Negative Reaction to Release Astrophilia Tonight at the Solstice

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 19th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Having marked the 30th anniversary of the band’s existence on Valentine’s Day, West Virginia by way of Long Island sludgers Negative Reaction, who serve at the behest of founding guitarist/vocalist Kenny Bones, will release their new album, Astrophilia, on this very evening to mark the arrival of the Spring solstice. If you like your heavy heavy, you probably already know that’s good news, but Bones and Company offer further intrigue in unveiling that the new record is a follow-up to their 38-minute epic “The Moon Song.”

The megatrack originally appeared as the opener among the three cuts on 2000’s The Orion Chronicles — the other two pieces were “Hypothermia” and the Hawkwind cover “Lord of Light,” if you’re curious — but this time around, “A Song for the Sun” stands entirely on its own, and given Bones‘ well-established affinity for Star Wars references and related content, I’m going to assume the name of the character ‘Luke’ as seen below isn’t a coincidence. I’m not saying it’s Luke Skywalker, but most likely that’d be where the name comes from. Just saying.

So how’s the record? I guess we’ll find out tonight:

negative reaction astrophilia

Negative Reaction – Astrophilia

The new full length album for NR is finished!

The new album is titled “Astrophilia.”

The release date is Thursday March 19th at 11:49PM Eastern Time.

It can be digitally downloaded through bandcamp.

CD copies are also available through the NR Facebook page.

It is a part 2 of the legendary “Moon Song.”

It is a concept on what happens after the earth is destroyed in the story of “The Moon Song.”

The concept…
A handful of people survive and travel through space looking for a new home……….
Or not.”

Track listing…..
“A song For The Sun”……..
Ch1 “Solar Flare”
Ch 2 “Europa”
Ch 3 “Luke’s Ascent”
Ch 4 ” Order 66″
Ch 5 “Solar Wind / Luke Has Landed”
Ch 6 ” Eclipse”
Ch 7 “Moonbase Alpha”
Ch 8 ” Luke’s Colony”

Negative Reaction are:
Sir Ken-E Bones: Founder/Singer/Guitars
Trey Crane: Bass
Ryan Aliff: Drums

https://www.facebook.com/Negative-Reaction-166679340107961/
https://negativereactionband.bandcamp.com/

Negative Reaction, “The Moon Song”

Tags: , , , , ,

Horseburner Postpone European Tour Plans

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 13th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

You don’t need me to tell you these are uncertain times, but kudos to West Virginia’s Horseburner for being smart enough to pull the plug on what would’ve been a nightmare trip to Europe instead of going over there and being thoroughly screwed without shows or money, etc., because that’s the kind of crap that breaks up good bands. So better they put off the tour than do it wrong.

And hey, if you want to take something positive from the story below — it is quite a story — at least it’s not just COVID-19 that’s their reason. Apparently whoever was booking their tour — they seem purposefully not to name said individual or entity — just didn’t do it. That’s a rough one. They were set to play Ripplefest Cologne with a bunch of other good bands and I assume like the rest of existence that’s up in the air now as to whether it’s even happening, but yeah. From how they tell the tale, it’s easy to see why they’re waiting. It’s the right call.

Here’s what they have to say:

HORSEBURNER

When this band started touring, our goal was to make it over to Europe within 5 years. We’ve been actively touring since 2011. If you know us, if you’ve followed us, you know some of the struggles we’ve had. Life gets in the way of keeping a band together. And the older you get, the more difficult it is. People’s goals change. Their ideals change. To be honest, I think most people would call us idiots for sinking as much of ourselves for so long into a band that is still touring and playing some empty rooms. The truth is we are total idiots who believe too much in what we’re doing to give up. But we’re lucky that we’ve found like minded idiots along the way, like Seth and Matt and and Rob and Scott and Mike and Chad, etc, who share this vision and tenacity. So even though we’ve had to postpone goals along the way, we’ve continually refused to give up. And because of that refusal to give up, we finally got our opportunity to take our music overseas this year.

We now have the unfortunate duty to announce that we will not be playing Ripple Fest in Cologne, Germany later this month. I really don’t want people to think we just easily threw in the towel, so here’s what we’ve gone up against in the past few months. Hope you’re ready to get a sneak peak into the struggles of a DIY band.

