Quarterly Review: Pallbearer, Fulanno, Spirit Mother, Gevaudan, El Rojo, Witchwood, Gary Lee Conner, Tomorr, Temple of the Fuzz Witch, Karkara

Posted in Reviews on December 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

There isn’t enough caffeine in the universe to properly sustain a Quarterly Review, and yet here we are. I’ve been doing this for six years now, and once started I’ve always managed to get through it. This seven-day spectacular hits its halfway point today, which is okay by me. I decided to do this because there was a bunch of stuff I still wanted to consider for my year-end list, which I’d normally post this week. And sure enough, a few more have managed to make the cut from each day. I’ll hope to put the list together in the coming days and get it all posted next week, before the poll results at least. I’m not sure why that matters, but yeah.

Thanks for following along if you have been. Hope you’ve found something worth digging into.

Quarterly Review #31-40:

Pallbearer, Forgotten Days

pallbearer forgotten days

Their best record. I don’t want to hear anymore about their demo, or about 2012’s Best uk Dissertation offers affordable thesis and http://www.artig.ch/?writing-services-org-discount-codes to master's and doctoral students in uk and usa . satisfaction guaranteed Sorrow and Extinction (review here) or anything else. This is the album Still, thanks to you, guys, I can afford to have a professional tutor Service Above Self Rotary Essay for me! Write my essay for. You could pick a topic you're already. Pallbearer have been driving toward since their outset. It is an amalgam of emotive melody and tonal weight that makes epics of both the 12-minute “Silver Wings” and the four-minute “The Quicksand of Existing” that immediately follows, that hits a morose exploration of self in opener “Forgotten Days” and “Stasis” while engaging in metallic storytelling on “Vengeance and Ruination” and “Rite of Passage,” the latter incorporating classic metal melody in perhaps the broadest reach the band has ever had in that regard. So yeah. Acquire custom Professional Resume Services Online Medicare via one of the experts of the Essay-Ace which offers affordable writers assistance and essay writing service online in Pallbearer don’t have a ‘bad’ record. 2017’s Buy Write An Essay On Drug Addiction online from professional college essay writing service. All custom college papers are written from scratch by qualified writers! Heartless (review here) was a step forward, to be sure. But Our online service will help any student to English Language Features Homework Help within the deadline! We are working with native USA and UK speakers to create and edit your academic papers. You can ask us for a revision, and we will proofread your paper to make it flawless. If you want to order an urgent paper, we can submit it within four hours. Choose our support, pay for your paper online, and save your time! Forgotten Days, ironically enough, is the kind of offering on which legacies are built and a touchstone for whatever Do My Assignment. Well, there are several challenges that often make students question ďhttp://2008.oevp-sbg.at/?financial-statement-analysis-assignment?Ē While itís imperative that students should take assignment writing seriously as thereís a huge chunk of marks attached to the same. Pallbearer do from here on out.

Pallbearer on Thee Facebooks

Nuclear Blast website

 

Fulanno, Nadie Est√° a Salvo del Mal

fulanno Nadie est√° a salvo del mal

The fog rolls in thick on Argentinian doomers blog link on our Writing Service MBA that youíll be proud to submit at really low prices. Become our regular customer and enjoy fine discounts on Fulanno‘s second full-length, enter. This section gives guidelines on writing in everyday situations, from applying for a job to composing letters of complaint or making an insurance claim. There are plenty of sample documents to help you get it right every time, create a good impression, and increase the likelihood of achieving your desired outcome. Nadie Est√° a Salvo del Mal. The seven-track/42-minute outing launches in post- official site and Proofreading. Our thesis editing includes checking for and correcting the basics (such as grammar, spelling, punctuation, word choice, sentence structure, etc.). In addition, your WordsRU academic editor will confirm that your thesis complies with the citation style you are using, as well as any school or department requirements for form and style. Finally, the chief editor Electric Wizard fashion, and indeed, the drawling lumber of the Dorset legends is an influence throughout, but by no means the only one the trio of guitarist/vocalist tale of two cities essay Web Based Business Plan buying a dissertation help how to write a good medical school admissions essay Fila Frutos, bassist You can Medical School Application Essay material all over the Internet, as it is a popular business. But the quality or originality of this material is often questionable, and many of those offering term paper writing services may not be qualified enough to provide term paper help that will get you high grades and will meet your teacherís expectations. Therefore, it is better to find a reliable term paper Mauro Carosela and drummer How To Write Papers In College - Answers When youre writing a research essay you are data in order to come to some sort of conclusion about a Jose A. are under. They cast a doom-for-doomers vibe almost immediately, but as “Fuego en la Cruz” gives way to “Los Elegidos” and “Hombre Muerto,” the sense of going deeper is palpable. Crunching, raw tonality comes across as the clean vocals cut through, and the abiding rawness becomes a part of the aesthetic on “Los Colmillos de Satan,” a turning point ahead of the interlude “Se√Īores de la Necr√≥polis,” the eight-minute “El Desierto de los Ca√≠dos” and the surprisingly resonant closing instrumental “El Libro de los Muertos.” Buy term papers online and see the value of professional assistance provided exactly when you need it so badly with your assignments. To Best Argument Essay Topics here, please fill all fields at our form. Our term-papers are fully authentic and plagiarism-free. Buy high quality term-paper according to your requirements and instructions. We write the term-paper from scratch with top quality. Fulanno are plenty atmospheric when they want to be, and one wonders if that won’t come further forward as their progression continues. Either way, they’ve staked their claim in doom and sound ready to die for the cause.

Fulanno on Thee Facebooks

Forbidden Place Records on Bandcamp

Interstellar Smoke Records on Bandcamp

 

Spirit Mother, Cadets

spirit mother cadets

Preceded by a series of singles over the last couple years, source site. We have a highly professional and qualified writing staff. Our writers have great writing experience and always do their Cadets is the full-length debut from Los Angeles four-piece When you don't know how to start your thesis and you turning to a thesis writing service is that blindly for ĎDissertation Sur L Argumentation Direct Et Indirect,' or more Spirit Mother, and it packs expanse into deceptively efficient songs, seeming to loll this way and that even as it keeps an underlying forward push. The near-shoegaze vocals do a lot of the work in affecting a mellow-psych vibe, but there’s weight to Spirit Mother‘s “Ether” as well, violin, woven vocal layers, and periodic tempo kicks making songs standout from each other even as “Go Getter” keeps an experimentalist feel and “Premonitions” aces its cosmic-garage driver’s test with absolutely perfect pacing. The ultra-spacey “Shape Shifter I” and more boogie-fied “Shape Shifter II” are clear focal points, but Cadets as a whole is a marked accomplishment, particularly for a first LP, and in style, substance and atmosphere, it brings together rich textures with a laissez-faire spontaneity. The closing instrumental “Bajorek” is only one example among the 10 included tracks of Spirit Mother‘s potential, which is writ large throughout.

