Days of Rona: Douglas Sherman of Gozu

Posted in Features on April 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

gozu douglas sherman

Days of Rona: Douglas Sherman of Gozu (Boston, Massachusetts)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Everyone in Gozu is doing great considering the unique situation we are in. We were actually in the middle of writing a new album when this all blew up. So now Gaff and I are exchanging ideas daily through text and have accrued an enormous stockpile of riffs. We are also scheduled to go in the studio late summer depending on what happens in the next month or two.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

In Boston we have a stay-at-home advisory in place: all non-essential business are closed and everyone is asked to stay at home unless for an emergency. Practice social distancing!

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and music?

We are in uncharted territory so I see lots of frightened friends. I also see lots of artists trying to focus as much as they can at home on their craft and making efforts to connect with each other through technology. Human interaction is a basic need and can quell fears.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

We need to breathe, listen and know that in the end we will all get through together. I also think you will see a totally different and more empathetic humanity when this is said and done.

Much love to everyone.

https://www.facebook.com/GOZU666
http://gozu.bandcamp.com
instagram.com/gozu666

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Days of Rona: Jon Davis of Conan

Posted in Features on April 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

conan jon davis

Days of Rona: Jon Davis of Conan, Ungraven, Black Bow Records & Blackskull Services (Merseyside, UK)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Conan and Ungraven cannot rehearse currently, but we communicate often. Approximately two weeks before all this hit, we signed up to a lease on a 24/7 rehearsal room, which was the worst timing EVER. It’s almost like divine intervention, but in a bad way. Our health is good, I don’t believe any of us has or has had this virus, so I guess we’re good. I’m just excited to tour again, I miss it.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

I’m in the UK so we have a stay at home request on us, and often there is a line to get into the supermarket. I’m allowed to walk the dog obviously, and I’m really lucky because I am 100 yards from the waterfront and have a lot of open space to enjoy. I work from home, so I’m not inconvenienced really. I can’t go see my folks for a few weeks because my Mum is in one of those people classed as ‘vulnerable’ because she has some minor health problems. The worst thing is that my wife is waiting for her UK entry visa (she is from New Zealand) so we have a nervy wait to see if there are any flights available when she is ready to come here.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The community here seems okay. I’ve been here almost a year, so have yet to really get to know a lot of people. The local pub, which I just started to frequent, is now closed because of the government lockdown, and that is a big loss. In terms of music, of course there have been a lot of shows cancelled and that has hurt a lot of promoters and bands. Most of my contact with those guys is online and most of us are doing okay, if maybe a little stressed.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

I personally am more creative when faced with a challenge or when I am dealing with some sort of life event. Conan was born from such circumstances and I’ve been writing some cool stuff as well as hatching some interesting ideas while we’re all under these restrictions. It’s not fun, but it affects us all so I’d rather keep myself busy than allow frustration to set in.

http://www.hailconan.com/
https://www.facebook.com/hailconan/
https://www.instagram.com/hailconan/
https://conan-conan.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/ungraven/
https://www.instagram.com/thisisungraven/
https://ungraven.bigcartel.com/
https://ungraven.bandcamp.com/
https://blackbowrecords.bigcartel.com/
https://blackbowrecords.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Black-Bow-Records-565275456841866/
https://www.weareblackskull.com/

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Days of Rona: Scott Harrington of Salt of the Earth Records & New England Stoner and Doom Fest

Posted in Features on April 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

SCOTT HARRINGTON SALT OF THE EARTH

Days of Rona: Scott Harrington of Salt of the Earth Records (Colchester, Connecticut)

How are you dealing with this crisis? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

I own Salt Of The Earth Records & 313 INC Artist Management, and I am a co-conspirator of The New England Stoner and Doom Festival.

The label side of things we have been busy because we do a good amount of mailorder, and people have been buying music and other things to help entertain themselves while staying in… We just had the new Thunderbird Divine EP, The Hand of Man, come out this week, and we have been using our YouTube channel to promote the release and hopefully give fans an entertaining look behind the scenes. Something visual to go along with the music side.

As far as the crisis having an impact on plans, it definitely has. Today we had to announce that New England Stoner and Doom Festival is being postponed till next year (May 14-16, 2021). The good news is that it appears all of the bands are on board.