Due to a laundry list of reasons that are not in the slightest bit his fault, we found out Seth was not going to be able to go. This was heartbreaking because Seth has worked his tail off for this band, and he deserves to have all the amazing experiences a tour like this should bring. But as sad as we were, we are lucky to have excellent friends. Scott from Bridesmaid was going to fill in for the tour just as he has many times in the past. Then one day Scott called with some potential terrible news and suddenly we didn’t know if he could go either. Strike two. After a few weeks of back and forth, some fingers crossed, and lots of positive vibes, Scott called and said everything was a go. Only now, we had a different problem. We only had one show (Ripple Fest).

The person who was hired to book the tour… didn’t. We were scheduled to be overseas for nearly three weeks, hoping to play as many shows as possible. As amazing as it would be to simply go explore Europe, we were going to work, not vacation. So as of two weeks ago, we had one show. The smart thing to do would have been to cancel as soon as we found out there was no tour. But we had already bought plane tickets and we’re not smart. So Ripple and Blues Funeral rallied the troops, and we had an amazing crew of true brothers and sisters go into hyperdrive, and as of yesterday, we had nine shows. Are we the type of people who will fly to a separate continent to play a handful of shows that have not even been advertised with insane drives due to emergency routing? Truthfully, yes. Yes we are. But now on top of all of this, some European countries are now closing off their borders and encouraging people to avoid public gatherings. So the show that came together in Italy was going to be canceled. And it really looks like other countries are going to be following suit in the coming weeks. There are too many uncertainties and too much risk of shows getting canceled last minute, and we’d still be sunk for thousands and thousands of dollars for renting gear and a van for the tour. Or even worse, getting stuck quarantined in a foreign country and not able to get home, not able to get back to our families or our jobs after the tour, and any other awful situation you can imagine. So here we are.

I don’t think any of us have ever been this disappointed. But we’re doing what we always do, we’re looking to the future. This is not the end of the road, this is just one more obstacle we’re going to overcome. We’re going to reschedule this tour, and as soon as we have news, we’re going to share it with you.

Lastly, we want to send our deepest gratitude to the folks who banded together over the last couple weeks and put together what should have been an amazing time. All our love to Buddy from Great Electric Quest and Mikaela from Loitsu Booking who did the bulk of the work the last couple weeks, Todd from Ripple and Jadd from Blues Funeral, Matt Bacon, Electric Avenue Music, Max from Plainride, Doza from Lightning Born, Tom from 20 Watt Tombstone, Nick from Stonecutters, and anyone else who tried to help us out. Lastly, to Howling Giant. Our plans for world domination will have to wait a few months, but we love you dudes and we’ll make this work eventually.

As always, we’ll see you on the road… in the US. Stay dirty.

Horseburner:
Adam Nohe – Drums/Vocals
Jack Thomas – Guitar/Vocals
Matt Strobel – Guitar
Seth Bostick – Bass

https://www.horseburner.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Horseburner/
https://horseburner.bandcamp.com/
https://www.instagram.com/horseburner/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Horseburner, The Thief (2019)

Tags: , , , ,

Review & Full Album Premiere: Seven Planets, Explorer

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on February 5th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

seven planets explorer

[Click play above to stream Explorer by Seven Planets in full. Album is out Friday on Small Stone Records. Preorders available here.]

Seven Planets‘ third album and first for Small Stone Records, Explorer, is a simple-enough proposition on its face. The West Virginian double-guitar instrumentalist outfit on paper — things like “instrumental” and “West Virginia” — inherently bring to mind Karma to Burn, who are more or less the kings of the form of straightforward, (mostly) sans-vocal heavy rock and roll. But Seven Planets wind up on a different trip with Explorer, and the surface impression is really just the beginning point for what they have to offer on the eight-track/36-minute Explorer, a follow-up to their 2012 self-titled (review here) and 2008’s first LP, Flight of the Ostrich, both self-released. Eight years between records is no minor stretch, but with a recording credited to the band and mix helmed by guitarist Leonard Hanks, joined in the band by guitarist James Way, bassist Mike Williams and drummer Ben Pitt, Explorer‘s tracks by and large carry an easy groove marked by tonal warmth and fluidity between the players.

