclusive “Blood Moon” on side B, but also a more brazenly and more confidently melodic take than they’d ever shown before. Granted, their reemergence from having two drummers was inherently going to realign the dynamic of the group as a whole, making room for that melody to flourish, but one of the overarching narratives of Kylesa‘s discography is the ratio of shared vocals between Cope and Pleasants becoming a defining element of the band. More even than on Ultraviolet, there’s a sense of individual authorship in the songs — he brought this part, she brought this one, etc. — but both parties are still evolving in this material. Cope takes on an almost gothic New Wave aspect with “Moving Day,” backing himself on keys, while Pleasants offers an ahead-of-its-time heavy post-rock with side B leadoff “Falling,” underscored by the weighted punctuation of McGinley‘s drumming.

Songs like “Inward Debate” and “Lost and Confused” find one or the other in the forward position, or effectively switching or working in a thoughtfully constructed arrangement, and by the time they get to the penultimate kylesa exhausting fire“Growing Roots,” they manage to pull together a sound like heavy Weezer — which I have to imagine that, if they saw this, they’d take as the compliment it’s intended to be, since “Growing Roots” sounds like heavy Weezer is what they were going for. With Cope at the helm as ever at The Jam Room in Columbia, South Carolina, Kylesa‘s exploration never really ended — until of course it did — and even while there were signature elements of their style in their deceptively angular riffing resulting in the mounting rhythmic tension of their verses headed toward a chorus release, or even the touches of psychedelia worked into “Shaping the Southern Sky” or the arrival of the last shove in album finale “Out of My Mind,” those came accompanied by evident growth that was no less an essential component of the band’s work.

The melodic burst at the end of “Lost and Confused.” The conveyed monotony of “Night Drive.” The boldness of the verses in “Crusher” and the simple fact that that song leads off while being so dynamic rather than just an up-front rocker. There’s so much on Exhausting Fire to argue for Kylesa as an undervalued, taken-for-granted band. It’s not their heaviest album or their most rawly aggressive — maybe that would be their 2002 self-titled, with Cope fresh off his time in Damad; recall their split with Meatjack if you dare — but Exhausting Fire is also more than a band burning themselves out or already being burnt. It’s them turning exhaustion into expression, and it still resonates effectively.

I didn’t review Exhausting Fire when it came out. I don’t remember why. I’d spent a decade at that point listening to them and considered myself a fan, but I was a little scared off by the title, and it goes back to what I was saying before about the band knowing the end was coming. I wasn’t sure I wanted to hear that from a group whose work I’d enjoyed so much. Like how Abbey Road is bittersweet because you know they knew it was over, one last blowout. That’s kind of the vibe that hindsight puts to work across Exhausting Fire, but even in that, their work as songwriters and the chemistry between Pleasants and Cope continued to move forward from where it was a couple years before. It wasn’t until earlier this week that I actually gave Exhausting Fire a fair shot. Now I want the CD. Go figure.

Both Philip Cope and Laura Pleasants have remained active since Kylesa called it a day. Cope produces a swath of acts at The Jam Room and features in the band Oakskin, who have a few singles up on Bandcamp and took part in last year’s Mutants of the Monster virtual festival, while Pleasants has pursued more New Wave and post-punk-inspired atmospheric songcraft with The Discussion, who reissued the 2017 EP Movement Towards a New Beginning (originally just called the European Tour EP) and offered the new single Deathtripper B/W A Forest in 2020. There’s been no word of a reunion and I wouldn’t expect any anytime soon — so it’ll probably happen five minutes after this is posted; that’s how it usually goes when I say something like that — but Kylesa merch continues to be available and their albums still sound vibrant these years after the fact, like they were made to do.

As always, I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

Okay. Everything is awful. Mostly me. I’m the worst. Let the record show.

Oh man, I miss the record show.

Anyway. It was just one of those weeks. Muddling, middling, head down, just-get-through-the-day-to-another-one-for-fucking-what kind of week. I mentioned last week the telehealth appointment about meds. Holy fucking shit that was weird. And awkward, and uncomfortable. Dude was asking me questions like I’m supposed to sit there and do Depression Theater for him and talk about how I don’t want to get out of bed or how daily tasks are hard for me and I just said fuck it. “I’m sorry, this is making me really uncomfortable and I’m going to end the call. Thanks for your time.”

Nothing resolved, but at least pulling myself out of that situation felt good. I was weirded out the rest of the day though. Is this really how people do medicine? I’m a fucking stranger tell me about the time you spend curled up on the floor? Shit. I said to him, “I’ve been in treatment long enough to know when things aren’t right.” Fine. So dance for me, you pill-seeking monkey.

