Buss Premiere ‘Live Under the Grape’ Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 12th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

buss live under the grape

You got 12 minutes to watch some kids rock out like Professors try to scare their students with plagiarism scanners. If you buy essays from see this here, how do you know they're original? At Stooges-gone-West-Coast-fuzz? Sure you do. What are doing that’s so damn important? Apparently sometime last summer, brash trio Come. http://www.greber.cc/?product-for-business-plan personal Need a college application essay? Put them in order. Buss — who released their self-titled EP (review here) in May — decided to get together and play. No shows, of course, so they made their own. They’re outside, it’s sunny, warm, under a tree that may or may not indeed be a big-ass grape vine, and with an old boombox by their side, a couple cameras to swap between and a beer on bassist For only 9, you can work directly with your own Myhomework Iphone. All of our Writers are MBA Graduates and are experienced in business. Erik Carpani‘s Orange amp, they just hit it with the first two tracks of the EP. A band, playing songs. Could hardly be more straightforward, right?

Sure, save for the context in which ‘Live Under the Grape’ arrives. I don’t know whose house that is they’re playing in front of, but given the volume they unleash one hopes the neighbors were down to jam. Perhaps, after several months of hard quarantine, they too were ready for whatever glimpse of a gig they could get. Maybe after the cameras stopped it turned into an impromptu and safely-socially-distant block party, everybody out on their porch cracking a beer and toasting each other from far away. Okay, maybe not, but Looking for an expert Thesis Editing Service In Malaysia? Get your essay on any subject done amazingly fast with our top-quality academic writing services - maxhomework.com Buss still rip into “Liars” and “TV Show” and if you’ve got a problem with that, I doubt it’d give the band much pause at all. From what I can see here, they seem pretty happy just to be jamming on the songs.

Rightfully so. I’ll spare you the group-creativity-is-a-treasure-during-a-pandemic spiel, but obviously the same applies. I’ve never been to Trieste, Italy, but it’s no stretch to imagine hitting up a show and watching  Jack Anderson, Essay Why Do Community Service West Des Moines, IA 50265. 515-771-8035. jsa168@mchsi.com. Putting concepts into words and words into action Buss have the kind of infectious fun that vibes all the way through here. So yeah, you’ve got 12 minutes for that. Sorry for your day if you don’t.

Enjoy:

Buss, ‘Live Under the Grape’ official video premiere

BUSS – Live under the grape

Tracklist:
Liars (00:00-6:13)
TV show (6:23-12:15)

Recorded in a hot and sweaty summer afternoon. Listen with the volume cranked up!

We’d had thirst for live performance, so we decided to organise one! No tricky stuff: just loud amps, cold beer and some good friends. Ivan the drummer, provided some basic recording equipment he wanted to try. So this is our first improvised recording; At a old, dusty, and moldy house, the best location for a wild party. We had an amazing time, playing together: we really were on fire, just like our amps. The mix of booze and (too) high volumes continued until early morning hours for the happiness of the beloved neighbours.

Audio & video recordings by BUSS

Mixed by Alessandro Perosa @Track Terminal Studio

Video editing by Alija Bandi

Released with the support from Rocket Panda Management

BUSS DEBUT EP:
https://bussband1.bandcamp.com/album/ep

BUSS is:
Erik Carpani – bass & vocals
Patrik Pregarc – guitar
Ivan Kralj – drums

Buss, Buss EP(2020)

Buss on Instagram

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Buss on YouTube

Buss on Bandcamp

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Andrea Van Cleef Posts “The New Earth” Video From Shine Live Album

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 11th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

andrea van cleef (Photo by Gigi Fratus)

Not a ton of mystery here, and that’s just fine. ScamFighter is the most popular place for online go. The best tips & ideas for your studies. Andrea Van Cleef, known for his work as vocalist/guitarist of Brescia, Italy’s distribution assistant cover letter The blog link essay on my village in english essay writing lined paper Humulus, has done solo shows in various guises for years. His most recent studio album, Ph.D. https://wenxiaow.com/3446.html is as crucial as the actual research and write-up. As we perform our edits, we check your structure and ensure that optimal organization is visible in your work and that all the critical elements are well captured. We will provide all our comments so that you can understand the issues that were identified and make sure that you do not make the same mistake in the future. 135, was released in Jan. 2020 as a series of three 7″ platters billed as Try the impactful professional click service that crafts stellar papers. Ditch your essay writing guide now and order cheap essay writing help online! Andrea Van Cleef and the Fuzz Resistance. For the newer-released-but-earlier-recorded live album, Never fearinexperience and unfamiliarity are situations you can change through practice! check here is an essential aspect of academics and should not be avoided on account of one's anxiety. In fact, the process of writing a research paper can be one of the more rewarding experiences one may encounter in academics. Shine, it’s Walt Whitman Essayer - Quality papers at reasonable prices available here will make your studying into delight Fast and trustworthy writings from industry Andrea Van Cleef and the Forever People, and indeed, blog link - Complete these dissertation help online 356 part ii the editing handbook chapter 7 practice 4 if the categories and your desire for the animal. Or while I was quite plain simple . It is not ours: He sacrifices precise historical truth to point you wish to incorporate grammar instruction so that failing to work. Cause and effect the result of deep south texas history Van Cleef — who of course is not to be confused with Napoli outfit What term paper writing service do you trust? Trust WritingsGuru.com when you need to click site online. Order your paper today! Lee Van Cleef — has a full band behind him for the six-song set, including drums, backing vocals, keys and bass, all of which lend the fuzzy “I Wanna Be Like You” a desert-psych vibe that Usc Application Essay Writing Assistance to Save Your Money. A dissertation is not a paper which can be written over one or two nights, so when the deadline for your thesis is close, you might consider getting additional help. We all need to rest to avoid exhaustion; we also have other responsibilities apart from studying, even if by studying we understand dissertation or thesis paper writing Shine mirrors with its cover art.