We also had a really big European tour that was going to be announced this week, that we have postponed till next February. As well as we had a huge concert event “Friday The 313th Oddities Bazaar” scheduled for March 13, that we canceled to be on the safe side. It was before the quarantine and at the moment when we canceled it, we wondered if we were going overboard, but in hindsight I feel we 100 percent did the right thing.

People need to stay home.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

We are based in Colchester Connecticut, a suburb of Hartford. So we are kind of in the middle of CT.

Our town and surrounding towns are quarantined except for essential workers.

My family has been in self-quarantine since March 12. We are taking this extremely seriously.

My son-in-law works for UPS as a driver. He is an essential worker, and I am proud as all hell of him. He is a major part of bringing some sort of normalcy to a lot of people. And he is extremely careful. Who would have thought a month ago that an Amazon order containing cereal, toothpaste and peanut butter would have made me happier then even a package with some killer records in it? It’s crazy times no doubt.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The virus’s effect has been monumentally huge on my local community as well as our global music community. There are so many tattoo shops, record stores, recording studios, venues, bars, merchandise printers, vinyl and CD manufacturers that have been forced to close for who knows how long. It’s a huge petrifying sacrifice on their parts. And I truly thank them with my all of my heart For doing the right thing, even though it’s not easy at all.

I feel like the music community has really come together to support each other and others around us. I see lots of people buying bands music and merch online… PLEASE KEEP DOING THIS! Every single sale can make a big difference.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

I want each and every person reading this to know all hope is not lost. We are being forced to show our resiliency and we are being reminded of the things that are really important. Family, friends and our health. I’m going to sound like a hippie here, but in my family we have raised (and are still raising) our kids by a simple creed: Be a good human.

If someone needs help, and you can help them… do it.

And Even through this chaos I count myself lucky. I have my wife and my kids and this huge global metal family that I am part of. I really appreciate all of the artists that we have the honor of working with. As well as all of the awesome metal fans we get to bring the heavy to.

Thank you. Each of you.

Please be safe. Please be well.

Be good humans.

https://www.facebook.com/SaltOfTheEarthRec/
www.SaltOfTheEarthRecords.com
http://www.Newenglandstoneranddoomfest.com
https://www.facebook.com/NewEnglandStonerAndDoomFest/

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Days of Rona: Scott O’Dowd of Cortez

Posted in Features on April 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

cortez scott odowd

Days of Rona: Scott O’Dowd of Cortez (Boston, Massachusetts)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

We have been finishing up artwork for our new album that we recorded in the fall with Benny Grotto at Mad Oak Studios. As far as playing shows, we’ve definitely had to cancel a few, and likely more as this pandemic continues. Cortez as a band has decided to suspend rehearsal for the time being as well, three of the members have children, and it just doesn’t seem like a good idea to risk getting together to rehearse in light of the current situation. Everyone is healthy at the current moment.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

In Massachusetts, the governor issued a stay-at-home advisory for non-essential personnel as well as limiting public gatherings to groups of 10 or less. The have also closed bars/restaurants except for take out. It’s pretty eerie exactly how quiet the city of Boston and surrounding areas have been, compared to normal.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

As for the community, most people seem to be taking this seriously as expected. Most seem to be following the social distancing guidelines and wearing masks and/or gloves in grocery stores, etc. It has obviously affected the ability to be social but people seem to be finding ways to adapt. Whether through FaceTime, or phone calls, or video chats.

Locally there have been Facebook groups / pages where local musicians have been doing live streams from their homes or rehearsal spaces.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

We as a band, are approaching this like most folks, waiting it out and trying to stay safe. It’s going to feel really nice to get together in a room and play some music when this is all over! I have a sneaking suspicion that we will have a ton of new albums to listen to once this passes as everyone suddenly has a lot of time on their hands.

http://www.cortezboston.com
http://www.instagram.com/cortezboston
http://www.facebook.com/cortezboston
http://cortezboston.bandcamp.com

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Vine Weevil Post “You Are the Ocean” Video from Sun in Your Eyes LP

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

VINE WEEVIL

There are a few other tracks up on Vine Weevil‘s YouTube page, in case you, like me, don’t have Tidal and are Spotify impaired — seriously, how many times do I need to sign up for the same service? if you need to prove I’m me so god damn badly just take my blood and have done with it — but I’ve yet to dig into their upcoming full-length, Sun in Your Eyes, in its entirety. This is something I hope to rectify as soon as possible; hopefully by the time this post actually goes live, I mean. And I think when you dig into the video below for Vine Weevil‘s “You Are the Ocean,” you’ll perhaps get a sense of where some of my urgency comes from.