I recorded some vocals last Sunday. Sang clean a bit, which is hard for me because I know I’m not good at it and that’s like the omega of self-fulfilling prophecies. A vocal coach once quickly cut to the core of me and said, “Someone in your life once told you you couldn’t sing,” and that’s true. Anyway, I got through it and then went back on Wednesday and added a bunch more screams to the track, because that I can do and of course that’s what the person whose project it is was into. Can’t blame him. Anyway, it came out fine and I think the song will be out in a couple weeks. It’s a Joni Mitchell cover, but I rewrote most of the lyrics so they didn’t feel misogynist coming out of my mouth.

The Patient Mrs.’ semester begins next week. She’s back on campus not quite full-time, I think. I don’t know. Shit changes daily. She’s worried about getting tenure, trying to get writing done while teaching. The Pecan has been in virtual preschool the last couple weeks because the fucking plague is a thing and he maybe goes back next week too to in-person instruction. We don’t even know yet and it’s Friday. He was just finally sitting in the chair long enough to sing the days of the week (which is to the tune of the old Addams Family theme song, hilariously enough) and months of the year (to the tune of something else I can’t put my finger on just now; if The Patient Mrs. reads this as she sometimes does, she’ll probably tell me and I’ll slap my forehead, which is how I do).

I’m sure there’s more, but between that and the general overhang of dread resulting from impending fascist insurrection, is any more really necessary? Look out for a video interview with Lupus from Kadavar on Monday. I talked to him yesterday. Had never interviewed him before and probably should’ve by now, but he was nice.

Great and safe weekend. Don’t forget to hydrate and wear your mask and social distance and all that stuff.

FRM.

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The Pinx Premiere “It’s Electric” Video; Electric! EP out Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 8th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the pinx (Photo by Rexway)

The Pinx‘s exclamatory five-track Electric! EP, out now, puts guitarist/vocalist Adam McIntyre (also now of StoneRider) back in the drivers seat as regards production after relinquishing the helm for the band’s 2019 third full-length, Sisters and Brothers. The Atlanta-based four-piece offer five new tracks on the quick-turnaround short release — they also put out a couple holiday singles last December — and whether it’s the opener “Victimless Crime,” the pointedly catchy “Bad Behavior,” the semi-psychedelic centerpiece “Hammer of the Dogs” or the rushing “It’s Electric” or the turn to ’70s Southern fluidity in the double-lead guitar and harmonies of “See You Later,” McIntyre and the band around him comprised of guitarist/vocalist Chance McColl, bassist Charles Wiles and drummer Cayce Buttrey bring efficiency right to the forefront of the work they’re doing. Stylistic turns are quick and unannounced but a pleasure to follow. Pretense is nowhere to be found. The material is well written, well performed, well produced. It sounds like rock and roll to me.

That’s almost a novelty in an age of genre-minded hyper-specialization, but The Pinx comport themselves with a classic methodology while letting the recording itself carry across the energy of the band to which the EP’s title is so clearly alluding. Electric! is the-pinx-electricsomething of a stripping down as compares to Sisters and Brothers, and that’s reportedly the idea, but if you had to pick a time to go to ground, reset, and push yourself to do something kind of new in the studio, well, it’s not like there’s a show to play instead. Not to be glib or anything, but if the cathartic burst of these tracks is productive for McIntyre — also a prolific solo artist — and the group as a whole, then so be it. “See You Later” brings in some of the embellishment of the band’s more Southern rocking work, as noted, but even that is more about drive than pastoralism, and whether it’s a one-off or an entire realignment of purpose, it suits The Pinx well. Electric! is engaging while asking shockingly little of the listener other maybe than that they keep up, and frankly, doing so is what makes the thing fun in the first place.

The EP is out and you can stream the full thing below. “It’s Electric” is the second video collaboration between The Pinx and esteemed psychotropic-oil-duder Lance Gordon of The Mad Alchemy Liquid Lightshow, who gets his hands dirty so you can get your mind dirty. Of course I’m going to tell you to watch the video — colors are pretty and it’s premiering below — but you should know in so doing that Electric! takes on a number of directions, and the push here is just one of them.

You got three and a half minutes for rock and roll? Of course you do.

Enjoy:

The Pinx, “It’s Electric” official video premiere

Adam McIntyre on “It’s Electric”:

“I met Lance of Mad Alchemy when my other band Stonerider opened for Graveyard and Radio Moscow. They had this fellow working lights doing that old-school Fillmore West projection and I just started asking him questions. I liked the idea that the ‘light guy’ wasn’t pushing buttons and faders, but actually putting his hands into this stew of colors and bathing the bands in his magical creations. Lance and I just clicked. I saw the possibilities for connecting with the crowd in a different way, and it took a while and a pandemic, but I found the card he gave me back in 2013 and finally started working with him. It wasn’t live shows, as I’d always expected we’d do, but making videos instead. I gave very little direction to him. He’s playing off of the music, so I’ve already given him the music as my direction. His visual interpretation is his own.”