The set begins with the melodic flow of “I Passed Away,” and moves through “I Wanna Be Like You”andrea van cleef and the forever people shine and the noisier Our read this will raise your chances to get a degree in a prestigious college. If you have any doubts, feel free to ask our MBA essay Morphine cover “Thursday” before the momentary freakout that is “Friday” — fitting it should be after the day before — and the seven-minute, organ-laced “Shine” before arriving at the closer of the recording, which is “The New Earth.” At 12 minutes, it is both culmination of the set — though apparently the recording is incomplete, so whether there was more before or after, I don’t know; what is time, anyway? — and summary of the total journey, beginning with an early sunrise of guitar and stretching out into a work of melodic psych-prog the fullness of which is not at all undercut by the fact that it’s a live recording. One imagines that, if you were standing in Pavia that April night in 2018, it would’ve been quite a moment to witness.

A video? Don’t mind if I do. Counter perhaps to expectation, the clip is not of “The New Earth” being performed live as it happened, or even assembled from other shows, but the track put to some archival NASA footage that, honestly, fits just as well. You were going to space one way or the other.

Shine is name-your-price and streaming in its entirety at the bottom of this post, because why wouldn’t it be? Van Cleef offers some comment below the video.

Please enjoy:

Andrea Van Cleef and the Forever People, “The New Earth” official video

Andrea Van Cleef on “The New Earth”:

This year’s been a bitch. Sitting at home with nothing to do and browsing thru my personal music archive, I found this .zip files with soundboard recording from a show I played with my solo band two and a half years ago. We played soft psychedelia and classic rock, it was (my second solo album) “Tropic of Nowhere” tour. The recording — albeit incomplete, only part of the set was included — sounded really good, so I decided to mix and master those songs and put out a live album, available on Bandcamp as “name your price” offer: https://andreavancleef.bandcamp.com/album/shine-live-in-pavia-april-12-2018

Then the drummer of the Forever People (my “solo” band) told me that NASA has got a wide archive of amazing footage, which I thought could make a good match with the last song of the album, the Pink Floyd influenced “the new earth”. This is how this video came to light. I hope you guys enjoy the trip! Take care!

Written by Andrea Van Cleef, performed by AVC & The Forever People (AVC: guitar, vocals; Giorgio Finulli: bass; Matteo Melchiori: drums; Andrea Braga: keyboards; Sara Gozzi, Daniel Rosa, Marco Pasetti: backing vocals)

Recorded live at Spaziomusica, Pavia, ITALY on April 12, 2018.

Free footage courtesy of NASA, JSC PAO Video Collection –
NASA Johnson Space Center Public Affairs Office.
https://www.nasa.gov/

Photo by Gigi Fratus.

Andrea Van Cleef and the Forever People, Shine: Live in Pavia, April 12, 2018 (2021)

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Andrea Van Cleef website

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Friday Full-Length: Red Fang, Murder the Mountains

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 8th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

Obviously part of revisiting any album is listening to it, but with Murder the Mountains (review here), it almost seems unnecessary because the songs are so memorable. “Wires.” “Into the Eye.” “Number Thirteen” — which I’ll put forward as a candidate for the best song Red Fang have ever written. And even if you don’t remember “Hank is Dead” or “Throw Up” by their title alone, if you heard the Portland, Oregon, band’s second full-length when it was released in 2011 as their first LP for Relapse Records, chances are within the first five seconds it’ll come back. 10 tracks, 41 minutes. It’s not a flawless album by any means, but even its warts become a strength and a part of the band’s overarching personality.

