Honeybone to Release Spheres LP Nov. 27

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 23rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

I may be 60 years old by the time I get there, but some day I will go to Australia. When I do, I’ll be sure to keep an eye out for whatever in the water it might be in the ecosystem that has currently caused so much quality and so much varied quantity of heavy to come from the country and Melbourne in particular. Could it be an interaction somehow between the Outback and the Coral Reef? If so, yet another reason to protect these threatened areas.

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honeybone spheres

Oz-Based Psych-Rockers, Honeybone, Release Brand New Album “Spheres” On Kozmik Artifactz This November 27th.

We couldn’t be more excited to welcome Oz psych-rockers, Honeybone, to the Kozmik fold. Honeybone are a three-piece psychedelic/garage rock band based in Melbourne, Australia, and hail from the city of Dunedin, in the deep south of New Zealand. Featuring drummer and vocalist Rachel Trainor, guitarist/vocalist Drew Handcock, and bass player Peter Jermakoff.

Honeybone has previously released one full-length album and two EPs since their formation in 2009, which caught the eye, or ears, of renowned Berlin based record label, Kozmik Artifactz. Having gigged and toured with the likes of Beastwars, Wo-Fat, The Datsuns, Dragon, and Luger Boa, the band have gradually built up a strong fanbase across Australia & New Zealand. Now with a Kozmik release imminent, they have set their sights on breaking through into European territory.

Spheres will be released on limited edition heavyweight vinyl on the 27th November on Kozmik Artifactz.

VINYL FACTZ
– Plated & pressed on high performance vinyl at Pallas/Germany
– limited & coloured vinyl
– 300gsm gatefold cover
– special vinyl mastering

TRACKS
1. Artificial Tears
2. Bruises
3. Sands
4. Metathesiophobia
5. Stratosphere
6. Thread the Needle
7. Bones
8. Mist

Honeybone is:
Vocals, Drums & Percussion: Rachel Trainor
Bass Guitar: Peter Jermakoff
Vocals, Guitar, Keys/Synth: Drew Handcock

https://www.facebook.com/honeybonemusic
https://honeybone.bandcamp.com/
http://www.honeybonemusic.com/
http://kozmik-artifactz.com/
https://www.facebook.com/kozmikartifactz

Honeybone, Spheres (2020)

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Sleeping Giant Premiere “Fortress”; Split 7″ with Foot Coming Soon

Posted in audiObelisk on October 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

sleeping giant

Fuzz-drenched Australian trio  We ordered college papers from the websites before composing our Importance Of College Education Essay. That's why you're on the right track to pick the Sleeping Gian business plan for writer College Essays Beginning With Quotes essay philosophy of life breaking barriers essay t will release their new single,  What term paper writing service do you trust? Trust WritingsGuru.com when you need to look at this site online. Order your paper today! Fortress, on Oct. 30 through  Get Essay Done offers affordable and top notch quality, just pay and ask us to http://nanomat.uprrp.edu/tmp/cache/?essays-online-that-you-can-purchase or do my essay and get well written college paper. Copper Feast Records. It’s the quick-turnaround answer to the Bendigo/Melbourne outfit’s 2019 self-titled debut (review here) and intended as a bridge between that release and their next full-length, and indeed it presents a shift in approach. “Fortress,” the song itself, runs just under five minutes long, but that’s plenty of time for guitarist/vocalist  Physics Today Jobs: Physics: Optics and Laser, Physics: Photonics, , Sterling, Virginia , Story Starters For Creative Writing at Thorlabs, Inc. Steven Hammer, bassist  Need assistance with your college term paper? Order 100% original custom written term papers from our professional online research Dissertation On Waste Management. James Wright and drummer  Masters Thesis Help - Entrust your assignment to us and we will do our best for you experienced scholars engaged in the company will fulfil your Pali Emond to established a thickened, full sound that runs denser and murkier than anything the LP had on offer. Certainly the elements that comprise it are there: dudes have riffs, tone, fuzz, groove, hook, some harsher shouts for good measure — all that we-wrote-a-song stuff. But what’s really intriguing about “Fortress” is the atmosphere it creates.

My Homework Help is house to expert English authors who can help you get proficiency of the English language, astonish your instructors and score that ideal A grade. Thats precisely why many of the trainees state, I constantly Department Business Plan Examples online. Emond did the cover art for the  Business Plan For Buying A - Hire Online Assignment Help for Completing your assignment writing. More than 10 years of experience with 98% success ratio. Fortress single — and for sure that’s a video game I want to play — but notice that beneath the stalactites of the cavern in the image is a smoky, humid swamp and of course the lingering sense of doom as the broken-horn, open-mouthed monster skull welcomes you to the titular fortress. It doesn’t look like a place in which you’d want to hang around for side-quests. However, it does expertly convey the spirit of what “Fortress” brings to Hunting for online writing jobs? Join our team of professional Essays About Respects and editors. Expert freelance writers wanted! Sleeping Giant‘s sound, which is precisely that sleeping giant fortressdoomed aspect. Where  help with apa research paper mba essay editing service get help with statistics homework homework helps you Sleeping Giant integrated influences from the likes of  Online Recommended Site for students of PK with 100% money back guarantee. Our professional writers help you achieving your academic and career goals. Lowride r and Kyuss, the clearest line one might draw from “Fortress” is to the rolling lurch of Windhand. This can be heard in Hammer‘s vocal melody as well as the immersion he conjures in doubling — or tripling, since he’s also playing guitar — as recording engineer, handling mixing and mastering too.

