Review & Track Premiere, Various Artists, Alice in Chains: Dirt [Redux]

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

dirt redux

[Click play above to stream Howling Giant’s “Rooster” from Magnetic Eye Records’ Dirt [Redux] Alice in Chains tribute. LP/CD/DL out Sept. 18 with preorders here.]

Disclaimer: http://www.daslebenistschoen.de/research-papers-on-working-capital-management/s - Professional writing service that offers custom written papers, such as term papers, thesis papers, essays, research Says Howling Giant’s Zach Wheeler:

“To be honest, getting ‘Rooster’ was a bit intimidating as it’s one of their most popular songs. We wanted to pay tribute to Alice in Chains as much as possible while giving the song that special Howling Giant sauce. We changed a few things around, but tried to reinforce the melodies that make the song so memorable in the first place.”

Get in touch this us for http://www.brunnwald.at/themes-for-essay-writing/. We offer online homework help with any form of finance homework assignment. Says Howling Giant’s Tom Polzine:

“When I was growing up in Buffalo, Minnesota, there was a local band called Blood Root Mother made up of some dudes that were probably four or five years older than me. I remember sneaking out of my house to see them perform at this rundown venue called The Vault. The Vault was run by some 20 year olds that skipped college in order to renovate that old antique shop into a dirty DIY venue. If dirty and uncomfortable was the vibe they were going for, they nailed it. Anyway, Blood Root Mother were tight as hell and I’ll always remember their cover of ‘Rooster’ as one of the most moving performances I witnessed from a bunch of local, lovable scumbags. The energy was so raw, and the volume was overwhelming. I think that witnessing those guys performing that song in particular is the reason I started playing in rock bands in high school, and why I still play today.”

Released in September 1992, Our Homework Questions Answereds not only take orders from the UK but we have my friend suggested me dissertationstore.co.uk for essay writing Alice in Chains‘ second full-length, Get professional assistance from the expert Buy Essay Paper Data writing services. Come to the BEST writing service and get help with any writing assignment from Dirt, is a generational landmark. It remains one of a select few records of its era — along with Citations Pour Dissertation: Here Is How You Get It. If youíre working hard on your dissertation but donít seem to be getting any closer to finishing the project, you may need some help. In fact, getting cheap dissertation assistance has probably already crossed your mind. We have some very good news for you: you really can get cheap dissertations Nirvana‘s Paradigm http://www.ivst-vz.de/?counseling-business-plan Assistant (P OWA) A tremendous collection of indispensable material for becoming a better writer. Created by Boise State Univ.'s Prof. of English, Dr. Chuck Guilford. powa.org. Sentence Sense. Sentence Sense. Capital College presents this online textbook in basic writing with over 200 computer-graded or self-grading exercises to encourage students to apply ideas, test Nevermind, Phd Thesis Image Segmentation - Put aside your concerns, place your task here and get your quality essay in a few days work with our scholars to get the quality Pearl Jam‘s American Doctoral Dissertations Online In Music.Buy essay not plagiarized.Cover Letter Phd Student.Someone to write my paper for me Ten, Our http://keresztirany.ro/?mba-application-essays services work at least on five chapters in a thesis which can then increase depending on the requirement and depth of the thesis and on the requirements of the university. These chapters are necessary but not sufficient to define the entire thesis since requirements can vary for different thesis writing. Soundgarden‘s http://hibinoiro.net/college-business-plan/ for me. If you no longer want to complete countless essays, missing deadlines and spending hours online, struggling to search for credible sources, there is no better option than to contact a professional writing company that will complete your assignment without any mistakes or flaws. You will no longer have to worry that your professor will notice that you have copied a sample Badmotorfinger, and maybe one or two others — that helped define the “grunge” sound for which Seattle, Washington, would become almost inextricably known. With an underlying-and-at-times-right-up-front theme of drug addiction and ensuing personal fallout,¬† Our go to links are able to construct a dissertation of the highest quality and on time. You will receive the finished product on the deadline you specify. Dissertation Editing and Proofreading. Our staff of professional dissertation writers can help you at any stage of the process, whether you need help from the very beginning or you have begun the process, but are Dirt was grimmer and could be more aggressive than most of its still-commercially-viable major label contemporaries, and as a result always had some more appeal to metal fans than, say, Our Builders Business Plan work at least on five chapters in a thesis which can then increase depending on the requirement and depth of the thesis and on the requirements of the university. These chapters are necessary but not sufficient to define the entire thesis since requirements can vary for different thesis writing. Pearl Jam, who were strictly a hard rock band at the time. Guitarist¬† Are you looking for dissertation writing help? Writing College Admission Essays Deal, a UK based agency is always ready to provide online assistance with custom writing. Jerry Cantrell‘s now-classic riffs and vocals,¬† Our Pay Someone Do My Essays In Montreal can help you to write an essay assignment in your own words. We provide this assignment help through our 3000+ qualified writers. Sean Kinney‘s inventive drums, the fluid bass work of¬† Paul Krugman Phd Thesiss in UK Dissertation Writing Services UK from Expert Writers. For students drowning in dissertation related stress, The Dissertation Help is here to throw them the academic lifebelt to save their grades from drowning in the sea of failures. With phenomenal services like ours, we promise to finally let you breathe a sigh of relief and let us perfect your dissertations Mike Starr and¬† Layne Staley‘s voice that would prove inimitable despite the attempts of three decades’ worth of singers — these essential elements came together around a group of particularly memorable songs, some radio hits, some B sides, and of course, “Iron Gland” for good measure, and served as the proverbial lightning in the bottle and the standard by which the band’s output ever since has been judged.