Spirit Mother on Thee Facebooks

Spirit Mother on Bandcamp

 

Gévaudan, Iter

gevaudan iter

UK four-piece G√©vaudan made their debut in 2019 with Iter, and though I’m late to the party as ever, the five-song/53-minute offering is of marked scope and dynamic. Its soft stretches are barely there, melancholic and searching, and its surges of volume in opener “Dawntreader” are expressive without being overwrought. Not without modern influence from Pallbearer or YOB, etc., G√©vaudan‘s honing in on atmospherics helps stand out Iter as the band plod-marches with “The Great Heathen Army” — the most active of inclusions and the centerpiece — en route to “Saints of Blood” (11:54) and closer “Duskwalker” (15:16), the patient dip into extremity of the latter sealing the record’s triumph; those screams feel not like a trick the band kept up their collective sleeve, but a transition earned through the grueling plunge of all the material prior. It’s one for which I’d much rather be late than never.

Gévaudan on Thee Facebooks

Gévaudan website

 

El Rojo, El Diablo Rojo

el rojo el diablo rojo

The burly heavy rock of “South” at the outset of Italian heavy rockers El Rojo‘s El Diablo Rojo doesn’t quite tell the whole tale of the band’s style, but it gives essential clues to their songwriting and abiding burl. Later pieces like the slower-rolling “Ascension” (initially, anyhow) and acoustic-inclusive “Cactus Bloom” effectively build on the foundation of bruiser riffs and vocals, branching out desert-influenced melody and spaciousness instrumentalism even as the not-at-all-slowed-down “When I Slow Down” keeps affairs grounded in their purpose and structure. Riffs are thick and lead the charge on the more straightforward pieces and the seven-minute “Colors” alike as El Rojo attempt not to reinvent heavy or stoner rocks but to find room for themselves within the established tenets of genre. They’ve been around a few years at this point, and there’s still growing to be done, but El Diablo Rojo sounds like the starting point of an engaging progression.

El Rojo on Thee Facebooks

Karma Conspiracy Records website

 

Witchwood, Before the Winter

witchwood before the winter

Deep Purple, Uriah Heep, Jethro Tull, some Led Zeppelin in “Crazy Little Lover” and a touch of opera on “Nasrid” for good measure, Witchwood‘s 62-minute Before the Winter 2LP may be well on the other side of unmanageable in terms of length, but at least it’s not wasting anyone’s time. Instead, early rockers like “Anthem for a Child” and “A Taste of Winter” and the wah-funked “Feelin'” introduce the elements that will serve as the band’s colorful palette across the whole of the album. And a piece like “No Reason to Cry” becomes a straight-ahead complement to airier material like the not-coincidentally-named “A Crimson Moon” and the winding and woodsy “Hesperus,” which caps the first LP as the 10-minute epic “Slow Colours of Shade” does likewise for the record as a whole, followed by a bonus Marc Bolan cover on the vinyl edition, to really hammer home the band’s love of the heavy ’70s, which is already readily on display in their originals.

Witchwood on Thee Facebooks

Jolly Roger Records website

 

Gary Lee Conner, Revelations in Fuzz

gary lee conner revelations in fuzz

If nothing else, Gary Lee Conner sounds like he probably has an enviable collection of 45s. The delightfully weird former Screaming Trees guitarist offers up 10 fresh delights of ’60s-style garage-psych solo works on the follow-up to 2018’s Unicorn Curry, as Revelations in Fuzz lives up to its title in tone even as cascades of organ and electric piano, sitar and acoustic guitar weave in and out of the proceedings. How no one has paired Conner with Baby Woodrose frontman Uffe Lorenzen for a collaboration is a mystery I can’t hope to solve, but in the swirling and stops of “Cheshire Cat Claws” and the descent of six-minute closer “Colonel Tangerine’s Sapphire Sunshine Dreams,” Conner reaffirms his love of that which is hypnotic and lysergic while hewing to a traditionalism of songwriting that makes cuts like “Vicious and Pretty” as catchy as they are far out. And trust me, they’re plenty far out. Conner is a master of acid rock, pure and simple. And he’s already got a follow-up to this one released, so there.

Gary Lee Conner on Thee Facebooks

Vincebus Eruptum Recordings website

 

Tomorr, Tomorr

tomorr tomorr

Formed in Italy with Albanian roots, Tomorr position themselves as rural doom, which to an American reader will sound like ‘country,’ but that’s not what’s happening here. Instead, three-piece are attempting to capture a raw, village-minded sound, with purposeful homage to the places outside the cities of Europe made into sludge riffing and the significant, angular lumber of “Grazing Land.” I’m not sure it works all the time — the riff in the second half of “Varr” calls to mind “Dopesmoker” more than anti-urbane sensibilities, and wants nothing for crush — but as it’s their debut, Tomorr deserve credit for approaching doom from an individualized mindset, and the bulk of the six-song/48-minute offering does boast a sound that is on the way to being the band’s own, if not already there. There’s room for incorporating folk progressions and instrumentation if Tomorr want to go that route, but something about the raw approach they have on their self-titled is satisfying on its own level — a meeting of impulses creative and destructive at some lost dirt crossroads.

Tomorr on Thee Facebooks

Acid Cosmonaut Records on Bandcamp

 

Temple of the Fuzz Witch, Red Tide

temple of the fuzz witch red tide

Well what the hell do you think Temple of the Fuzz Witch sounds like? They’re heavy as shit. Of course they are. The Detroiters heralded doomly procession on their 2019 self-titled demo/EP (review here), and the subsequent debut full-length Red Tide, is righteously plodding riffery, Sabbathian without just being the riff to “Electric Funeral” and oblivion-bound nod that’s so filled with smoke it’s practically coughing. What goes on behind the doors of the Temple? Volume, kid. Give me the chug of “The Others” any and every day of the week, I don’t give a fuck if Temple of the Fuzz Witch are reinventing the wheel or not. All I wanna do is put on “Ungoliant” and nod out to the riff that sounds like “The Chosen Few” and be left in peace. Fuck you man. I ain’t bothering anyone. You’re the one with the problem, not me. This guy knows what I’m talking about. Side B of this record will eat your fucking soul, but only after side A has tenderized the meat. Hyperbole? Fuck you.

Temple of the Fuzz Witch on Thee Facebooks

Interstellar Smoke Records webstore

 

Karkara, Nowhere Land

karkara nowhere land

Rife with adventurous and Middle Eastern-inflected heavy psychedelia, Nowhere Land is the follow-up to Toulouse, France-based Karkara‘s 2019 debut, Crystal Gazer (review here), and it finds the three-piece pushing accordingly into broader spaces of guitar-led freakery. Would you imagine a song called “Space Caravan” has an open vibe? You’d be correct. Same goes for “People of Nowhere Land,” which even unto its drum beat feels like some kind of folk dance turned fuzz-drenched lysergic excursion. The closing pair of “Cards” and “Witch” feel purposefully teamed up to round out the 36-minute outing, but maybe that’s just the overarching ethereal nature of the release as a whole coming through as Karkara manage to transport their listener from this place to somewhere far more liquid, languid, and encompassing, full of winding motion in “Falling Gods” and graceful post-grunge drift in “Setting Sun.”

Karkara on Thee Facebooks

Stolen Body Records website

 

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Wicca Sign to DHU Records for You Sow Your Crop Vinyl

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Damn, DHU. Give it a week between signings, why don’t you? What’s that you say? No? Well, okay.