He did some amount of recording on the self-titled as well, but as that record was pieced together over a longer period of time and multiple sessions, “Fortress” not only feels like a progression in aesthetic, but one of cohesion. Hammer‘s guitar, Wright‘s bass and Emond‘s drums flow together with an in-the-same-room feel — mind you, whether they were actually in the same room or not, I have no idea; probably not given quarantine and so on — and the song pulls you deeper into its swirling, possibly toxic haze because of that. Like the shouts that emerge later on, these were things hinted at on the LP, especially in the later reaches of the “Visions” trilogy that capped, but come through more focused, more complete, and even more intentional on the single. For something that sounds so foreboding, it bodes awfully well.

“Fortress” will see issue as part of a split 7″ single with labelmates Foot sometime soon via Copper Feast, and it’s my pleasure to host the premiere today. Find it below, accompanied by more details from the PR wire.

And enjoy:

Sleeping Giant are back – and they’re back heavier and harder than we’ve seen them before with this absolute behemoth of a track crawling out of the abyss and into your earholes on October 30th.

Following the successful release of their eponymous debut in 2019, rehearsals and progress on the anticipated follow-up record was halted as a result of the worldwide coronavirus pandemic. Undeterred, the band have been able to write and record a brand new track from lockdown to give fans a glimpse of what’s to come next year.

Having been inspired to move in a heavier direction after recording the epic fan favourite ‘Visions’ trilogy, new single ‘Fortress’ has been a feature of their live set ever since the debut record came out and lyrically represents how cancerous cells can debilitate and make you a shadow of your former healthy self. Though the lyrics were written well before COVID, they still bear a strong relevance to the current climate.

This standalone single intended as a bridge between albums was written, recorded, mixed and mastered by frontman/guitarist Steve Hammer and is Sleeping Giant’s first foray into the world of home recording.

Drummer Pali Emond has meticulously slaved away to perfectly depict the visual aesthetic of ‘Fortress’ on the cover art, as well as producing a brand new t-shirt design which will be available for pre-order alongside the track, ahead of its 30th October release date.

What’s more, Copper Feast Records will be releasing ‘Fortress’ as a 7″ split single before the end of the year alongside label mates Foot on limited edition coloured vinyl which also features a brand new track from Paul Holden & co.

Sleeping Giant is:
Steve Hammer – Guitar/Vocals
James Wright – Bass
Pali Emond – Drums

Sleeping Giant on Thee Facebooks

Sleeping Giant on Instagram

Sleeping Giant on Bandcamp

Copper Feast Records on Thee Facebooks

Copper Feast Records on Instagram

Copper Feast Records on Bandcamp

Copper Feast Records BigCartel store

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Fumarole Releasing Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes LP Next Week

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

fumarole

Brisbane trio Fumarole have their ducks in a row on their debut album, Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, and by ducks I definitely mean riffs. Posted for digital consumption on Oct. 16, the record will be released on vinyl next week through Interstellar Smoke Records, beating the glut of Halloween offerings by a day. Take that, everybody else.

You can hear the record, so by all means, don’t let me keep you. You’ll find it to be a garden of fuzzy delights set to a sci-fi narrative that serves as a pretty clear analog to existence under capitalism, “Desert Worms” and all.

PR wire has info, audio is at the bottom:

fumarole Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes

FUMAROLE TO RELEASE NEW ALBUM ON VINYL

Australia’s FUMAROLE are pleased to announce that their newly released album Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes will see a vinyl release via Interstellar Smoke Records on October 30th. The album was released digitally today on Bandcamp.

Pre-order the vinyl: https://interstellarsmokerecords.bigcartel.com/product/fumarole-valley-of-the-thousand-smokes

Listen to the digital version: https://fumarole.bandcamp.com/album/valley-of-ten-thousand-smokes

As with all great bands, Fumarole initially met… through work? Having pulled together a full lineup in April of 2018, the Australian outfit rapidly developed a sound reminiscent of their heroes in bands like Orange Goblin and Earthless but also local bands like Zong and Witchskull. Having gelled almost instantly, the band record their debut EP, Mountain, in their rehearsal space and have since followed that up with singles “Ghost Smoke” and “Valley” in 2019. Heads started to turn, and now the band seeks to push their fully solidified sound, further focusing on dark creatures and bleak futures. Taking the Antipodes by storm, it’s only a matter of time before Fumarole blows out an amp near you!

Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes is set in a future where the rich have enslaved the poor and placed them on a planet to mine a bacteria that can keep them alive forever. Recorded at Love Street Studios and mixed with Scott French. Mastered at Satanic Audio.

Fumarole are:
Ryan Stewart (drums)
Dan Bartsch (bass)
Kurt Werder (Guitar and Vocals)

https://www.facebook.com/fumaroleband/
https://www.instagram.com/fumarolebandaus/
https://fumarole.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Interstellar-Smoke-Records-101687381255396/
https://interstellarsmokerecords.bigcartel.com/

Fumarole, Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (2020)

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Bunny Racket Post “Moon Buggy” Video; Bunny Racket in Space out Now

Posted in Bootleg Theater on October 20th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

bunny racket

At this point, I’m not sure anymore who likes Bunny Racket more, me or my son. The Pecan — about to turn three in less than a week’s time — was duly transfixed yesterday when I showed him the Australian kid-friendly heavy rockers’ video for “Moon Buggy,” which comes from their new album, Bunny Racket in Space, and as ever from my own point of view, I couldn’t help likewise appreciating the song’s complete and total lack of pretense. They’re not pretending fun doesn’t exist or that making and playing music together isn’t fun. And they’re engaging their audience without dumbing down the material. It’s simple but not at all unclever, talking about moon buggies carrying balloons and riding into the night — the dark side of the moon, in other words — and all that.