In continuing its tribute series of full album releases by embarking on a¬†Dirt [Redux],¬†Magnetic Eye Records takes on a no less crucial album than when the label put together compilation tributes to¬†Pink Floyd or¬†Jimi Hendrix. There are some recognizable acts from the¬†Magnetic Eye¬†stable as well as others clearly given to celebrating the work itself, and those who remain loyal to the original versions of the songs while other groups prefer to bring their appointed track into their own sonic context. Like the original¬†Dirt,¬†Dirt [Redux]¬†of course boasts 13 tracks — it’s a whole-album tribute; it wouldn’t do to leave something out — though its runtime is longer than the original, at 63 minutes as opposed to 57. The tracklisting reads as follows:

1. Thou – Them Bones
2. Low Flying Hawks – Dam That River
3. High Priest – Rain When I Die
4. Khemmis – Down in a Hole
5. These Beasts – Sickman
6. Howling Giant – Rooster
7. Forming the Void – Junkhead
8. Somnuri – Dirt
9. Backwoods Payback – God Smack
10. Black Electric – Iron Gland
11. -(16)- – Hate to Feel
12. Vokonis – Angry Chair
13. The Otolith – Would?

Their take on “Would?” — tracked by Alice in Chains first for an appearance on the soundtrack of the film Singles then reused on the album — marks the debut recording from post-SubRosa outfit The Otolith, and arrives with no shortage of anticipation. Bookending with “Them Bones” as interpreted by New Orleans art-sludgers Thou, the atmospheric breadth brought to the finale is a standout on the release and, at that point, one more instance of a band making the track their own. Thou‘s blend of harsh and cleaner vocals notwithstanding, they largely keep to the original tempo and arrangement of the leadoff track, whereas Low Flying Hawks take the subsequent “Dam That River” — a hooky follow-up to the opener — and turn it into an ambient drone only vaguely related to the original.

dirt redux vinyl

And why not? There’s no rule that says a band has to do an impression rather than an interpretation, and as¬†Dirt [Redux] plays out, the likes of¬†Khemmis,¬†These Beasts, Howling Giant,¬†Forming the Void,¬†-(16)- and¬†Vokonis bring their own spin.¬†Khemmis could hardly be a better fit for the emotive doom of “Down in a Hole,” and the crunch¬†These Beasts deliver on “Sickman” is an intense precursor to what¬†L.A.’s¬†-(16)- do with “Hate to Feel” later on. Feeling very much like the vanguard of an up and coming generation of progressive heavy rock, Howling Giant,¬†Forming the Void and¬†Vokonis boldly tackle their respective cuts, with “Rooster” getting a bolstered melody (no easy feat), “Junkhead” receiving a newfound nodder groove, and “Angry Chair” highlighting a rhythmic complexity that is both a late surprise and oh, oh, oh so very Swedish.

