Melody Fields Premiere “Rhymes of Goodbye”; Broken Horse EP out Sept. 19

Posted in audiObelisk on August 21st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

melody fields

Swedish acid folk rockers masters proposal we accept money order - find main recommendations as to how to receive the greatest research paper ever All sorts of academic writings & research papers. Opt Melody Fields will issue their new four-song EP, Research Paper Of Fashion. Our modern writers of research subjects to ensure quality and incorporate the latest variations on the theme. Broken Horse, Sept. 18 on CD and LP through Paperhelper.org best essay service. Our service is one of the most popular recommended you reads,offers high-quality services for writing a speech. Sound Effect Records and Looking for an essay helper? With Grademiners, you can get any type of paper done I Could Help Rose Tyler With Her Homework Quote for me? you are probably looking for a Coop Records, respectively. For the Gothenburg-based five-or-six-piece, it’s the follow-up to the gorgeousness that was their 2018 self-titled debut full-length (review here), and if you haven’t yet caught on to that offering, the fact that the band plays an utterly timeless form of sweetly melodic psychedelia means that you’re in no way too late. I’ve even put it at the bottom of the post to make it easier for you, so really, have at it.

melody fields Broken Horse EPBefore you do, though, dig into the new track “Rhymes of Goodbye” on the player that follows here, because that’s something you’re definitely going to want to hear. It’s like someone decided to build a house on a slowed-down version of “Good Day Sunshine.” The We are an exceptional source of all the solutions to your my review here writing service needs, providing a diverse range of services that are guaranteed to Broken Horse EP runs about 19 minutes long and comprises four tracks — “Långsam Död,” “Rhymes of Goodbye,” “Broken Horse” and “Painted Sky,” in that order — that push even deeper into the band’s affinity for lush and unabashed psych-pop, maintaining a distinctive presence vocally through the employ of multiple singers and instrumentally through varied layers and approaches of guitar, be it acoustic or electric, etc. The release breaks more or less evenly into its two component sides with two tracks each, and each half seems to offer a complementary vibe, beginning with the subdued unfolding spaciousness of “Långsam Död,” which introduces the sitar and wash of instrumental melody that will characterize both that song and “Rhymes of Goodbye.” Sitar follows the notes of the verse, or maybe it’s the other way around; either way, it’s gorgeous and exploratory in kind, a solid underlying structure serving as the bed for a subtly memorable chorus. They’re one song in and already I wish Stop asking yourself "A Written Statement for me"! We can and we will! Give us a brief information about your needs and stop worrying about it! Broken Horse was a full album.

“Rhymes of Goodbye,” as noted, follows a similar path to the opener, up to and including the sitar and the quiet intro. There’s more bounce to the rhythm, with wood block percussion alongside the drums — it’s deep in the mix, but it’s there — and a flowing bassline that complements the drums and the harmonized vocals alike. As lush as “Rhymes of Goodbye” and the preceding cut are, transition words for research papers Writing Skills Help admission essay editing service scholarship college student homework helper Melody Fields don’t depart from their pop underpinning, and frankly, they don’t need to. Both cuts are shortly under five minutes, which is enough time not only for the chorus to be established, but for the band to meander a bit and give their listener a sense of the particular sunshine in which they’re basking on this good day. “Rhymes of Goodbye” is immersive as it moves toward its finish, with a crash as it passes four minutes and residual melodic hum on a fadeout that brings in “Broken Horse” (after a platter flip, if you’re doing the vinyl thing), replacing sitar with acoustic guitar and an immediately earthier, more folkish presentation. Harmony in the MELODY FIELDSvocals ties the two sides together, but really, How To Write A Conclusion To A Research Paper. Essay bibliography - . Researching on the given topic In order that the assignment is well understood, the topic must be Melody Fields make it so easy to go along with them on this short journey that to resist would seem pointless. Why would you even want to, with the sweetness and warmth of what they’re doing? The sheer comforting nature of it? Come on, people. Let go.

Finishing out, “Painted Sky” is the longest cut at 6:35 and gives  Many other how to get someone to write an essay for you services of ours have been assisting most of the students across the globe. Melody Fields even more landscape (or skyscape, as it were) to play in. Lines of guitar float with due descriptiveness to rest alongside the regular chants in homage to aurora borealis, weaving and intertwining as magnetic resonance might on a special evening in the north. Particularly on side B,  Complete your Dissertation or Research on time with our expert PhD http://bola-bicycle.com/?how-to-write-introduction-research-paper services. Get in touch with our expert Dissertation Consultants Melody Fields remind of the circa-2010 Swedefolk troupe  Write My Thesis. If you are asking Who can Help Writing My Resume? the answer is right here! We can do it for you. You have found the right place Barr — whither thou? — but both groups are acting to interpret with a modern edge the classic ideals of psychedelic pop, bringing a focus on the organic to rich and textured melodicism. As on their self-titled, on http://www.ferdinand.si/?law-coursework-help by Bryan Greetham, writer and philosopher, official Website Broken Horse global warming essay thesiss - Get to know basic tips as to how to get the greatest essay ever Top reliable and trustworthy academic writing help. Essays Melody Fields are nothing if not aptly-named. Perhaps there’s even a breeze blowing through those fields. A pleasant one, that, if you were to step back, you could see patterns in the slightly-overgrown grass like an echo of “Painted Sky” itself.

