Friday Full-Length: Black Sabbath, Live Evil

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 22nd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Black Sabbath, Live Evil (1982)

Black Sabbath had already done the impossible by the time they released Live Evil in 1982. After a run of six albums resulting in several timeless and formative landmarks in the history of heavy metal, they’d seen something of a decline in the late ’70s with frontman Ozzy Osbourne and, after separating with him and hiring Rainbow singer Ronnie James Dio for the vocalist role, managed to bounce back and not only produce two more records in 1980’s Heaven and Hell (discussed here) and 1981’s Mob Rules (discussed here), but to use those albums as a means for redefining their personality as a band and reclaim their place at the forefront of a heavy metal movement they helped to shape at its outset. When ’82 rolled around, the New Wave of British Heavy Metal was underway, and rather than languish as so many ’70s heavy outfits did with those not already undone by punk either breaking up or fading into obscurity, Sabbath — guitarist Tony Iommi, bassist Geezer ButlerDio on vocals and first Bill Ward and subsequently Vinny Appice on drums — stormed forward into the new decade and continued to have an impact and an influence still felt today. Unbelievable. How many bands get to do that twice? How many get to do it once?

But for the fact that the lineup was once again falling apart at the time — with friction between Dio and Iommi documented in the latter’s memoir and other sources — and perhaps in spite of its terrible here-are-our-song-titles-turned-into-people (note the War Pig, the Neon Knight, etc.) cover art, one might consider the 14-track Live Evil a victory lap. Its 14 tracks span an 80-minute runtime and find Black Sabbath hitting with maximum force and presence that comes through clearly from each player. I don’t know if Dio ever sounded so powerful again as he does on this version of “Children of the Sea,” and certainly I’ve never heard a thrust from Appice to match the surge he puts into “Neon Knights” at the outset. Ozzy-era classics like “N.I.B.” and “Children of the Grave” find Butler and Iommi utterly refreshed compared to how they sound on 1980’s band-unsanctioned Live at Last (nothing against that release, but if you want primo live Ozzy Sabbath, chase down the Asbury Park ’75 soundboard bootleg), and in extended versions of “Voodoo” from Mob Rules and the Heaven and Hell title-track brim with vitality no less than the screaming rendition of “The Mob Rules” or the nine-minute take on “War Pigs.” Captured while the band was on the road for the second of the LPs issued with Dio during their first run together, Live Evil has a stateliness and fury in kind, and though it would ultimately mark the capstone for this version of Black Sabbath, it perfectly summarizes the absolute mastery they conveyed at this point on every level — style, structure, charge and poise.

Of course, even when a band releases a whole show officially, let alone a live record compiled from multiple sources like this one, they’re putting the best representation of themselves forward, but even with that caveat, Live Evil absolutely soars. With a crisp mix much bolstered by the keyboard work of Geoff Nicholls (who, sadly, passed away earlier this year) and an absolutely vital blend of songs like “Sign of the Southern Cross” and “Black Sabbath,” it represents Black Sabbath acknowledging what by then was already their history as well as their unwillingness to be bound by it. As they finish with “Children of the Grave,” they leave no question as to their place in the lore of metal and the NWOBHM specifically, and though the language of their serving as forebears of doom didn’t really exist at the time, that too is no less chiseled in stone here via Iommi‘s solo in “Heaven and Hell” than by the swing of “Voodoo” or the lumbering heft of “Iron Man.” This incarnation, this band, this moment: Untouchable.

And temporary. Within a year of Live Evil‘s release, Ronnie James Dio would be out of Black Sabbath. His debut with his own Dio band on Warner Bros., 1983’s Holy Diver, kicked off a trio of releases with the lineup of Dio, Appice, guitarist Vivian Campbell and bassist Jimmy Bain rounded out by 1984’s The Last in Line and 1985’s Sacred Heart that further affirmed his place among metal’s greatest frontmen while achieving massive commercial success in the studio and on tour. Sabbath, meanwhile, tried to go three-for-three in bringing aboard Deep Purple vocalist Ian Gillan for 1983’s Born Again (discussed here), and while the result was one of their darkest, grittiest albums and one that’s only flourished in appeal in the years since, at the time it didn’t have the same kind of far-reaching success as either Heaven and Hell or Mob Rules before it, and the lineup didn’t last. Iommi would work with another former Deep Purple singer, Glenn Hughes, for the Seventh Star album in 1986 — reportedly supposed to be a solo record that was later stamped as a Black Sabbath release — before settling in with singer Tony Martin to begin the band’s next era in earnest, which would carry them until their 1992 reunion with Dio for the Dehumanizer LP, and then pick up again for two more outings in the mid ’90s — 1994’s Cross Purposes and 1995’s Forbidden — before Iommi, Butler and Bill Ward eventually reunited with Osbourne in 1997.

That’s not the end of Sabbath and Dio‘s complicated history together by any means. They’d get together again under the guise of Heaven and Hell in the aughts/early ’10s, tour and produce both a live and a studio album, the latter being 2009’s The Devil You Know (review here), and perform together essentially until sidelined by Dio‘s declining health and the battle with cancer that took his life in 2010.