It may have taken Seven Planets eight years to put a record out, but whatever might’ve been behind that delay — life? — listening to the languid, semi-bluesy nod of the title-track, it’s easy to believe they’ve been jamming all the while. Beginning with “Vanguard,” they bring together elements out of heavy rock riffing and heavy psychedelic immersion, something that, for the first record, I compared to Clutch offshoot The Bakerton Group. The same applies to Explorer at least in the use of Tim Sult-style wah on lead guitar lines, but perhaps to a lesser degree than on the preceding release, since, as Explorer hints in its title, the band seem to be working here to find their own space and sound here in a progressive step forward from where they were those years ago. The drift of “Plain Truth in a Homespun Dress” shows a patience in unfolding its bluesy undercurrent and builds up over its first 90 seconds or so toward a momentary wash before receding again, cycling through with a solo overtop and shifting in its second half to a surprise bit of boogie before, in the last minute, the jam seems to take an improvised turn led by the guitar before coming apart.

That moment is important and feels particularly honest, if somewhat understated. The title-track follows in its own liquefied near-seven-minutes of flow, but the exploratory feeling is palpable at the culmination of “Plain Truth in a Homespun Dress,” and the fact that the band let the song follow its own path organically, even as it dissipates, is admirably honest and speaks to their ethic and lack of outward pretense overall. Not that their material can’t be thoughtful or planned out, as the initial unfurling of “Explorer” itself certainly seems to be, with hints toward prog structures and a spacier thematic as depicted on the Alexander von Wieding album art, but it’s the ability to move in either realm and to subtly shift between mindsets that gives Explorer as a whole its sense of character throughout its relatively brief runtime. As the title cut settles into its funky bounce moving toward the midpoint, with Pitt‘s drums and Williams‘ bass leading the way through the encompassing jam — something backwards layered in — it’s no challenge for the listener to go along with the groove as they make their way to the finish of the album’s longest track.

seven planets

The spirit of the material is nothing but warm and welcoming throughout, and certainly that’s emphasized in the title-track, which gives way to a quicker, solo-laced boogie in “206,” the presumed end of side A, as the two guitars hold sway over the creation of a swirl of effects and a central riff cutting through. Like “Vanguard” at the outset, “206” feels like something of a snippet, but it moves smoothly into “Seven Seas” — the only piece besides the title-track to reach over six minutes — and provides a buffer between the more psychedelic vibe of the two longer stretches when listening to a linear (CD/DL) format; a well-intentioned pickup in energy and momentum that, like the rest of what surrounds, asks little more of the listener than a nod-along. “Seven Seas” is particularly notable as the beginning point of side B as it leads to “Great Attractor,” which — and not just for the inclusion of organ (or organ sounds) lurking in the mix — makes for the most hypnotic one-two dive on Explorer. With the drums still acting as a grounding factor, Seven Planets are never in any real danger of floating away, but their drive toward meandering here and there in the guitars makes the later moments of “Great Attractor” a mirror for “Plain Truth in a Homespun Dress,” even if the ending works out smoother.

Shuffle blues guitar takes hold in the penultimate “Grissom” with a due sense of space, picking up at the end before dropping out and hitting on the beat into the rush of closer “The Buzzard,” which immediately begins the speediest movement on the record. Feeling more plotted than “Grissom” or some of the other material, the finale works around a winding riff with suitable rhythmic push and a summarizing feel in the interplay of lead and rhythm guitar, resolving itself in a last shove that, as they have at several points throughout, cuts away just as it seems to reach a head. Seven Planets never reach the same kind of jammy elevations as, say, their labelmates in Austin, Texas’ Tia Carrera, but neither do they seem to want to. Rather, their melding together of different styles and plays back and forth between constructed and off-the-cuff material and parts — sometimes, it seems, within individual tracks — is a distinguishing factor for their sound and ends up being the basis for much of Explorer‘s personality. Eight years after the first offering, it probably shouldn’t be a surprise to find that Seven Planets have progressed as a band, but they’ve also managed to hold onto the essential instrumental conversation between them that allows those improvisational stretches to shine through.

Seven Planets on Thee Facebooks

Seven Planets on Bandcamp

Small Stone Records website

Small Stone Records on Thee Facebooks

Small Stone Records on Bandcamp

Tags: , , , , ,

Seven Planets to Release Explorer Feb. 7 on Small Stone; Preorders up Now

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 18th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

seven planets

Ah, February release dates. In the last few years especially, as underground release patterns have reorganized around digitalia and the recentering of common focus on vinyl, there’s been a resurgence of the February/September dynamic that I find fascinating. Big albums come out at the start of the year and the end of the year, and the year starts in February and ends in September. You still get stuff in the months between, of course, but consider the fact that it’s mid-November now and we’re already seeing looks-ahead to what’s arriving in 2020. Similarly, as everyone’s touring in the summer, it’s the early Fall releases that are the focus more than anything coming out at the time. The fact that Seven Planets will make their debut on Small Stone Records on Feb. 7 with their third outing, Explorer, is immediately encouraging.