More info on the EP follows ahead of the Sept. 19 release, and you can and should dig into “Rhymes of Goodbye” right here.

Please enjoy:

MELODY FIELDS – Broken Horse EP

September 19th 2020 Melody Fields release their new EP Broken Horse. The EP is recorded in Studio Parkeringshuset, where bands like Goat, Hills and The Movements previously have been recording and is released by Sound Effect Records and Coop Records Gotland.

Unlike many other contemporary psych and kraut bands Melody Fields put the classic popsong formula in focus. Sunny californian harmonies has been processed, modernised, ragafied and droneified to an honest ”here and now” experience. No retro, no seeking for effects. Melody Fields has a depth and a substance in their song writing, that feels unique in an otherwise effect seeking scene. LA meets mystic Far East meets melancholy North. Here and now, yesterday and tomorrow, east and north and south, all melt together on the Broken Horse EP.

Available from: 18/09/2020
Label: Coop Records (Vinyl 12”EP)
Sound Effect Records (CD)

Line-up:
Thomas Widholm – drums
David Henriksson – vocals, guitar
Ramo Spatalovic – vocals, guitar
Cornelia Adamsson – vocals, string machine
Henrik Bäckström – vocals, guitar
Sebastian Jannesson – bass

Melody Fields, Melody Fields (2018)

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Melody Fields on Instagram

Melody Fields on Bandcamp

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Coop Records on Instagram

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Sound Effect Records website

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Quarterly Review: Horisont, Ahab, Rrrags, Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs, Earthbong, Rito Verdugo, Death the Leveller, Marrowfields, Dätcha Mandala, Numidia

Posted in Reviews on July 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the-obelisk-qr-summer-2020

Well, I’m starting an hour later than I did yesterday, so that’s maybe not the most encouraging beginning I could think of, but screw it, I’m here, got music on, got fingers on keys, so I guess we’re underway. Yesterday was remarkably easy, even by Quarterly Review standards. I’ve been doing this long enough at this point — five-plus years — that I approach it with a reasonable amount of confidence it’ll get done barring some unforeseen disaster.

But yesterday was a breeze. What does today hold? In the words of Mrs. Wagner from fourth grade homeroom, “see me after.”

Ready, set, go.

Quarterly Review #11-20:

Horisont, Sudden Death

horisont sudden death

With a hefty dose of piano up front and keys throughout, Gothenburg traditionalist heavy rockers High-quality lab Dissertation About China is developed by our company to provide students with custom lab reports written from scratch. Get professional lab Horisont push retro-ism into full-on arena status. Moving past some of the sci-fi aspects of 2017’s Asking "Write my essay for cheap online"? Hire the This Site and get your work done in an hours. Special December Offer. -50% OFF About Time, Sudden Death comprises 13 tracks and an hour’s runtime, so rest assured, there’s room for everything, including the sax on “Into the Night,” the circa-’77 rock drama in the midsection of the eight-minute “Archeopteryx in Flight,” and the comparatively straightforward seeming bounce of “Sail On.” With cocaine-era production style, Sudden Death is beyond the earlier-’70s vintage mindset of the band’s earliest work, and songs like “Standing Here” and the penultimate proto-metaller “Reign of Madness” stake a claim on the later era, but the post-Queen melody of “Revolution” at the outset and the acoustic swing in “Free Riding” that follows set a lighthearted tone, and as always seems to be the case with Horisont, there’s nothing that comes across as more important than the songwriting.

Horisont on Thee Facebooks

Century Media website

 

Ahab, Live Prey

ahab live prey

Scourge of the seven seas that German nautically-themed funeral doomers Ahab are, Live Prey is their first live album and it finds them some five years removed from their last studio LP, The Boats of the Glen Carrig (review here). For a band who in the past has worked at a steady three-year pace, maybe it was time for something, anything to make its way to public ears. Fair enough, and in five tracks and 63 minutes, Live Prey spans all the way back to 2006’s Call of the Wretched Sea with “Ahab’s Oath” and presents all but two of that debut’s songs, beginning with the trilogy “Below the Sun,” “The Pacific” and “Old Thunder” and switching the order of “Ahab’s Oath” and “The Hunt” from how they originally appeared on the first record to end with the foreboding sounds of waves rolling accompanied by minimal keyboards. It’s massively heavy, of course — so was Call of the Wretched Sea — and whatever their reason for not including any other album’s material, at least they’ve included anything.

