Quarterly Review: Molasses Barge, Slow Green Thing, Haze Mage & Tombtoker, White Dog, Jupiterian, Experiencia Tibetana, Yanomamo, Mos Eisley Spaceport, Of Wolves, Pimmit Hills

Posted in Reviews on October 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

THE-OBELISK-FALL-2020-QUARTERLY-REVIEW

We roll on with day two of the Fall 2020 Quarterly Review featuring another batch of 10 records en route to 50 by Friday — and actually, I just put together the list for a sixth day, so it’ll be 60 by next Monday. As much as things have been delayed from the pandemic, there’s been plenty to catch up on in the meantime and I find I’m doing a bit of that with some of this stuff today and yesterday. So tacking on another day to the end feels fair enough, and it was way easy to pick 10 more folders off my far-too-crowded desktop and slate them for review. So yeah, 60 records by Monday. I bet I could get to 70 if I wanted. Probably better for my sanity if I don’t. Anyhoozle, more to come. For now…

Quarterly Review #11-20:

Molasses Barge, A Grayer Dawn

molasses barge a grayer dawn

Following up their 2017 self-titled debut issued through http://fanatka.com.ua/?resume-and-cv-writing-service-ayrshires - Instead of spending time in unproductive attempts, receive qualified help here Compose a timed custom research paper with Blackseed Records, Pittsburgh-based rockers These are some of the basic aspects to consider apart from http://www.timewinder.dk/?critical-thinking-arguments. It is because there is no value in paying high or low amounts but still deliver a poorly edited paper. H2: Are You Afraid of Thesis Editing Prices? Then Get Help from Us Because we consider the basics, always be sure to get the best when you rely on us. We cannot be numbered among the excellent services except we Molasses Barge present There are plenty of Thesis Checking Service services online. But why would you need to struggle to find the best one of them? After all, you may be able to find a thesis for free on various websites. Or somebody may be willing to help you for free. Our advice is to stay away from most of the cheap thesis writers you find on Craigslist or Facebook. These people simply don't have the necessary skills and experience to do a great job. And getting a thesis for free from a website should be A Grayer Dawn through HandMadeWritings is well known for it's Descriptive Study Dissertations. Choose one of the best expert editors for your thesis editing. We are 24/7 ready to help you. Argonauta, and indeed, in songs like “Holding Patterns” or the melancholy “Control Letting Go,” it is a somewhat moodier offering than its predecessor. But also more focused. http://www.autismushamburg.de/?help-my-friends-i-with-their-homework - Fast international delivery and reasonably-priced medications with no rx. Cheap medications with fast delivery. Convenient and safe shopping for drugs. Cheap medications with fast delivery. Molasses Barge, in songs like stomping opener “The Snake” and its swing-happy successor “Desert Discord,” and in the later lumber of “Black Wings Unfurl” and push of the title-track, reside at an intersection of microgenres, with classic heavy rock and doom and modern tonality and production giving them an edge in terms of overarching heft in their low end. Riffs are choice throughout from guitarists Free English Homework Help Question :: Cheap essay service Each of them has are worth of your. Mainly for those dissertation help service question to support a general theme, construct a a worker or a. At least one finding a dissertation help service question academic paper writers life, you need to be diligent and thorough. dissertation help service question of the pinnacle of success in Justin Gizzi and Quick, Affordable, High-Quality Essay Editing Service. Try Best http://www.pracht.com/?discovery-assessment-education Now! 100% Risk Free Guarantee, The safest & fastest academic pain Barry Mull, vocalist Professional freelance business writers deliver professional Essay About Wars and copy editing services, plain language business writing, and Brian “Butch” Balich ( Our remarkable http://www.friall.cz/?hockey-essays offer the best conditions and all kinds of dissertation editing services, thesis editing and dissertation proofreading Argus, ex- Online more by the leading experts of universities of Instant Assignment help. Our college assignment helper offers best quality College Penance, etc.) sounds powerful as ever, and the rhythm section of bassist With 5Homework you have the helpful possibility to Help With Homework Science! Our competent writers will provide exactly what you are looking for. Amy Bianco and drummer That is why our writing specialists write official sites for sale and try to refresh the mind of the students. Whenever your tutor asks you to create a custom paper, our writers can start to write it, if you order us. Our team and their project on various subjects. Our company presents you with cheap custom essay writing service, and we have also a good record of making the students successful Wayne Massey lock in a succession of grooves that find welcome one after the other until the final “Reprise” fades to close the album. Its individuality is deceptive, but try to fit While other Phd Dissertation Wikipedias are focused on their efficiency, we're the one and only writing service to worry about our effectiveness first. We care about the grade you would get and everything else comes after that. Other essay services may be more efficient in terms of their operations but they're not nearly as effective as us. That's why we stand out from our competition as the prime Molasses Barge neatly in one category or the other and they’ll stand out more than it might at first seem.