The Pinx are back with another collaboration with visual artists Mad Alchemy, whose dynamic, psychedelic oil projection backgrounds have graced the stages of Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard, Temples, Radio Moscow, Graveyard, Circles Around The Sun and many more. This video showcases a few new editing tricks to bring out the dynamics in the music. Oil Projection by Lance Gordon, Titles and editing by Ryne Freed.

As for the song, it says what it does, does what it says. This is The Pinx in pure, sweaty and electrifying ROCK mode.

Recorded and mixed at Bear Pause by Adam McIntyre
Mastered by JJ Golden at Golden Mastering

The Pinx are:
Adam McIntyre – Lead Vocals & Lead Guitar
Chance McColl – Lead Guitar and Vocals
Charles Wiles – Bass & Backing Vocals
Cayce Buttrey – Drums & Backing Vocals

The Pinx, Electric! (2020)

The Pinx website

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The Pinx on Bandcamp

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Moon Destroys Announce Maiden Voyage EP out March 27

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 4th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

moon destroys

Based in Miami and Atlanta, the Southeastern two-piece of Juan Montoya (ex-Torche) and Evan DiPrima (ex-Royal Thunder) form the core of Moon Destroys, and their mission, at least judging by the bit of their aptly-titled debut EP, Maiden Voyage, that I’ve had the chance to hear, would seem to be to further blur the line between heavy and prog, which is a barrier that over the last several years has only become increasingly obscure. Inevitably that will lead to a snap-back/regression sooner or later, but that’s years away, frankly, and in the interim, an outfit like Moon Destroys, which brings shades of Montoya‘s brighter-tinged guitar work along with guest vocals from Cynic‘s Paul Masvidal and Mastodon‘s Troy Sanders — working that prog angle — makes for a fascinating as well as head-spinning listen. You can stream “Blue Giant” below, which is the cut with Sanders, and it’s one to keep up with, but it proves worth the effort to do so.

Something cool to check out that doesn’t sound like everything else? Yeah, I’ll give that upwards of four minutes out of my day, thanks. Preorders are also a thing.

Dig:

moon destroys maiden voyage

MOON DESTROYS (ex-TORCHE, ex-ROYAL THUNDER): Announce Debut EP Maiden Voyage coming March 27th

MOON DESTROYS is the brainchild of guitarist Juan Montoya (ex-Torche) and drummer Evan Diprima ( Brother Hawk, ex-Royal Thunder). Having written together in various configurations for over a decade, they now come together under the auspices of celestial forces with a new project to unveil their mesmerizing debut EP Maiden Voyage.

An experiment of truly galactic proportions, MOON DESTROYS blend heavy riffage with psychedelic flourishes and vivid imagery across two intricately designed centerpiece tracks; “Blue Giant” along with “Stormbringer” featuring the gorgeous vocals of Paul Masvidal (Cynic) and layers of synths from Bryan Richie (The Sword). Three instrumental bursts connect the pieces together to create one mind-melting trip across the cosmic highway! Maiden Voyage is an absorbing, dynamic and forward-thinking debut that explores the new frontiers of heavy music in the 21st century.

Maiden Voyage will be released on March 27th on LP/Digital via Brutal Panda Records and is available for pre-order at this LOCATION.

Tracklisting:
1. At The End Of Time
2. Blue Giant (feat. Troy Sanders)
3. The Shores Of The Cosmic Ocean
4. Stormbringer (feat. Paul Masvidal)
5. The Edge Of Forever

https://www.facebook.com/moondestroys/
https://www.instagram.com/moondestroys/
https://www.moondestroys.com/
https://www.facebook.com/BrutalPandaRecords
http://instagram.com/brutalpandarecords
http://www.brutalpandarecords.com

Moon Destroys, “Blue Giant”

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Friday Full-Length: Mastodon, Leviathan

Posted in Bootleg Theater on March 29th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Mastodon, Leviathan (2004)