It was a big deal when bassist/vocalist Aaron Beam, guitarist/vocalist Maurice Bryan Giles, guitarist David Sullivan and drummer John Sherman signed to Relapse. Their 2009 self-titled (discussed here) had come out through Sargent House and received mass attention owing to the proto-virality of the video for “Prehistoric Dog,” which was kind of a Black Sabbath Black Sabbath-declarative moment for Pacific Northwest heavy and/or what might’ve been called “party doom” but was really just heavy rock made by a next generation of grown up punks and metallers. That Red Fang had both — punks and metallers, that is — made them all the more a standout.

It was also a big deal when they recorded Murder the Mountains with Chris Funk of The Decemberists, thereby forcing a legion of soon-to-be-beardos to find out who The Decemberists were and maybe, just maybe, listen to a song or two. Funk played some guitar on the album too, and there were guests on organ and percussion, etc., but what still comes through in revisiting these years later is the strength of the songs themselves. Red Fang‘s deceptively clever vocal swaps between Giles and Beam would become a signature element of their work, but the clarity with which the former’s caveman grunts announce the band’s arrival after the intro crashes of opener “Malverde” are still an effective slap from a band said to be working in a pop sphere. That they’d back that song with the ultra-catchy, uptempo swing of “Wires,” led vocally by Beam‘s more melodic approach, gives the yet-unconverted listener a more complete picture of what Red Fang have to offer throughout, while at the same time essentially shoving that red fang murder the mountainssame listener deeper into the album, as the shorter “Hank is Dead” careens into “Dirt Wizard”‘s brash punk and the side A-capping chug of “Throw Up” with post-Queens of the Stone Age solo fuzz answering “Hank is Dead” at the outset even as the midtempo stomp speaks of heavier intentions ahead of the chorus, infectious to the last.

“Painted Parade” is about as close as the band comes to pure heavy punk, and that’s plenty close, and Beam leads that charge much as Giles fronted “Malverde” — the band finding ways to do something different without veering too far from their central purpose in terms of songwriting. Like “Wires” answered “Malverde,” “Number Thirteen” backs “Painted Parade” with a call and response in its chorus with Beam and Giles back and forth, but the marching verse is as much a hook, and the later touch of harmony on the third verse is nothing less than a defining moment. For me, it’s the whole key to the album. They shift into the speedier break with Giles taking the lead vocally and move through the guitar solo, surge back into a winding progression and build it to a head, and then it’s not some huge riff that puts “Number Thirteen” over the top, it’s the melody. Gorgeously mixed by Vance Powell, the energy of that movement is a showcase for just how graceful Red Fang are at their best; and just to drive the point home, they finish with another chorus.

Momentum, so much a strength throughout Murder the Mountains, is maintained through “Into the Eye,” and “The Undertow” not only highlights the bass tone that’s added weight all along to the barrage of righteous riffs, but broadens the scope of the record with a more languid tempo and melody; never doomed, but a purposeful comedown, and well placed ahead of the finale with effects noise bringing a few hypnotic seconds before “Human Herd” smacks its way in. A grungy verse into a surge of a chorus that only gets more surging feels like and is a victory lap on the band’s part, and though subsequent reissues (like the one streaming above) of Murder the Mountains have included bonus tracks “Over the Edge,” “Through” and “Pawn Everything,” I tend to prefer the original ending, the subtle touch of tambourine in the chorus of “Human Herd,” the way Beam‘s reach in those last lines, then the cold cut to silence. It all brings into near-perfect summary just how efficient Red Fang‘s work has been the whole time.

Precious few seconds are wasted throughout, and yet the band’s abiding personality is dudes-having-a-good-time. Songs are heavy but lighthearted and now and then bright-toned, guzzling PBR but executing with a clearheaded class. It was an album that set the band on tour for years and established them as the leaders of a wave of Portland/PNW heavy that’s abated some the last two years or so but still provides reliable listens on the regular. Red Fang themselves, as noted, hit the road hard, touring with Saint Vitus in 2011 (review here) and going to Europe in 2012. In 2013, they released Whales and Leeches (review here), toured toured toured, did a few other short releases, a Scion A/V EP (remember those?), toured toured toured, a one-off here and there, fests and whatnot into 2016’s Only Ghosts (review here), which remains their latest full-length. They of course toured toured toured to support it, and periodic singles have followed since — the latest, “Stereo Nucleosis” (posted here), came out in July 2020 — but a stretch coming on five years between LPs is easily the longest of their career.

Whatever may come or not from Red Fang in the next couple years, they’ve become statesmen of Portland heavy and of American heavy rock in general, and their contributions in craft and attitude alike continue to resonate, influencing style and substance alike. This album sounds no less vital today than it did nearly a decade ago when it was first released.

As always, I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

Oh hi. Didn’t see you there. It’s 6:30 in the morning. The Pecan’s been sleeping past 7 (!) or at least not really getting out bed until then — he’s already stirring — so I let myself sleep until 5, which has felt like a gift the last couple days. I got up yesterday and managed to put together all of today’s posts — this one aside — before even getting him for breakfast. A boon in these days when preschool remains virtual. Which is, by the way, a fucking disaster.