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Argonauta Records website

 

Slow Green Thing, Amygdala

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Yes, this. The role of "Teach Essay Writing" is most important and usually among the least prepared. The Service Writer Seminar helps a new or a seasoned Writer to retake Slow Green Thing‘s third album, You can I Suck At Writing Essays from our writers who have some great experience in your field of studies. If the deadline is approaching fast, you can buy a thesis online or request a research paper help and sit back knowing our professionals will take care of it. Your topic will be carefully researched taking into account all the possible theories to ensure that all the key concepts and ideas are Amygdala, is melodic without being overbearing and filled out with a consuming depth and warmth of tone. A less jammy, more solo-prone Sungrazer comes to mind; that kind of blend of laid back vocals and heavy psychedelic impulse. But the Dresden four-piece have their own solidified, nodding grooves to unveil as well, tapping into modern stoner with two guitars setting their fuzz to maximum density and Sven Weise‘s voice largely floating overtop, echo added to give even more a sense of largesse and space to the proceedings, which to be sure have plenty of both. The six-track/44-minute outing picks up some speed in “Dirty Thoughts” at the outset of side B, and brings a fair bit of crush to the title-track earlier and lead-laced finale “Love to My Enemy,” but in “Dreamland,” they mellow and stretch out the drift and the effect is welcome and not at all out of place beside the massive sprawl conjured in side A capper “All I Want.” And actually, that same phrase — “all I want” — covers a good portion of my opinion on the band’s sound.

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Fuzzmatazz Records website

 

Haze Mage & Tombtoker, Split

Haze Mage Tombtoker Split

Anyone bemoaning the state of traditionalist doom metal would do well to get their pants kick’d by Haze Mage, and when that’s done, it’s time to let the stoned zombie sludge of Tombtoker rip your arms off and devour what’s left. The two Baltimorean five-pieces make a righteously odd pairing, but they’ve shared the stage at Grim Reefer Fest in Charm City, and what they have most in common is a conviction of approach that comes through on each half of the four-song/19-minute offering, with Haze Mage shooting forth with “Sleepers” and the semi-NWOBHM “Pit Fighter,” metal, classic prog and heavy rock coming together with a vital energy that is immediately and purposefully contradicted in Tombtoker‘s played-fast-but-is-so-heavy-it-still-sounds-slow “Braise the Dead” and “Botched Bastard,” both of which find a way to be a ton of fun while also being unspeakably brutal and pushing the line between sludge and death metal in a way that would do Six Feet Under proud. Horns and bongs all around, then.

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Tombtoker on Thee Facebooks

 

White Dog, White Dog

white dog white dog

Oldschool newcomers White Dog earn an automatic look by releasing their self-titled debut through former Cathedral frontman Lee Dorrian‘s Rise Above Records, but it’s the band’s clearcut vintage aesthetic that holds the listener’s attention. With proto-metal established as an aesthetic of its own going on 20 years now, White Dog aren’t the first by any means to tread this ground, but especially for an American band, they bring a sincerity of swing and soul that speaks to the heart of the subgenre’s appeal. “The Lantern” leans back into the groove to tell its tale, while “Abandon Ship” is more upfront in its strut, and “Snapdragon” and opener “Sawtooth” underscore their boogie with subtle progressive nods. Closing duo “Pale Horse” and “Verus Cultus” might be enough to make one recall it was Rise Above that issued Witchcraft‘s self-titled, but in the shuffle of “Crystal Panther,” and really across the whole LP White Dog make the classic ideology theirs and offer material of eminent repeat listenability.