Ahab on Thee Facebooks

Napalm Records website

 

Rrrags, High Protein

rrrags high protein

Let’s assume the title High Protein might refer to the fact that Dutch/Belgian power trio Rrrags have ‘trimmed the fat’ from the eight songs that comprise their 33-minute sophomore LP. It’s easy enough to believe listening to a cut like “Messin'” or the subsequent “Sad Sanity,” which between the two of them are about as long as the 5:14 opener “The Fridge” just before. But while High Protein has movers and groovers galore in those tracks and the fuzzier “Sugarcube” — the tone of which might remind that guitarist Ron Van Herpen is in Astrosoniq — the stomping “Demons Dancing” and the strutter “Hellfire,” there’s live-DeepPurple-style breadth on the eight-minute “Dark is the Day” and closer “Window” bookends “The Fridge” in length while mellowing out and giving drummer/vocalist Rob Martin a rest (he’s earned it by then) while bassist Rob Zim and Van Herpen carry the finale. If thinking of it as a sleeper hit helps you get on board, so be it, but Rrrags‘ second album is of unmitigated class and straight-up killer performance. It is not one to be overlooked.

Rrrags on Thee Facebooks

Lay Bare Recordings website

 

Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs, Viscerals

pigs pigs pigs pigs pigs pigs pigs viscerals

There’s stoner roll and doomed crash in “New Body,” drone-laced spoken-word experimentalism in “Blood and Butter,” and post-punk angular whathaveyou as “Halloween Bolson” plays out its nine-minute stretch, but Viscerals — the third or fourth Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs album, depending on what you count — seems to be at its most satisfying in blowout freak-psych moments like opener “Reducer” and “Rubbernecker,” which follows, while the kinda-metal of “World Crust”‘s central riff stumbles willfully and teases coming apart before circling back, and “Crazy in Blood” and closer “Hell’s Teeth” are more straight-up heavy rock. It’s a fairly wide arc the UK outfit spread from one end of the record to the other — and they’re brash enough to pull it off, to be sure — but with the hype machine so fervently behind them, I have a hard time knowing whether I’m actually just left flat by the record itself or all the hyperbole-set-on-fire that’s surrounded the band for the last couple years. Viscerals gets to the heart of the matter, sure enough, but then what?

Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs on Thee Facebooks

Rocket Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Earthbong, Bong Rites

Earthbong Bong Rites

Kiel, Germany’s Earthbong answer the stoner-sludge extremity of their 2018 debut, One Earth One Bong (review here), with, well, more stoner-sludge extremity. What, you thought they’d go prog? Forget it. You get three songs. Opener “Goddamn High” and “Weedcult Today” top 15 minutes each, and closer “Monk’s Blood” hits half an hour. Do the quick math yourself on that and you’ll understand just how much Earthbong have been looking forward to bashing you over the head with riffs. “Weedcult Today” is more agonizingly slow than “Goddamn High,” at least at the beginning, but it builds up and rolls into a pace that, come to think of it, is still probably slower than most, and of course “Monk’s Blood” is an epic undertaking right up to its last five minutes of noise. It could’ve been an album on its own. But seriously, if you think Earthbong give a shit, you’re way off base. This is tone, riff and weed worship and everything else is at best a secondary concern. Spend an hour at mass and see if you don’t come out converted.

Earthbong on Thee Facebooks

Earthbong on Bandcamp

 

Rito Verdugo, Post-Primatus

rito verdugo post-primatus

No doubt that at some future time shortly after the entire world has moved on from the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be a glut of releases comprised of material written during the lockdown. Peruvian four-piece Rito Verdugo are ahead of the game, then, with their Post-Primatus four-song EP. Issued digitally as the name-your-price follow-up to their also-name-your-price 2018 debut, Cosmos, it sets a 14-minute run from its shortest cut to its longest, shifting from the trippy “Misterio” into fuzz rockers “Monte Gorila” (which distills Earthless vibes to just over three minutes) and “Lo Subnormal” en route to the rawer garage psychedelia of “Inhumación,” which replaces its vocals with stretches of lead guitar that do more than just fill the spaces verses might otherwise be and instead add to the breadth of the release as a whole. Safe to assume Rito Verdugo didn’t plan on spending any amount of time this year staying home to avoid getting a plague, but at least they were able to use the time productively to give listeners a quick sample of where they’re at sound-wise coming off the first album. Whenever and however it shows up, I’ll look forward to what they do next.