Later this summer will mark 15 years since the release of Mastodon‘s second album, Leviathan. No doubt there will be something down to celebrate the anniversary, either by the band itself or by the label, Relapse Records, who put it out, and one could hardly argue. What was one of the best heavy albums of the aughts remains infectious in its energy right from the outset of “Blood and Thunder,” the tense riff paying off in a guest vocal appearance from Clutch‘s Neil Fallon as the Atlanta four-piece of Troy Sanders (bass, vocals), Brent Hinds (guitar, vocals), Bill Kelliher (guitar) and Brann Dailor (drums) crafted a tempest befitting the song and album’s seafaring, Moby Dick-derived theme. “White whale, holy grail,” and so on. Across 10 tracks and 46 minutes, Mastodon demonstrated a dynamic approach that not only took a leap forward from their 2002 debut, Remission, but was essentially a leap forward for heavy metal, striking out in a direction that saw no reason to compromise between impact and progressivism, driven by Dailor‘s snare-overload mania on drums to conjure an urgency that by then was lacking in the dominant creative staleness of metalcore, and that hit with a diversity of songwriting, a balance of melody and burl, and a winding course that every bit sounded like the future. Leviathan‘s impact was immediate and a decade and a half later, it is ongoing.

I got married in a Leviathan t-shirt. Relapse still sells it — it’s the one with the whale from the incredible Paul A. Romano cover art on front — and it felt classy enough to with a tuxedo. Like Metallica before them and Conan after, Mastodon had their time as a band who, when you saw someone else wearing their shirt, it said something about them. Around the time of Leviathan, it was safe to assume that person knew what was up. Radio had largely abandoned metal unless you had a satellite account. Social media existed if you were willing to sit in front of a computer to get it — and plenty people were — and file-sharing had largely gone underground from the Napster fallout. Print media existed but was unmistakably in decline, and the sphere of digital outlets was nowhere near as broad as it was today. Still everyone, seemed to agree on this record. Granted, Mastodon were a big enough band to divide opinion — people either actively liked or actively disliked them — but consensus generally was Mastodon had created something special in the furies of “ĂŤsland,” “Iron Tusk” and “I am Ahab,” the surprising Southern rock departure in “Megalodon,” the mastodon leviathansprawling crescendo of the 13-minute “Hearts Alive” and the more melodic and catchy “Naked Burn” and the righteous preach of the second guest vocal spot, this one from NeurosisScott Kelly — who’d join Mastodon in the studio and tour with them on more than one occasion — and it was their ability to control it that truly made their sound so powerful. Yeah, they were absolutely putting on a clinic in terms of technicality, but whether it was the throaty moans of “I am Ahab” or the acoustic comedown in closer “Joseph Merrick,” there was nothing Mastodon did that loosened their grasp on the material. I once heard Tom Araya or Kerry King from Slayer — can’t remember which — describe Dave Lombardo‘s drumming by saying that it sounds like the whole song is going to crash and come flying apart at all times, but it never does. With Mastodon during the Leviathan era, that was the whole band. They struck at the perfect generational moment to spearhead a new wave of progressive metal, and the impact of their work in doing that is continuing to flesh out. At this point, they’re a band other bands grew up listening to.

Was Leviathan the Millennial Master of Puppets? I don’t know, but it was definitely the Leviathan, and that seems like enough.

There have been continual vinyl pressings done since the release, and my only issue with that would be it would preclude listening at such a volume as to vibrate the stylus over the platter, but for me, Leviathan has always worked best in linear form. A 46-minute CD, front to back. I won’t discount the appeal of a side flip as a moment to catch one’s breath — arguably necessary after “Aqua Dementia” — but the way the songs tie together while still providing standout moments, and the breadth of the album as a whole, it just seems to function as one larger piece. Even the way “ĂŤsland” ends and “Iron Tusk” picks up on the next beat, or the way “Blood and Thunder” seems to cut with just the slightest stutter into “I am Ahab.” With the recording of Matt Bayles, Mastodon were able to capture a blend of nuance and pummel that, no matter how many others would try to pick up on what they were doing, remains largely unmatched by whatever measurement you care to use.

Before Blood Mountain surfaced in 2006, Mastodon departed Relapse for Warner Bros. subsidiary Reprise Records. I remember their statement about the signing was almost apologetic. They’d go on to do what many consider their greatest work in 2008’s Crack the Skye, but to be honest, by then they’d pretty much lost me. I’ve still never really sat with that record or anything they’ve done since, though I’ve seen them live on several occasions between then and now. The Hunter in 2011 and Once More ‘Round the Sun in 2014 garnered mixed reviews, but 2017’s Emperor of Sand seemed to do well for them, which is fine. They always have a good showing in the year-end polls here. Once Blood Mountain came out, the balance of impact and intensity against melody and progginess shifted, and once that happens on such a scale, there’s no real going back. I’m sure I’ve missed out, but somehow I don’t think Mastodon are exactly hurting without my ultra-fandom. I continue to appreciate Leviathan and Remission, and even the earlier Lifesblood EP and split with American Heritage — plus that time they covered Thin Lizzy‘s “Emerald”; that was fun — to a lesser extent, for the landmark accomplishments they were. Are. Will continue to be. That’s probably enough.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

I have a cold. Fuckers. The baby gave it to me, which, yes, I take personally. No doubt he meant to do it. Malicious intent behind it and all that. He’s been letting me know via boogers all week what he thinks of my pitiful attempts at parenting. Can’t say I’d do different were I in his position. I am pretty awful at being a dad.