If their work as Heaven and Hell proved anything at all, it was the continued relevance of this lineup and the sonic persona that made it distinct from any incarnation of Sabbath before or after. Live Evil represents that at its best and most vivid, and as always, I hope you enjoy.

Thanks for reading.

In the middle of a conversation about something else — I don’t remember what, but can only imagine it was baby-related as most things these days seem to be — The Patient Mrs. turned to me the other day and said this exact quote: “Also: we should listen to some Dio.” Sometimes a relationship provides you with a moment when you’re so filled with love that you feel carried by it, like you’re floating in its warmth and safety. My wife suggesting we put on Dio was, for me, one of those moments. Naturally I chose Live Evil to close the week in her honor.

This coming Monday is the 13th anniversary of our marriage in 2004. Next Thursday, Sept. 28, is an even bigger one, marking 20 full years since we got together in 1997. Staggering. Well more than half my life at this point. It is my marriage and my life with The Patient Mrs. that defines who I am as a person — whatever else I am and whatever else I do, I am hers first — and of all the courses I could have imagined for what my life would become in my childhood (which I still arguably was at 15 when we became a couple), I could never have dreamed of being so fortunate as to have her in that central role. Every day, I continue to be so, so, so lucky and so, so, so much in love. 20 years is nothing. Give me forever.

We’re celebrating this weekend by returning to Ludlow, Vermont, which has kind of become an “our place,” at least in my mind. You’d be forgiven for not recalling we rented a small cottage there last year after spending a month on the same property in 2010, and I think the intent is to make it as much of an annual anniversary-marking sojourn as we can. Sounds awesome. Three hours on the road this afternoon will be well worth it to see those mountains again with their already-changing leaves and to feel the cool clarity of the air at altitude. We’re there until Wednesday morning, and aside from the absolute-must of watching the premiere of Star Trek: Discovery on Sunday — please don’t suck please don’t suck please don’t suck — I believe the plan is to hang out mellow, maybe get some work done, and enjoy each other’s exclusive company before The Pecan arrives and transforms our life together as we know it.

Due date is in about three weeks. Oct. 15. Getting close now.

We had another ultrasound appointment yesterday. He looks like a person, is one, and seems to be healthy and hearty enough that if he was born today, he’d be small but otherwise fine. That’s good to know. I should probably note that when The Pecan arrives, I’ll probably put up a post about it, but if there are a few days there where I’m occupied outside this site, I hope you’ll forgive me. As it could happen anytime, the situation obviously requires flexibility. Allowances to be made, etc.

So of course I’m going to try to sneak in a six-day Quarterly Review starting this coming Monday. Ha. 60 albums written up between Monday and Monday. I’ve still got links and players to embed in the back ends of the posts — ugh — but otherwise we’re good to go. Here’s a full look at my notes for what’s coming:

Mon.: QR day 1, Doomstress announce/song premiere, Scream of the Butterfly video premiere.
Tue.: QR day 2, Radio Moscow review.
Wed.: QR day 3, Fungus Hill video.
Thu.: QR day 4, Windhand video.
Fri.: QR day 5, whatever else comes along.

Might not look like it, but that’s a packed week. The Quarterly Review is a huge amount of work on my end in a way that nothing else I do for this site is, but I’ve yet to put one together and not feel like it was worth the effort, so I expect to get there once again. There’s a lot of cool stuff included. It’ll be good. Stay tuned.

That’s gonna do it for me. The Patient Mrs. and I have another doctor’s appointment on this rainy-as-hell morning, because babies, doctors, that’s how it goes, and then it’s back home to pack and hit the road to Vermont. Whatever you’re up to, I hope you have a great and safe weekend. Thanks again for reading and please check out the forum and radio stream.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

Tags: , , , , , ,

Frank Sabbath to Release Are You Waiting? Oct. 2; New Song Streaming

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 22nd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

This one’s coming up quickly, so keep an eye out. French trio Frank Sabbath released their second album, Telluric Wanderers (discussed here), last year through Argonauta as the follow-up to their 2015 self-titled debut (review here), and even after two later-2016 sessions-type offerings posted on their Bandcamp, it would seem the Paris/Montpellier troupe are unwilling to let 2017 pass without a proper full-length, so on Oct. 2 they’ll drop Are You Waiting?, of which they’re giving a first taste now in the off-the-wall “Sasume.”

Crazed is nothing new as regards a general status for these guys, but I feel like this might even be a different level in that regard. Not sure how I feel about those maybe-Japanese vocals, but it’s weird, and the bass tone is inarguable, so there are definitely elements working in its favor.

Are You Waitingwill be Frank Sabbath‘s first record through their new label, Bermuda Cruise, and you can see more info about it below, courtesy of the PR wire, as well as hear “Sasume” if you’re feeling particularly brave:

frank-sabbath-are-you-waiting

Frank Sabbath is proud to reveal the cover and first extract from their new album, Are You Waiting?