Rito Verdugo on Thee Facebooks

Rito Verdugo on Bandcamp

 

Death the Leveller, II

Death the Leveller II

Signed to Cruz Del Sur Music as part of that label’s expanding foray into traditionalist doom (see also: Pale Divine, The Wizar’d, Apostle of Solitude, etc.), Dublin’s Death the Leveller present an emotionally driven four tracks on their 38-minute label debut, the counterintuitively titled II. Listed as their first full-length, it’s about the same length as their debut “EP,” 2017’s I, but more important is the comfort and patience the band shows with working in longer-form material, opener “The Hunt Eternal,” “The Golden Bough” and closer “The Crossing” making an impression at over nine minutes apiece — “The Golden Bough” tops 12 — while “So They May Face the Sun” runs a mere 7:37 and is perhaps the most unhurried of the bunch, playing out with a cinematic sweep of guitar melody and another showcase for the significant presence of frontman Denis Dowling, who’s high in the mix at times but earns that forward position with a suitably standout performance across the record’s span.

Death the Leveller on Thee Facebooks

Cruz Del Sur Music website

 

Marrowfields, Metamorphoses

marrowfields metamorphoses

It isn’t surprising to learn that the members of Fall River, Massachusetts, five-piece Marrowfields come from something of an array of underground styles, some of them pushing into more extreme terrain, because the five songs of their debut full-length, Metamorphoses, do likewise. With founding guitarist/main-songwriter Brandon Green at the helm as producer as well, there’s a suitably inward-looking feel to the material, but coinciding with its rich atmospheres are flashes of blastbeats, death metal chug, double-kick and backing growls behind the cleaner melodic vocals that keep Marrowfields distinct from entirely traditionalist doom. It is a niche into which they fit well on this first long-player, and across the five songs/52 minutes of Metamorphoses, they indeed shapeshift between genre elements in order to best serve the purposes of the material, calling to mind Argus in the progressive early stretch of centerpiece “Birth of the Liberator” while tapping Paradise Lost chug and ambience before the blasts kick in on closer “Dragged to the World Below.” Will be interesting to see which way their — or Green‘s, as it were — focus ultimately lies, but there isn’t one aesthetic nuance misused here.

Marrowfields on Thee Facebooks

Black Lion Records on Bandcamp

 

Dätcha Mandala, Hara

datcha mandala hara

Dätcha Mandala present a strong opening salvo of rockers on Hara, their second album for MRS Red Sound, before turning over to all-out tambourine-and-harp blues on “Missing Blues.” From there, they could go basically anywhere they want, and they do, leading with piano on “Morning Song,” doing wrist-cramp-chug-into-disco-hop in “Sick Machine” and meeting hand-percussion with space rocking vibes on “Moha.” They’ve already come a long way from the somewhat misleading ’70s heavy of opener “Stick it Out,” “Mother God” and “Who You Are,” but the sonic turns that continue with the harder-edged “Eht Bup,” the ’70s balladry of “Tit’s,” an unabashed bit o’ twang on “On the Road” and full-on fuzz into a noise freakout on closer “Pavot.” Just what the hell is going on with Hara? Anything Dätcha Mandala so desire, it would seem. They have the energy to back it up, but if you see them labeled as any one microgenre or another, keep in mind that inevitably that’s only part of the story and the whole thing is much weirder than they might be letting on. No complaints with that.

Dätcha Mandala on Thee Facebooks

MRS Red Sound

 

Numidia, Numidia

Numidia Numidia

If you’ve got voices in your band that can harmonize like guitarists James Draper, Shane Linfoot and Mike Zoias, I’m not entirely sure what would lead you to start your debut record with a four-minute instrumental, but one way or another, Sydney, Australia’s Numidia — completed by bassist/keyboardist Alex Raffaelli and drummer Nathan McMahon — find worthy manners in which to spend their time. Their first collection takes an exploratory approach to progressive heavy rock, seeming to feel its way through components strung together effectively while staying centered around the guitars. Yes, three of them. Psychedelia plays a strong role in later pieces “Red Hymn” and the folky “Te Waka,” but if the eponymous “Numidia” is a mission statement on the part of the five-piece, it’s one cast in a prog mentality pushed forward with poise to suit. Side A capper “A Million Martyrs” would seem to draw the different sides together, but it’s no minor task for it to do so, and there’s little sign in these songs that Numidia won’t grow more expansive as time goes on.

Numidia on Thee Facebooks

Nasoni Records website

 

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Orsak:Oslo Release Skimmer EP

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

orsak oslo

Norwegian/Swedish purveyors of mellow psych and soundscapes Orsak:Oslo released their new EP, Skimmer, this past Friday through their Bandcamp. The release follows up on their self-titled long-player that came out last year and brings more expansive and patient craft to bear across its three tracks and relatively brief runtime. The four-piece seem pretty comfortable working in the extended-play format — Skimmer might be their 10th EP, if I’ve got the count right; if so, way to hit double-digits, guys — and the new outing brings a quick bit of meditative sprawl before returning you back to the “real world,” such as it is.

The cruelty of that brevity notwithstanding, it’s a cool listen. I got put onto these guys at Høstsabbat last year, where they played on a stage so small it could barely hold them, and haven’t regretted digging in ever since. Maybe you’ll take a listen to Skimmer and feel the same way.