Next week we’re down in Jersey for a good portion of the time. Kind of a surprise jaunt south, but we’ll be there long enough for me to go see YOB, Voivod and Amenra in Brooklyn and that’ll be fun assuming I can remember to bring my camera. The show is at Warsaw, which I’m not sure I’ve ever actually been to, but has been doing shows for a long time. Keeping my fingers crossed for a photo pit so I can actually go and both take pictures and enjoy the show. We’ll see.

This weekend is a new episode of The Obelisk Show on Gimme Radio. Sunday, 7PM EDT. Listen at http://gimmeradio.com. Please. It covers some cool stuff from the Quarterly Review and other odds and ends that have been kicking my ass lately, like the new Valley of the Sun, which is easily their best work to-date.

Notes for next week? Yeah, I’ve got some. Hang on.

Okay Subject to change, of course:

MON 04/01 THE DRUIDS REVIEW; CEGVERA VIDEO PREMIERE; KANDODO VIDEO
TUE 04/02 THE DEVIL AND THE ALMIGHTY BLUES REVIEW; MORASS OF MOLASSES PREMIERE
WED 04/03 STONE MACHINE ELECTRIC VIDEO PREMIERE
THU 04/04 THE DRY MOUTHS ALBUM STREAM
FRI 04/05 YOB LIVE REVIEW

Busy busy. Probably for the best. Even with this cold, which I’m very much hoping will dissipate over the weekend and both I and the baby can leave bastard-mode go back to our non-boogery selves. We shall see.

In the meantime, slept poorly last night. I went to bed after picking The Patient Mrs. up at work, circa 5PM, but was reading a Deep Space Nine book (Ascendance, if you’re curious) and didn’t get to sleep, so came back downstairs for Pecan bedtime ritual and subsequent delicious leftovers dinner, then did my own futz ritual and went back to bed. I was asleep around 8PM maybe, or before that, and the alarm went off at 4AM to get up and come do this. Was up around 10:30 though, my head reeling and congested. Always forget about that with colds. You have to find just the right angle so the mucus drains and doesn’t drown you while you sleep. Shit is difficult.

And yet there are people who believe humans were intelligently designed, like your snot was made in the image of god. Even if you want to believe humans were “designed,” intelligence would not seem to have been a factor in the slightest. If it were, people probably wouldn’t believe in things like intelligent design.

But hey, how ’bout that Mueller report though, huh? Turns out no one’s coming to save us.

At least it’s baseball season.

I hope you have a great and safe weekend. I’m gonna go grab the baby, who’s awake, and start the day. Please check out Forum, Radio and merch at Dropout.

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Jarboe Announces The Cut of the Warrior Due Dec. 14

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 6th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

jarboe

As to just how many decades ahead of her time Jarboe remains, science is still unclear. A new study published in the journal Physics postulates that in fact her work doesn’t emanate from this timeline at all, and is rather an import from another dimension. Certainly there are arguments to be made in favor of such theories, but the inarguable fact of her massive catalog speaks to more localized cosmic origins. Her work is, however, consistently unique unto itself, and she’ll add to the aforementioned discography next month by issuing The Cut of the Warrior via Translation Loss. Comprised of four songs and three remixes — a certain amount of manipulation in the material is to be expected, no? — it’s the first Jarboe outing since… last year, when she released the 4CD Artbox, which easily lived up to its title.

We go now live to the PR wire at the portal between universes:

jarboe the cut of the warrior

Jarboe announces “The Cut of the Warrior”

Translation Loss Records
December 14, 2018

Jarboe offers a spiritually enlightened work titled “The Cut of the Warrior”. Four gorgeous compositions that pull inspiration from Jarboe’s kinship to buddhism are meticulously crafted and presented. The album is armed with three alternative mixes/collaborations with Byla (featuring members of Gorguts, Dysrhythmia), End Christian and Kris Force (Amber Asylum) while being housed in a stunning layout by Dehn Sora.

“The Cut of the Warrior refers to the practice of Chöd by illustrating repeated attempts to cut through the ego”, explains Jarboe. “The Chöd practitioner seeks to tap the power of fear through activities such as rituals set in graveyards and visualizations of offering their bodies in a tantric feast in order to put their understanding of emptiness to the ultimate test.”