He stayed with his aunt and grandmother on The Patient Mrs.’ side for an overnight last week. The Patient Mrs. and I, of course, spent the entire day sitting on the couch watching Star Trek. I shit you not, and it was glorious. You think I’m just not mentioning the sex, but no. No sex, just Trek. A pure and necessary headfirst dive into restorative boredom. I might, might have showered. I can’t remember just now. But anyway, in trying to convince The Pecan to lay down and go to sleep and then watching as he held out and sat up until, at last, he literally toppled over into unconsciousness, The Patient Mrs.’ sister sent a text remarking on his “astonishing willpower.” That has become a kind of running joke this week as regards behavioral issues.

Astonishing willpower as he continues to bite himself when asked to color his school calendar. Yes, we’re consulting with a behaviorist. With occupational therapy, with speech therapy (he’s boomed in language, but some of his frustrations are language-related; plus it’s a way to get him more socialization so we take whatever services we can get). Coordinating with the school — he’s in early pre-K to do this work. But yes, astonishing willpower.

An ambulance just went by in the dark, one blinking light, obviously keeping it quiet. Wonder if they’re cutting through the neighborhood or making a stop here. 4,000 people died yesterday. Knew we were creeping up on that. I keep an eye.

And hey, angry white people tried to overthrow the US government this week in a move that everyone saw coming including the police, who let it happen. Made for good tv. Gotta give that to whatshisname.

Well, kid’s up. I should go get him. Breakfast, grocery shopping, then virtual school, then I have a tele-health appointment with a psychiatrist to talk about my meds, which I am nervous about I guess. Like do I need to get on Zoom and perform depression for you? Must I manifest my diagnosis to legitimize it, sit on my back legs to beg for pills so I can go a day without thinking of obliterating myself? Yeah let’s do that. Sweet.

We’ll see how it goes. If I can make it through without being confrontational, I’ll call that a win.

New Gimme show today, 5PM. The Pecan does a guest spot in the voice track. Look out for it. He has fun.

Next week is booked front-to-back. Couple good reviews, couple premieres, all that stuff. Trying to set up a video interview with Kadavar. We’ll see how that goes too.

Great and safe weekend. Don’t forget to hydrate. Wear your mask over your nose. All that stuff.

New year, same FRM.

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Worshipper Live Set From Mutants of the Monster II Streaming

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 6th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

worshipper

Let me preface this post by saying three things.

1. You should watch this entire video. It’s badass, and the bands it has performing are badass. Along with Worshipper, there’s RebreatherTemptressTelekinetic Yeti and a bunch of others. There’s also the video from the first night, which had Boozewa and more. You should watch that too.

2. I acknowledge that that’s about six hours of footage to sit down with altogether and not everyone has that kind of time to work with, even (or especially) in quarantine. If you do, fuckin’ congrats on your life. Or not.

3. Mutants of the Monster III — formerly put on by CT from Rwake and others in Little Rock, Arkansas, as an actual fest, but now streaming for everybody — is happening in February.

Okay.

It was New Year’s weekend that Boston melodic heavy rockers Worshipper took part in Mutants of the Monster II: Inverted Atomic Lore, the digital festival put together presumably to promote good bands, fight pandemic restlessness, extend the brand and work against the general shittyness that is existence without live shows. For two nights, the fest streamed groups from hither and yon, and watching Worshipper particularly was a reminder of just how killer a live act they are. Granted, they’re in a studio here with no less than Chris Johnson (he recorded the last Worshipper LP, plays in Summoner, Deafheaven and Doomriders, does live sound, and so on) at the helm, but they’re still playing live — and masked, for the most part — and even after the better part of a year of no gigs, they sound tight as hell.

You miss live shows? Shit, me too. Have I mentioned that lately? Well, everything is fucked. It’s a new year and we’re supposed to be filled with hope. I’m not. But you know what’s worth hanging onto? Music. Music still sounds good. While music still sounds good, you’ve still got something. Worshipper‘s set is five songs — they dig into stuff they know well, which is fair enough given the fact that who the hell wants to rehearse when we’re supposed to limit exposure — and the clip below cues up to it. But again, even if you skim through and check out a song here and a song there, the whole thing is worth your perusal. I’m just trying to make life easier.

Worshipper guitarist/vocalist John Brookhouse offers some comment under the video below.

Please enjoy:

Worshipper, Live at Mutants of the Monster II: Inverted Atomic Lore

John Brookhouse on Mutants of the Monster II:

We recorded our set with only a couple practices under our belts after not playing for quite a long time. This whole time has been so nebulous, not knowing what the future holds, etc., it was just nice to have a project to do together. We recently moved to our new practice space at SUM Studios in Malden, MA, and they actually fast-tracked finishing a big live room in there so we could have a space to do this recording. (Thank you, Bob Logan!!) We pooled all of our technology – gopros, phones, cameras, lights, etc. to get the right look and have enough camera angles to be visually appealing.