Info and audio follow:

orsak oslo skimmer

ORSAK:OSLO – SKIMMER OUT NOW

For now Skimmer is available on Bandcamp only!

Due to Covid lock-down our digital distributor is short staffed and not able to honour the release date. We feel their struggle and they’ve got our support. The release will be available on all digital platforms at a later time.

We thank you for your patience, and hope that you will head over to Bandcamp to give Skimmer a listen.

Orsak:Oslo is a dark slow brew containing of psych, dystopian post-rock and trippy space blues. The Norwegian/Swedish band have released 9 EPs since the beginning in 2014. With their monolithic and melancholic instrumental pieces, this is music for the active listener. O:O is a marriage between impulsive improv and thoughtful composition, melodies and new harmonies carefully woven in, layer by layer. With a reverence and underlying devotion to the aura and musical preconditions laid down from the start, the result is raw, unpolished and true.

Tracklisting
1. 057 Passage 05:16
2. 061 Skimmer 04:40
3. 058 Cloudburst 06:38

Orsak:Oslo is:
O:Qrill
O:Peter
O:Øyvind

https://www.facebook.com/orsakoslo/
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Orsak:Oslo, Skimmer EP

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Dun Ringill Set July 31 Release for Library of Death

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 18th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

DUN RINGILL

With their penchant for classic metal theatrics intact, Swedish doom rockers Dun Ringill give a first glimpse at their second album, Library of Death, in the new video for “NBK.” The record, which follows behind their 2019 debut, Welcome (discussed here), will see release on July 31 through Argonauta Records, and as I haven’t heard the thing yet, I can’t help but wonder how the stateliness of the debut might coincide with what they describe below as being a rawer and darker presentation that also dives further into folk influences. Funny, I thought “classic metal” and “Nordic folk” were kind of the same thing at this point. Ha.

The acronym “NBK” stands for “natural born killer,” as the PR wire reveals, and you’ll find the video at the bottom of this post, under the album info. You know how this works. Don’t pretend you don’t.

Dun dun dun:

dun ringill library of death

DUN RINGILL (feat. members of THE ORDER OF ISRAFEL) Share Album Details + Brutal, New Music Video!

Following their highly acclaimed debut album Welcome, Swedish heavy doom rock collective Dun Ringill ( feat.members of The Order Of Israfel, Doomdogs & many more ) have just announced the release of their sophomore album titled Library of Death on July 31st 2020 via Argonauta Records!

Dun Ringill’s new album will dig deeper into the soil of Nordic folk music and at the same time, it is even darker, rawer and heavier than their debut. Recorded with mastermind Joona Hassinen at Studio Underjord and Grand Recording Studio during the winter of 2019, with Library of Death the band creates a haunting vibe of the evil wilderness and the dark woods lurking around the corner.

The album was arranged in a basement in the grey parts of Gothenburg while the lyrics were written on the high and mighty mountains of Norway. This special combination gives this album its unique aura of a beautiful darkness and malevolent feelings, that will follow you into your dreams…

Today, Dun Ringill are sharing a first track taken from the Library Of Death, and premiering an ironically brutal music video to the track “NBK” (= Natural Born Killer)!

“Killing is my Business…. and Business is good!!” The band quotes the first Megadeth album, and continues: “You are all invited to the party: A violent butcher fiesta!”

The artwork for Library of Death has been created by Henrik Jacobson / Art of Henk and is inspired by the lyrics from the album. Dun Ringill’s forthcoming record will also feature songs with guest musicians such as Opera singer Glenn Kjellberg, Per Wiberg from Kamchatka and formerly Opeth and Candlemass, Matti Norlin from the band Lugnet and Philip Lindgren of ex Hypnos.

When The Order of Israfel took a one year break from September 2017, the rhythm section Patrik Andersson Winberg (Bass) and drummer Hans Lilja (also in Lotus) grabbed the chance to create new music again together with Patrik’s old band mate from the Doomdogs era, Tomas Eriksson (Intoxicate and ex Grotesque). To make this exciting project of Dun Ringill as great as possible, the band teamed up with Gothenburg’s fella musicians, guitarists Tommy Stegemann (Silverhorse), Jens Florén (also in Lommi & ex- live guitarist for Dark Tranquillity) and Patric Grammann (SFT, Neon Leon). After the band released their critically acclaimed debut, Welcome, in March 2019 – followed by several gigs and tours with acts alike Church Of Misery, Year Of The Goat and Elder to name just a few, their new studio album Library of Death will be seeing the light of day on July 31st on Argonauta Records. With a pre-sale and more tracks to be unleashed in the weeks ahead, the band is currently also preparing for a heavy live schedule to hopefully follow more than soon.