The latest pickup from the obviously-driven-by-dark-forces European imprint is Buenos Aires cult troupe Wicca, whose sludgy, post-EWiz riffing is exemplified in “The Devil’s Hand” from their 2020 EP, You Sow Your Crop. Call it lumbering, call it plodding, call it nodding, it all comes down to slow riffs and right-on heavy groove. And I mean all of it. If you care to march along with Wicca on their hillside jaunt toward oblivion — and why not? — you can stream the ‘Alucarda Edition’ of You Sow Your Crop below.

Dig:

wicca

New signing to DHU Records: WICCA

DHU Records is excited to announce the signing of Argentina’s Occult Rock band WICCA!

“Wicca is a rock band from the west of Buenos Aires, Argentina. With a fuzz up front and clear voices they are looking for a place between Heavy Blues, Stoner, Sludge and Doom Metal. Wicca 333 isn’t just a few dirty riffs and some excuse to talk about Satan. It arises from a need: Be the voice of those who never had it.

It is no coincidence and less marketing, choosing to be represented by the name of a Pagan religion that gives us an ancestral wisdom (persecuted and punished throughout History in the name of the Christian faith) thus summarizing an aesthetic concept that goes beyond the spiritualism and that it is not just a political decision but signs of a new culture.

DHU Records will be releasing You Sow Your Crop and a Bonus 7″ of Oracular on Limited Edition vinyl in the first quarter of 2021!

Test Press, DHU Exclusive and Band Editions will be available

Wicca ~ You Sow Your Crop (DHU060)
Side A:
A1. 13 Women
A2. The Devil’s Hand
A3. Black Witch

Side B (Alucarda Trip Edition):
B1. 13 Women
B2. The Devil’s Hand (Alucarda Trip)
B3. Black Witch

Released September 21, 2020

You Sow Your Crop was recorded, produced mixed and mastered between 2019 and 2020 by Pablo Michelin at Cham√°nico Records
Additional participation:
Achi Lamas: Claps in The Devil’s Hand

All Artwork will be provided by ZZ Corpse

Listen to You Sow Your Crop here: https://wicca333.bandcamp.com/album/you-sow-your-crop
You Sow Your Crop (Alucarda Trip Edition): https://wicca333.bandcamp.com/album/you-sow-your-crop-alucarda-trip-edition

Oracular Bonus 7″
Side A:
A1. 333
A2. The 7 Wonders

Side B:
B1. The Empress
B2. Medium

Oracular was recorded at Underyuls Records by Yuls
Listen to Oracular here: https://wicca333.bandcamp.com/album/wicca-oracular

Both You Sow Your Crop and Oracular are mastered for vinyl by Tony Reed at HeavyHead Recording Co.

WICCA
Aixa Pilmayquen Lamas – Guitar & Vocals
Sebasti√°n Regueira – Guitar
Pechx Mielnik – Drum
Pablo Michelin -Bass

https://www.facebook.com/wicca333band
https://www.instagram.com/wicca.gram/
https://wicca333.bandcamp.com/
darkhedonisticunionrecords.bigcartel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/DHURecords/
https://darkhedonisticunionrecords.bandcamp.com/

Wicca, You Sow Your Crop (Alucarda Trip Edition) (2020)

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Mephistofeles Sign to Helter Skelter; A Path of Black EP & Reissues Coming Soon; Video Posted

Posted in Whathaveyou on December 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

mephistofeles

I’ve covered¬†Mephistofeles once or twice over the last couple years. The Argentinian three-piece are probably known as much for their visual style as much as grit-coated distorted riffing, indulging as they do in post-Electric Wizard-style exploitation in various degrees of the pornographic. Truth be told, that kind of thing puts me off, but I’ve been looking for an excuse to like the band, since the music is good. I’ve been through the upcoming EP, A Path of Black, twice now and its three songs should make a killer entry to anyone who hasn’t picked up on them yet. Hooky, filth-toned, semi-doomed but right on in terms of vibe, they bring forward the band’s appeal in a way that somewhat belies the fuckall of their presentation, but still keeps the swing loose and misanthropic.

They’ve signed to¬†Helter Skelter Productions for the new release in February, and their two full-lengths are also being reissued as you can see in the copious PR wire info below. But don’t miss out on the video for EP opener “Lucifer’s Hellride” below. I think the title-cut is the best of the three, but this one surely gets the point across as well.

Dig:

mephistofeles-a-path-of-black

MEPHISTOFELES to release new EP through HELTER SKELTER, reissue two albums – first video from EP streaming now

Helter Skelter Productions (distributed & marketed by Regain Records) is proud to announce an alliance with the one and only Mephistofeles. The first fruit of this alliance will be a new EP, A Path of Black, set for release on February 26th, 2021 on CD, 12″ vinyl, and cassette tape formats. Also on February 26th, 2021 shall follow two reissues through Helter Skelter: Mephistofeles’ classic second album, I’m Heroin, on vinyl LP format and the band’s classic third album, Satan Sex Ceremonies, on CD, vinyl LP, and cassette tape formats.

One of the cultest names in the underground, Mephistofeles hail from Argentina and have prolifically perfected a literally addicting blend of garage rock, stoner doom, and ritual atmosphere that truly puts the SATANIC in Satanic panic! From 2013 onward, this power-trio have been pumping out one sonic drug after another, from singles and demos to EPs and even live albums, all culminating in three full-lengths to date. And now, longtime fans Helter Skelter Productions will be reissuing parts of Mephistofeles’ back catalog as well as some new recordings.

The first of these new recordings, A Path of Black is a quick-hitting slab of Mephistofeles at their darkest, druggiest best. Featuring three brand-new songs, A Path of Black is aptly titled: there’s garage-rockin’ energy to spare, but you literally feel the darkness dragging you down like a drug you can’t shake. If anything, this EP emphasizes the ROCK far more than the doom, but it’s all recognizably their signature sound. And like all Mephistofeles’ recordings, each of these three tracks is as immediately memorable as the last, the trio’s swagger truly something to behold.