With their third album Are You Waiting? the French psychedelic jokesters Frank Sabbath present a concentrate of their composition style in four songs, ranging from high energy psychedelic rock, to progressive doom-laden melodies, and trippy atmospheric soundscapes.

The first track off the album, “Sasume,” album premiere is a japanese infused psychedelic tune, reminding the seemingly forgotten times where humor did belong in rock music.

Are You Waiting? will be released on CD and digital format by the new associative label Bermuda Cruise, which is focusing on psychedelic, experimental and improvised music. The date of release for the album is set to October 2nd.

Frank Sabbath is:
Guillaume Jankowski : Bass
Baptiste Reig : Drums, vocals
Jude Mas : Guitare électrique, vocals
Léo Minart : Sound engineer, tapist

https://www.facebook.com/franksabbath.band/
https://franksabbath.bandcamp.com/
http://bermudacruise.fr/

Frank Sabbath, “Sasume”

Tags: , , , , , ,

Desertfest London 2018 First Announcements: Monster Magnet, Nebula Reunion, Eyehategod, Jex Thoth, Planet of Zeus, Black Moth and The Black Wizards

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 22nd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Desertfest London 2018 comes out of the gate with some pretty huge confirmations for next Spring. The fest will feature Monster Magnet headlining and a return appearance from Eyehategod, as well as — just days after they announced their reunion lineup — the reformed heavy psych rockers Nebula. The set at Desertfest London 2018 is the first confirmation from Eddie Glass and company, and I’m thrilled to say I wrote the announcement for that one as well as for Monster Magnet, which I totally scammed myself into doing, citing the New Jersey connection in the process.

Also confirmed for the bill are the doomily delightful Jex Thoth, Greek burl-bringers Planet of Zeus and the also-worthy-of-alliteration-but-really-enough-is-enough Black Moth and The Black Wizards. All told it’s an immediately awesome and varied bill that sets up the fest — to be held from May 4-6 in Camden Town — with multiple avenues for further expansion. And no doubt it will expand, with more lineup announcements to come along with ticket info and all the rest over the coming months as we move into the end of 2017 and the arrival of the New Year.

But one way or another, the season has started. Check it out:

desertfest london 2018

MONSTER MAGNET, NEBULA AND MORE KICK OFF DESERTFEST 2018!

Desertfest aims to get bigger and better every year, and for our 7th edition it’s no different. Ladies and gentlemen, bow down to the Bullgod because Monster Magnet are headlining Desertfest 2018!

That’s right, New Jersey’s finest rock exports, Monster Magnet, are set to steamroll through Camden as headliners of Desertfest. The bona fide stoner psych living legends are approaching three decades of bringing the world acid freakouts and riff rock anthems; freakouts and anthems which, it’s no understatement to say, helped shape the stoner rock scene.

From their boundary breaking psych in early releases to the hard rock stomp through the noughties and their recent return to early influences, Monster Magnet have a knack for putting out iconic albums, before doing it all better live. We were always going to have Monster Magnet play eventually and 2018 is the year it happens. We can’t wait to be part of the biggest singalong in Desertfest history when Powertrip hits.

Joining them are the recently resurrected early stoner kings, Nebula, who return from an eight year hiatus in 2018. Steered by the riffs of Eddie Glass, Nebula tore through the turn of the millennium thanks to releases such as To The Center and Charged; must own LPs for anybody reading these words.

Also on the bill are barons of the Bayou, Eyehategod. Shaped by destruction, the sludge metal heroes have a life beaten coarseness that brings a next level of harshness to their sound. Pioneering sludge with their 1990 release, In the Name of Suffering, Eyehategod’s brutal assault through the nineties is something to behold. Then, after a decade away, the band came back stronger with 2014s self-titled, rawer, angrier and more driven than before. Having smashed The Electric Ballroom to pieces in 2015, Eyehategod are back at Desertfest.

We also have performances from High Priestess of occult rock Jex Thoth, stoner strut from champions of the Greek underground Planet of Zeus, the garage infused sound of Black Moth and the soulful proto-doom of The Black Wizards. Of course, that’s only the beginning. We have dozens of huge bands to announce over the next few months so keep your eyes open.

Alongside that mammoth announcement, tickets are now on sale for Desertfest 2018. As ever, we’re offering affordable hotel and hostel packages, which you can find out about here. Also, for the first time ever, we’re also offering a split payment plan. With our payment plan, you’ll pay half now and half early next year, making it easier to get your ticket for Desertfest 2018. For more info on our payment plan, click here.

It’s going to be another huge weekend in Camden. We can’t wait for you to see what we have in store for our 7th edition of Desertfest.

http://www.desertfest.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/DesertfestLondon
https://twitter.com/DesertFest
https://www.instagram.com/desertfest_london/

Monster Magnet, Live in Lakewood, NJ, Oct. 1, 2016

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Review & Full Album Stream: Lucifer’s Chalice, The Pact

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 22nd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

lucifer's chalice the pact

[Click play above to stream The Pact by Lucifer’s Chalice in full. Album is out Sept. 29 on Shadow Kingdom Records.]