White Dog on Thee Facebooks

Rise Above Records website

 

Jupiterian, Protosapien

jupiterian protosapien

The only thing that might save you from being swallowed entirely by the deathly mire Brazil’s Jupiterian craft on their third full-length, Protosapien, is the fact that the album is only 35 minutes long. That’s about right for the robe-clad purveyors of tonal violence — 2017’s Terraforming (review here) and 2015’s Aphotic (review here) weren’t much longer — and rest assured, it’s plenty of time for the band to squeeze the juice out of your soul and make you watch while they drink it out of some need-two-hands-to-hold-it ceremonial goblet. Their approach has grown more methodical over the years, and all the deadlier for that, and the deeper one pushes into Protosapien — into “Capricorn,” “Starless” and “Earthling Bloodline” at the end of the record — the less likely any kind of cosmic salvation feels. I’d say you’ve been warned, but really, this is just scratching the surface of the trenches into which Jupiterian plunge.

Jupiterian on Thee Facebooks

Transcending Obscurity Records on Bandcamp

 

Experiencia Tibetana, Vol. I

Experiencia Tibetana Vol I

It’s an archival release, recorded in 2014 and 2015 by the Buenos Aires-based band, but all that really does for the three-song/hour-long Vol. I is make me wonder what the hell Experiencia Tibetana have been up to since and why Vols. II and III are nowhere to be found. The heavy psych trio aren’t necessarily inventing anything on this debut full-length, but the way “Beirut” (18:36) is peppered with memorable guitar figures amid its echo-drifting vocals, and the meditation tucked into the last few minutes of the 26:56 centerpiece “Espalda de Elefante” and the shift in persona to subdued progressive psych on “Desatormentandonos” (14:16) with the bass seeming to take the improvisational lead as guitar lines hold the central progression together, all of it is a compelling argument for one to pester for a follow-up. It may be an unmanageable runtime, but for the come-with-us sense of voyage it carries, Vol. I adapts the listener’s mindset to its exploratory purposes, and proves to be well worth the trip.

Experiencia Tibetana on Thee Facebooks

Experiencia Tibetana on Bandcamp

 

Yanomamo, No Sympathy for a Rat

yanomamo no sympathy for a rat

Filth-encrusted and lumbering, Yanomamo‘s sludge takes Church of Misery-style groove and pummels it outright on the opening title-track of their four-song No Sympathy for a Rat EP. Like distilled disillusion, the scream-laced answer to the Sydney four-piece’s 2017 debut, Neither Man Nor Beast, arrives throwing elbows at your temples and through “The Offering,” the wait-is-this-grindcore-well-kinda-in-this-part “Miasma” and the suitably destructive “Iron Crown,” the only letup they allow is topped with feedback. Get in, kill, get out. They have more bounce than Bongzilla but still dig into some of Thou‘s more extreme vibe, but whatever you might want to compare them to, it doesn’t matter: Yanomamo‘s unleashed assault leaves bruises all its own, and the harsher it gets, the nastier it gets, the better. Can’t take it? Can’t hang? Fine. Stand there and be run over — I don’t think it makes a difference to the band one way or the other.

Yanomamo on Thee Facebooks

Iommium Records on Bandcamp

 

Mos Eisley Spaceport, The Best of Their Early Year

mos eisley spaceport the best of their early year

They mean the title literally — “early year.” Bremen, Germany’s Mos Eisley Spaceport — who so smoothly shift between space rock and classic boogie on “Further When I’m Far” and brash tempo changes en route to a final jam-out on “Mojo Filter,” finally unveiling the Star Wars sample at the head of organ-inclusive centerpiece “Space Shift” only to bring early Fu Manchu-style raw fuzz on “Drop Out” and finish with the twanging acoustic and pedal steel of “My Bicycle Won’t Fly” — have been a band for less than a full 12 months. Thus, The Best of Their Early Year signals some of its own progressive mindset and more playful aspects, but it is nonetheless a formidable accomplishment for a new band finding their way. They lay out numerous paths, if you couldn’t tell by the run-on sentence above, and I won’t hazard a guess as to where they’ll end up sound-wise, but they have a fervent sense of creative will that comes through in this material and one only hopes they hold onto whatever impulse it is that causes them to break out the gong on “Space Shift,” because it’s that sense of anything-as-long-as-it-works that’s going to continue to distinguish them.