Based in London, the duo is comprised of brothers Itamar and Yotam Rubinger, who — on drums and guitar/vocals, respectively — are both former members of a little band called Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats. Oh, well then. Okay. Sun in Your Eyes is their second long-player behind a quietly-issued 2019 self-titled, and while one might recognize some of their foundation in the songwriting traditions of the ’60s garage and ’70s heavy rock movements, an edge of grit pervading all the while, at least from what I’ve heard thus far — cuts like “Out of Tune,” the Beatlesy shimmer of “My Friend,” and the title-track — there isn’t quite the same gonna-go-kill-some-ladies vibe going on, and you know what? I’m cool with that. Cool with the idea of not killing ladies. I know that’s a bold position to take, but I’m putting it out there.

Thematically, you’ll fine Vine Weevil working from a deeply personal point of view on Sun in Your Eyes, which is the Rubingers’ tribute to their late father. The video for “You Are the Ocean,” which was made by Omri Bigetz, deals in a worldlier scale in terms of the environmental scenarios being portrayed, but certainly life and death factor in one way or the other, as they do to most everything.

I already sent the band a “please please please let me hear your whole record” email, so when/if that happens, I’ll let you know.

In the meantime, in case your Spotify (ever) works, here’s this to get you introduced to the band:

Vine Weevil, “You Are the Ocean” official video

Vine Weevil would like to introduce their new music video “You Are the Ocean”.

“You Are the Ocean” is the first video release from the album “Sun in Your Eyes”.

Vine Weevil is a London-based band formed of singer-guitarist Yotam Rubinger and drummer Itamar Rubinger, both formerly of Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats.

Vine Weevil’s sound is heavily influenced by 60s and 70s acid rock and garage. True to their influences, the album was recorded live on tape with analogue equipment at Gizzard Studios in London.

“The origins of the song come from a very personal place. We started writing the song after our father passed away. He spent most of his life by the sea. The feelings behind the song – and most parts of the album – are about our father.”

The distinctive animated video is by Amsterdam-based 3D artist Omri Bigetz.

The full album is now available on Spotify and Tidal.

https://open.spotify.com/album/2gISGt5j1kKz5BmiQglcqN

https://tidal.com/browse/album/127777264

Vine Weevil is:
Itamar Rubinger
Yotam Rubinger

Vine Weevil on Thee Facebooks

Vine Weevil on YouTube

Vine Weevil on Spotify

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Days of Rona: “Comet Lulu” Neudeck of Electric Moon & Worst Bassist Records

Posted in Features on April 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

electric moon lulu neudeck

Days of Rona: Lulu Neudeck of Electric Moon & Worst Bassist Records (Germany)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

At the moment, we are separated from each other, as our drummer is living in Vienna, Austria. We really miss each other and also are sad about the so far canceled shows.

Dave [“Sula Bassana” Schmidt] and me are also at the edge at the moment, cause this situation really affects our labels Sulatron Records and Worst Bassist Records. Means, distribution does not sell so much anymore due to closed record stores, it’s not possible to ship records worldwide at the moment ’cause of the shutdown of flights and restrictions, and of course playing no shows also affects, so there is not much income at the moment, which brings us struggles quickly.

Health is okay, no one infected with covid-19 (yet). The only thing is my cronical disease which puts me on the risk-list in getting critical with covid-19. So, fingers crossed, won’t get that shit.

So we’re doing music everyone on his own at the moment. Which brings also many new ideas. But we all can’t wait to meet again, playing together. We also have plans for a fourth bandmember and can’t wait to rehearse with him, so Corona really crossed some plans…

But, most important thing is we all stay healthy!