Dun Ringill are:
Thomas Eriksson – Vocals
Hans Lilja – Drums
Patrik Andersson Winberg – Bass
Jens Florén – Guitar
Tommy Stegemann – Guitar
Patric Grammann – Guitar

www.facebook.com/DunRingillSwe
www.argonautarecords.com
www.facebook.com/ArgonautaRecords

Dun Ringill, “NBK” official video

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Days of Rona: Esben Willems of Monolord

Posted in Features on April 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. — JJ Koczan

esben willems monolord

Days of Rona: Esben Willems of Monolord & Berserk Audio (Gothenburg, Sweden)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

The weird thing is that we already decided to take a break until this summer, so on some strange level we’ve been kind of lucky that way. But, the aftermath of this virus will most likely linger long after the pandemic is under control. We’ve already had to postpone one planned tour later this year until 2021, one festival we were booked on was cancelled and there’ll probably be more cancellations ahead. Everything came to a grinding halt and all of us in the music business are still trying to figure out what the next steps should be. If everything’s under control and touring is back on in the fall it’s gonna be crazy. Shows everywhere all the time and lots of broke people that have been out of work for months who want to go, but can’t afford it. Very uncertain times ahead, I feel.

So far, so good with our health, thanks for asking. None of us or our loved ones have caught anything yet.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

Here in Sweden, the decision is no quarantine, only restrictions like a maximum of 50 people on public events and places, strong recommendations not to travel anywhere outside of the country and social distancing. Flattening the curve, basically. So far, that has worked quite well, so we’ll see what the immediate future brings.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The live scene here is under extreme pressure at the moment, some of the best venues here are struggling to survive past the pandemic. Regarding the online music community, apart from the obvious frustration and worry there’s a lot of support. It seems like the collective mindset is that we’re in this together. Borders and cultural differences are irrelevant, the focus is on getting through it the best way we can.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

I can’t wait until we’re all on the other side of this and we can all play and watch shows again. How tax money are distributed is more important than ever, I think. Fuck the greedy corporations and banks, focus on healthcare and culture. Give the medical workers all they need without any hesitations or strings attached and do everything possible to support culture, venues, cafes, bars, restaurants and other public places that is the very heart of any living and breathing community.

monolord.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/MonolordSweden
monolord.com
http://relapse.com
https://www.facebook.com/RelapseRecords/

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Thomas V. Jäger of Monolord to Release Solo Album A Solitary Plan May 8

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Not that anyone asked, least of all Monolord guitarist/vocalist Thomas V. Jäger himself, but if — as the PR wire alludes below — one of the issues he’s dealing with on this album is related to not being able to procreate through traditional biological means, as someone who’s been through that very particular kind of hell, I would only say in response, “There’s all kinds of families, dude.” Adoption, fostering, all that stuff. If you think it makes a difference not having a little booger-and-turd-factory running around who doesn’t look just like you, well, I wouldn’t know, but I do know that once you decide a kid is “your kid,” the chemicals in your brain kick in and make it so. That’s all I’ll say about it. Again, not that anyone asked.

Jäger‘s forthcoming solo debut, A Solitary Plan, is out May 8 and available to preorder now through RidingEasy Records, which of course was the imprint that first brought Monolord to light as well before the Gothenburg-based trio signed to Relapse ahead of last year’s album of the yearNo Comfort (review here). The largely-acoustic album was mixed and mastered by Kalle Lilja of Wolves in Haze and Långfinger fame and you can stream the leadoff title-track at the bottom of this post.

Dig in:

thomas v jager a solitary plan

Monolord singer/guitarist Thomas V. Jäger announces solo debut, shares title track

Swedish doom trio frontman preps emotionally heavy solo album on RidingEasy

Thomas V. Jäger is best known as the vocalist/guitarist in Monolord, the hottest, most crushing melodic doom band in the world. So, releasing an intimate, deeply and boldly personal album of acoustic and synth based songs hot on the heels of No Comfort, the band’s most successful and powerful album to date, might seem like a risky move. And yet, that’s not even the most daring and inspiring thing about A Solitary Plan.

Rather, this 7-song album is a cathartic depiction of very real and heart-wrenching situations as a means of musical therapy for the artist and, hopefully, for the listener as well. “This album is me venting all of this emotional energy I’ve been carrying around,” Jäger says. “Now I’m feeling more open about it, but at the start I had a hard time talking with friends and family. The record is what came out instead of talking about it.”

The central lyrical theme to the album is a coming to terms with the likelihood of not becoming a parent after wanting to have a family for a long time. “When I put down vocal tracks on the last song ‘The Bitter End’, you can hear my voice is trembling at parts. Every time I listen I get goosebumps, which rarely happens with songs I write.”

Other songs also deal with personal challenges, like health scares, existential searching, and death in the family. “Goodbye” is written for Monolord bassist Mika and his wife Emma. “When they had to put down their dog Eskil it affected me greatly. This song is him talking to them and telling them it is gonna be alright.” Heavy stuff, indeed — but in a different way from Monolord’s pummeling riffs.