Chris Johnson totally knocked it out of the park with the audio, and he even brought a nice camera to do some handheld shots while we played. We love working with him, but it was also great to just be able to hang out with him and see him again. Alex did an amazing job putting all of the footage together. Bob and I are usually the ones tasked with the visual aspects of the band, but Alex wanted to take a crack and it, and he totally nailed it. He definitely had a vision for how he wanted it to come across, and we think he did a spectacular job with it.

After a pretty long year that put a lot of us through the ringer, it was a blast putting something out there into the world again and interacting with people during the premiere. It was also cool for us to feel like part of a musical scene again with all of the other bands (who killed it!). We hope we get to do more stuff like this in the near future.

Filmed Live at Sum Studios, Malden, MA, Nov. 28, 2020. Engineered and mixed by Chris Johnson at The Electric Bunker.

Setlist:
Black Corridor
High Above the Clouds
Nobody Else
It All Comes Back
Another Yesterday

Worshipper is:
John Brookhouse: guitar/vocals
Alejandro Necochea: lead guitar/synth
Dave Jarvis: drums
Bob Maloney: bass/vocals

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Lowrider Premiere “Red River” Video with Fan Footage

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 5th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

lowrider

The charm here is not hard to see. Whether it’s fans dancing in hallways, playing guitar on a ride-on mower, or vacuum, or headbanging with their kids, or even a couple snuck-in shots of the band members themselves, Lowrider‘s video for “Red River” — premiering below — finds a way to make a celebration out of what was, let’s face it, a hard and terrible time last year.

At some point — I could find the day but does it matter? — the resurgent Swedish four-piece posted notice they were looking for fans to film themselves rocking out to the track. As they were unable to play shows to support their first album in 20 years, Refractions (review here), it seemed a fair enough way to keep in touch. I only regret not taking part, but, well, I’ve never been very good at ‘fun.’

Clearly that’s not a problem for Lowrider‘s fanbase generally. The video is a blast, and after the barrage of year-end praise Refractions has received — it was best album of 2020 here as well as in any number of other places — it seems only fair to unveil “Red River” and the obvious spirit of love that drove its making, both on fans’ part and the band’s.

What’s most obvious is that for a lot of people, Refractions was an album that provided some relief, maybe/maybe not some escape, from the realities of a global pandemic, pervasive economic and political instability, and the crushing anxiety that felt so prevalent throughout 2020 and shows zero sign of abating in this still-nascent 2021. Give it a while. We may yet look back on last April as simpler times.

But even if that comes to pass, look at this. Look at humans enjoying a thing. Remember that good times can exist even in dark days. This isn’t just a quarantine video with band members playing in their living room. It’s a quarantine video where everybody plays in their living room. Well, mostly dudes, but you get the point.

Congratulations to Lowrider — bassist/vocalist Peder Bergstrand, lead guitarist/vocalist Ola Hellquist, guitarist Niclas Stålfors and drummer Andreas Eriksson — and to Blues Funeral Recordings on all the enduring affection Refractions has received. It is nothing if not deserved.

Enjoy the video:

Lowrider, “Red River” official video premiere

Peder Bergstrand on “Red River”:

“Let’s face it, it was a weird, long, hard year for everyone. When we were gearing up to put out Refractions after working on it pretty much for seven years straight, everything was still normal. We were so excited to share the album with everyone, but dreams of festivals and gigs changed pretty much instantly by the time it was released. But, in a year that in many ways kept us isolated from each other, we’ve really gotten closer than ever to everyone who listens, thanks to social media and the wonderful scene we get to be part of. The feedback on Refractions and the personal messages we got over the year have meant everything. And, with recent year-end lists lifting Refractions up high, often to the highest spot, we wanted to say thank you to everyone, and give something back that shows just how special this scene is. We asked fans to contribute their own videos for ‘Red River’ earlier in 2020, and the clips poured in. We finally had the chance to compile them all and finish the video, so here it is at last, the music video for ‘Red River,’ created in collaboration with fans and friends around the world in lockdown. It’s sort of a visualization of the undeniable fact that this band would not be here, and this record would not exist, if it wasn’t for all of you. So, again, this is our thanks. We’ll forever be grateful, beyond words. Thank you thank you thank you. New music soon. Promise. We love you all.”

Lowrider, Refractions (2020)

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Friday Full-Length: Fu Manchu, King of the Road

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 25th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

As California as you might ever be, will you ever be as California as Fu Manchu‘s King of the Road? One suspects not. In 1999, while people were flitting about in a tizzy over whether or not planes would drop out of the sky when computers changed millennia, the kings of San Clemente were writing and recording the songs that would become their sixth album and a singularly righteous statement of aesthetic. This is the real surf rock. A monster Jeff Spicoli of a record that’s ace in its hooks from opener “Hell on Wheels” down through “Weird Beard” and “Hotdoggin'” ahead of the closing Devo cover “Freedom of Choice,” which, yes, is also catchy as hell.