Preorders are up (because that’s how Small Stone does), and a song is streaming now (ditto), so get to it.

Info came from Bandcamp. I edited the bio but can’t take credit for having written it in the first place:

seven planets explorer

Seven Planets – Explorer

West Virginia-based heavy instrumentalists Seven Planets will release their third full-length, Explorer, on February 7, 2020, through Detroit’s Small Stone Records. Drawing on classic metal, heavy boogie, and blues rock, the group formed in 2007 and consists of guitarists Leonard Hanks and Jim Way, bassist Mike Williams and drummer Ben Pitt, all of whom have played in bands together in different configurations for over 25 years. Its groove-anchored sound has drawn comparisons to Brant Bjork and Clutch-offshoot The Bakerton Group.

Written and recorded over a period of personal difficulties and individual strife for the four band members, Explorer captures a sense of escapist freedom in its deep grooves, burly riffs, and expansive atmosphere, which further illustrates what Heavy Planet stated in its review of the band’s self-titled 2012 LP: “Seven Planets take you on an amazing journey into another cosmic dimension.”

The new album features artwork by renowned German illustrator Alexander von Wieding (Monster Magnet, Brant Bjork, Karma to Burn, etc.), giving further representation to the idea of escape with a spacebound retro-style rocket headed to the unknown. Exploration in the truest sense.

Tracklisting
1. Vanguard 02:46
2. Plain Truth In A Homespun Dress
3. Explorer
4. 206
5. Seven Seas
6. Great Attractor
7. Grissom
8. The Buzzard

Recorded by Seven Planets at Stonewall Studios, Beckley, WV.
Produced and mixed by Leonard Hanks.
Mastered by Chris Goosman @ Baseline Audio Labs, Ann Arbor, MI.
Album artwork by Alexander von Wieding.
All songs by Seven Planets.
Published by Small Stone Records (ASCAP)

Seven Planets is:
Leonard Hanks: guitar
Ben Pitt: drums
James Way: guitar
Mike Williams: bass

https://www.facebook.com/Seven-Planets-102040383183657/
https://sevenplanets.bandcamp.com/
http://www.smallstone.com
http://www.facebook.com/smallstonerecords
http://www.smallstone.bandcamp.com

Seven Planets, Explorer (2020)

Tags: , , , , ,

Rhin Release Passenger Outtakes Recordings from 2015

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 5th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Okay, so I’ll just say that 2016 was three years ago, and early 2016 even longer than that, so if you don’t have immediate recall on Rhin‘s third and most-recent album, Passenger (discussed here). Time passes, life happens, and maybe you remember and maybe you don’t. It’s okay. It’s a big internet and the record is out there waiting for you to dig back in at your leisure. That’s the tradeoff for all that privacy you sold away without knowing about it.

In fact, because I believe in supporting that investment, I’ve included the embed below. Fine.

Before you get there, however, you’ll find the new release Passenger Outtakes, culled from the same sessions — or at least one day thereof — that revisit the album’s sound. Presented name-your-price style by Bandcamp, it’s basically an excuse to pay another visit to a record (and then some) that those who might recall might do so fondly. I do.

So go ahead and have at it and enjoy. Note that two of the three inclusions showed up later on a split, but in different form, with vocals, so this is how they were to start with.

As per Grimoire‘s Bandcamp page:

rhin passenger outtakes

Passenger Outtakes by Rhin

Three previously unreleased instrumental tracks from the “Passenger” recording session on October 24th, 2015, remixed and remastered for a less roomy, tighter punk-rock vibe. Despite the fact that two of these songs were re-recorded, completed with vocals, and featured on a split with Rat Ship, everyone agreed these takes were too good to not publish!

In 2018, Rhin entered an indefinite hiatus from which they may never return, but these tracks are a reminder of how freaking tight these three guys were. At the time of this recording, Rhin was Dom (bass), Tucker (guitar), and Ben (drums).

All proceeds go to the ACLU.

Released November 1, 2019.