Along with Bunny Racket‘s take on “Stagger Lee,” and other recent clips like “Rock Like an Animal” and the perhaps-forever-on-regular-rotation “Woolly Mammoth on a Motorcycle,” the “Moon Buggy” video continues to serve as a fitting argument that whichever streaming service it might be — Netflix, Amazing, Hu-ever — should immediately set about financing a Bunny Racket show based around these songs. I have to imagine you could get a whole season out of Bunny Racket in Space. Plus you’d have cameo opportunities for the likes of Brant Bjork and Ed Mundell! And then in 25 years they can do a gritty reboot for the adults who were the kids who watched the original and everyone can make even more well-deserved money.

I’m not even asking for an executive producer credit. Just make it happen.

Enjoy the video:

Bunny Racket, “Moon Buggy” official video

2020. Wow.

If nothing else, it really has been an incredible year for space travel. And that is exactly what these punk-rock bunnies have been doing. Travelling the outer reaches of the Solar System, they searched for a new sound to share with planet Earth’s radical kids. The mission has been successful. With a little help from some like minded space rockers – Brant Bjork (Kyuss/Fu Manchu) and Ed Mundell (Monster Magnet), the intergalactic stage has been set for a new chapter in the Kids rock ‘n’ roll playbook.

Now Bunny Racket are back from outer space with a brand new album and the first of a new series of music videos!

Bunny Racket In Space – this new album is out of this world!

Bunny Racket on Thee Facebooks

Bunny Racket on Instagram

Bunny Racket on YouTube

Bunny Racket webstore

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Quarterly Review: Molasses Barge, Slow Green Thing, Haze Mage & Tombtoker, White Dog, Jupiterian, Experiencia Tibetana, Yanomamo, Mos Eisley Spaceport, Of Wolves, Pimmit Hills

Posted in Reviews on October 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

We roll on with day two of the Fall 2020 Quarterly Review featuring another batch of 10 records en route to 50 by Friday — and actually, I just put together the list for a sixth day, so it’ll be 60 by next Monday. As much as things have been delayed from the pandemic, there’s been plenty to catch up on in the meantime and I find I’m doing a bit of that with some of this stuff today and yesterday. So tacking on another day to the end feels fair enough, and it was way easy to pick 10 more folders off my far-too-crowded desktop and slate them for review. So yeah, 60 records by Monday. I bet I could get to 70 if I wanted. Probably better for my sanity if I don’t. Anyhoozle, more to come. For now…

Quarterly Review #11-20:

Molasses Barge, A Grayer Dawn

molasses barge a grayer dawn

Following up their 2017 self-titled debut issued through Blackseed Records, Pittsburgh-based rockers Molasses Barge present A Grayer Dawn through Argonauta, and indeed, in songs like “Holding Patterns” or the melancholy “Control Letting Go,” it is a somewhat moodier offering than its predecessor. But also more focused. Molasses Barge, in songs like stomping opener “The Snake” and its swing-happy successor “Desert Discord,” and in the later lumber of “Black Wings Unfurl” and push of the title-track, reside at an intersection of microgenres, with classic heavy rock and doom and modern tonality and production giving them an edge in terms of overarching heft in their low end. Riffs are choice throughout from guitarists Justin Gizzi and Barry Mull, vocalist Brian “Butch” Balich (Argus, ex-Penance, etc.) sounds powerful as ever, and the rhythm section of bassist Amy Bianco and drummer Wayne Massey lock in a succession of grooves that find welcome one after the other until the final “Reprise” fades to close the album. Its individuality is deceptive, but try to fit Molasses Barge neatly in one category or the other and they’ll stand out more than it might at first seem.

Molasses Barge on Thee Facebooks

Argonauta Records website

 

Slow Green Thing, Amygdala

slow-green-thing_amygdala-2000

Yes, this. Slow Green Thing‘s third album, Amygdala, is melodic without being overbearing and filled out with a consuming depth and warmth of tone. A less jammy, more solo-prone Sungrazer comes to mind; that kind of blend of laid back vocals and heavy psychedelic impulse. But the Dresden four-piece have their own solidified, nodding grooves to unveil as well, tapping into modern stoner with two guitars setting their fuzz to maximum density and Sven Weise‘s voice largely floating overtop, echo added to give even more a sense of largesse and space to the proceedings, which to be sure have plenty of both. The six-track/44-minute outing picks up some speed in “Dirty Thoughts” at the outset of side B, and brings a fair bit of crush to the title-track earlier and lead-laced finale “Love to My Enemy,” but in “Dreamland,” they mellow and stretch out the drift and the effect is welcome and not at all out of place beside the massive sprawl conjured in side A capper “All I Want.” And actually, that same phrase — “all I want” — covers a good portion of my opinion on the band’s sound.