There is a branch of doom and darker-tinged metal that remains steeped in olden ways. Released this past February as a digital offering by the band, the debut full-length from Lucifer’s Chalice, dubbed The Pact, finds wider issue through Shadow Kingdom Records and belongs to this branch. With influences culled from the early New Wave of British Heavy Metal — Cirith UngolPagan AltarWitchfinder General, youngest Iron Maiden, etc. — and classic Sabbathian doom, its four tracks feel as much ready to have the logo representing them scrawled sloppily on the front of a high-school notebook as flown proudly on a denim “battle vest” backpatch.

The Durham, UK, four-piece of guitarist/vocalist CW, lead guitarist SRM, bassist DH and drummer KShevil sound like they’d be just fine with either, if the songs are anything to go by. Earning immediate points by opening with the 11-minute “Hung at the Crossroads,” the hook and gallop of which serve as a table-setting representation of the band’s methods in general, The Pact unfolds brazenly and with a cassette-ready feel that has become cult metal in a way that is perhaps outside Lucifer’s Chalice‘s control, but nonetheless feels prevalent in their late-’70s/early-’80s vibe, persistent in spite of a modern production that’s telling of its actual time — i.e., now — especially in the drums, which if they were actually tracked in 1981 would have the snare likely be obtrusively loud in the mix and coated in reverb. Fortunately (mostly), that emblematic nuance of the era to which The Pact owes so much of its affect has been left by the wayside.

What’s been kept in place is careening riffs leading a charge topped by raw but proto-soaring vocals, and those elements provide the crux of The Pact‘s castle-storming, rusty-axe-wielding 36-minute charge. Though it begins with a mournful lead over a strummed central figure, it’s “Hung at the Crossroads” that begins the thrust in earnest, and the song moves fluidly through its extended runtime, gaining momentum as it works through its verses and chorus toward a slowdown just before the five-minute mark that brings a few minutes of doomier impression-making, to which CW‘s voice is well-suited in post-Candlemass fashion. Following a solo from SRM, a subsequent verse, and another lead, KShevil‘s drums signal a tempo change and the initial push resumes just before nine minutes in and holds sway for the remainder prior to the crash that brings on the sample from 1960’s The City of the Dead in which Massachusetts villagers burn Abigail Adams as a witch.

lucifer's chalice

That’s as fitting an intro as one could ask for the 10-minute track itself, which builds into a rolling first verse quickly and holds to a method ultimately similar to “Hung at the Crossroads” before it, with straightforward push and some underlying doomly swing in the drums to go with its horror-based Satanic lyrical theme, storytelling done in the second-person such that “The devil owns your soul/Hell will be your home.” Of course, the familiarity and blatant play to style is an important part of the aesthetic for Lucifer’s Chalice, and the band have that moniker to live up to, after all, so the adoption cliché isn’t necessarily unwelcome, particularly with the solo it leads to and the uptick in tempo past four minutes in, heading to a midsection that holds to its central modus where the preceding cut veered away and an end that is perhaps the most Maiden-esque stretch here, setting up “Full Moon Nights” and “Priestess of Death” as a shorter side two with another big finish and quick fade.

“Full Moon Nights” arrives with no less than Klaus Kinski as Dracula in Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre from 1979, hearing the howling of wolves and calling it the music of the children of the night. Not a minor reference to make, but the song lives up to it with the fervency of its metallic shove, marked out by the kind of riff from which thrash would’ve taken influence three and a half decades ago and CW pushing his voice to and beyond its breaking point. A more turning progression arrives as the title-line is delivered, but it’s not long before Lucifer’s Chalice are heading forward again, and in the second half of “Full Moon Nights” the energy of their thrust picks up and is drawn toward another extended ending, this one consuming the full last minute and adding a sense of grandeur to counterbalance what’s still been a fairly raw production throughout. The Pact pays one more visit to the VHS shelf to break out 1971’s Twins of Evil for the sample that begins closer “Priestess of Death,” the hook of which is arguably the most memorable since “Hung at the Crossroads” and which reaffirms the devil worship of “The Pact” and “Full Moon Nights.”

As with those cuts, the source material is referenced in the lyrics, and it’s the guitars doing most of the heavy lifting in establishing the personality of the piece — a dual-layered lead as they move through the third minute is a standout point leading into more full-on thrashing and another precise, crashing run through the chorus prior to a surprisingly shredding solo. That gives way to a temporary slowdown that seems like it might be the band’s ending statement, but as “Hung at the Crossroads” did so skillfully, “Priestess of Death” also returns to its core to finish out, capping The Pact on a sudden but effective snap. Lucifer’s Chalice are hardly reinventing classic metal on their first record, but neither is that their intent. Rather, they pay homage to the Metal of Old with these four songs and in theme and purpose begin to stake out the approach they’ll hopefully continue to develop as they move forward, forging themselves in steel and casting outward with doom and pre-thrash malevolence.