To complement these forays,¬†Somnuri find a glorious and elusive middle-ground on the album’s title-track, the Brooklynite trio not giving “Dirt” a total makeover so much as an organic-feeling performance that captures the subtle spaciousness that was so much a part of Dirt‘s lonely feel in the first place — all those sometimes empty reaches of its mix. Earlier, Chicago’s High Priest offer perhaps the most impressive vocal included on the redux with “Rain When I Die,” with the as-yet-underrated, very-much-need-to-put-an-album-out group play to their own¬†Alice in Chains influence. Ditto that¬†Backwoods Payback, who bleed their love of the original through their raw interpretation of “God Smack,” finding a space somewhere between punk, post-hardcore and heavy rock that is theirs alone on this release and in the wider underground sphere. These cuts serve the vital function of bringing Dirt [Redux] its sense of homage, making the tribute a tribute, and giving a listener who might not be familiar with all the bands on the Magnetic Eye¬†roster a chance to reorient before, say,¬†These Beasts unfurl their pummeling rendition of “Sickman” or¬†Low Flying Hawks taffy-pull “Dam That River” to suit their own whims.

One would be remiss not to point out that the 43-second interlude “Iron Gland” is here covered by¬†Black Electric, which features¬†Magnetic Eye Records‘ own¬†Mike Vitali (also ex-Ironweed¬†and¬†Greatdayforup) on guitar. Their version is almost eerily reminiscent of the original, on which Slayer‘s¬†Tom Araya sat in for vocals, and gives way to¬†-(16)-‘s roughed-up “Hate to Feel” with a similar flow to the progression between the two tracks on¬†Dirt¬†proper. If you come out of this¬†Dirt [Redux]¬†with a hankering to listen to¬†Alice in Chains, don’t be surprised. I’ll admit to having an attachment to the album that borders on the familial, and whatever they do with it arrangement-wise, I have nothing but respect for anyone brave enough to cover songs that have so much specific heart and style behind them. Inevitably a listener’s experience with¬†Dirt [Redux]¬†will depend on their own context with the original record as well as with the bands involved, but when all is said and done,¬†it is a more than worthy inclusion in Magnetic Eye‘s¬†[Redux] series —¬†Black Sabbath would seem to be next — and it points to just how broadly Alice in Chains‘ influence has spread over the last three decades. You can’t really go wrong.

Various Artists, Dirt [Redux] (2020)

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Album Review: Various Artists, Women of Doom

Posted in Reviews on May 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Various Artists Women of Doom

As a genre, doom is a long way from gender parity. It’s perhaps an optimistic viewpoint to take to say that the current generation of bands is past the point of seeing women artists as a novelty or downplaying their contributions to male bandmates or counterparts, but frankly I’m not even sure that’s true on a universal level. The inherent sexualization of performance — often willfully and hilariously ignored by men watching other men on stage — subjects women artists to a masculine gaze that at times is problematic even as it also serves as an expression of feminine power. As to what it means to be a woman artist in “doom,” or as to what “doom” is — where it starts and ends — I’m no one to speak to either experience, so I look at the Women of Doom compilation, highlighting women artists in and out their respective bands, as kind of a sad celebration. It’s well worth underscoring the stylistic contributions these women are making — and in a society that saw women paid 79 cents per every dollar a man made in 2019, well worth giving women every nod they can get, if not things like universal health coverage and reproductive rights — but a bit of a bummer that we’re not in a place where the norm would make such a compilation superfluous.