Slow Green Thing on Thee Facebooks

Fuzzmatazz Records website

 

Haze Mage & Tombtoker, Split

Haze Mage Tombtoker Split

Anyone bemoaning the state of traditionalist doom metal would do well to get their pants kick’d by Haze Mage, and when that’s done, it’s time to let the stoned zombie sludge of Tombtoker rip your arms off and devour what’s left. The two Baltimorean five-pieces make a righteously odd pairing, but they’ve shared the stage at Grim Reefer Fest in Charm City, and what they have most in common is a conviction of approach that comes through on each half of the four-song/19-minute offering, with Haze Mage shooting forth with “Sleepers” and the semi-NWOBHM “Pit Fighter,” metal, classic prog and heavy rock coming together with a vital energy that is immediately and purposefully contradicted in Tombtoker‘s played-fast-but-is-so-heavy-it-still-sounds-slow “Braise the Dead” and “Botched Bastard,” both of which find a way to be a ton of fun while also being unspeakably brutal and pushing the line between sludge and death metal in a way that would do Six Feet Under proud. Horns and bongs all around, then.

Haze Mage on Thee Facebooks

Tombtoker on Thee Facebooks

 

White Dog, White Dog

white dog white dog

Oldschool newcomers White Dog earn an automatic look by releasing their self-titled debut through former Cathedral frontman Lee Dorrian‘s Rise Above Records, but it’s the band’s clearcut vintage aesthetic that holds the listener’s attention. With proto-metal established as an aesthetic of its own going on 20 years now, White Dog aren’t the first by any means to tread this ground, but especially for an American band, they bring a sincerity of swing and soul that speaks to the heart of the subgenre’s appeal. “The Lantern” leans back into the groove to tell its tale, while “Abandon Ship” is more upfront in its strut, and “Snapdragon” and opener “Sawtooth” underscore their boogie with subtle progressive nods. Closing duo “Pale Horse” and “Verus Cultus” might be enough to make one recall it was Rise Above that issued Witchcraft‘s self-titled, but in the shuffle of “Crystal Panther,” and really across the whole LP White Dog make the classic ideology theirs and offer material of eminent repeat listenability.

White Dog on Thee Facebooks

Rise Above Records website

 

Jupiterian, Protosapien

jupiterian protosapien

The only thing that might save you from being swallowed entirely by the deathly mire Brazil’s Jupiterian craft on their third full-length, Protosapien, is the fact that the album is only 35 minutes long. That’s about right for the robe-clad purveyors of tonal violence — 2017’s Terraforming (review here) and 2015’s Aphotic (review here) weren’t much longer — and rest assured, it’s plenty of time for the band to squeeze the juice out of your soul and make you watch while they drink it out of some need-two-hands-to-hold-it ceremonial goblet. Their approach has grown more methodical over the years, and all the deadlier for that, and the deeper one pushes into Protosapien — into “Capricorn,” “Starless” and “Earthling Bloodline” at the end of the record — the less likely any kind of cosmic salvation feels. I’d say you’ve been warned, but really, this is just scratching the surface of the trenches into which Jupiterian plunge.

Jupiterian on Thee Facebooks

Transcending Obscurity Records on Bandcamp

 

Experiencia Tibetana, Vol. I

Experiencia Tibetana Vol I

It’s an archival release, recorded in 2014 and 2015 by the Buenos Aires-based band, but all that really does for the three-song/hour-long Vol. I is make me wonder what the hell Experiencia Tibetana have been up to since and why Vols. II and III are nowhere to be found. The heavy psych trio aren’t necessarily inventing anything on this debut full-length, but the way “Beirut” (18:36) is peppered with memorable guitar figures amid its echo-drifting vocals, and the meditation tucked into the last few minutes of the 26:56 centerpiece “Espalda de Elefante” and the shift in persona to subdued progressive psych on “Desatormentandonos” (14:16) with the bass seeming to take the improvisational lead as guitar lines hold the central progression together, all of it is a compelling argument for one to pester for a follow-up. It may be an unmanageable runtime, but for the come-with-us sense of voyage it carries, Vol. I adapts the listener’s mindset to its exploratory purposes, and proves to be well worth the trip.

Experiencia Tibetana on Thee Facebooks

Experiencia Tibetana on Bandcamp

 

Yanomamo, No Sympathy for a Rat

yanomamo no sympathy for a rat

Filth-encrusted and lumbering, Yanomamo‘s sludge takes Church of Misery-style groove and pummels it outright on the opening title-track of their four-song No Sympathy for a Rat EP. Like distilled disillusion, the scream-laced answer to the Sydney four-piece’s 2017 debut, Neither Man Nor Beast, arrives throwing elbows at your temples and through “The Offering,” the wait-is-this-grindcore-well-kinda-in-this-part “Miasma” and the suitably destructive “Iron Crown,” the only letup they allow is topped with feedback. Get in, kill, get out. They have more bounce than Bongzilla but still dig into some of Thou‘s more extreme vibe, but whatever you might want to compare them to, it doesn’t matter: Yanomamo‘s unleashed assault leaves bruises all its own, and the harsher it gets, the nastier it gets, the better. Can’t take it? Can’t hang? Fine. Stand there and be run over — I don’t think it makes a difference to the band one way or the other.

Yanomamo on Thee Facebooks

Iommium Records on Bandcamp

 

Mos Eisley Spaceport, The Best of Their Early Year

mos eisley spaceport the best of their early year

They mean the title literally — “early year.” Bremen, Germany’s Mos Eisley Spaceport — who so smoothly shift between space rock and classic boogie on “Further When I’m Far” and brash tempo changes en route to a final jam-out on “Mojo Filter,” finally unveiling the Star Wars sample at the head of organ-inclusive centerpiece “Space Shift” only to bring early Fu Manchu-style raw fuzz on “Drop Out” and finish with the twanging acoustic and pedal steel of “My Bicycle Won’t Fly” — have been a band for less than a full 12 months. Thus, The Best of Their Early Year signals some of its own progressive mindset and more playful aspects, but it is nonetheless a formidable accomplishment for a new band finding their way. They lay out numerous paths, if you couldn’t tell by the run-on sentence above, and I won’t hazard a guess as to where they’ll end up sound-wise, but they have a fervent sense of creative will that comes through in this material and one only hopes they hold onto whatever impulse it is that causes them to break out the gong on “Space Shift,” because it’s that sense of anything-as-long-as-it-works that’s going to continue to distinguish them.