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Thee Facebooks

Mos Eisley Spaceport on Bandcamp

 

Of Wolves, Balance

of wolves balance

One doesn’t often hear “the Wolfowitz Doctrine” brought out in lyrics these days, but Chicago heavy noise metallers Of Wolves aren’t shy about… well, anything. With volume inherent in the sound no matter how loud you’re actually hearing it, conveyed through weighted tones, shouts of progressions unified in intensity but varied in aggression and actual approach, the three-piece take an unashamed stance on a range of issues from the last two decades of war to trying to put themselves into the head of a mass shooter. The lyrics across their sophomore outing, Balance, are worth digging into for someone willing to take them on, but even without, the aggro mosh-stomp of “Maker” makes its point ahead of the 17-second “Flavor of the Weak” before Of Wolves dive into more progressively-structured fare on the title-track and “Clear Cutting/Bloodshed/Heart to Hand.” After “Killing Spree” and the aural-WTF that is “Inside (Steve’s Head),” they finish with a sludgecore take on the Misfits‘ “Die, Die My Darling,” which as it turns out was exactly what was missing up to that point.

Of Wolves on Thee Facebooks

Trepanation Recordings on Bandcamp

 

Pimmit Hills, Heathens & Prophets

Pimmit Hills Heathens Prophets

Comprised of four-fifths of what was Virginian outfit King Giant, it’s hard to know whether to consider Pimmit Hills a new band or a name-change, or what, but the first offering from vocalist David Hammerly, guitarist Todd “TI” Ingram, bassist Floyd Lee Walters III and drummer Brooks, titled Heathens & Prophets and self-released, hits with a bit of a bluesier feel than did the prior outfit, leaving plenty of room for jamming in each track and even going so far as to bring producer J. Robbins in on keys throughout the four-song/29-minute release. I suppose you could call it an EP or an LP — or a demo? — if so inclined, but any way you cut it, Heathens & Prophets plainly benefits from the band’s experience playing together, and they find a more rocking, less moody vibe in “Baby Blue Eyes” and the harmonica-laced “Beautiful Sadness” that has a feel as classic in substance as it is modern in sound and that is both Southern but refusing to bow entirely to cliché.

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Pimmit Hills on Bandcamp

 

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Burning Gloom, Amygdala: Out Beyond Walls

Posted in Reviews on July 15th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

burning gloom amygdala

For a band to switch names is no minor decision. First of all, once past the initial over-thought process of picking one in the first place, the band name becomes more than just a collective brand, it’s a flag you fly. And that’s for bands starting out, never mind those who already have a release under their belt. Italy’s My Home on Trees had two in 2015’s How I Reached Home (review here) debut and their prior 2013 self-titled EP before they made the decision to morph into Burning Gloom, so it seems all the more of consequence. The lineup of vocalist Laura Mancini, guitarist Marco Bertucci, bassist Giovanni Mastrapasqua and drummer Marcello Modica is intact despite the transition, and Burning Gloom offer their own debut, Amygdala, through Argonauta Records as an aggro-spirited eight songs/47 minutes that still keeps a sense of atmosphere in its echoing instrumentation and voices.

Mancini, joined by High Fighter‘s Mona Miluski on “Nightmares,” switches smoothly between melodic singing and harsher screams, either driving the change herself, as on “The Tower II” or following the linear build behind her, as in the payoff of the subsequent “Eremite.” Heavy rock is a tool in their arsenal, as the central riff to the penultimate “Beyond the Wall” will attest, but Amygdala is less centered on playing to genre than it is on establishing and developing this new identity for the group. There’s a current of ’90s alt rock in the proceedings from the outset, as brief 2:48 opener “The Tower I” sprints out of the proverbial gate, and though Burning Gloom will wind up in a much different place by the end of the record in the reggae-inflected initial verses and quiet melodic finish of eight-minute closer “Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder,” the journey from one to the other wants nothing for cohesion either in the individual songs or in how they’re drawn together. They seem to find middle ground, suitably enough, in the middle, with “Modern Prometheus” drawing together elements of sludge rock, grunge and heavier churning groove, but Amygdala is neither summarized within or built around a single track. It’s a whole-album album.