Jäger doesn’t intend for the album to be a “woe is me” exercise, but rather something constructive. “I know that music helps people,” he says. “This is without any irony, it’s therapeutic. I know fans can interpret and use the songs for their own purposes. That feels meaningful to me.”

The album began organically, as Jäger often writes and records at home, sketching out song ideas on acoustic guitar into a computer with no set goal for anyone else to hear them. RidingEasy Records chief and Monolord manager Daniel Hall cajoled the guitarist into sending him some of the home recordings he’d been working on, and he immediately pushed for them to be released in this stripped-down form.

“I could’ve rearranged them to get a Monolord vibe, but I wanted the basis of just voice, guitar and synths,” Jäger says. “Really laid back and mellow.” He completed the album between tours, with mixing and mastering by Kalle Lilja at Welfare Sounds. Emil Rolof plays a real Mellotron on the title track, all other instruments and voices are Jäger himself.

A Solitary Plan will be available on LP, CD and download on May 8th, 2020 via RidingEasy Records.
Pre-orders are available at www.ridingeasyrecs.com.

Tracklisting:
01. A Solitary Plan
02. Creatures Of The Deep
03. It’s Alright
04. From The Ashes
05. The Drone (Oh Why)
06. Goodbye
07. The Bitter End

thomasvjager.bandcamp.com
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http://www.ridingeasyrecs.com/
https://www.instagram.com/easyriderrecord/

Thomas V. Jäger, “A Solitary Plan” official video

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Cities of Mars Announce April/May European Touring

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

cities of mars

It’s a pretty simple story with this one so I’ll try to keep it simple accordingly. Good band puts out good record, then a little while later, goes on a tour to support it. Taa-daa! That’s what it really comes down to. The band in this case are Cities of Mars from the creative hotbed that is Gothenburg, Sweden. The record was 2019’s The Horologist (review here), which served double-duty as their label debut for Ripple Music. And the tour — which is by no means their first — is an upcoming 13-day run through Sweden, Denmark, Germany, France, Belgium and Norway that they’ll undertake to spread their sci-fi gospel of time-travel, cosmonaut idolatry and secrets held by the Martian underground.

See? Simple story.

Just not maybe in terms of the actual story.

Always dig seeing what these guys are up to, and if you need a refresher on The Horologist, well, there just happens to be a Bandcamp stream at the bottom of this post. How about that?

Poster rules:

cities of mars 2020 tour

Cities of Mars Spring 2020 tour!

By some stunning art of Potsdam, Germany-based artist Simon Schürmann (Instagram @boarddecor) comes tour artwork for Swedish sci-fi-doomers Cities of Mars who will be back on the road again in April 2020. For the fifth time, the riff-heavy stories of the KGB cosmonaut Nadia and ancient, solar system-spanning conspiracies of old will be delivered on stages all over Europe. A few familiar hunting grounds will be covered, as well as a few new cities and venues.

With the critically acclaimed albums The Horologist (Ripple Music) and Temporal Rifts (Argonauta Records) released and live skills honed on 70+ gigs all over the EU and UK, this tour will be thirteen days of heaviness!

April 22 Plan B, Malmö Sweden
April 23 Lygtens Kro, Copenhagen Denmark
April 24 Hafermarkt, Flensburg Germany
April 25 Archiv, Potsdam Germany
April 26 Le Grillen, Colmar France (w DOOL)
April 27 Rock’n Eat, Lyon France
April 28 Mondo Bizarro, Rennes France
April 29 (still uncertain venue) Lille France
April 30 Den Drummer, Ghent Belgium
May 1st MTS Records, Oldenburg Germany
May 2 Dimman Musikfest, Helsingborg Sweden (w Dirt Forge)
May 8 Revolver, Oslo, Norway
May 9 Dirty Deeds, Gothenburg Sweden

CITIES OF MARS:
Danne Palm – Bass, Vocals
Christoffer Norén – Guitar, Vocals
Johan Küchler – Drums, Vocals

www.facebook.com/citiesofmars
http://citiesofmars.bandcamp.com/
https://www.instagram.com/citiesofmars
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com/

Cities of Mars, The Horologist (2019)

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Review & Video Premiere: Yuri Gagarin, The Outskirts of Reality

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Reviews on January 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

yuri gagarin the outskirts of reality

[Click play above to see the premiere of Yuri Gagarin’s new video for ‘QSO.’ The Outskirts of Reality is out Jan. 31 on Kommun 2 and Sound Effect Records.]