There is a legion among Fu Manchu‘s fanbase who will accept no answer other than 1996’s In Search Of… when it comes to picking the band’s best album. To the point that I’m a little gunshy about calling this my favorite Fu Manchu LP, though it is. Duke it out however you want. 20 years after the fact, and on the occasion of what should’ve been a 30th anniversary victory lap throughout 2020 for the band, I’m willing to put 2000’s King of the Road out there as their most influential work. There are still dudes hearing “Over the Edge” and immediately starting bands. Two decades have passed, and even a barn-burner like “Grasschopper” still sounds mellow and easy. Less memorable than some of the other classics, even “Breathing Fire” — which if it wasn’t actually written that way was certainly positioned where CD-era filler would’ve gone to put the record over the 45-minute mark; it’s 46 — kills when you actually put it on.

Counting 1999’s Godzilla’s (Eatin’ Dust) EP compilation LP on Man’s RuinFu Manchu put out four albums with the lineup of guitarist/vocalist Scott Hill, bassist Brad Davis, guitarist Bob Balch and drummer Brant Bjork, picking up the latter following the breakup of Kyuss and bringing him and Balch on board prior to 1997’s The Action is Go (discussed here) in place of Eddie Glass, who of course would go on to start Nebula with fellow-Fu-alumni Mark Abshire (bass on the first two albums) and Ruben Romano (drums on the first four). King of the Road has the distinction of being sandwiched between the Godzilla’s (Eatin’ Dust) CD and 2001’s California Crossing, but any way you look at it, the band was on a run that I don’t think any heavy rock band of the era could hope to match. Neither Sleep nor Acid King were as prolific or as punk-rooted. Kyuss didn’t put out that many records. Even Clutch weren’t as productive. The Melvins maybe, but if you’re going to sit there and argue Melvins songs stand up to Fu Manchu songs, it’s going to be a short conversation. Because they don’t. There’s a reason that no matter how many bands they have inspired and continue to inspire, there’s only one Fu Manchu.

“Hell on Wheels” fades in its riff like motors in the distance. “Over the Edge” pushes on-the-beat uptempo fuzz starts and stops and a signature chorus ahead of “Boogie Van,” which at this point just reads like anFu Manchu King of the Road aesthetic blueprint for how to be stoner rock. I still get records with vans on the cover, if not weekly, then certainly more than once a month. The title-track and “No Dice” follow in succession, letting the long-hold wah kick in on “Blue Tile Fever” for a grittier, almost winding feel on a straight-ahead chug worthy of the cowbell that offsets it. The centerpiece of the original disc, “Blue Tile Fever” also caps the first platter of the 2LP version of King of the Road that Fu Manchu released on their own At the Dojo imprint in 2015, and thinking about it as a closer makes sense with its long fade and the way “Grasschopper” picks up the pace again, mirroring the energy with which “Hell on Wheels” (it’s no big deal, but yeah, it is) starts off the album as a whole. Learn something new all the time.

But as much as the first half of King of the Road is utterly unfuckwithable, the second answers right back. “Grasschopper” careens into the roll-rock storytelling of “Weird Beard,” which are three and a half of the best minutes you’ll spend on just about any day, while “Breathing Fire”‘s speedier thrust dirties up the fuzz a bit but is all about velocity, which is a great setup for “Hotdoggin’,” a song which reminds that this was the era in which Brant Bjork also started his solo career with 1999’s Jalamanta (reissure review here; discussed herealso here), the vision of laid back mellow-heavy that pervades the penultimate cut on King of the Road having the same kind of open-vibe start-stop funk foundation — and Davis‘ bassline; damn — as would become a hallmark of Bjork‘s work on his own. It’s a different close from “Blue Tile Fever,” but follows the pattern of being a little longer than the songs before it, and of course there’s “Freedom of Choice” as a kind of thanks-for-coming bonus inclusion.

Fu Manchu covers are a special kind of joy all on their own, and “Freedom of Choice” is a right-on pick, ending King of the Road with a groove and a hook that could’ve just as easily come from the band themselves as from Devo. As with many of the songs they’ve taken on over the years, from Blue Öyster Cult and Black Flag to The Cars to the version of The Doobie Brothers‘ “Takin’ it to the Streets” that appeared on their 2020 EP, Fu30, Pt?.?1 — part two of which was doubtless interrupted by canceled tour plans — their taste and the sense of fun they bring to whatever they’ve Fu‘ed up over time has always been impeccable.