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Thee Facebooks

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Bandcamp

 

Of Wolves, Balance

of wolves balance

One doesn’t often hear “the Wolfowitz Doctrine” brought out in lyrics these days, but Chicago heavy noise metallers Of Wolves aren’t shy about… well, anything. With volume inherent in the sound no matter how loud you’re actually hearing it, conveyed through weighted tones, shouts of progressions unified in intensity but varied in aggression and actual approach, the three-piece take an unashamed stance on a range of issues from the last two decades of war to trying to put themselves into the head of a mass shooter. The lyrics across their sophomore outing, Balance, are worth digging into for someone willing to take them on, but even without, the aggro mosh-stomp of “Maker” makes its point ahead of the 17-second “Flavor of the Weak” before Of Wolves dive into more progressively-structured fare on the title-track and “Clear Cutting/Bloodshed/Heart to Hand.” After “Killing Spree” and the aural-WTF that is “Inside (Steve’s Head),” they finish with a sludgecore take on the Misfits‘ “Die, Die My Darling,” which as it turns out was exactly what was missing up to that point.

Of Wolves on Thee Facebooks

Trepanation Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Pimmit Hills, Heathens & Prophets

Pimmit Hills Heathens Prophets

Comprised of four-fifths of what was Virginian outfit King Giant, it’s hard to know whether to consider Pimmit Hills a new band or a name-change, or what, but the first offering from vocalist David Hammerly, guitarist Todd “TI” Ingram, bassist Floyd Lee Walters III and drummer Brooks, titled Heathens & Prophets and self-released, hits with a bit of a bluesier feel than did the prior outfit, leaving plenty of room for jamming in each track and even going so far as to bring producer J. Robbins in on keys throughout the four-song/29-minute release. I suppose you could call it an EP or an LP — or a demo? — if so inclined, but any way you cut it, Heathens & Prophets plainly benefits from the band’s experience playing together, and they find a more rocking, less moody vibe in “Baby Blue Eyes” and the harmonica-laced “Beautiful Sadness” that has a feel as classic in substance as it is modern in sound and that is both Southern but refusing to bow entirely to cliché.

Pimmit Hills on Thee Facebooks

Pimmit Hills on Bandcamp

 

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Quarterly Review: Steve Von Till, Cyttorak, Lambda, Dee Calhoun, Turtle Skull, Diuna, Tomorrow’s Rain, Mother Eel, Umbilichaos, Radar Men From the Moon

Posted in Reviews on October 5th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

Oh hi there. It’s Quarterly Review time again, and you know what that means. 50 records between now and Friday — and I may or may not extend it through next Monday as well; I think I have enough of a backlog at this point to do so. It’s really just a question of how destroyed I am by writing about 10 different records every day this week. If past is prologue, that’s fairly well destroyed. But I’ve yet to do a Quarterly Review and regret it when it’s over, and like the last one, this roundup of 50 albums is pretty well curated, so it might even be fun to go through. There’s a thought. In any case, as always, I hope you find something you enjoy, and thank you for reading if you do or as much as you do.

Quarterly Review #1-10:

Steve Von Till, No Wilderness Deep Enough

steve von till no wilderness deep enough

Neurosis guitarist/vocalist Steve Von Till seems to be bringing some of the experimentalism that drives his Harvestman project into the context of his solo work with No Wilderness Deep Enough, his fifth LP and first since 2015’s A Life unto Itself (review here). Drones and melodic synth backs the deceptively-titled “The Old Straight Track,” and where Von Till began his solo career 20 years ago with traditional folk guitar, if slower, on these six tracks, he uses that meditative approach as the foundation for an outward-reaching 37-minute run, incorporating ethereal strings among the swirls of “Shadows on the Run” and finishing with the foreboding hum of “Wild Iron.” Opener “Dreams of Trees” establishes the palette’s breadth with synthesized beats alongside piano and maybe-cello, but it’s Von Till‘s voice itself that ties the material together and provides the crucial human presence and intimacy that most distinguishes the offerings under his own name. Accompanied by Von Till‘s first published book of poetry, No Wilderness Deep Enough is a portrait of the unrelenting creative growth of its maker.

Steve Von Till on Thee Facebooks

Neurot Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Cyttorak, Simultaneous Invocation of Apocalyptic Harbingers

Cyttorak Simultaneous Invocation of Apocalyptic Harbingers

Take a breath before you hit play only to have it punched right out from your solar plexus by the brutalist deathsludge Cyttorak cleverly call “slowerviolence.” Dominated by low end and growls, screams, and shouts, the lumbering onslaught is the second standalone EP for the three-piece who hail from scenic Pawtucket, Rhode Island (former home of the PawSox), and throughout its six-track run, the unit conjure an unyieldingly punishing tonal morass set to aggressive purpose. That they take their name from the Marvel Universe character who controls X-Men villain Juggernaut should not be taken as coincidence, since their sound indeed seems intended to put its head down and smash through walls and/or anything else that might be in its path in pursuit of its quarry. With Conan-esque lyrical minimalism, the songs nonetheless give clues to their origins — “Royal Shokan Dismemberment” refers to Goro from Mortal Kombat, and finale “Domination Lord of Coldharbour” to Skyrim (which I still regret not playing) — but if you consider comics or video games to be lighter fare, first off, you’re working with an outdated mentality, and second, Cyttorak would like a bit of your time to smother you with volume and ferocity. They have a new split out as well, both on tape.