One tends to think of the motorik beat and the notion of the kosmiche in terms of kraut- and progressive space rock as being ideas drawing from influences half a century ago, but Yuri Gagarin readily demonstrate that it doesn’t have to be so. The Gothenburg-based troupe realize a modernist vision of krautrocketing hypnosis on their third long-player, The Outskirts of Reality, and drill to the molten core of a planetoid all their own with an approach that, far from reckless, approaches grandeur as though wielding a cosmic hammer, ready to smash the last vestiges of the reality in its title to shards floating in the sonic ether. Instrumental and running over a stretch of 44 minutes that begins with the ultra-fueled 10-minute blaster “QSO” and follows immediately with the 13-minute dimension-bending immersion of “Oneironaut,” resulting in a side A that seeks to pummel brain cells through the subspace barrier, never to be seen or heard from again. But the important thing to remember amid all this we’re-all-star-stuff-so-let’s-start-acting-like-it aural going-boldly is that Yuri Gagarin, in following up late-2015’s sophomore LP, At the Center of All Infinity — which was also recorded with Linus Andersson — is that Yuri Gagarin manage to pull together this sound of such a vast range and atmospheric willfulness without simply repeating the past. The Outskirts of Reality isn’t classic space rock. At least not yet. It’s forward thinking. It’s urgent and it’s energetic and it’s not just about who plays to what time or what stylistic rules are being followed. It’s about rewriting those rules to suit its own purposes.

And what are those purposes? What is it that Yuri Gagarin seek there in the outskirts? If the synth-laden closing title-track — which follows the delightfully airy “Crystal Dunes” and the even-more-experimentalist “Laboratory 1” on side B — has secrets to unveil, it’s doing so in the wash of guitar and keyboard creating melodic instrumentalist surges setting themselves to convey a feeling of “The Outskirts of Reality” as a point of arrival rather than a place of departure. That is, if we’re buying into the cliché of the album as a journey — and hell yes, we most certainly are — then ‘the outskirts’ is clearly the place we’re headed. The positioning of the title-track last speaks to this, as does the progression of the song itself, which one might think of as answering the liftoff-ignition-blast of “QSO” with a last, consuming wash of noise. Maybe I’m reading too much into it, but I don’t think so, because while Yuri Gagarin are jamming here in the sense of following instrumental paths of their songs to the places they might naturally lead — linear builds, ebbs and flows, and so on — the dynamic the Swedish outfit bring to space rock has so much intentionality behind it that to give anything less than full consideration to its complexity feels half-assed. Even as the push-push-push of “QSO” departs and the song’s last two minutes or so are given to a stretch of quiet guitar fade that lead directly into “Oneironaut,” there’s a plan at work, if not a direct narrative. This isn’t just about self-indulgence or a showcase of effects wash. There’s more to it.

yuri gagarin the outskirts of reality

Certainly Yuri Gagarin are aware of space rock’s past glories. Almost 50 years later, Hawkwind looms over the entire genre as much as ever, but there’s a significant difference between being aware of something and beholden to it and it seems to be the latter where the band draw the line. It isn’t just a question of having modern production or a sleek gatefold by Påhl Sundström — though neither hurts in terms of presentation — but about the forward push in the material itself. To wit, the winding guitar of “Crystal Dunes” and how that song touches on Middle Easternism or Mediterranean folk without fully abandoning the overarching outward thrust of The Outskirts of Reality‘s entirety, instead bringing those elements into the context of the song and the record as it moves ahead toward the track’s emergent wash and eventual dissolution around a final resonant hum and strum. That this happens en route to the time-warp manipulations of “Laboratory 1” likewise isn’t a coincidence. Aside from being a fit in terms of runtime, the otherwise-interlude is a readjustment of mentality that sets up and reinforces the spirit of arrival at “The Outskirts of Reality” itself. And while the title-track doesn’t hit 13 minutes like “Oneironaut” or even the 10 of “QSO” back on side A, it doesn’t need to.

Rather, the point comes across in the encompassing effects and keys and the scorching guitar soloing, as undulations and surges of melodies take hold and recede and return in nigh-on-maddening fashion. They’re five minutes in before you realize what’s happened, and by then, you couldn’t get out if you wanted to. The shift to the final progression is subtle, but there, and soon Yuri Gagarin are engulfed in a last wash of noise that takes hold despite the ongoing and adjoining loops. If you’re wondering who wins, the answer is noise. Noise wins. The band doesn’t so much deconstruct the piece as let it drift off into the crushing vacuum, and as harsh as the noise is, it fades out in surprisingly gentle fashion. Perhaps there’s room for sentiment in the cosmos after all. One way or the other, Yuri Gagarin‘s The Outskirts of Reality portrays space rock as a reinvigorated aesthetic in such a way as to make it exciting not just to established fans of the style, but those who might be taking it on for the first time. It’s a rare sense of outreach in terms of audience-building, and thus something of a gamble on the part of the band, but in terms of world-building and making its own impression, it is likewise resonant and organic: An ultrasonic blowout for all tomorrow’s todays. Sometimes with records that see envelopes as things to push there is purist backlash as a result, and maybe Yuri Gagarin are at least potentially exposing themselves to that, but there’s much work being done on The Outskirts of Reality to open the minds of those who take it on, and those willing to meet the band on their level will find doing so all the more rewarding.

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