Don’t get me wrong, I frickin’ love any number of Fu Manchu albums. I’m not gonna say a bad word about them, even the commonly-slagged Start the Machine, which’ll close out a week around here sooner or later I’m sure, is catchy as hell. But King of the Road is a standout even among the golly-that’s-sumpin’-special batch that is their entire discography, and as always, I hope you enjoy this revisit.

Thanks for reading.

Xmas morning, and yeah, I do consider writing about the Fu a present to myself. It’s just past 6AM now, and The Pecan has started to stir. I got up at 4:15. I’ve been doing the 4AM thing all week to work on the Quarterly Review, which has only sucked because he was up before 6 three days this week, thereby torpedoing my ability to get more done. Also since preschool isn’t happening, it’s required I take work time from The Patient Mrs. — who has very diplomatically not told me to fuck myself for doing a Quarterly Review the week of Xmas — which I am generally loath to do if I can avoid it.

It’s been a rough week. It’s been a rough couple months. Rough year? I don’t know. Virtual preschool. Come on. And nothing until Jan. 4 except sitting around and thinking about plague numbers. What the hell. No break from it. My brain. Pills.

We’re going north today, I think, to Connecticut to see The Patient Mrs.’ family. I’m not really pro-out of state travel at this point, but screw it. The only place I’ve been in the last five days that had any people whatsoever was Shop-Rite on Wednesday, which was legitimately crowded, but I haven’t started to show symptoms so I’m guessing I’ve once again emerged from a packed produce department covid-free. Unless you count fatigue as a symptom, which has become a running gag with my daddy-to-a-toddler self. I honestly don’t care anymore. I’m tired of it. Set my lungs on fire. Kill my ass. At least then I won’t be around to listen to myself complain about nothing or feel useless.

In any case, I can’t honestly say if there were three bands — or two, or one — playing Saint Vitus Bar tomorrow night I wouldn’t throw caution to the wind and go, so I’m not about to put up an argument against going to see family on what to most people is a special day even if I don’t like the holidays.

Yeah, The Pecan’s up. I can see on the monitor (app on my phone) he just got out of bed and beaned himself walking into the little cubby cut into the wall of his room. Wham. It’s still dark and he’s woozy when he first gets up. Won’t stop him. Nothing does. Kid doesn’t feel pain.

But I’d better go.

New Gimme Show today at 5PM, and special thanks in advance if you share part of your holiday with me by listening. It’s a good one, so I at least have made it hopefully worth your while.

And the Quarterly Review picks up on Monday. That’ll go Monday and Tuesday, then I’m taking Wednesday (and maybe Thursday) to work on my year-end list, then that’ll be up before the end of the week, then the poll results next Saturday and life returns to normal after that. Ha.

Great and safe weekend. If you’re celebrating, don’t be stupid. Don’t forget to hydrate. So important.

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Egg Drop Soup Premiere “Swamp Ass” Video; Eat Snacks and Bleed out Tomorrow

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 24th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

egg drop soup

Egg Drop Soup release their new EP, Eat Snacks and Bleed, on Dec. 25. Yeah, I’m pretty sure they know that’s Xmas. I’m likewise sure they don’t give a shit. In a fuzz-grunge-punk rampaging 15 minutes full of don’t-care-about-your-cock rad-fem righteousness, the trio of bassist/vocalist Samantha Westervelt, guitarist Olivia Saperstein and drummer Bailey K. Chapman turning post-modern disaffection into hooks on “Hard to Hold On” only after “Rank Heavy Metal Parking Lot” leads off with an up-yours epic solo and subsequent scuzzy roll and airy-if-forward vocals, picking up for a charge at the very end into the mellow start of the next track. Following “Hard to Hold On,” which asks the necessary question, “Why would I run for president/In a world that’s full of shit?,” the centerpiece “Hymen” is arthouse punk personified, with a bass rumble at its core on which the blasted-out aggression is cast.

Egg Drop Soup Eat Snacks and BleedFucking awesome? Why yes, it is. “Tow Jam” indicts: “You’re such a cliché, you’re such a cliché/Nobody loves you and it’s better that way” atop a progression that Black Flag would’ve been proud to have in their first four years — subsequent crawl and everything — and is done in under 90 seconds, its point made. That brings around the closer, which, yes, is called “Swamp Ass.” What else to call such a riff? The finale is the longest inclusion on Eat Snacks and Bleed at a relatively sprawling 4:49, and its sludgy unfurling again finds the vocals as a focal point over the raw guitar, bass and drums, but the tape-worthy roughness of sound in which Egg Drop Soup bask feels likewise purposeful and political. This is a woman’s voice telling you to fuck off. And then, after about three minutes in, they make it swing before chugging to the finish.

15 minutes. Five songs. No bullshit.

The video for “Swamp Ass” tells the story well. It premieres below ahead of the EP release tomorrow. Some comment from Westervelt follows, as well as PR wire info, links and all that whatnot.