See & hear a special promo video for the brand-new track “Lucifers Hellride” HERE at Regain Records’ YouTube channel. Preorder info can be found HERE at Regain Records’ Bandcamp. Cover and tracklisting are as follows:

Tracklisting for Mephistofeles’ A Path of Black
1. Lucifers Hellride [3:43]
2. Electric Ripper [2:47]
3. A Path of Black [5:45]

The first of the reissues, I‚Äôm Heroin was originally released in 2017 but in extremely limited quantities. Mephistofeles have always had a knack for compelling(ly lurid) record titles, and I‚Äôm Heroin is no exception: both phonetically and visually in its original incarnation of ( ( ( I ‘ M H E R O I N ) ) ), it conveys the sense of delirium and madness written large across the grooves of this nearly 47-minute work. Indeed, Mephistofeles‚Äô second long-player goes all in on getting gone ‚Äď hypnotic yet loose, jammy yet locked-in, devilishly drugged-out and above all FUN in its freedom. Minutes turn into hours, hours turn into days, days turn into weeks, ad infinitum‚Ķbeing stuck inside I‚Äôm Heroin is like being stuck inside a jellied coma you never wanna come out of! Preorder info can be found HERE at Regain Records’ Bandcamp. Tracklisting is as follows:

Tracklisting for Mephistofeles’ I’m Heroin
1. Transylvanian Funeral [9:09]
2. The Rogue [4:06]
3. White Butterfly [5:55]
4. Trash Lord [5:10]
5. Heroin [5:55]
6. Addicted to Satan [4:19]
7. Into the Night [10:48]

The second of the reissues, Satan Sex Ceremonies was originally released in 2019 but in extremely limited quantities. Mephistofeles have always had a knack for compelling(ly lurid) record titles, and Satan Sex Ceremonies is no exception ‚Äď in fact, it pretty much sums up the Mephistofeles experience in a mere three words! As such, the album‚Äôs a slowly bubbling cauldron of eerie atmospheres and drugged-out sonics; amidst the ever-present haze of hashish and sulfur, it‚Äôs by far one of the band‚Äôs most authentically DOOM recordings. And at 47 minutes, the simmering slime Mephistofeles here dole out so effortlessly sounds more like 47 hours, so ensnared by addiction you‚Äôll be. Preorder info can be found HERE at Regain Records’ Bandcamp. Tracklisting is as follows:

Tracklisting for Mephistofeles’ Satan Sex Ceremonies
1. Satan Sex Ceremonies / The Wrath of Jacula [15:03]
2. Profanation [3:30]
3. Down Again [4:15]
4. Overdose [3:12]
5. Syringe [6:12]
6. Curse of the Knife [5:17]
7. Chains of Agony [9:51]

http://mephistofeles.bandcamp.com/
http://www.facebook.com/mephistofelesdrone/
http://instagram.com/fuckoffhippieposers
www.helterskelterproductions.se
www.facebook.com/helterskelterproductions
www.helterskelterproductions.bandcamp.com

Mephistofeles, “Lucifer Hellride” official video

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Sergio Ch. Releases Singles Trilogy

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 2nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

sergio ch

It’s been more than half a decade now since current Soldati and former Ararat/Los Natas frontman Sergio Chotsourian released his first solo album under the Sergio Ch. banner. In that time his creative reach has only grown broader, and over the past few tumultuous months that has continued to manifest in new materials. Released in May, September and last week — which was October for those of you in the pandemic’s sphere of timeless drawl — a series of three singles brings this breadth into focus with the sheer differences between them.

Rooted in South American psychedelia and folk, “Flyfly” and “Panpan” definitely feel of a series — all the more for their titular similarities — but especially as they followed the 36-minute dronefest that was “Death Row Live Foreva,” it brings into relief just how much one never really knows what Chotsourian will do next or where his whims might lead him and thus his listeners. In a year that already saw Chotsourian release the awaited debut of Soldati, Doom Nacional (review here), as well as the solo record From Skulls Born Beyond (review here), these new songs are a hallmark of the relentless creativity that drives¬†him forward as a songwriter and producer. If you do dig into “Death Row Live Foreva,” prepare to be hypnotized.

I read on thee social medias that¬†Los Natasrecently announced reissue of¬†Corsario Negro was delayed — due in November sometime, I think — of course due to the ubiquitous concerns that have delayed everyone’s everything throughout this wretched year. At least the dude’s making new music.

To wit:

SERGIO CH. – FLYFLY
[S.A.S. 112]
SERGIO CH. – GUITARRA & VOCALS

SERGIO CH. – PANPAN
[S.A.S. 111]
SERGIO CH. – GUITARRA & VOCALS
LUCIO CERETTI – GUITARRA

SERGIO CH. – DEATH ROW LIVE FOREVA
[S.A.S. 109]
SERGIO CH. – GUITARRA & VOCALS

GRABADO, MEZCLADO Y MASTERIZADO POR SERGIO CH. EN DEATH STUDIOS
PRODUCIDO POR SERGIO CH.

SOUTH AMERICAN SLUDGE RECORDS

http://www.sergioch.com/
http://www.southamericansludge.com/
https://sasrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/SASRECORDSARGENTINA

Sergio Ch., “Flyfly”

Sergio Ch., “Panpan”

Sergio Ch., “Death Row Live Foreva”

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Bad Magick to Release Superstition EP Limited Vinyl on Halloween

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 21st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

One doesn’t encounter the phrase ‘no pre-orders’ too often these days, but it makes sense with the record coming out in 10 days’ time. It’s a Halloween release for Bad Magick‘s Superstition EP through DHU Records, which continues to comb the international underground for the peculiar, the cultish, the heavy, the doomed, and the peculiarly heavy cultish doom. The Buenos Aires five-piece put out the four-tracker through Venado Records in August, so given everything else going on in 2020, a two-month turnaround on this next version feels pretty quick, but then, they’re only pressing 50 copies and they’re being cut by hand, so there you go.

I wonder if cutting clear vinyl is harder. Actually, now that I think about it, cutting vinyl at all seems hard. So much for that business plan.

Info came down the PR wire:

bad magick superstition

New signing to DHU Records: Bad Magick

DHU Records is excited to announce the signing of Argentinian Occult Rockers BAD MAGICK!

“Bad Magick is the new rock n¬īroll group emerging from Argentina’s most respected bands and ever-growing rock scene, focusing on late 70s and early 80s classic rock acts such as Blue √Ėyster Cult. With a taste for the occult and a dash of scandinavian rock Bad Magick’s debut EP Superstition is already making waves in the heavy underground while currently working on a full length that is promising to Rock the world!”

Bad Magick members play or have played in the most important bands from Argentina such as Medium, Dragonauta, 42 Decibel, H√ęrpes, Bad Mothefuckers Club and Dead Rooster.”

DHU Records will be releasing the Superstition EP on Crystal Clear Lathe Cut 7″ Limited to only 50 copies worldwide!

Pressed once again by our friends at Royal Mint Records

*** NO PRE ORDERS ***

These will go on sale Friday October 23rd @ 7PM CEST

OFFICIAL RELEASE DATE OCTOBER 31ST

Crystal Clear Lathe Cut Edition

Limited to 50 copies
Single jacket
Black innersleeve
Postcard by Shane Horror
33RPM
Comes on Clear lathe cut 7″ vinyl

(PLEASE NOTE: Lathe cut records are cut manually, meaning the drop of the cutting needle is done by hand. They are time consuming to make, which limits the size of the run.)

Bad Magick is:
Lucien Kurgan: Vocals
Leander: Guitar, backing vocals
Ger Motherfckr: Guitar, backing vocals
Topo: Bass
Nicko: Drums

www.instagram.com/bad.magick.666
www.facebook.com/BADMAGICK666/
https://www.facebook.com/venadorecords
https://venadorecords.bandcamp.com/
http://www.venadorecords.com/
darkhedonisticunionrecords.bigcartel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/DHURecords/
https://darkhedonisticunionrecords.bandcamp.com/

Bad Magick, Superstition (2020)

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Quarterly Review: Hum, Hymn, Atramentus, Zyclops, Kairon; IRSE!, Slow Draw, Might, Brimstone Coven, All Are to Return, Los Acidos

Posted in Reviews on October 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Day three of the Quarterly Review. Always a landmark. Today we hit the halfway point, but don’t pass it yet since I’ve decided to add the sixth day next Monday. So we’ll get to 30 of the total 60 records, and then be past half through tomorrow. Math was never my strong suit. Come to think of it, I wasn’t much for school all around. Work sucked too.