Cyttorak on Thee Facebooks

Tor Johnson Records website

 

Lambda, Heliopolis

lambda heliopolis

Also signified by the Greek letter from which they take their moniker, Czech four-piece Lambda represent a new age of progressive heavy post-rock. Influences from Russian Circles aren’t necessarily surprising to find coursing through the instrumental debut full-length, Heliopolis, but there are shades of Elder as well behind the more driving riffs and underlying swing of “Space Express,” which also featured on the band’s 2015 EP of the same name. The seven-minute “El Sonido Nuevo” did likewise, but older material or newer, the album’s nine-song procession moves toward its culminating title-track through the grace of “Odysea” and the intertwining psychedelic guitars of “Milkyway Phaseshifter” with an overarching atmosphere of the journey to the city of the sun being undertaken. And when they get there, at the closer, there’s an initial sense of peace that gives way to some of the most directly heavy push Heliopolis has to offer. Payoff, then. So be it. Purposeful and somewhat cerebral in its execution, the DIY debut brings depth and space together to immersive effect.

Lambda on Thee Facebooks

Lambda on Bandcamp

 

Dee Calhoun, Godless

dee calhoun godless

Following his 2016 debut, Rotgut (review here) and 2018’s Go to the Devil (review here), Godless is the third full-length from former Iron Man and current Spiral Grave frontman Dee Calhoun, and its considerable 63-minute runtime finds him working in multiple directions while keeping his underlying roots in acoustic-based heavy metal. Certainly “To My Boy” — and Rob Calhoun has appeared on his father’s releases before as well — has its basis in familial expression, but its pairing with “Spite Fuck” is somewhat curious. Meanwhile, “Hornswoggled” cleverly samples George W. Bush with a laugh track, and “Here Under Protest,” “The Greater Evil,” “Ebenezer” and “No Justice” seem to take a worldly view as well. Meanwhile again, “Godless,” “The Day Salvation Went Away” and “Prudes, Puritanicals and Puddles of Piss” make their perspective nothing if not plain for the listener, and the album ends with the two-minute kazoo-laced gag track “Here Comes the Bride: A Tale From Backwater.” So perhaps scattershot, but Godless is nonetheless Calhoun‘s most effective outing yet in terms of arrangements and craft, and shows him digging further into the singer-songwriter form than he has up to now, sounding more comfortable and confident in the process.

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Argonauta Records website

 

Turtle Skull, Monoliths

Turtle Skull Monoliths

Melodic vocal lines weave together and float over alternately weighted and likewise ethereal guitars on Turtle Skull‘s second album, Monoliths. The percussion-inclusive (tambourine, congas, rain stick, etc.) Sydney-based heavy psychedelic outfit create an immersive wash that makes the eight-song/55-minute long-player consuming for the duration, and while there are moments of clarity to be found throughout — the steady snare taps of “Why Do You Ask?” for example — but the vast bulk of the LP is given to the overarching flow, which finds progressive/space-rock footing in the 11-plus minutes of finale “The Clock Strikes Forever” and is irresistibly consuming on the drifting wash of “Rabbit” or the lysergic grunge blowout of “Who Cares What You Think?,” which gives way to the choral drone of “Halcyon” gorgeously en route through the record’s back half. It’s not the highest profile heavy psych release of 2020, but neither is it to be overlooked for the languid stretch of “Leaves” at the outset or the fuzz-drenched roll in the penultimate “Apple of Your Eye.”

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Art as Catharsis on Bandcamp

Kozmik Artifactz website

 

Diuna, Golem

diuna golem

In some ways, the dichotomy of Diuna‘s 2019 sophomore full-length, Golem, is set by its first two tracks, the 24-second intro “Menu” and the seven-minute “Jarmark Cudów” that follows, each longer song throughout is prefaced by an introduction or interlude, varying in degrees of experimentation. That, however, doesn’t cover the outsider vibes the Polish trio bring to bear in those longer songs themselves, be it “Jarmark Cudów” devolving into a post-Life of Agony noise rock roll, or the thrust in “Frank Herbert” cut into starts and stops and shouting madness. Heavy rock, noise, sludge, post-this-or-that, it doesn’t matter by the end of the 12-track/44-minute release, because Diuna establish such firm control over the proceedings and make so clear the challenge to the listener to keep up that it’s only fun to try. It might take a couple listens to sink in, but the more attention one gives Golem, the more one is going to be rewarded in the end, and I don’t just mean in the off-kilter fuckery of closer “Pan Jezus Idzie Do Wojska.”