And that seems to suit Burning Gloom‘s purposes just fine as the Milano four-piece make their way deeper into the emotional and atmospheric mire as “Modern Prometheus” and “Nightmares” give way to “Warden,” which is longer at 7:47, has a slower rollout in its first half — they get into some gritty-style shuffle late, or at least what would be shuffle in a different context — and signals the arrival at Amygdala‘s final salvo. Though really, if one wants to trace the change further, the arrival of Miluski on “Nightmares” at the outset of side B is a departure in itself from the first four tracks — her recognizable scream and growl adding to Mancini‘s own approach as the track drives toward its fadeout. That plunge at the end feels especially crucial in what it does to set up the mood of “Warden” and the subsequent “Beyond the Wall,” and it’s not that “The Tower II” or “Eremite” or “Modern Prometheus” were wanting for some deeper sensibility, but the balance of aggression shifts after the Mancini/Miluski blowout in “Nightmares,” and the energy with which the end of that song is executed — the sheer metallic feel of it — seems to be as far as Burning Gloom are willing to push in that direction this time out.

burning gloom

To be fair, it’s pretty far, and Miluski‘s contributions there would be enough to make Angela Gossow blush. But it’s in “Warden,” “Beyond the Wall” and “Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder” that the dynamic of Amygdala more fully begins to show itself, and it’s not just that the songs are longer — “Beyond the Wall” isn’t, at 5:32 — but in how they relate to the initial impression of “The Tower I,” its companion and the others on side A. Everything fits together, and so Amygdala reveals itself as even more of a second album than a first, though part of what makes it exciting is that though the band benefits from their time as My Home on Trees on the level of basic chemistry, they’ve made this conscious decision to embark on something new together. As the manifestation of that, Burning Gloom‘s debut is all the more engaging, even down to the accented croon on “Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder,” which only adds to the sway of that song’s beginning moments.

Like a lot of Amygdala — the part of the brain’s limbic system in which emotions are processed — the finale is a subtle build, but it has enough time at its disposal to hit its payoff in the middle and even out again, choosing not to end the record not on an all-go push, but with a more gentle, easing letting go. It’s only about a minute and a half longer than, say, “Modern Prometheus,” but its purposes are compellingly different, and underscore the band’s purpose in crafting such breadth between the two sides of the record. If one goes back to the beginning of My Home on Trees, they’ve been a band for about seven years, and the shades of grunge, post-hardcore, heavy rock, sludge and whatever else they throw into Amygdala stand as testament to the work they’ve done thus far into their tenure to develop their sonic identity.

At the same time, Amygdala is Burning Gloom‘s first album, and an even-more-purposeful first album for the fact that they became a new band to make it, so while it’s forehead-slappingly plain to hear once one understands they’d worked together before, one has to acknowledge the element as well of forward potential in these songs and most of all in the way they interact with each other across the full span of the collection. I would say that’s the most resounding impression Amygdala makes, but it needs to be weighed against the atmospheric accomplishments of this material itself, and it’s pick-your-poison whether you want to appreciate what Burning Gloom are doing now or be excited at the prospect of what they might do next. Their heft, shove and melodic prowess is as much realized as it is pointing toward future realization.

Burning Gloom, Amygdala (2019)

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Burning Gloom on Bandcamp

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Argonauta Records website

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Burning Gloom Set June Release for Amygdala on Argonauta Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 20th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

burning gloom

Milano four-piece Burning Gloom — formerly known as My Home on Trees — have found a new home on Argonauta Records, and it’s as part of that label’s ever-expanding roster of acts that they’ll issue their first album under their recently changed moniker, Amygdala, in June. I dug My Home on Trees, but can’t really begrudge them the name change, and if they’re looking for a fresh start, the Argonauta banner is a good one to be under. As to how it will play into their sound as Burning Gloom, it’s a wait-and-see prospect at this point, but they’re positioning themselves as having a darker vibe on Amygdala, and certainly the creepo-factor of the record’s cover art below bears that out. Seems likely they’d be able to make such a call, since obviously they’re a group with some consideration for how they present themselves.

The PR wire brought news of the allegiance with Argonauta and the details for the album:

burning gloom amygdala

BURNING GLOOM (formerly MY HOME ON TREES) SIGNS WITH ARGONAUTA RECORDS!

New band name, new sound, new album coming this Summer!

Previously known as MY HOME ON TREES, the stoner-doom band hailing from Milano, Italy, started their first moves in 2011, but it’s in 2012 when the band dives into any live activities and understood quickly which road had to be taken, playing the first shows and looking for the right sound. After the release of a first self-produced EP featuring 5 tracks in 2012, the band played tons of shows in Italy and signed with the label Heavy Psych Sounds Records in 2015, who released their first and ciritically acclaimed album, How I Reached Home.