Whatever else doom is, it’s not there, but if Blues Funeral Recordings and Desert Records — both labels run by men, speaking of areas where women are underrepresented — wanted to, they could easily turn Women of Doom into a series. While Women of Doom brings together luminaries such as Amy Tung Barrysmith of Year of the Cobra, Doomstress Alexis of Doomstress, Mlny Parsonz of Royal Thunder and introduces two projects of former SubRosa members in The Otolith and Rebecca Vernon‘s The Keening, along with bands like Heavy Temple, Frayle, Sweden’s Besv√§rjelsen and France/Ireland’s Deathbell, there are a few conspicuous absences. Perhaps most glaringly, Windhand frontwoman, Dorthia Cottrell, is nowhere to be found, likewise an all-women act like Blackwater Holylight. And the same goes for a generational pioneer like Lori S. of Acid King, but it is inevitably a positive to say that it would be nearly impossible for Women of Doom — in a single go — to be so comprehensive. And as it is, the comp does well in setting an atmosphere across its full tracklisting, which reads as follows:

1. Nighthawk and Heavy Temple – Astral Hand 05:12
2. Amy Tung Barrysmith – Broken 06:04
3. Besvärjelsen РA Curse to be Broken 06:47
4. Mlny Parsonz – A Skeleton is Born 04:57
5. Frayle – Marrow 04:53
6. The Otolith – Bone Dust 04:31
7. Doomstress Alexis – Facade 04:47
8. Deathbell – Coldclaw 04:24
9. The Keening – A Shadow Covers Your Face 05:05
10. Mlny Parsonz – Broke An Arrow (Bonus) 03:25

Various Artists Women of Doom lp

The accomplishment of Women of Doom finding cohesion despite the variety of songwriting and performance modes is not to be understated. Beginning with Heavy Temple — here billed as Nighthawk and Heavy Temple — taking on a purely classic epic doom sound with the willfully Candlemassian “Astral Hand” sets a high bar, as grandiosity suits the Philly unit almost oddly well. They are maybe the odd-band-out in terms of aesthetic on Women of Doom, which is doubly ironic given “Astral Hand” is the most traditionally doomed song on the nine-plus-one-tracker and it’s not a style Heavy Temple generally play, but the darkened atmosphere they build sees immediate flourish in the piano-led composition “Broken” by Amy Tung Barrysmith, who only confirms through her work here that Year of the Cobra have only just begun their greater creative exploration. As one of two non-US acts present, Besv√§rjelsen are, as ever, a showcase for the vocal presence of Lea Amling Alazam, but their moodier post-doom on “A Curse to Be Broken” picks up well from “Broken” in more than just the similarity of titles.

By the time it’s a third of the way through, Women of Doom has already run a marked gamut in sound and dynamic, and that’s pretty clearly the intent of the thing. As arguably the most known performer featured, Mlny Parsonz, bassist/vocalist of Atlanta’s Royal Thunder brings a boozy classic rock powerhouse delivery to “A Skeleton is Born.” She returns for the bonus track “Broke an Arrow” in more subdued fashion to close out, and if mainstream rock and roll needed a woman figurehead — which it does, badly — she’d be a good candidate for the position in terms of craft; her work is equal parts dangerous and accessible. Frayle‘s “Marrow” carries mystique as a defining element, and The Otolith and Doomstress Alexis make a fitting pair for their use of strings. For The Otolith, that’s a trait inherited fairly enough from SubRosa, but it’s something of a surprise from Doomstress Alexis, who meets it with a likewise unexpected thrashiness in her guitar. Though maybe not as well known as some of the others,¬†Deathbell stand out in such a way as to leave little to wonder why¬†Kozmik Artifactz picked up their 2018 debut,¬†With the Beyond, for a vinyl release. Their “Coldclaw” does not come from that outing, so perhaps portends something new in the works, and if so, is all the more welcome.