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Diuna on Bandcamp

 

Tomorrow’s Rain, Hollow

tomorrows rain hollow

“Ambitious” doesn’t begin to cover it. With eight songs (plus a bonus track) and 11 listed guest musicians, the debut full-length, Hollow, from Tel Aviv-based death-doomers Tomorrow’s Rain seems to be setting its own standard in that regard. And quite a list it is, with the likes of Aaron Stainthorpe of My Dying Bride, Greg Mackintosh of Paradise Lost, Fernando Ribeiro of Moonspell, Mikko Kotamaki of Swallow the Sun, and so on, it is a who’s-who of melodic/gothic death-doom and the album lives up to the occasion in terms of the instrumental drama it presents. Some appear on one track, some on multiple tracks — Ribeiro and Kotamaki both feature on “Misery Rain” — and despite the constant shifts in personnel with only one of the eight tracks completely without an outside contributor, the core six-piece of Tomorrow’s Rain are still able to make an impression of their own that is bolstered and not necessarily overwhelmed by the extravagant company being kept throughout.

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AOP Records website

 

Mother Eel, Svalbard

mother eel svalbard

Mother Eel‘s take on sludge isn’t so much crushing as it is caustic. They’re plenty heavy, but their punishment isn’t just meted out through tonal weight being brought down on your head. It’s the noise. It’s the blown-out screams. It’s the harshness of the atmosphere in which the entirety of their debut album, Svalbard, resides. Five tracks, 33 minutes, zero forgiveness. One might be tempted to think of songs like “Erection of Pain” as nihilistic fuckall, but that seems incorrect. Nah, they mean it. Fuckall, yeah. But fuckall as ethos. Fuckall manifest. So it goes through “Alpha Woman” and “Listen to the Elderly for They Have Much to Teach,” which ends in a Primitive Man-ish static assault, and the lumbering finish “Not My Shade,” which assures that what began on “Sucking to Gain” half an hour earlier ends on the same anti-note: a disaffected malevolence writ into sheer sonic unkindness. There is little letup, even in the quiet introductions or transitions, so if you’re looking for mercy, don’t bother.

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Mother Eel on Redbubble

 

Umbilichaos, Filled by Empty Spaces

Umbilichaos Filled by Empty Spaces

The four-song/39-minute atmospheric sludge long-player Filled by Empty Spaces is listed by Brazilian solo outfit Umbilichaos as being the third part of, “the Tetralogy of Loneliness.” If that’s the emotion being expressed in the noise-metal post-Godflesh chug-and-shout of “Filled by Empty Spaces Pt. 02,” then it is loneliness viscerally presented by founding principal and multi-instrumentalist Anna C. Chaos. The feel throughout the early going of the release is plodding and agonized in kind, but in “Filled by Empty Spaces Pt. 01” and “Filled by Empty Spaces Pt. 03” there is some element of grim, crusted-over psychedelia happening alongside the outright dirge-ism, though the latter ultimately wins out in the four-minute instrumental capper “Disintegration.” One way or the other, Chaos makes her point through raw tonality and overarching intensity of purpose, the compositions coming across simultaneously unhinged and dangerously under control. There are many kinds of heavy. Filled by Empty Spaces is a whole assortment of them.

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Sinewave website

 

Radar Men From the Moon, The Bestial Light

radar men from the moon the bestial light

Fueled by avant grunge/noise impulsion, Radar Men From the Moon‘s latest foray to Planet Whothefuckknows arrives in the eight-song/41-minute The Bestial Light, a record alternately engrossing and off-putting, that does active harm when the sounds-like-it’s-skipping intro to “Piss Christ” comes on and then subsequently mellows out with psych-sax like they didn’t just decide to call the song “Sacred Cunt of the Universe” or something. Riffs, electronics, the kind of weirdness that’s too self-aware not to be progressive, Radar Men From the Moon take the foundation of experimentation set by Astrosoniq and mutate it via Swans into something unrecognizable by genre and unwilling to compromise its own direction. And no, by the time “Levelling” comes on to round out, there is no peace to be found, though perhaps a twisted kind of joy at the sheer postmodernism. They should score ballets with this stuff. No one would go, but three centuries from now, they’d be worshiped as gods. Chance of that anyway, I suppose.

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Fuzz Club Records on Bandcamp

 

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Oceanlord Premiere “Come Home” Video from Debut Demo

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 2nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

oceanlord

Melbourne, Australia’s Oceanlord posted their first demo — titled simply Demo — on June 26. Generally speaking, I’m not one for bands calling their initial short releases anything else, but if Oceanlord had gone the “debut EP” route instead, I don’t think I’d have been able to hold it against them. Certainly I’ve come across such “debut EPs” — demos by any other name — that are less coherent in style, less purposefully adventurous, patient in their craft and less aesthetically bold. Comprising just two songs — “Come Home” (7:41) and “Isle of the Dead” (7:56) — the offering takes aspects of emotive doom, heavy post-rock, and sludge in “Come Home” and, in the case of “Isle of the Dead,” latter-day Enslaved-style progressive black metal riffing. All of this is turned into an obscure and immediately individualized approach to craft. Each track showcasing a different look as they do, guitarist/vocalist Peter Willmott, bassist Jason Ker and drummer Jon May seem to have come into their demo with a clear idea of who they want to be as a band and, as their debut full-length is reportedly already in the works, the potential they show here only gives the impression that they’re ready to take on such a task.

“Come Home” is the more emotionally-focused of Demo‘s two inclusions, and the band would seem to have chosen to highlight it with the oceanlord demovideo premiering below in part for that reason. Sound-wise, the track starts off quiet and runs for about a minute before the echoing vocals enter with a longing echo that recalls Patrick Walker and Warning, and the strumming guitar and concurrent melodic hum (mellotron? keys?) add to the sense of space as the song unfolds and builds, a steady march of snare punctuating its motion. That snare sound, at least on my crap-tastic speakers, has a bit of bite to it in its place in the mix that might warrant keeping an eye on as they move into their album, but the crash and riffing that surrounds it is immersive in its flow such that it becomes almost like a matter of timekeeping for oars striking water. As “Come Home” progresses into its final movement, it does so with not only that continued rhythmic foundation, but with some additional swirl in Willmott‘s guitar and an increasingly hypnotic groove to coincide with the resonance on display lyrically and in the earlier vocal performance.