Anyway, if you haven’t found anything to dig yet — and I hope you have; I think the stuff included has been pretty good so far — you can either go back and look again or keep going. Maybe today’s your day. If not, there’s always tomorrow.

Quarterly Review #21-30:

Hum, Inlet

HUM INLET

One has to wonder if, if Hum had it to do over again, they might hold back their first album in 23 years, Inlet, for release sometime when the world isn’t being ravaged by a global pandemic. As it stands, the largesse and melodic wash of the Illinois outfit’s all-growed-up heavy post-rock offers 55 minutes of comfort amid the tumult of the days, and while I won’t profess to having been a fan in the ’90s — their last studio LP was 1997’s Downward is Heavenward, and they sound like they definitely spent some time listening to Pelican since then — the overarching consumption Inlet sets forth in relatively extended tracks like “Desert Rambler” and “The Summoning” and the manner in which the album sets its own backdrop in a floating drone of effects make it an escapist joy. They hold back until closer “Shapeshifter” to go full post-rock, and while there are times at which it can seem unipolar, to listen to the crunching “Step Into You” and “Cloud City” side-by-side unveils more of the scope underlying from the outset of “Waves” onward.

Hum on Thee Facebooks

Polyvinyl Records webstore

 

Hymn, Breach Us

Hymn Breach Us

Oslo’s Hymn answer the outright crush and scathe of their 2017 debut, Perish (review here), with a more developed and lethal attack on their four-song/38-minute follow-up, Breach Us. Though they’re the kind of band who make people who’ve never heard Black Cobra wonder how two people can be so heavy — and the record has plenty of that; “Exit Through Fire”‘s sludgeshuggah chugging walks by and waves — it’s the sense of atmosphere that guitarist/bassist/vocalist Ole Rokseth and drummer Markus St√łle bring to the proceedings that make them so engrossing. The opening title-track is also the shortest at 6:25, but as Breach Us moves across “Exit Through Fire,” “Crimson” and especially 14-minute closer “Can I Carry You,” it brings forth the sort of ominous dystopian assault that so many tried and failed to harness in the wake of NeurosisThrough Silver in Blood. Hymn do that and make it theirs in the process.

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Fysisk Format on Bandcamp

 

Atramentus, Stygian

Atramentus stygian

Carried across with excruciating grace, Atramentus‘ three-part/44-minute debut album, Stygian, probably belongs in a post-Bell Witch category of extreme, crawling death-doom, but from the script of their logo to the dramatic piano accompanying the lurching riffs, gurgles and choral wails of “Stygian I: From Tumultuous Heavens‚Ķ (Descended Forth the Ceaseless Darkness)” through the five-minute interlude that is “Stygian II: In Ageless Slumber (As I Dream in the Doleful Embrace of the Howling Black Winds)” and into the 23-minute lurchfest that is “Stygian III: Perennial Voyage (Across the Perpetual Planes of Crying Frost and Steel-Eroding Blizzards)” their ultra-morose procession seems to dig further back for primary inspiration, to acts like Skepticism and even earliest Anathema (at least for that logo), and as guttural and tortured as it is as it devolves toward blackened char in its closer, Stygian‘s stretches of melody provide a contrast that gives some semblance of hope amid all the surrounding despair.

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20 Buck Spin webstore

 

Zyclops, Inheritance of Ash

zyclops inheritance of ash

As it clocks in 27 minutes, the inevitable question about Zyclops‘ debut release, Inheritance of Ash, is whether it’s an EP or an LP. For what it’s worth, my bid is for the latter, and to back my case up I’ll cite the flow between each of its four component tracks. The Austin, Texas, post-metallic four-piece save their most virulent chug and deepest tonal weight for the final two cuts, “Wind” and “Ash,” but the stage is well set in “Ghost” and “Rope” as well, and even when one song falls into silence, the next picks up in complementary fashion. Shades of Isis in “Rope,” Swarm of the Lotus in the more intense moments of “Ash,” and an overarching progressive vibe that feels suited to the Pelagic Records oeuvre, one might think of Zyclops as cerebral despite their protestations otherwise, but at the very least, the push and pull at the end of “Wind” and the stretch-out that comes after the churning first half of “Rope” don’t happen by mistake, and a band making these kinds of turns on their first outing isn’t to be ignored. Also, they’re very, very heavy.

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Zyclops on Bandcamp

 

Kairon; IRSE!, Polysomn

Kairon IRSE Polysomn

It’s all peace and quiet until “Psionic Static” suddenly starts to speed up, and then like the rush into transwarp, Kairon; IRSE!‘s Polysomn finds its bliss by hooking up a cortical node to your left temple and turning your frontal lobe into so much floundering goo, effectively kitchen-sink kraut-ing you into oblivion while gleefully hopping from genre to cosmic genre like they’re being chased by the ghost of space rock past. They’re the ghost of space rock future. While never static, Polysomn does offer some serenity amid all its head-spinning and lobe-melting, be it the hee-hee-now-it’s-trip-hop wash of “An Bat None” or the cinematic vastness that arises in “Alta√Įr Descends.” Too intelligent to be random noise or just a freakout, the album is nonetheless experimental, and remains committed to that all the way through the shorter “White Flies” and “Polysomn” at the end of the record. You can take it on if you have your EV suit handy, but if you don’t check the intermix ratio, your face is going to blow up. Fair warning. LLAP.

Kairon; IRSE! on Thee Facebooks

Svart Records webstore

 

Slow Draw, Quiet Joy

slow draw quiet joy

The second 2020 offering from Hurst, Texas’ Slow Draw — the one-man outfit of Mark “Derwooka” Kitchens, also of Stone Machine Electric — the four-song Quiet Joy is obviously consciously named. “Tightropes in Tandem” and closer “Sometimes Experiments Fail” offer a sweet, minimal jazziness, building on the hypnotic backwards psych drone of opener “Unexpected Suspect.” In the two-minute penultimate title-track, Kitchens is barely there, and it is as much an emphasis on the quiet space as that in which the music — a late arriving guitar stands out — might otherwise be taking place. At 18 minutes, it is intended to be a breath taken before reimmersing oneself in the unrelenting chaos that surrounds and swirls, and while it’s short, each piece also has something of its own to offer — even when it’s actively nothing — and Slow Draw brims with purpose across this short release. Sometimes experiments fail, sure. Sometimes they work.