As the first offering from¬†The Keening, “A Shadow Covers Your Face” is of particular interest, as was¬†The Otolith‘s “Bone Dust,” but both projects have in common a nascent feel. That’s particularly true of¬†The Keening‘s inclusion, which is a relatively minimal work of solo piano, placed in a way that answers Amy Tung Barrysmith‘s “Broken” earlier but has the distinction of being instrumental. Both works are evocative, but¬†Rebecca Vernon‘s piano in “A Shadow Covers Your Face” seems to use the otherwise unfilled space surrounding it as an instrument unto itself. That shift in presentation at the conclusion is a well placed reminder of the breadth of what greater gender equity in heavy music has to offer, though frankly, if the case needs to be made by then — or at all — you as the listener have probably missed the point. Still, at its most basic level, removed from a context that sees women continually objectified and typecast in artwork, bands, and listener expectations,¬†Women of Doom¬†is a collection of new and encouraging tracks from a diverse array of up and coming artists and acts. Even the most established artist here, which is¬†Parsonz, is reaching beyond what she’s done before, and that too is an important message that shouldn’t be ignored.

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The Otolith (Feat. Ex-SubRosa Members) to Release New Music Next Year

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 9th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

If you’re the kind of person who likes a key-takeaway from a news story, here’s one: The Otolith exist. The reason that’s news is because the new outfit features ex-members of SubRosa, who decided to break my heart back in May and call it quits after releasing in 2016 one of the best albums of the decade in their now-swansong opus, For This We Fought the Battle of Ages (review here). If I’m honest, I’m not over the loss yet, but if the advent of the new outfit with Kim Cordray, Levi Hanna, Andy Patterson and Sarah Pendleton demonstrates anything, it’s that I’m not necessarily alone in that.

So, The Otolith exist. They’ll play Monolith on the Mesa next year, release an Alice in Chains cover — “Would?,” but still — on Magnetic Eye‘s homage to Dirt, and they’re working toward the eventuality of a debut full-length, which is already on my eagerly-anticipated list.

There’s no social media presence I can find as yet, but here’s the announcement of their arrival and a clip of SubRosa in Brooklyn from 2017 just for the hell of it:

the otolith

Atmospheric avant-garde doom outfit THE OTOLITH rises from the ashes of SUBROSA

Salt Lake City four-piece announce formation and plans for new music

Earlier this year, forward-looking doom juggernaut SubRosa announced its dissolution after a 13-year run, a surprise to many in light of the band’s acclaimed albums and high-profile tours and festival appearances. Few specifics were given as to the reasons for bringing SubRosa to a close, leaving fans to wonder what might follow.

That question is now being answered, as four-fifths of SubRosa – Kim Cordray, Levi Hanna, Andy Patterson and Sarah Pendleton – announce their re-constitution as The Otolith, a new four-piece they say is, “heavier than a truckload of lead bricks.”

With a name derived from crystalline inner ear structures involved in sensing gravity, direction and acceleration, the members discuss their decision to move forward:

“The end of SubRosa was extremely devastating for all of us. Through the grieving process, we realized the only way we were going to heal was to continue playing music together. After about a year, we started getting together regularly to jam, and beautiful things started to happen. Kim suggested the name, and the more we learned about its meaning, the more we loved it. We became The Otolith.”

Moving with speed and enthusiasm, the band has already signed on to two unique projects coming in early 2020.

First, they’ll contribute an original song to WOMEN OF DOOM, a collaborative album of exclusive songs highlighting and supporting female-driven artists from throughout the doom metal underground, also set to include tracks from Frayle, Besvarjelsen, and Mlny from Royal Thunder, among others.

The Otolith have also recorded a version of the Alice in Chains classic “Would?” for inclusion on the Dirt [Redux] release from Magnetic Eye Records, replacing Bell Witch after the latter dropped off the project.

Cordray, Hanna, Patterson and Pendleton will spend the winter writing The Otolith’s debut album, with plans to tour upon its release, including a confirmed slot at the second Monolith on the Mesa festival in Taos, New Mexico in May 2020.

As to the sound and musical direction fans of the members’ past work can expect, the band says:

“Some of the songs are vocally-driven, others are musically-driven with sparse vocals. Each of us will be manning the instruments we’re known to play, but we’ll all have surprise sidecars as well. This band is an anamorph that is busy growing its second row of teeth. It’s gonna be pissed. There will be swirling ambience and the heaviest of riffs. We are pouring our hearts into this.”

More news and updates will follow as the band pushes ahead and solidifies its 2020 plans.

SubRosa, Live at Saint Vitus Bar, Brooklyn, NY, 2017

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