Lucifer’s Chalice on Thee Facebooks

Lucifer’s Chalice on Bandcamp

Shadow Kingdom Records on Thee Facebooks

The Pact at Shadow Kingdom’s Bandcamp page

Shadow Kingdom Records website

Tags: , , , , ,

Earth Witch Sign to Cursed Tongue Records; Out of the Shallow LP Due in December

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 22nd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

earth witch

Illinois trio Earth Witch will release their debut album, Out of the Shallow, on vinyl through Cursed Tongue Records before the end of the year. They mark the fifth pickup from the emergent imprint behind Neon WarshipDevil’s WitchesGreen Yeti and Mental Tremors, and the second to come from the US. First issued independently earlier this year on CD/DL, Out of the Shallow makes an immediately burled-out impression, dense in its riffing and decidedly belonging to the up-and-coming generation of heavy rock — the Bandcamp boom — but listening to the shouted vocals and dense riffing, one is reminded as well of the bluesy undertones of Egypt and Wo Fat as well.

The songs offer straight-ahead pummel and should make for a heavy platter, all the better since it seems Cursed Tongue has plans for deluxe editions, probably multiple colors, and so on. Preorders start in November for the December release, and you can stream Out of the Shallow in its entirety now on the player at the bottom of this post. Because it’s the future and that’s how shit works here.

Dig and enjoy:

earth-witch-out-of-the-shallow

EARTH WITCH SIGN TO CURSED TONGUE RECORDS

Earth Witch has signed to Cursed Tongue Records for a release of their highly appraised debut album ‘Out Of The Shallow’ coming late 2017. The label is extremely happy to have inked a deal with this hard hitting ensemble and look forward to give OOTS the full red carpet vinyl treatment. Expect several different vinyl editions, TP’s, posters, patches, etc. Already garnering quite a following and appraisal from around the scene amongst fellow musicians, fans and reviewers alike plus also securing them a place on the Doom Charts for March 2017 there is no questioning the band’s merits.

“It’s a real honor to get to work with such talented and focused people as the guys behind Earth Witch and we look forward to pay the much needed respect and acknowledgement to this high-octane stoner rock gold nugget, says Niels Bartholdy of Cursed Tongue Records.

Following up their doom laden 2013 Earthbound EP, Earth Witch unveils their debut longplayer, Out of the Shallow, that shows the trio in their truest rock n’ roll meets doom form. After founding members Ivan Catron (Guitar/Vocals) and Nathan Landolt (Drums) parted ways with their first bassist, they were joined by Derrin Coad (Bass/Vocals) for a Black Sabbath cover set on Halloween. The underlying doom sound remained a vital driving force in the writing, however the band was able to speed things up and get more technical with the new lineup.

Out of the Shallow pays tribute to Iommi style guitar solos and the driving force of rock bands like Red Fang, The Sword, and Kadavar. The 42 minute album was written over the course of two years and tracked in late 2015 with Brandon Carnes in Springfield, IL. From the fast paced high energy opening track until the last chords fade out, Earth Witch keeps the listener headbanging throughout. Album art by David Paul Seymour, with logo and additional layout by Mike Tirehaus. Recorded, mixed, and mastered by Brandon Carnes (Looming) in Springfield, IL at Southtown Studios, Out Of the Shallow was released digitally on Bandcamp as well as on CD and tape in March 2017.

Earth Witch – ‘Out Of The Shallow’ will be Cursed Tongue Records fifth release in just little more than a year. Pre-orders will go online Friday, November 3rd with an expected official release date early December just in right time for the Christmas shopping. So looks like the present hunt is an easy solve this year.

Earth Witch live:
Oct 21 Vaudeville Mews Des Moines, IA
Oct 25 The Swan Dive Austin, TX
Oct 26 Saturn Bar New Orleans, LA

Earth Witch is:
Ivan Catron – Guitars, Vocals
Derrin Coad – Bass, Vocals
Nathan Landolt – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/earthwitch420
https://www.instagram.com/earthwitchdoom
https://earthwitch.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/CursedTongueRecords/
https://www.instagram.com/cursedtongue
http://cursedtonguerecords.bigcartel.com/

Earth Witch, Out of the Shallow (2017)

Tags: , , , , ,

Tuber Announce November Tour Dates

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 22nd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

tuber-orleff-photography

Greek progressive heavy rock four-piece Tuber are getting ready to hit the road this Fall. They go on the strength of their massively well received 2017 full-length, Out of the Blue (discussed here), which has only helped put emphasis on the booming scene in Greece generally. You might recall Tuber was out in Europe earlier this year, playing Desertfest Berlin 2017, following up on a wider bit of touring they did in 2016 — those shows, like these, presented by Total Volume Agency — so yeah they seem due to hit the road again, and no doubt with Out of the Blue behind them, no doubt it’ll be a killer vibe at the gigs.

Dates follow here, as posted by the band in the poster below and dutifully transcribed by yours truly:

tuber euro tour

Tuber – Out of the Blue Tour

This fall we embark on a European tour supporting our new record “Out Of The Blue”. See you on the road!