The band continued as a four piece, and toured Europe several times and all over in the central part of the continent, sharing prestigious stages with bands alike Church of Misery, Ufomammut, Karma to Burn, Windhand, and taking part of some international Festivals such as at Up In Smoke or Red Smoke Festival in Poland. After three years working on new tracks, the band entered the studio and recorded their new album, Amygdala, between February and June 2018. 2019 will see them celebrating their comeback with a new shining identity, a new name, leaving behind the past and signing with a new label, Argonauta Records! Set for a release on June 14th 2019, BURNING GLOOM will return with their brand new album, which will definitely surprise and please both fans and critics alike.

Says the band: “Mystic trees and stoner blues didn?t represent us anymore, after the first abum we started to look for darker atmospheres and heavier sounds; we decided to not continue with two guitars, but to have just one and we felt closer to doom metal and far enough from any psychedelic rock and blues appeals we had before. A different mood, more melancholic, more and louder screaming voices. All this became the new attitude, closer to doom and sludge metal and quite distant from usual stoner rock.

We thought to look for a label more connected to that kind of metal music we like, sludge, doom, post metal and closer to the underground scene. Actually we even didn’t start to look for any, because a label looked for us first. We found the interest of Argonauta Records, asking us about new album and we started to talk about it. We met and we received a very interesting proposal. We’re very proud about the decision we have made and we found a family, considering the good connections between some of the bands of the label.

“Amygdala” is our intimistic journey focused on brain disorders themes, talking about someone seriously threatened by dangerous nightmares, scaring landscapes. Some kind of a walk on a dark road in the night, enlighted just by flames and sparks of fires on the road, where fear and screams take place. It sounds like a violent storm of low tuning and fuzzy riffs mixed with a powerful female voice arising from loudness and madness. We’re proud of what we have recorded, in more sessions, in different seasons, from winter to summer. We’re really satisfied by the final result, we hope people will enjoy it, like we do”.

The tracklist will read as follows:
THE TOWER I
THE TOWER II
EREMITE
MODERN PROMETHEUS
NIGHTMARES featuring Mona Miluski (High Fighter)
WARDEN
BEYOND THE WALL
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER

BURNING GLOOM is:
Laura Mancini – Vocals
Marco Bertucci – Guitar
Marcello Modica – Drums
Giovanni Mastrapasqua – Bass

www.facebook.com/burninggloom
https://myhomeontreesband.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/ArgonautaRecords/
www.argonautarecords.com

My Home on Trees, How I Reached Home (2015)

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Burning Gloom: My Home on Trees Announce Name Change & New Album

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 18th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

I’m not going to go as far as to say I’ve heard any of Burning Gloom‘s forthcoming long-player, Amygdala, or that I’m listening to a song from it right now that’s kicking my ass all over this room, but I will advise anyone still reading this sentence to keep an eye out for more on the offering as it gets closer to its to-be-announced release date. Big tones, big melodies, big hooks. It’s an interesting turn from the Milan-based outfit formerly known as My Home on Trees toward a kind of psychedelic but still thoroughly doomed atmosphere. Again, not that I’m listening to it or anything, because I’m not going to say that I am.

In all seriousness though, you can hear enough of a shift in vibe as to justify a name swap, and beyond just the fact that they’re doing something different, Burning Gloom sound vital even coming of My Home on Trees‘ 2015 album, How I Reached Home (review here). Hard to believe it’s coming up on four years since that one came out. Wow.

Time flies, doom plods. Here’s word from the band on the name change:

burning gloom

We used to be called MY HOME ON TREES from 2012 to 2018, but this new year that just started brought us a new life and a new identity: Burning Gloom. We realized that “My Home on Trees” didn’t fit us properly anymore. We feel closer to a different and heavier path, mentally and also musically. A new journey, made of fires in the night, a dark road enlightened by flames and sparks.

This is what our new full-length “Amygdala” represents. It took us 3 years to be ready to come back in studio, but we made it between february and june 2018 and our new record is now ready to be released later on this year, we have signed a contract and we’ll announce it very soon. Our new logo has been made by our friend STRX. A new life has begun, see you soon on the road and stay tuned for the next news.

https://www.facebook.com/burninggloom/
https://myhomeontreesband.bandcamp.com/

My Home on Trees, How I Reached Home (2015)

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