Tracklisting:
1. Awake 05:28
2. Bullshit 03:16
3. Nothing 07:02

http://rhin.bandcamp.com
http://www.facebook.com/rhinwv
http://grimoirerecords.bandcamp.com
http://www.facebook.com/GrimoireRecords

Rhin, Passenger Outtakes (2019)

Rhin, Passenger (2016)

Tags: , , , ,

Horseburner Touring the Midwest and West Coast in November

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 10th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

horseburner

West Virginia’s Horseburner made a suitably barnstorming label debut on Ripple Music a couple months back with The Thief (review here), and in November, they’ll be heading out westward to support the album, aligning with Boston’s Worshipper and of course a host of others for shows along the way. Sound cool? It is. Horseburner have a few tours under their collective belt at this point, but they go with a new and marked level of accomplishment following the issue of their second album, and increasingly their reputation is preceding them. This is the kind of thing that only continues a band’s forward momentum, and Horseburner have plenty of that, in sound and circumstance alike.

If the style of the poster looks familiar, it’s probably because you’ve been staring at Lo-Pan artwork. It’s Pittsburgh-based Chris Smith behind the design, and it rules in such a way as to wonder what it would cost to ask for a t-shirt design for this site. Probably more than I’ve got, but still. Might be worth finding that out.

Anyway, here are the dates:

horseburner tour

We are pleased as can be to announce the entirety of our November tour. We’re hitting a ton of places we’ve never played before, so we’re looking forward to getting out there and meeting you. Yes, you.

Even more stoked to be meeting up with our brothers in the mighty Worshipper for the west coast dates!

As always, we’ll see you on the road. Stay dirty.

11-1: Cleveland, OH – Now That’s Class
11-2: Bloomington, IL – Nightshop
11-3: Rock Island, IL – RIBCO
11-5: Lawrence, KS – Replay Lounge
11-6: Denver, CO – HI DIVE
11-7: Cheyenne, WY – Ernie November
11-8: Salt Lake City, UT – The Greek Station
11-9: Seattle, WA – Substation**
11-10: Portland, OR – High Water Mark**
11-11: Eugene, OR – Luckey’s**
11-13: San Francisco, CA – The Elbo Room**
11-14: Las Vegas, NV – Count’s Vampd**
11-15: Los Angeles, CA – The Lexington**
11-16: Oceanside, CA – The Pourhouse**
11-17: Albuquerque, NM – Moonlight Lounge
11-18: El Paso, TX – Neon Rose
11-19: Fort Worth, TX – Main at South Side
11-20: Austin, TX – Lost Well
11-21: Lafayette, LA – Freetown Boom Boom Room
11-23: Nashville, TN – Cobra
11-29: Marietta, OH – The Adelphia

** with Worshipper **

Poster by Chris Smith/Grey Aria Design Studio

Horseburner:
Adam Nohe – Drums/Vocals
Jack Thomas – Guitar/Vocals
Matt Strobel – Guitar
Seth Bostick – Bass

https://www.horseburner.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Horseburner/
https://horseburner.bandcamp.com/
https://www.instagram.com/horseburner/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Horseburner, The Thief (2019)

Tags: , , , ,

Review & Track Premiere: Horseburner, The Thief

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on July 29th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

horseburner the thief

[Click play above to stream ‘Drowning Bird’ from Horseburner’s The Thief. Album is out Aug. 9 on Ripple Music.]

Though the inherent energy of their material and the fact that they’re newly signed to Ripple Music read otherwise, West Virginia’s Horseburner are not actually a new band. They played their first show just over a decade ago, and released two EPs before making such a splash with their 2016 full-length debut, Dead Seeds, Barren Soil (review here). That album was picked up for release through Hellmistress Records and subsequent touring and response led to the Ripple signing ahead of The Thief, their second LP and label debut. It’s worth mentioning not only for basic background, because when one listens to The Thief front-to-back, Horseburner‘s chemistry is not that of a new band.

While they recently parted ways with guitarist Zach Kaufman and brought in Matt Strobel to take on the role alongside guitarist/vocalist/keyboardist Jack Thomas, drummer/vocalist Adam Nohe and bassist Seth Bostick, the lineup that appears on the nine-song/46-minute The Thief feels wholly solidified in its songwriting approach, taking cues from modern progressive metal, NWOBHM and shades of traditional doom. Thomas‘s vocals remind here and there of Butch Balich‘s work in Argus — thinking of songs like “A Joyless King” and the later “Fathoms,” but it’s a comparison one might make elsewhere too, and not a comparison made lightly — and the winding course of riffing over which he and Nohe harmony-shout is reminiscent of the likes of Leviathan-era Mastodon in its hard edge and obviously considered composition.