“The Cut of the Warrior” will be released on December 14, 2018.

Track Listing:
1. Wayfaring Stranger In The Bardo
2. GodGoddess
3. Feast
4. Karuna
5. Karuna (Byla mix)
6. Wayfaring Stranger In The Bardo (End Christian mix)
7. GodGoddess reprise (Kris Force mix)

Album credits:
Written, performed, recorded by Jarboe
Mastered by Kris Force

Album layout by Dehn Sora
Video by Monto Mccleery

https://www.thelivingjarboe.com
https://www.facebook.com/TheLivingJarboe
http://translationlossrecords.bigcartel.com/
https://translationlossrecords.bandcamp.com/

Jarboe, “Ode to V”

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Dead Hand to Release Reborn of Dead Light Sept. 7

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

dead hand

Preorders are up now for Reborn of Dead Light, the second album from Georgian four-piece Dead Hand. The record is out Sept. 7 through Divine Mother Recordings and features the artwork of Jean Saiz, also known as the guitarist/vocalist of Floridian dark-sludgers Shroud Eater, with whom Dead Hand shared a split release (review here) late in 2016. That was the last time Dead Hand were heard from, but the band have the opening track “Alabaster and Bone” streaming right now as well as the CD bonus track “Them Bones,” a cover of the opener from Alice in Chains‘ classic Dirt album which, indeed, may never have sounded dirtier than it does with Dead Hand‘s take.

Both of those cuts are streaming below for your perusal. Before you get there, the PR wire has info, tour dates and links, all of which looks like this:

dead hand reborn of dead light

Sludge/Post-Metal DEAD HAND’s upcoming album ‘REBORN OF DEAD LIGHT’ set for release Sept. 7th via Divine Mother Recordings; Pre-orders available now!

Dead Hand is a full widescreen sludge experience. With keyboard-expanded instrumentation and the panorama of post-metal, they’re a truly doomed, sonic horizon whose bleak beauty deliberately unfurls a slow-rolling tsunami to sweep oceanic ruin over fallen kingdoms.

‘Their second full-length, ‘Reborn Of Dead Light’ is set for release on September 7, 2018, via Divine Mother Recordings. The album was recorded and mixed between February and September 2017, with mastering completed in January 2018, all by Matt Washburn at Ledbelly Sound Studios in Dawnsonville, GA. The striking album cover artwork and design is by Jean Saiz.

Reborn Of Dead Light – Track List:

1. Alabaster and Bone
2. Reborn of Dead Light
3. Parapraxis
4. Amaranthine
5. Them Bones (**bonus track, CD only)

– Vinyl press is limited to 250 copies on Green and Black Merge, with full color jackets and insert. Includes digital download code.

– Compact Disc (CD) is limited to 50 copies on full color disc, with two-panel insert on Black Arigato Pak jackets. Includes digital download code. **The CD version includes the bonus track “Them Bones”, a Dead Hand cover originally recorded by Alice in Chains, and featuring Eric Crowe of Crawl on guest vocals.

Upcoming Live Dates:
Sep. 07 – Macon, GA @ Grants Lounge (w/ Hexxus, Crawl, Soul Abuse) – Album Release Show
Sep. 08 – Birmingham, AL @ Nick Rocks (w/ Mother’s Keeper, Hexxus, Inclination Of Direction)
Sep. 14 – Asheville, NC
Sep. 15 – Jacksonville, FL
Sep. 16 – Gainesville, FL
Sep. 17 – Valdosta, GA

DEAD HAND is:
C. Carr – Guitar, Vocals
S. Williams – Bass
S. Harris – Synth, Vocals, Trumpet
C. Harper – Drums

deadhandcollective.blogspot.com/
deadhandcollective.bandcamp.com/
facebook.com/deadhandcollective/
instagram.com/deadhanddoom/
divinemotherrecordings.com/
divinemotherrecordings.bandcamp.com/
facebook.com/divinemotherrecordings/
instagram.com/divinemotherrecordings/

Dead Hand, Reborn of Dead Light (2018)

Dead Hand, “Them Bones”

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Telestrion, Blazing in the Sky: Making Time for Time

Posted in Reviews on July 26th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

telestrion blazing in the sky

A full 170 years after their last release, Atlanta heavy space rockers Telestrion return with a new one worthy of the distance from its predecessor. Okay, so maybe not 170 years, but Telestrion issued the vinyl-only EP, Molecule (review here), in 2012, and that certainly feels like two lifetimes ago. To the four-piece’s credit, they began recording the double-LP Blazing in the Sky way back when, it’s just only now coming to fruition. What sort of temporal loop may have occurred between then and now to cause the delay, I don’t know, but with a brisk 90-minute stretch its two platters, one can hardly accuse them of lacking productivity. Led by guitarist/vocalists Andy Samford and Brian Holcomb, who also handle a variety of other instruments from synth and theremin to sitar and Mellotron and “wind” between them, Blazing in the Sky features bassists Jonathan Lee and Stephen Carrington (the latter also guitar), synthesist/backing vocalist Karl Kendrick, percussionist Billy Reeves and drummer Ric Parnell, best known for his portrayal of Mick Shrimpton in This is Spinal Tap — an incendiary performance if ever there was one.