This? This right here? These guys are onto something.

Obviously I don’t know what the future is going to bring on any level, let alone what a band from the other side of the planet is going to sound like on their first record, but there are few things more exciting than a group who come together knowing what they want to do sound-wise and setting about doing it. Demo bleeds purpose. I look forward to the album hopefully soon to follow.

Enjoy the video premiere. Quote from the band and more info follow:

Oceanlord, “Come Home” official video premiere

Oceanlord on “Come Home”:

“Come Home” is about losing who we love, and the regret that haunts us. We launched Oceanlord in January, played some cool shows, recorded our demo in February, felt like things were really taking off, planned a launch gig in March, you can guess how that went! We were gutted, and we could see so many bands online hurting, losing hope. Weeks dragged on and “Come Home” spoke to me, I wasn’t ready to walk away and regret. Jon (drums) had a contact at an amazing space, so we came up with this story for the song, a macabre short horror. We worked out how to make it safe, and comply with the city-wide lockdown, we had a whole crew ready to go. Then a few weeks out the film crew bailed. We found some really talented people who liked the project, came on board at the last minute, and we filmed it in one massive day — everyone brought this creative energy and the darkness we wove was electric. We’re really proud of how it has come together. This is a video about enduring, surviving the horror.

Ghoul Bride: Kerryx
Produced by: Peter Willmott
Director: Brigid Morgan
Cinematographer: Samuel Young
Key Grip / Set Design: Miriam Grey
Assistant: Jessie Ribchester
Location: The Establishment Studios Fitzroy

Engineer, Mix, and Mastering: Lewcifer

Oceanlord are an Australian stoner rock trio formed in 2019 with a desire to take on the continent with a storm of riffs. Fusing the sounds of bands from Windhand to All Them Witches by way of Portishead and The Sword they just started to make waves in the Melbourne underground before the coronavirus shutdowns. Now, they’ve released a two track demo highlighting their progressive mix of doom with psychedelic sounds that they have dubbed ‘Stoner Gloom Rock’. Oceanlord have now started work on their debut full length, seeking to satisfy their love of all things heavy, dark, transcendent, and slow. Once more they are distilling the magic of the ‘Stoner Gloom’ sound.

Oceanlord is:
Jason Ker – Bass
Jon May – Drums
Peter Willmott – Guitar/Vox

Oceanlord, Demo (2020)

Oceanlord on Thee Facebooks

Oceanlord on Instagram

Oceanlord on Bandcamp

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Light Pillars Premiere Self-Titled Debut out Sept. 4 on Sound Effect Records

Posted in audiObelisk, Whathaveyou on July 31st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

If you’ve ever been in a band and had a moderately friendly conversation with someone else in a similar band, you’ve probably somewhere along the line heard the phrase “we should jam” used once or twice. Rarely does jamming result and even more rarely does it go any further than that. Melbourne two-piece Light Pillars — whose origins would seem to be based in similar proceedings — have beat the odds and will release their self-titled debut on Sept. 4 through respected Greek purveyor Sound Effect Records (sign up for their newsletter; doesn’t matter where you live). The outfit features Toby Wrecker (né Matthews) of Hotel Wrecking City Traders and Andrew Pana (né Panagopoulos) of Comacozer, and each offers a distinctive presence from within the increasingly populated sphere of Australian heavy psychedelia.

One might also think there’s nothing but self-indulgent chaos to come out of such an affair, but it actually seems like Wrecker and Pana meshed well in the studio, and had a fitting sense of where they were headed in their jams. They made the record in two days. Two days. And one was writing. How can you possibly mess with that? I can’t.

Here’s the announcement. Preorders are up today:

light pillars self titled

Light Pillars – Light Pillars – Sept. 4 2020

Australian noisy psych project LIGHT PILLARS consisting of Toby – Guitars (Hotel Wrecking City Traders) and Andrew – Drums (Comacozer) came together in June 2019 at Cellar Sessions Studios in Melbourne for an improved jam session. Both bands having played together previously and after some ideas and banter being thrown around the two decided to finally get together and see what the cosmos can produce and this release debut self-titled release resulting in 4 tracks of noisy dark heavy instrumental psych rock. Recorded in one session with Max behind the recording desk and mastered by Kent Stump (Crystal Clear Sound Studios, Dallas, Texas USA) and amazing artwork by Dora Wednesday, this is one journey taking diverse release.

Day 1: Go into a room and throw around some ideas. Day 2: Enter a studio and record. This is Light Pillars.

Album will be up on Sound Effect Records for Pre-Sale on Friday 31st July. www.soundeffect-records.gr

Street Date for release is 4th September 2020.

Light Pillars are:
Andrew Pana (Comacozer) – Drums
Toby Wrecker (Hotel Wrecking City Traders, GOUTS) – Guitars and Bass

www.facebook.com/LightPillars
www.instagram.com/lightpillarspsych
www.lightpillars.bandcamp.com
http://www.motljud.com/
https://www.facebook.com/SoundEffectRecords/
https://www.soundeffect-records.gr/

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