Across intense pieces like “Drowning Bird” and “The Fisherman’s Vow,” they manifest crunch and gallop in kind and still set up a smooth-moving flow within and between the songs. It’s fast, and it’s a lot to keep up with, but that’s the idea, and when Horseburner are at a sprint, as on “Hand of Gold, Man of Stone” (premiered here), the effect is righteously head-spinning. Movements within songs mesh well together and take shape as verses and choruses, and as its two-minute titular introduction, and the likewise-timed centerpiece “Seas Between” and closer “Thiefsong” weave an acoustic-based thread throughout all the heft, the feeling of a masterplan at work becomes all the more prevalent.

If Horseburner are telling a story here — and they may or may not be; I haven’t had the benefit of a lyric sheet — then it’s one that sets up across intricately conceived chapters that balance indulgence and creative will against sheer impact of groove, “A Joyless King,” “Drowning Bird” and “The Fisherman’s Vow” separated by “Seas Between” from the side B salvo “Hand of Gold, Man of Stone,” “The Oak” and “Fathoms.” The underlying modus doesn’t necessarily change between the two sections — in fact, I’d argue The Thief is best enjoyed on a linear format so as to get the whole effect of “Seas Between” as the centerpiece without having to worry about a side flip as one would on vinyl — but flourish of proggy guitar interplay and keyboard in “The Oak” and the fact that “Fathoms” is the only song on the record to top eight minutes does speak to a certain amount of branching out, though there’s no question that in the case of the latter, its position as the full-album payoff is purposeful as well.

 

HORSEBURNER new lineup

One imagines that if Horseburner didn’t already know it when they were writing the song, it quickly became clear in the recording process that “Fathoms” would close out ahead of “Thiefsong,” such is the thump with which it lands and the heights to which it soars in its finishing, solo-topped sway. That puts further emphasis on the flow that’s been happening all along throughout The Thief, as all the more it seems “A Joyless King” and “Drowning Bird” are meant to draw the listener into the varied but linear whole-album progression. The short version is it works, and with deceptive subtlety, because as they’re setting up this linear motion, Horseburner are also bashing and crashing through killer chug and hairpin-turn rhythms, stomping through headbang-ready heavy parts and adding more than hints of nuance to deepen the proceedings beyond what might otherwise be “cool riffs, bro.”

Nothing against that, understand, but The Thief is on a different and more complex mission, and the band bear that out in the means by which they maintain both the thoughtfulness of the material and the conversation they’re having with their audience here. Because whatever layering there might be between Thomas‘s keys and guitar, the recording itself is geared toward capturing a live setting. With so much vitality, it could hardly be otherwise. Tracked at Amish Electric Chair Studios and Green Mist Studios respectively by Neil Tuuri (who also mixed) and Thomas himself, there’s no lack of clarity in the offering, and even the most distorted, driving moments have a crispness to them that speaks further to the band’s will to actively engage their listenership, but the balance with raw energy across The Thief‘s span is striking, and it’s exactly that engagement that’s the reason why.

Horseburner want you to get into this album. They make it plain. The Thief is the output of a band who’ve been around for 10 years, have gotten their shit together, built up some momentum and decided to make a real push at having an impact. They sound hungry more than angry, but most of all they sound ready, and that’s true in the brief quiet interlude in “The Fisherman’s Vow” as much as in the fist-pumping early dual-guitar theatrics and subsequent all-out start-stop crunch of “The Oak.” The only question is what that engagement is leading to? If, after 10 years as a band, Horseburner want to hit the road and make a go of selling full-color t-shirts to various US and eventually European cities, I have no doubt in my mind they could pull that off in a fashion that’s at least no more or less sustainable than anyone else doing the same. Time will tell what their goals ultimately are and whether or not they get there, but most importantly, The Thief is a resonant announcement of their arrival, and that is not at all to be missed.