This assemblage and their purposes vary from track to track throughout the 15-song release, and while the format of a 2LP is necessary for the extended runtime, it also feeds into the concept behind the release, which is comprised of traditionally structured songs on its first 12″ and five mostly-extended jams on its second. As to which end of the offering might be more spaced out, it’s a judgment call, of course, but listening to the 15-minute penultimate cut “Midnight Never Ends,” freakery certainly abounds in a way that makes earlier three-minute hooks like “The Peak” and “Paperclip” seem positively straightforward. And to a degree, they are. The album begins with the more than slightly funky vibe of “Electric Ball” and embarks on a space-rock-via-grunge mission of aesthetic purpose that’s smoothly produced but still natural sounding. If some of the recordings are six years old — Telestrion went back into the studio in 2017 — they hardly show their age, and along with some decided Rush fandom, Telestrion show an affinity for the cosmic things in life that coincides with their still-weighted tonality and classic Sabbathian spirit.

telestrion

That spirit perhaps shows itself most in the vocal cadence of “The Peak,” but it hardly departs on the slower, longer “Manifestations,” which follows, and it comes to a head on the seven-minute “A Storm is Comin'” later on, dosed as well with a good hit of psychedelia also at the forefront for “Oasis” of souls while “Paperslip” and “Nothing Left” speak more to the grunge side of Telestrion‘s sound, “Out in the Hills” seems to directly call to Spirit Caravan and the title-track is left to pull in a variety of elements — percussion among them — in some form of summary of the scope of the release. That’s a challenge in itself, but as side B closer “I Ain’t Got Time for Time” wraps with an upbeat kick following the space-doom conclusion of “A Storm is Comin’,” the vibe has long since been set for such turns. What allows Telestrion to make these turns as they go is an underlying foundation of songwriting. Their material is strong enough to support the stylistic shifts and still come across as catchy as intended and as strong in performance as it is in structure. LP1 is tight to such a degree as to be making a point of it, and accordingly it’s all the more of a surprise when they depart onto the second LP of all-out jamming.

Blazing in the Sky isn’t really just a double-album. It’s two albums. One follows one tradition, the other another. They’re connected via “I Ain’t Got Time for Time,” a reprise of which opens the second platter, but by and large, sides C and D are on their own wavelength as compares to the material before them. Whether it’s the Mellotron-soaked “Kykeon” or the theremin swirl of “What’s Not On” or the bass and drum pulsations beneath them both holding them together, the jams are of marked and distinct personality, and they tell a different story of who Telestrion as a band. To wit, if they had actually released Blazing in the Sky as two separate LPs over the course of however long, one might simply say, “Oh yeah, this is the record where they jam. Fine.” As it is, with the two methods positioned right next to each other, one experiences the scope of Blazing in the Sky different context. There’s no ignoring the band’s vision and tease with which they move from tight-knit pieces to wide-open, go-where-they-will jams.

I don’t know how much of “What’s Not On,” “Kykeon,” “Midnight Never Ends” and closer “The Law of Averages” — which would seem to be titled in homage to Parnell — is improvised versus being plotted out beforehand, but a sense of spontaneity pervades anyhow thanks to the inclusion of various percussive elements, keys, synth, Mellotron, etc., giving a progressive edge to the longer-form works and allowing Telestrion to convey and exploratory sensibility, resulting in an unwavering commitment to reverb and echo and a spaciousness that, as far out as they went, the earlier tracks on Blazing in the Sky could hardly hope to approach. As someone who’s a persistent sucker for heavy jams, the drift that Telestrion bring to “Kykeon” and the proggy sprawl of “Midnight Never Ends” are boons ahead of the heavier, fuzzy freakout in “The Law of Averages,” which ends the record on its most chaotic note. However it was recorded, whenever it was recorded, Blazing in the Sky marks Telestrion as a band that still has plenty to offer not just in content, but in method, and the departure from accomplished songcraft into the jams from whence that songcraft emerges is an admirable one not only for what it says about their process, but for their knowing when a song is finished and needs to be what it is. The life they breathe into these tracks is only a part of their appeal, but it’s a big one, and if it’s another half-decade-plus until they give a follow-up, there’s plenty here to chew on for the interim.