At the moment, the days are somehow running quick and slow at the same time.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

At the moment, we have the restrictions to meet up with people, only family members are allowed. Also, it is allowed to walk outdoors but you may not rest anywhere. Building groups is forbidden, not more than two people are allowed walking together.

You have to keep a distance of two meters of each other, also in supermarkets, and they only let a certain amount of people in to make sure it’s possible to keep that distance.

Shops which are not really necessary for the system to go on, are all closed down, like record shops, book shops, tattoo and so on, only supermarkets, pharmacies and banks are opened. Now they are talking about the obligation of wearing masks in public, people get the advice to make their own ones and not buying medical supplies as there is a lack of it.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

It is weird, outside, somehow all looks normal but everything is different than before. Streets are empty. People are stressed in supermarkets, or are totally making fun of the situation, but go for tons of toilet paper. It’s a surreal feeling, I try to go into a supermarket as rarely as possible.

But nature seems to feel happy right now, the air smells better, it feels surreal to be outdoors, surreal beautiful, birds sing louder than usually –- this maybe seems as if because of the silence in the streets. Like a silence before a storm…

In music I feel a big shift within the connection between each other. I’m totally impressed of the support by all the people to the bands and small labels. It feels huge in my heart to get such a response.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

We’re in this together, take care of those who might need your help! And: Don’t lose the humour…

www.electricmoon.de
https://electric-moon.bandcamp.com/
www.facebook.com/ElectricMoonOfficial
www.sulatron.com
https://fb.com/worstbassistrecords
https://worstbassistrecords.bandcamp.com/

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Days of Rona: Peder Bergstrand of Lowrider

Posted in Features on April 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

lowrider peder bergstrand

Days of Rona: Peder Bergstrand of Lowrider (Stockholm, Sweden)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

To be honest, it hasn’t hit us that hard as a band, at least not yet. We luckily did not have any long tours planned that now are cancelled, that financial situations depended on. Fortunately our new record is already out and distribution of it has not been affected by all of this too much, at least not yet.

On a personal level, it’s hitting harder though. Ola is a nurse outside of the band, so he’s very much in the middle of the storm right now.

The rest of us are working from home since 3 weeks, most Swedes that can are. We’re ok, but trying to juggle stay-at-home kids and every day life is a little intense – but that’s of course a total non-issue compared to what people who are ill, or the ones treating them, are going though right now.

We’ve obviously also had to postpone the London and Berlin DesertFest gigs. We were looking forward to those so so much – but honestly it wasn’t even a choice or anything to debate. It was just something we needed to do – we all need to stay home and try to flatten the curve.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

The rules here in Sweden are so far pretty mild compared to rest of Europe. You aren’t allowed to have any gatherings larger than 50 people, and the recommendation is to stay at home if you can, but the latter is not enforced by police or anything. Also, people above 70 are advised to not go out at all.

Me and my siblings take turns leaving groceries outside our mum’s door. It’s a good thing she enjoys staying home reading – it’s going to be a lot of it by the looks of things. They aren’t expecting things to change before mid May, and it probably will be even longer than that.

People are out walking a lot here though, but of course social distancing. Exercising is encouraged by authorities but in ways where you can keep your distance.

It’s now a reversed Stockholm in a lot of ways – the streets are empty, but the surrounding forests are full of people.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Oh it’s a lot. Most people work from home, staying in. Therefor restaurants, businesses and venues are having a really really rough time. Many are looking at going belly up in a month or two. Friends in the industry are in free fall. It’s rough. Booking agencies, promoters, bands… all are getting hit by this.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

Well, we are safe, and in a country with free healthcare and with — what at least seems like now — a decent shot at flattening the curve. So, knock on wood, we are okay, considering. Our near and dear are okay as well, but there’s a lot of friends of friends and neighbors that have the virus or have had severe symptoms. We are, as a city, definitely in the middle of it. Trying not to get to bogged down in negativity though, and focus on all the things that are good rather than the opposite.