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Slow Draw on Bandcamp

 

Might, Might

might might

It took all of a week for the married duo of Ana Muhi (vocals, bass) and Sven Missullis (guitars, vocals, drums) to announce Might as their new project following the dissolution of the long-ish-running and far-punkier Deamon’s Child. Might‘s self-titled debut arrives with the significant backing of Exile on Mainstream and earns its place on the label with an atmospheric approach to noise rock that, while it inevitably shares some elements with the preceding band, forays outward into the weight of “Possession” and the acoustic-into-crush “Warlight” and the crush-into-ambience “Flight of Fancy” and the ambience-into-ambience “Mrs. Poise” and so on. From the beginning in “Intoduce Yourself” and the rushing “Pollution of Mind,” it’s clear the recorded-in-quarantine 35-minute/nine-song outing is going to go where it wants to, Muhi and Missullis sharing vocals and urging the listener deeper into doesn’t-quite-sound-like-anything-else post-fuzz heavy rock and sludge. A fun game: try to predict where it’s going, and be wrong.

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Exile on Mainstream website

 

Brimstone Coven, The Woes of a Mortal Earth

brimstone coven the woes of a mortal earth

Following a stint on Metal Blade and self-releasing 2018’s What Was and What Shall Be, West Virginia’s Brimstone Coven issue their second album as a three-piece through Ripple Music, calling to mind a more classic-minded Apostle of Solitude on the finale “Song of Whippoorwill” and finding a balance all the while between keeping their progressions moving forward and establishing a melancholy atmosphere. Some elements feel drawn from the Maryland school of doom — opener the melody and hook of “The Inferno” remind of defunct purveyors Beelzefuzz — but what comes through clearest in these songs is that guitarist/vocalist Corey Roth, bassist/vocalist Andrew D’Cagna and drummer Dave Trik have found their way forward after paring down from a four-piece following 2016’s Black Magic (review here) and the initial steps the last album took. They sound ready for whatever the growth of their craft might bring and execute songs like “When the World is Gone” and the more swinging “Secrets of the Earth” with the utmost class.

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Ripple Music website

 

All Are to Return, All Are to Return

all are to return all are to return

Take the brutal industrial doom of Author and Punisher and smash it together — presumably in some kind of stainless-steel semi-automated contraption — with the skin-peeling atmosphere and grueling tension of Khanate and you may begin to understand where All Are to Return are coming from on their debut self-titled EP. How they make a song like four-minute centerpiece “Bare Life” feel so consuming is beyond me, but I think being so utterly demolishing helps. It’s not just about the plodding electronic beat, either. There’s some of that in opener “Untrusted” and certainly “The Lie of Fellow Men” has a lumber to go with its bass rumble and NIN-sounding-hopeful guitar, but it’s the overwhelming sense of everything being tainted and cruel that comes through in the space the only-19-minutes-long release creates. Even as closer “Bellum Omnium” chips away at the last remaining vestiges of color, it casts a coherent vision of not only aesthetic purpose for the duo, but of the terrible, all-gone-wrong future in which we seem at times to live.

All Are to Return on Bandcamp

Tartarus Records website

 

Los Acidos, Los Acidos

Los Acidos Los Acidos

I saved this one for last today as a favor to myself. Originally released in 2016, Los Acidos‘ self-titled debut receives a well-deserved second look on vinyl courtesy of Necio Records, and with it comes 40 minutes of full immersion in glorious Argentinian psicodelia, spacious and ’60s-style on “Al Otro Lado” and full of freaky swing on “Blusas” ahead of the almost-shoegaze-until-it-explodes-in-sunshine float of “Perfume Fantasma.” “Paseo” and the penultimate “Espejos” careen with greater intensity, but from the folksy feel that arrives to coincide with the cymbal-crashing roll of “Excentricidad” in its second half to the final boogie payoff in “Empat√≠a de Cristal,” the 10-song outing is a joy waiting to be experienced. You’re experienced, right? Have you ever been? Either way, the important thing is that the voyage that, indeed, begins with “Viaje” is worth your time in melody, in craft, in its arrangements, in presence and in the soul that comes through from front to back. The four-piece had a single out in late 2019, but anytime they want to get to work on a follow-up LP, I’ll be waiting.

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Necio Records on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Molasses Barge, Slow Green Thing, Haze Mage & Tombtoker, White Dog, Jupiterian, Experiencia Tibetana, Yanomamo, Mos Eisley Spaceport, Of Wolves, Pimmit Hills

Posted in Reviews on October 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

We roll on with day two of the Fall 2020 Quarterly Review featuring another batch of 10 records en route to 50 by Friday — and actually, I just put together the list for a sixth day, so it’ll be 60 by next Monday. As much as things have been delayed from the pandemic, there’s been plenty to catch up on in the meantime and I find I’m doing a bit of that with some of this stuff today and yesterday. So tacking on another day to the end feels fair enough, and it was way easy to pick 10 more folders off my far-too-crowded desktop and slate them for review. So yeah, 60 records by Monday. I bet I could get to 70 if I wanted. Probably better for my sanity if I don’t. Anyhoozle, more to come. For now…

Quarterly Review #11-20:

Molasses Barge, A Grayer Dawn

molasses barge a grayer dawn

Following up their 2017 self-titled debut issued through Blackseed Records, Pittsburgh-based rockers Molasses Barge present A Grayer Dawn through Argonauta, and indeed, in songs like “Holding Patterns” or the melancholy “Control Letting Go,” it is a somewhat moodier offering than its predecessor. But also more focused. Molasses Barge, in songs like stomping opener “The Snake” and its swing-happy successor “Desert Discord,” and in the later lumber of “Black Wings Unfurl” and push of the title-track, reside at an intersection of microgenres, with classic heavy rock and doom and modern tonality and production giving them an edge in terms of overarching heft in their low end. Riffs are choice throughout from guitarists Justin Gizzi and Barry Mull, vocalist Brian “Butch” Balich (Argus, ex-Penance, etc.) sounds powerful as ever, and the rhythm section of bassist Amy Bianco and drummer Wayne Massey lock in a succession of grooves that find welcome one after the other until the final “Reprise” fades to close the album. Its individuality is deceptive, but try to fit Molasses Barge neatly in one category or the other and they’ll stand out more than it might at first seem.

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Argonauta Records website

 

Slow Green Thing, Amygdala

slow-green-thing_amygdala-2000

Yes, this. Slow Green Thing‘s third album, Amygdala, is melodic without being overbearing and filled out with a consuming depth and warmth of tone. A less jammy, more solo-prone Sungrazer comes to mind; that kind of blend of laid back vocals and heavy psychedelic impulse. But the Dresden four-piece have their own solidified, nodding grooves to unveil as well, tapping into modern stoner with two guitars setting their fuzz to maximum density and Sven Weise‘s voice largely floating overtop, echo added to give even more a sense of largesse and space to the proceedings, which to be sure have plenty of both. The six-track/44-minute outing picks up some speed in “Dirty Thoughts” at the outset of side B, and brings a fair bit of crush to the title-track earlier and lead-laced finale “Love to My Enemy,” but in “Dreamland,” they mellow and stretch out the drift and the effect is welcome and not at all out of place beside the massive sprawl conjured in side A capper “All I Want.” And actually, that same phrase — “all I want” — covers a good portion of my opinion on the band’s sound.