Tour planning by Total Volume, stef@totalvolumeagency.com. Graphics by Original Replica.

Get “Out Of The Blue” on Vinyl, CD or Digital Download: http://tuber.bandcamp.com

Tuber live:
03.11.17 Robot Budapest
04.11.17 Rockhouse Salzburg
07.11.17 White Rabbit Freiburg
09.11.17 Jagerklause Berlin
10.11.17 Cadillac Oldenburg
11.11.17 Vortex Siegen
12.11.17 Walhalla Karlsruhe
15.11.17 Viper Room Vienna
16.11.17 SKC Fabrika Novi Sad
17.11.17 Daos Club Timisoara
18.11.17 Flying Circus Cluj
01.12.17 8Ball Club Thessaoniki
02.12.17 AN Club Athens
04.01.18 Downtown Nicosia Nicosia

Tuber grew up in a sunny place, south of Greece, in an island called Crete. They were hiding from the sun, jamming in dark studios and playing their music in rock caves. As they moved north, sounds became lighter, since they started miss hot ground. Balance came as a result of smash, dark embraced light and improvisation turned into an effortless and instinctive process. Tuber moved their interest into new forms, founding themselves experimenting with compositions that combine mixed styles and sounds from different ground. Focus is now on rock aesthetic flirting with psychedelic atmosphere and a touch of romantic mood. At this time Tuber live in Serres, forming their feelings and thoughts into music and words, still learning how to leave with reality and reinventing it with love.

Tuber is:
Yannis Gerostathos
Yannis Artzoglou
Nickos Gerostathos
Paris Fragkos

https://www.facebook.com/tuberband/
https://tuber.bandcamp.com/album/out-of-the-blue

Tuber, Out of the Blue (2017)

Tags: , , , , , ,

Review & Full Stream: Heavy Traffic & The Mad Doctors, Split 7″

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 21st, 2017 by JJ Koczan

heavy-traffic-mad-doctors-split

[Click play above to stream the new split between Heavy Traffic and The Mad Doctors in its entirety. Seven-inch is out Sept. 22 via Twin Earth Records and King Pizza Records.]

It’s a quick one, but there’s enough cacophony in the split between Heavy Traffic and The Mad Doctors to make a larger impression than its seven-minute runtime might lead you to believe. The two New York-based bands pair up for a mini-platter with the cooperation of their respective labels, Twin Earth Records and King Pizza Records, and really, that’s about where the cooperation ends. From the point of its existence onward, the split is much more about brash noisemaking than being friendly, though both bands certainly seem to be having a good time. Maybe “mischief” is the right word. Yeah. It’s like if the night before Halloween was a two-song sampler of what these groups have to offer; as though a release might somehow throw rolls of toilet paper into the tree in your front yard or egg your car. Take that, suburbia.

Pressed in an edition of 500 copies with smaller numbers on clear (150), gold (150) and black (200) vinyl, the split brings one song each from Heavy Traffic and The Mad Doctors, both of whom are following up on relatively new releases. In the case of the four-piece Heavy Traffic, their sixth full-length, Plastic Surgery (review here), was issued late in 2016 via Twin Earth, and the 4:44 of “Daylight Ripoff” begins side A with a fervent charge that answers the heavy psychedelic blister-raising they proffered with the album, which was the debut of the lineup that found guitarist Ian Caddick and drummer/vocalist/cover-artist Tav Palumbo — both formerly of Santa Cruz, California, blowout psych-gazers Spanish Moss — joined by bassist Dave Grzedzinski and drummer Dan Bradica (which presumably moved Palumbo to guitar/vocals, though don’t quote me on that).

Whether or not “Daylight Ripoff” was recorded at the same time as Plastic Surgery or under similar live-tracked conditions, I don’t know, but it’s certainly a believable. The song begins with just a momentary wail of feedback before lurching forth with a blast and wash alike, melodic vocals topping a thrust that could just as easily have come from modern black metal as heavy psych. It’s a surprising way to begin, and no doubt that’s exactly what Heavy Traffic had in mind. About 20 seconds in, they find their footing a prog-metallic churn of intertwining guitars at 53 seconds, they slam on the brakes to hit into a Sabbathian lumber that will slow even further as they hit the second minute, maintaining a spaciousness and fuzzed tonality as it nods itself seemingly into oblivion. The “but wait — there’s more!” moment happens just before the three-minute mark when they bring back the melodious assault that began “Daylight Ripoff” and cycle through it and the more angular riffing again before a distant lead echoes out behind tense chug and a build on the toms in the last minute.