This whole involuntary pause from playing live has also forced us to shift focus and look ahead instead. So me and Andreas have started working on the drums for the third album, and by the looks of things we might even finish it this year. It feels good to focus on that in the middle of all of this. Keeps you going. Keeps you sane.

https://www.facebook.com/lowriderrock/
https://www.instagram.com/lowridergram/
https://lowriderofficial.bandcamp.com/
https://bluesfuneralrecordings.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/bluesfuneral
https://www.bluesfuneral.com/

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El Rojo Premiere “Cactus Bloom” from El Diablo Rojo Album

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

el rojo (Photo by TuEm)

Recorded by Filippo ‘Phil Liar’ Buono of Karma Conspiracy Records at Monolith Recording Studio in February, El Rojo‘s second full-length, El Diablo Rojo was finished just ahead of the quarantine as a result of the country’s early-adopter/particularly-severe COVID-19 outbreak. As that has now spread to other parts of the Europe and the planet as a whole, it has usurped public consciousness in a way few things ever could. If a comet were on a course to smash into the planet, it’s hard to imagine it would be more of a topic of discussion.

Nonetheless, El Rojo — a double-guitar five-piece based in Morano Calabro in the southern part of the country, right on the bridge-of-the-foot part of the heeled boot that is the Italian peninsula — are pressing ahead with the release later this Spring. One assumes the lack of a precise release date also is related to the outbreak, since pressing, shipping and even packaging are all affected one way or another, but certainly that does nothing to make the music any less powerful. “Cactus Bloom” is the six-minute closer of El Diablo Rojo, and while its tonality is steeped in desert-worship warmth and it moves from a quiet wistfulness to a more aggressive stance by the time it’s finished, the weight of the message being delivered is significant and only grows more so as the volume intensifies later, to the point that vocalist Evo Borruso asks point blank, “Can you hear my rage?” Loud and clear, sir.

Perhaps El Rojo were thinking about issues of climate change when they put the song/album together, or at least some part of it, but no question the video for “Cactus Bloom” represents the current situation in Italy, and by that I mean the stark realities of living in social isolation, at physical remove from loved ones, bandmates, peers, fellow citizens, and so on. As the drone footage of empty landmarks shows, what should be brimming with tourists pissing off the Italian natives — hey, I’ve been one of those tourists, it’s the same everywhere — are empty spaces, looking mournful in sunlight or all the more like the ruins we’ll leave behind us when we’re gone and even the drones have stopped flying.

Of course, the COVID-19 pandemic will recede in the months to come. The virus may be with us for years, but the scale will change, doors will reopen to some degree, and a long recovery will begin. That would seem to make it all the more crucial to capture this fleeting moment, not only to preserve it for the future to learn from, but to remind ourselves of what it was to live through this time and how it brought into focus that which was most important to us as human beings. To love, to share.

Made in isolation, with band members filming themselves performing the track, here’s El Rojo‘s “Cactus Bloom.”

Please enjoy:

El Rojo, “Cactus Bloom” official video premiere

Cactus Bloom is the final track of our new concept album. The album itself is based on the tale of the struggle of a whole generation of youngsters coming from the southern part of Italy. The sound is elegant, nostalgic on purpose. The music plays along with lyrics full of melancholy, bitterness and rage, in which the protagonist speaks intimately of the hard times we all are living, of the sorrow for an uncertain future, of a context that seems to have given up on life.

Cactus Bloom is the metaphor of a difficult environment like the desert and how, in this ambient, the miracle of blossoming can happen. We must be able to understand that life always win: it’s engraved in our DNA.

The events hitting our life right now strengthen the message inside the tune and this is the reason that led us to tell this tale directly from our homes, where we are secluded at the moment. We share the restriction with all the people on the planet and so, along with this, we all share the uncertainty about the future.

So, during this time of isolation, should we reconsider our lives?

Shall we understand that everything that we were taking for granted could, in the beat of an eyelash, be gone?

We are asking ourselves these questions and, in the isolation of our own homes with no resources but our smartphones, we created this video along the notes of our new single, which is titled “Cactus Bloom”.

El Rojo is:
Evo Borruso (Vocals)
Fabrizio Vuerre (Guitar)
Fabrizio Miceli (Guitar)
Pasquale Carapella (Bass)
Antonio Rimolo (Drums)

El Rojo on Thee Facebooks

El Rojo on Instagram

El Rojo on Bandcamp

Karma Conspiracy Records on Thee Facebooks

Karma Conspiracy Records website

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