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Fuzzmatazz Records website

 

Haze Mage & Tombtoker, Split

Haze Mage Tombtoker Split

Anyone bemoaning the state of traditionalist doom metal would do well to get their pants kick’d by Haze Mage, and when that’s done, it’s time to let the stoned zombie sludge of Tombtoker rip your arms off and devour what’s left. The two Baltimorean five-pieces make a righteously odd pairing, but they’ve shared the stage at Grim Reefer Fest in Charm City, and what they have most in common is a conviction of approach that comes through on each half of the four-song/19-minute offering, with Haze Mage shooting forth with “Sleepers” and the semi-NWOBHM “Pit Fighter,” metal, classic prog and heavy rock coming together with a vital energy that is immediately and purposefully contradicted in Tombtoker‘s played-fast-but-is-so-heavy-it-still-sounds-slow “Braise the Dead” and “Botched Bastard,” both of which find a way to be a ton of fun while also being unspeakably brutal and pushing the line between sludge and death metal in a way that would do Six Feet Under proud. Horns and bongs all around, then.

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Tombtoker on Thee Facebooks

 

White Dog, White Dog

white dog white dog

Oldschool newcomers White Dog earn an automatic look by releasing their self-titled debut through former Cathedral frontman Lee Dorrian‘s Rise Above Records, but it’s the band’s clearcut vintage aesthetic that holds the listener’s attention. With proto-metal established as an aesthetic of its own going on 20 years now, White Dog aren’t the first by any means to tread this ground, but especially for an American band, they bring a sincerity of swing and soul that speaks to the heart of the subgenre’s appeal. “The Lantern” leans back into the groove to tell its tale, while “Abandon Ship” is more upfront in its strut, and “Snapdragon” and opener “Sawtooth” underscore their boogie with subtle progressive nods. Closing duo “Pale Horse” and “Verus Cultus” might be enough to make one recall it was Rise Above that issued Witchcraft‘s self-titled, but in the shuffle of “Crystal Panther,” and really across the whole LP White Dog make the classic ideology theirs and offer material of eminent repeat listenability.

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Rise Above Records website

 

Jupiterian, Protosapien

jupiterian protosapien

The only thing that might save you from being swallowed entirely by the deathly mire Brazil’s Jupiterian craft on their third full-length, Protosapien, is the fact that the album is only 35 minutes long. That’s about right for the robe-clad purveyors of tonal violence — 2017’s Terraforming (review here) and 2015’s Aphotic (review here) weren’t much longer — and rest assured, it’s plenty of time for the band to squeeze the juice out of your soul and make you watch while they drink it out of some need-two-hands-to-hold-it ceremonial goblet. Their approach has grown more methodical over the years, and all the deadlier for that, and the deeper one pushes into Protosapien — into “Capricorn,” “Starless” and “Earthling Bloodline” at the end of the record — the less likely any kind of cosmic salvation feels. I’d say you’ve been warned, but really, this is just scratching the surface of the trenches into which Jupiterian plunge.

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Transcending Obscurity Records on Bandcamp

 

Experiencia Tibetana, Vol. I

Experiencia Tibetana Vol I

It’s an archival release, recorded in 2014 and 2015 by the Buenos Aires-based band, but all that really does for the three-song/hour-long Vol. I is make me wonder what the hell Experiencia Tibetana have been up to since and why Vols. II and III are nowhere to be found. The heavy psych trio aren’t necessarily inventing anything on this debut full-length, but the way “Beirut” (18:36) is peppered with memorable guitar figures amid its echo-drifting vocals, and the meditation tucked into the last few minutes of the 26:56 centerpiece “Espalda de Elefante” and the shift in persona to subdued progressive psych on “Desatormentandonos” (14:16) with the bass seeming to take the improvisational lead as guitar lines hold the central progression together, all of it is a compelling argument for one to pester for a follow-up. It may be an unmanageable runtime, but for the come-with-us sense of voyage it carries, Vol. I adapts the listener’s mindset to its exploratory purposes, and proves to be well worth the trip.

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Experiencia Tibetana on Bandcamp

 

Yanomamo, No Sympathy for a Rat

yanomamo no sympathy for a rat

Filth-encrusted and lumbering, Yanomamo‘s sludge takes Church of Misery-style groove and pummels it outright on the opening title-track of their four-song No Sympathy for a Rat EP. Like distilled disillusion, the scream-laced answer to the Sydney four-piece’s 2017 debut, Neither Man Nor Beast, arrives throwing elbows at your temples and through “The Offering,” the wait-is-this-grindcore-well-kinda-in-this-part “Miasma” and the suitably destructive “Iron Crown,” the only letup they allow is topped with feedback. Get in, kill, get out. They have more bounce than Bongzilla but still dig into some of Thou‘s more extreme vibe, but whatever you might want to compare them to, it doesn’t matter: Yanomamo‘s unleashed assault leaves bruises all its own, and the harsher it gets, the nastier it gets, the better. Can’t take it? Can’t hang? Fine. Stand there and be run over — I don’t think it makes a difference to the band one way or the other.

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Iommium Records on Bandcamp

 

Mos Eisley Spaceport, The Best of Their Early Year

mos eisley spaceport the best of their early year

They mean the title literally — “early year.” Bremen, Germany’s Mos Eisley Spaceport — who so smoothly shift between space rock and classic boogie on “Further When I’m Far” and brash tempo changes en route to a final jam-out on “Mojo Filter,” finally unveiling the Star Wars sample at the head of organ-inclusive centerpiece “Space Shift” only to bring early Fu Manchu-style raw fuzz on “Drop Out” and finish with the twanging acoustic and pedal steel of “My Bicycle Won’t Fly” — have been a band for less than a full 12 months. Thus, The Best of Their Early Year signals some of its own progressive mindset and more playful aspects, but it is nonetheless a formidable accomplishment for a new band finding their way. They lay out numerous paths, if you couldn’t tell by the run-on sentence above, and I won’t hazard a guess as to where they’ll end up sound-wise, but they have a fervent sense of creative will that comes through in this material and one only hopes they hold onto whatever impulse it is that causes them to break out the gong on “Space Shift,” because it’s that sense of anything-as-long-as-it-works that’s going to continue to distinguish them.

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Mos Eisley Spaceport on Bandcamp

 

Of Wolves, Balance

of wolves balance

One doesn’t often hear “the Wolfowitz Doctrine” brought out in lyrics these days, but Chicago heavy noise metallers Of Wolves aren’t shy about… well, anything. With volume inherent in the sound no matter how loud you’re actually hearing it, conveyed through weighted tones, shouts of progressions unified in intensity but varied in aggression and actual approach, the three-piece take an unashamed stance on a range of issues from the last two decades of war to trying to put themselves into the head of a mass shooter. The lyrics across their sophomore outing, Balance, are worth digging into for someone willing to take them on, but even without, the aggro mosh-stomp of “Maker” makes its point ahead of the 17-second “Flavor of the Weak” before Of Wolves dive into more progressively-structured fare on the title-track and “Clear Cutting/Bloodshed/Heart to Hand.” After “Killing Spree” and the aural-WTF that is “Inside (Steve’s Head),” they finish with a sludgecore take on the Misfits‘ “Die, Die My Darling,” which as it turns out was exactly what was missing up to that point.