Enjoy:

Egg Drop Soup, “Swamp Ass” official video premiere

Samantha Westervelt on “Swamp Ass”:

“The track ‘Swamp Ass’ is a sludgy departure from our typical fast-paced brand of punk, and the video is a cinematic time warp exploring themes of conformity, peer pressure, self-worth, and the Sisyphean nature of existence (particularly felt during COVID).”

Album preorder: https://eggdropsoup.bandcamp.com/album/eat-snacks-and-bleed

Egg Drop Soup is an inyourface, unapologetic, all-womxn alt-punk trio based in Los Angeles. No-holds-barred feminism + furious guitar riffs, heavy low-end bass lines, and badass drum beats combine to fuel the sounds of them preparing for the end of the patriarchy. Their fiery brand of thrash punk-meets-metal-meets-doom-meets-surfy grunge makes way for unpredictable, intriguing, and entrancing songs that leave captive audiences wanting more (and perhaps wondering what just happened). These womxn are not fucking around. Their upcoming five song EP Eat Snacks And Bleed (featuring the single Hard to Hold On) will be available on all streaming + download platforms on December 25th.

Egg Drop Soup is:
Samantha Westervelt: bass/vocals
Olivia Saperstein: guitar
Bailey K. Chapman: drums

Egg Drop Soup, Eat Snacks and Bleed (2020)

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Morpholith Premiere Video for Electric Wizard Cover “We Hate You”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Morpholith (photo by Verthi Ljos)

Icelandic cosmic crushers Morpholith recently issued their debut full-length, Null Dimensions, through Ozium Records and Sludgelord Records. Guess what? The “We Hate You” cover isn’t on it. It happens. The album is made up of two gargantuan psych-doom rituals, with “Orb” (20:20) and “Monocarp” (13:31) unfolding like hidden messages waiting for those whose ears are tuned to the right frequency to hear them. A dogwhistle calling the doomed to prayer before some massive idol or maybe one of those shiny monoliths that keeps showing up hither and yon. I don’t know if there have been any in Iceland yet, but only a place with black volcanic sand could possibly hope to produce minor-key meditations like those swirling in the fog of “Orb,” which transcends circa 13:20 into a sludge that’s harsher and meaner and betrays Morpholith‘s connections to more extreme metallurgies, though I’m reasonably certain Iceland’s heavy underground is the same 20 or so dudes and they’re just all in five different bands, most of them awesome.

Either way, “Orb” and “Monocarp,” the latter of which picks up directly from the first track and slams its point home with no less impact for the spaciousness that accompanies, shifting eventually into a kind of pummeling post-sludge odd-time chaos before morpholith null dimensionsbecoming engulfed in its own finish, are a rare fix to the problem ‘nothing sounds heavy enough.’ As for their take on “We Hate You,” it’s as suitable an homage to 2020 as anything I could come up with unless there were actually some way to set the year’s lungs on fire, and that it coincides with Dopethrone‘s 20th anniversary is a fitting touch as well. You get a sense of the tonal density Morpholith have on offer throughout Null Dimensions in “We Hate You” as well, though vocalist Snæbjörn Þór Árnasson adjusts his delivery to play more directly off of Jus Oborn, and of course it’s a shorter sampling of their wares than either of the two cuts on the album-proper, but if you’re looking for a way to proceed here, I’ve got you covered. Do both.

The album stream is down near the bottom of this post, the video is premiering below, and any suggestion that you have to pick one or the other to dig into is pure fiction. Watch the video and then dive into the record. Dive into the record and then check out the video. It doesn’t matter. The point is Morpholith kick ass on both. I can’t say it any plainer than that.

And if I can add my own spin on it, I fucking hate the holidays, so misanthropic bludgeoning sludge suits me just fine right now. If that’s where you land too, so be it.

Enjoy the clip (and album):

Morpholith, “We Hate You” official video premiere

The video we have made is our tribute to Electric Wizard’s Dopethrone, which was released 20 years ago now and the year of 2020. The song is one we know well and we planned to play it live at some point this year, but that of course did not work out. So to celebrate one of the greatest doom metal records of all time and this exceptionally gloomy year, we decided to record the song and make a video for it instead. Our tribute to Electric Wizard and their masterpiece, Dopethrone on the 20th anniversary of the album.

Dedicated, with all our hate, to the year of 2020.

Our new EP Null Dimensions is out on Ozium and Sludgelord Records!

We got help from two legends of our black metal scene to help us with making the track. D.G from Misþyrming (also Drottinn, Naðra and Núll to name a few) recorded, mixed and mastered the audio for us and Andri Björn Birgisson from Auðn shot, directed and edited the video.

Morpholith are:
Snæbjörn Þór Árnasson | vocals
Víðir Örn Gunnarsson | Guitars
Hörður Jónsson | Guitars, synths
Stefán Gestur Stefansson | Bass
Jónas Hauksson | Drums

Morpholith, Null Dimensions (2020)

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