This fades out relatively quickly and relatively noisily and “Daylight Ripoff” seems like anything but as it ends having been marked by its dizzying tempo changes and drawn together through the vague but resonant vocals laid over its shifting bulk. One might be tempted to call it a kitchen-sink approach, but Heavy Traffic keep the arrangement to their two guitars, bass, drums and voice, even if those common elements are put to uncommonly madcap use. In relation to Plastic Surgery, “Daylight Ripoff” feels altogether more unhinged than groove-rolling cuts like “Rule of Nines” or “Three Stigmata,” and whether its punkish refusal to settle into a pace or method is indicative of an overall shift in direction on the part of the band or just a one-off experiment in style and/or structure, it’s impossible to say, but the weirdo vibe suits Heavy Traffic well. If “Daylight Ripoff” is them continuing to refine and explore options with their approach and this relatively new lineup, one can hardly argue with either the variety or the intensity with which they deliver.

Though their inclusion is shorter and more straightforward, The Mad Doctors hardly come across as subdued upon the flip to side B. Their cleverly-titled “Yuengling Malmsteen” checks in at 2:57 and is the first new music they’ve had out since their earlier-2017 sophomore full-length, No Waves, Just Sharks (discussed here). The trio of guitarist/vocalist/recording engineer Seth Applebaum, bassist Joshua Park and drummer Greg Hanson, who also runs King Pizza Records, employed a few guests throughout that album for vocals and had spoken word samples peppered throughout as they shifted between surf punk and heavier impulses, crafting a rare union in atmosphere that actually worked without being either overly punkish, overly surfish, or a crude amalgam of desert and garage, while still sounding impressively off the rails and unpredictable — it really was something, if you didn’t hear it — but here it’s just the three of them and they once again adjust the balance.

“Yuengling Malmsteen” doesn’t feel intended to be a summary of The Mad Doctors‘ sound as a whole — I suspect it would have at least as tough a time in providing that summary as I just did — so much as a quick-burst showcase of their craft in general. Its push begins with a deceptive jangle before unveiling a full tonal boar moving at a crisp tempo that shortly opens to the first verse. Momentum is held in Hanson‘s drums throughout and before the first minute is done, The Mad Doctors have trod through the verse and chorus both in shoving, party-time fashion. Not a moment is wasted, but “Yuengling Malmsteen” doesn’t necessarily feel stripped down either — vocals are soaked in reverb and the guitar and bass are both weighted and present a depth of tone, the former particularly with a quick-but-drawn lead around two minutes in that shimmers before a final chorus takes hold to drive the song to its somewhat understated finish. The thickened thrust that kicks in before each verse proves especially righteous, and “Yuengling Malmsteen” is primarily about motion and its own forward drive, which it fulfills while giving the sense that if one just continued to let the record play, ApplebaumPark and Hanson would be on to the next track in no time at all.

Of course, that’s not the case, but in each band giving listeners a look at what they do, Heavy Traffic and The Mad Doctors both acquit themselves well in terms of songwriting and style without necessarily sounding like they’re competing with one another in the way of splits with groups more sonically akin. That’s not to say they don’t have anything in common, just that while both show a strong sense of personality on this short release, those personalities are distinct enough that there’s never going to be any confusion about who it is saying what with their material. Heavy Traffic raise a few questions as to where they might be headed and The Mad Doctors reaffirm the deceptive depth of their latest album, and among the traits the two bands share is a clear efficiency with which this is accomplished. Like I said at the outset, it’s over and done in about seven minutes.

Heavy Traffic on Thee Facebooks

Heavy Traffic on Bandcamp

The Mad Doctors on Thee Facebooks

The Mad Doctors on Bandcamp

Twin Earth Records webstore

King Pizza Records webstore

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Obsessed to Reissue Self-Titled Debut Nov. 17; Tour Starts Sept. 27

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 21st, 2017 by JJ Koczan

If you were wondering how The Obsessed were going to follow-up the earlier-2017 release of their comeback LP, Sacred (review here), now we know. The Wino-fronted verifiable doom legends will go back to the start (or the sort-of-start, anyway) and reissue their 1990 self-titled debut via Relapse, complete with their 1985 Concrete Cancer demo and a boatload of live tracks. Right on.

Already own the record? Fair enough. Me too. And I’ll admit, I was kind of like, “Well yeah, that makes sense, cool I guess, been out of print for a while, etc.” and a little meh on the notion — until I actually listened to the version of “The Way She Fly” that you’ll find down at the bottom of this post. It sounds fucking great. I don’t know who handled the remastering process, but clearly it’s somebody with a love for the work. Really, give it a shot. Not like it’s long or anything.

The Obsessed launch a massive headlining tour on Sept. 27 and will be out again in December with Clutch and The Devin Townsend Project. Dates and all other info came down the PR wire:

the obsessed self-titled

THE OBSESSED Announces Reissue Of Legendary Self-Titled Debut Album + Concrete Cancer Demo

Originally released in 1990 and out-of-print for almost two decades, the now legendary debut album from doom godfathers THE OBSESSED will once again see the light of day in multiple deluxe formats. Now completely remastered with previously unreleased bonus tracks, including the highly sought-after Concrete Cancer demo, expanded artwork, never-before-seen photos, and extended liner notes from frontman Scott “Wino” Weinrich, this is the definitive edition of THE OBSESSED’s self-titled debut, a true piece of doom history!