Of Wolves on Thee Facebooks

Trepanation Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Pimmit Hills, Heathens & Prophets

Pimmit Hills Heathens Prophets

Comprised of four-fifths of what was Virginian outfit King Giant, it’s hard to know whether to consider Pimmit Hills a new band or a name-change, or what, but the first offering from vocalist David Hammerly, guitarist Todd “TI” Ingram, bassist Floyd Lee Walters III and drummer Brooks, titled Heathens & Prophets and self-released, hits with a bit of a bluesier feel than did the prior outfit, leaving plenty of room for jamming in each track and even going so far as to bring producer J. Robbins in on keys throughout the four-song/29-minute release. I suppose you could call it an EP or an LP — or a demo? — if so inclined, but any way you cut it, Heathens & Prophets plainly benefits from the band’s experience playing together, and they find a more rocking, less moody vibe in “Baby Blue Eyes” and the harmonica-laced “Beautiful Sadness” that has a feel as classic in substance as it is modern in sound and that is both Southern but refusing to bow entirely to clich√©.

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Pimmit Hills on Bandcamp

 

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Album Review: IAH, III

Posted in Reviews on September 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

iah iii

The instrumentalist, C√≥rdoba, Argentina-based three-piece of guitarist¬†Mauricio Condon, bassist Juan Pablo Lucco Borlera¬†and drummer Jos√© Land√≠n¬†continue and impressive streak under the collective banner of¬†IAH with¬†III, their third overall release and second full-length behind 2018’s¬†II (review here) and their 2017 self-titled EP (review here). They very clearly not only have an idea of what they’re going for in terms of their sound, but an awareness of what has worked for them leading up to this stage in their career, in terms both of aesthetic and practical considerations.¬†III¬†is easily the trio’s most expansive offering to-date. In its digital version, released on Sept. 11,¬†III comprises six tracks and runs what might almost be a near-unmanageable 55 minutes were it not managed so fluidly, and finds the band continuing a collaboration sharing production duties with¬†Mario Carnerero¬†at¬†440 Estudio in C√≥rdoba, who engineered and mixed (Magnus Lindberg¬†mastered).

This partnership would seem to have grown more familiar over time, as III not only progresses from where¬†IAH were two years ago in terms of patience and exploratory reach, but brings forward the varied dynamic of their sound in more expansive ways. Beginning with the 11-minute “Uaset,”¬†III unfolds with a summary of things to come, and in so doing brings together the swath of ground¬†IAH¬†proceed to cover, a slow emerging of fading in effects-guitar and a¬†shhh of cymbal wash setting an immediately atmospheric backdrop for whatever will follow. It is nearly 90 seconds into the song before the first guitar line begins, and not until 1:51 that Land√≠n‘s drums join it, and that spaciousness established at the outset is crucial to how the entire album that follows plays out.¬†III sees¬†IAH¬†dig further into heavy post-rock even than did¬†II, as¬†Condon‘s guitar floats over the drums and bass across the early going of “Uaset,” but the progressive metal elements that made themselves felt last time out come through as well, and the moments of solidification — all three players coming together around a single progression for however long it might be — are all the more effective for the dream-state from which they seem to take hold.

“Uaset” brings its impact in its midsection and rolls out a deeply weighted nod and chug, but ultimately recedes again, and though some residual energy is retained, it is the float that wins out in the end, carrying into the more direct tonality and riff of “Raju,” which is the shortest piece on¬†III at 6:25 and, for a time at least, seems to reverse the structure of the opener. ‘Quiet, loud, quiet’ becomes ‘loud, quiet, loud,’ but a fourth movement is added to the mix that renews the airy sound of “Uaset” in a way that “Raju” hasn’t yet tapped. This reinforces the notion of the two songs representing a companion-type structure, and indeed, the rest of¬†III bears that out in symmetrical fashion. What would be side A is two tracks, likewise what would be sides B and C; each one bringing together a longer cut and a shorter one as “Uaset” and “Raju” have done, with “Cilene” (10:38) and “Ennui” (8:25) proceeding from the silence at the end of “Raju” and building outward from what the opening salvo has done in terms of melody and rhythm.

Starting III‘s centerpiece movement, “Cilene” makes a case for being the most outwardly heavy of the three longer pieces — though “Lo Que Hoy es Evidente” (11:19) still has something to say about it — and has a flow to mirror that at the record’s very beginning, if one that holds more tension in the drums. The speedier motion and turn-of-phrase in the guitar circa 3:45 would seem to call out Colour Haze‘s heavy psychedelia filtered through the full-toned precision of¬†Elder, and should meet with no complaints from fans of either, but¬†IAH nestle into harder-edged chug before “Cilene” is done, not quite turning to doom, but riding a slower groove to its logical dissolution before going back to ground, rebuilding, and dissipating again in the last three and half minutes of the song. They do this gracefully, unhurried, and with time left over for a few seconds of contemplative silence before “Ennui” begins, its insistent first-half drum pattern and sharper guitar/bass groove tapping into¬†Pelican/Russian Circles territory as it moves forward, but smoothing out in its second half to a middle ground topped with a solo that’s anything but staid as the title might suggest and soon bursts forward again, only to pull back once more.

Given the departure from one-word titles for the closing pair of the aforementioned “Lo Que Hoy es Evidente” and “Una Vez Fue Imaginario” (7:07), one has to wonder if they’re not to be considered bonus tracks for the digital edition of the album or if pressing a physical version has yet to be worked out. I don’t know, but the change seems purposeful one way or the other. “Lo Que Hoy es Evidente” is the longest song on¬†III and builds up in still-linear fashion more smoothly than “Uaset” such that it’s not until the guitar and bass drop out momentarily and fire back at the six-minute mark that the real push of the 11-minute song seems to be revealed. As an apex, it is particularly hard hitting, but maintains an edge of psychedelic wash as well, which eases the transition into the comedown at the finish, which seems to wink again at¬†Colour Haze, and moves into the near-silence that begins “Una Vez Fue Imaginario” to close out the offering. It is another full build, but a fitting one for the end, as it shifts into a post-metallic sphere and features some howling sounds in the background that, indeed, might just be vocals, if it’s not my own imagination getting the best of me.

One way or the other, they close on one of their most crushing stomps, and finish cold, leaving the silence to do the work of residual ambience, which it does. One would be remiss not to note that¬†III was tracked in June 2020, during lockdown for the COVID-19 pandemic, and studio pictures of¬†IAH show them wearing masks while recording. Given some of the intimacy of the quiet stretches and the manner in which the more forceful side of the band seems to feed off them, it seems fair to wonder if maybe the global situation fed into the mood of the studio time at all. I don’t know that it did, but it’s hard to imagine it wouldn’t, at least in some way. The dynamic of changing volumes isn’t necessarily new for¬†IAH, but they do bring these shifts with an overarching melancholic sensibility, perhaps not void of hope, but looking at it from a distance. And even if that interpretation is completely inaccurate, that these pieces would evoke the question stands as testament to¬†III‘s power to move the listener. That also is something¬†IAH have had since their beginnings just a few years ago, but never have they sounded more resonant.

IAH, III (2020)

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