Horseburner website

Horseburner on Thee Facebooks

Horseburner on Bandcamp

Horseburner on Instagram

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music website

Tags: , , , ,

Horseburner Set Aug. 9 Release for The Thief; Tour Dates Announced

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 11th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

horseburner

Yeah, I’ve got it on now and this one’s pretty sick. Like, gonna-be-on-a-lot-of-lists sick. Maybe mine. Horseburner will make their debut on Ripple Music with The Thief and they’ve already got shows booked into November to support it, so that’s nifty, but listening to the album, it’s got stomper riffs and modern prog metal inflection galore in its winding guitar lines and not-at-all-overplayed drums, taking a cue from the Mastodons of the world without, well, sucking, I guess. It can be a fine line to walk, but Horsebuner would seem to have found the balance between nuance and groove and melody in these tracks that, yes, will be very well received. Bandcamp’s gonna go apeshit for this one. I hope Ripple has an ample supply.

I’m gonna try to set up another track premiere — the first one was here back in March — to go with a review a proper review, but in the meantime, here’s some info from the PR wire:

horseburner the thief

HORSEBURNER: Hard Hitting Road/Riff Merchants Return With New Album + Tour Dates

The Thief by Horseburner is officially released on 9th August on Ripple Music

Pre-order the album now at www.ripple-music.com

Together since 2008 and borne from the wild Appalachian green of West Virginia, Horseburner has never cowered from hard toil. From performing their first live show, self-recording and releasing two EPs (2009’s Dirt City and Strange Giant in 2013), putting on an inaugural tour in 2011 and releasing their debut full-length album, Dead Seeds, Barren Soil in 2016, the band has quite simply, done it all themselves.

Having played hundreds of shows over the past decade, performing alongside acts such as Torche, Weedeater, Goatwhore, Obituary, Corrosion of Conformity, The Obsessed, Karma to Burn and Bell Witch, in 2017 the band reissued their debut album through Hellmistress Records, which quickly reignited that song writing/recording flame, resulting in the gift of new music.

This year, as well as hitting the road for a monster Summer/Fall Tour of the US, the band join forces with Ripple Music, the California-based record label and world leader in Heavy Rock, Stoner, Doom and Heavy Psych to bring you the hard rocking yield of that fruitful and inspired year. The official worldwide release of their brand-new album, The Thief. As the band explains:

“We are thrilled to finally be putting out new music after almost three years and several member changes, and we can’t wait for people to hear, ‘Hand of Gold, Man of Stone’. It was the first song we finished for this new album, and we think it really sets the tone for what’s to come this summer when the full album is released. It’s loud, it’s aggressive, it’s a little weird… It’s also the shortest song. Brevity has never been our strong suit, but there is a much larger story waiting to be told, and this song is just one chapter. We’re even more excited to be teaming up with Ripple Music for the new record. We love so many bands on their roster, it’s such a well curated label. We’re honored to be joining the Ripple Family, and honestly, that’s what it feels like, a family.”

TRACK LISTING:
1. The Thief
2. A Joyless King
3. Drowning Bird
4. The Fisherman’s Vow
5. Seas Between
6. Hand of Gold Man of Stone
7. The Oak
8. Fathoms
9. Thiefsong

LIVE DATES (MORE DATES TBC):
2/8 – Richmond, VA – Wonderland
3/8 – Beckley, WV – Melody’s
23/8 – Athens, OH – Casa
24/8 – Youngstown, OH – Westside Bowl
25/8 – Cleveland, OH – Grog Shop
27/8 – Canton, OH – Buzzbin
5/9 – Huntington, WV – V Club
6/9 – Johnson City, TN – Hideaway
7/9 – Charlotte, NC – Skylark
8/9 – Jacksonville, FL – Jack Rabbits
9/9 – Miami, FL – Las Rosas
11/9 – Savannah, GA – El Rocko
12/9 – Athens, GA – Caledonia Lounge
27/9 – Toronto, ON – Bovine Sex Club
5/10 – Pittsburgh, PA – Gooski’s
6/10 – Buffalo, NY – Electric Avenue
7/10 – Saratoga Springs, NY – Desperate Annie’s
11/10 – Brooklyn, NY – The Well
12/10 – Wilmington, DE – Oddity Bar
13/10 – Baltimore, MD – The Depot
29/11 –Marietta, OH – Adelphia

HORSEBURNER:
Adam Nohe – Drums, Vocals, Percussion
Jack Thomas – Guitar, Vocals, Keys
Seth Bostick – Bass
Zach Kaufman – Guitar

https://www.horseburner.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Horseburner/
https://horseburner.bandcamp.com/
https://www.instagram.com/horseburner/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Horseburner, “Hand of Gold, Man of Stone”

Tags: , , , ,