Weinrich comments: “This record defines the passion, the pureness, and vibrancy of youth, and the fierce love, loyalty, and dedication to this music. I am happy and proud it lives once again! Thanks to all who believe, Wino.”

THE OBSESSED’s self-titled reissue is due out November 17th on 2xCD, LP, 2xLP, and digital formats via Relapse Records. Physical bundles and digital preorders are available via Relapse Records HERE and streaming services at THIS LOCATION.

THE OBSESSED will embark upon a US fall headlining tour beginning September 27th in Asheville, North Carolina and ending October 27th in Baltimore, Maryland. Direct support will be provided by Cobalt and Iron Tongue on select dates. Additionally, the band will join Clutch and Devin Townsend Project for a winter run of shows to close out the year. See all confirmed dates below.

The Obsessed (Reissue) Track Listing:
1. Tombstone Highway
2. The Way She Fly
3. Forever Midnight
4. Ground Out
5. Fear Child
6. Freedom
7. Red Disaster
8. Inner Turmoil
9. River of Soul
10. Concrete Cancer (1984 unreleased Concrete Cancer demo cassette)
11. Feelingz (1984 unreleased Concrete Cancer demo cassette)
12. Mental Kingdom (1984 unreleased Concrete Cancer demo cassette)
13. Hiding Masque (1984 unreleased Concrete Cancer demo cassette)
14. Ground Out – Feelingz (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
15. Concrete Cancer (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
16. No Blame (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
17. Mental Kingdom (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
18. Tombstone Highway (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
19. Iron and Stone (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
20. Rivers of Soul (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
21. Sittin on a Grave (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
22. Freedom (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)
23. Indestroy – Kill Ugly Naked (live at The Bayou 4-15-1985)

Concrete Cancer Demo Track Listing:
1. Concrete Cancer
2. Feelingz
3. Mental Kingdom
4. Hiding Masque

THE OBSESSED:
9/27/2017 Mothlight – Asheville, NC
9/28/2017 Clermont Lounge – Atlanta, GA
9/29/2017 Whitewater – Little Rock, AR
9/30/2017 Fubar – St. Louis, MO ^
10/01/2017 Hi Tone – Memphis, TN ^
10/02/2017 Lost Well – Austin, TX ^
10/03/2017 Lolas – Ft. Worth, TX ^
10/05/2017 Beauty Bar – Las Vegas, NV
10/07/2017 Cal Jam – San Bernardino, CA
10/08/2017 Elbo Room – San Francisco, CA *
10/09/2017 Old Nicks – Eugene, OR *
10/10/2017 Bossanova Ballroom – Portland, OR
10/12/2017 Studio Seven – Seattle, WA *
10/13/2017 The Pin – Spokane, WA *
10/16/2017 7th St. Entry – Minneapolis, MN *
10/17/2017 Cactus Club – Milwaukee, WI *
10/18/2017 Barauerhaus – Lombard, IL *
10/19/2017 Woodward Theater – Cincinnati, OH *
10/20/2017 Trixies – Louisville, KY *
10/21/2017 Chameleon Club – Lancaster, PA *
10/24/2017 Saint Vitus – Brooklyn, NY *
10/25/2017 The Cafe at Parlor – Newport, RI *
10/26/2017 Voltage Lounge – Philadelphia, PA *
10/27/2017 Metro Gallery – Baltimore, MD *
^ w/ Iron Tongue
* w/ Cobalt

w/ Clutch, Devin Townsend Project:
11/29/2017 Cone Denim Entertainment – Greensboro, NC
12/01/2017 House Of Blues – Myrtle Beach, SC
12/02/2017 Revolution – St. Petersburg, FL
12/03/2017 Revolution – Fort Lauderdale, FL
12/05/2017 Backyard Stage @ St. Augustine Amphitheater – St. Augustine, FL
12/06/2017 Vinyl Music Hall – Pensacola, FL
12/08/2017 Varsity Theater – Baton Rouge, LA
12/09/2017 The Aztec Theater – San Antonio, TX
12/10/2017 House Of Blues – Houston, TX
12/12/2017 Gillioz Theater – Springfield, MO
12/13/2017 Bourbon Theater – Lincoln, NE
12/15/2017 Limelight Eventplex – Peoria, IL
12/16/2017 Marathon Music Works – Nashville, TN
12/27/2017 Upstate Concert Hall – Clifton Park, NY
12/28/2017 Starland Ballroom – Sayreville, NJ
12/29/2017 The National – Richmond, VA
12/30/2017 The International – Knoxville, TN
12/31/2017 Express Live – Columbus, OH

https://www.facebook.com/TheObsessedOfficial
http://relapse.com/the-obsessed-sacred/
https://theobsessed.bandcamp.com/
http://www.relapse.com
http://www.relapserecords.bandcamp.com
http://www.facebook.com/RelapseRecords
http://www.twitter.com/RelapseRecords
https://www.facebook.com/tonedeaftouring/

The Obsessed, “The Way She Fly”

Tags: , , , , , , , ,