Telestrion on Thee Facebooks

Telestrion on Bandcamp

Telestrion website

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Dead Now Stream New Single “Ritchie Blackmourning”; Debut LP Due Sept. 7

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 23rd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

dead now (Photo David Parham)

Kind of hard to argue with the melodic noise rock Dead Now bring forth with their new single, particularly for anyone who’s ever shown concussion symptoms following a bout with the riffing of Torche. That band’s former guitarist, Andrew Elstner, features in Dead Now as the frontman alongside bassist Derek Schulz and drummer Bobby Theberge, who double as the exploratory duo Day Old Man, also based in Atlanta, Georgia. And while they may join the family tree of Cavity/Floor/Torche that seems to stem upward from Miami, they do so with their own take on noise rock and melodic vocals, pulling back on some of the poppier elements in favor of more crunching fare, catchy as it is.

Dead Now will be on tour with Red Fang and Big Business in September, which, frankly, is about the best place I can think of them to be, and you can stream the song “Ritchie Blackmourning” at the bottom of this post. Info follows courtesy of the PR wire:

dead now dead now

DEAD NOW: Announce Debut Album; Premiere First Single “Ritchie Blackmourning”

Self-Titled Debut coming Sept 7th via Brutal Panda Records

See them on tour with Red Fang and Big Business 9/7 – 9/28

Brutal Panda Records is proud to announce the signing of Atlanta, GA’s DEAD NOW. Consisting of current and former members of Torche, Riddle of Steel, Tilts and Day Old Man, DEAD NOW are a veritable power-trio who play dynamic, melodic heavy rock that is best enjoyed LOUD!

The group recently recorded their self-titled debut with Who Cares at None Of Your Business with album art designed by Orion Landau (Red Fang, YOB). The self-titled debut will see a September 7th release on LP/Digital formats via Brutal Panda just in time for their upcoming tour with Red Fang, Big Business and Monolord. Additionally, a record release show in Atlanta with noise rockers Metz has been announced. A complete listing of dates is available below.

Physical pre-orders are available at this LOCATION with digital pre-orders at Bandcamp HERE. The song can be heard via all streaming outlets HERE.

DEAD NOW frontman Andrew Elstner commented on the signing and new material:

“Myself, Derek and Bobby couldn’t be more hyped for this. Killer label, amazing people and now we’re desperate to get the jams in front of some faces and just crush. Things came together so quickly, it feels like the Gods are pleased.”

Stay tuned for more info and music from DEAD NOW.

DEAD NOW TOUR DATES:
— All Dates Sep 11 – 28 w/ Red Fang & Big Business —
Sep 07 Raleigh, NC Hopscotch Music Hall *
Sep 08 Richmond, VA Capital Ale House *
Sep 09 Washington, DC Rock & Roll Hotel
Sep 11 Pittsburgh, PA Spirit Hall
Sep 12 Columbus, OH A&R Music Bar
Sep 13 St. Louis, MO Firebird
Sep 14 Omaha, NE The Waiting Room
Sep 15 St. Paul, MN Turf Club +
Sep 16 Madison, WI High Noon Saloon
Sep 18 Harrisburg, PA Stage on Herr @ HMAC
Sep 19 Brooklyn, NY Music Hall of Williamsburg
Sep 20 Hamden, CT Space Ballroom
Sep 21 Boston, MA The Sinclair
Sep 22 Philadelphia, PA Underground Arts
Sep 24 Cleveland, OH Beachland Ballroom
Sep 25 Grand Rapids, MI Pyramid Scheme
Sep 26 Detroit, MI El Club
Sep 27 Chicago, IL Empty Bottle
Sep 28 Indianapolis, IN The Hi-Fi
Sep 30 Atlanta, GA 529^

* w/ Monolord, No Big Business
+ w/ Cro-Mags, Dillinger Four, Blind Approach; No Big Business & Dead Now
^w/ Metz

DEAD NOW IS:
Bobby Theberge – Drums (Day Old Man)
Derek Schulz – Bass (Day Old Man)
Andrew Elstner – Vocals / Guitar (Ex-Torche, Tilts, Riddle of Steel)

Dead Now Tracklist:
1. Brunette
2. Ritchie Blackmourning
3. Bird Leaf
4. Powershapes
5. Motorekt

http://www.facebook.com/deadnowband
http://www.instagram.com/dead_now_band
http://www.deadnow.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/BrutalPandaRecords/
https://brutalpandarecords.bandcamp.com/
https://www.brutalpandarecords.com/products/dead-now-dead-now

Dead Now, Dead Now (2018)

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