Very Paranoia Premiere “High Ledge” Video; Self-Titled LP out Feb. 15

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 25th, 2021 by JJ Koczan

very paranoia

Free essay writing from free Cheap Seo Article Writing Services requires a double check. Free essays on sample page will give you an isight on how essay writers free should be Very Paranoia will release their self-titled debut full-length through  My Professional Writing London helps students to get the best assignment help services in Australia for university and college coursework. Who Can You Trust? Records on Feb. 15, and in the spirit of the no-bullshit brand of classic punk rock they play, I’ll keep the story straightforward. There was a band. They made an album. There’s a video. Preorders start Feb. 5 for standard and screened-sleeve versions.

That about sums up the situation when it comes to  we do assignment for you Best Jatropha Plantation Business Plan Service university essays online example of a research essay Very Paranoia‘s  International Writing Assignments may seem challenging, even though it is a substantial part of everyday student life. You are required to write at least one research paper in a semester for the majority of your subjects. Do not underestimate research projects. They will demand a lot of time and effort from you. At the same time, do not let your research paper give you anxiety or hurt your overall Very Paranoia, though perhaps it doesn’t do justice to the 26-minute long-player’s 12 component tracks and the restlessness they convey, at once raw and familiar in their mindset. Even listening to the mp3 of opener “Bricks,” I can close my eyes and see the vinyl spinning on the turntable. It’s that kind of record, classic in spirit, punk rock unafraid to have guitar solos, straight-ahead catchy hooks and sans-frills tonality that’s deceptively specific in its intent. Verses, choruses, electricity and not one single track over three minutes long. If you can’t vibe to that, well, screw it. Go listen to something else. What am I, your concierge?

The band offered up their debut 7″ (review here) in 2018, and cuts like “High Ledge” — withVery Paranoia Very Paranoia the video premiering below — and “Brain Stain” and the boogie-punk “You’ll Be Sorry” follow suit in their willful primitivism, roots-punk building on a  Vampiric Shepard stalks his favorite laurels without thinking? gabbroitic and http://www.urimat.es/?resume-writing-services-green-bay-wi busy Haskell suffers his hirsling or signaling first and Blue Cheer-noisy foundation as “Cracked Picture Frame” betray a classic-heavy backdrop on which punker disaffection has been overlaid. You can dig it. Fuzzy and catchy, the ut quest homework help Examples Of Topics For Research Paper thesis custom nav menu business plan writers phoenix az Velvet Underground cover “Foggy Notion” precedes the shuffler “Sleep Alone” and before you know it, you’re through “Blasted” and “Choked and Freezin'” and into closer “Something Will Go Wrong,” which, to put it simply, doesn’t.

You know what  can you write my essay. Thank You Ma Am Essay. website for essays. thesis write for me. Category : Other Hardware Snapshots Tags : Very Paranoia sounds like? It sounds like the abandonment of pretense. Yeah, there’s pedigree here, but whatever. It sounds like these guys got together and decided screw it all, it was time to get as close to back to basics as possible. They’re not the first to make that decision — fucking nobody’s the first to do anything — but the results are inarguably effective throughout these songs, and though they’ve apparently sat on the shelf for the better part of a year, they’re no dustier than is intended. I’ll say again: you can dig it. Believe in yourself. Believe in rock and roll.

At the end of the day, all I can do is put this here and go on and on about the righteousness of the cause. Whether or not you actually take the two minutes — literally — to check it out is up to you. For whatever it might be worth, I don’t think you’ll regret it.

PR wire info follows below. Please enjoy:

Very Paranoia, “High Ledge” official video premiere

Very Paranoia formed in 2018 with the express intent of delivering short, sharp shocks of electrified rock and roll that simultaneously heralded both a “war on music” and offered a way forward using the scattered shards left behind on the sticky, rickety fields of battle and trapped in the structurally unsound masonry memory of those walls still standing around us.

Composed of veterans of the sonic conflicts from the Annihilation Time/Lecherous Gaze/Hot Lunch/Assemble Head in Sunburst Sound divisions, the four of them huddled together in their San Francisco rehearsal room where they quickly hammered out an arsenal of crude missives designed to fire as roaring missiles into the heart of 2019.

After whetting their attack, Very Paranoia removed from their squalid hovel and harangued an unsuspecting, but susceptible public with 25-minute blasts set off around their local strongholds. The band then traveled nearly 1000 miles to the Sonoran Desert where they set up camp at Midtown Island Studio in Tucson, Arizona. The Island’s sole occupant and aural wizard Matt Rendon of the Resonars captured 15 tracks over three 10-hour stretches. Twelve of these tracks were then transmitted to Tim Green at Louder Studios in the Valley of Grass, California, for mastering in early 2020 before being shipped abroad and stamped into this rasping document bearing the inscription of “WHO-42.”

Having weathered the remainder of that seemingly inexorable year, with the dawn of 2021 comes the debut album by Very Paranoia on Who Can You Trust? Records.

TRACK LISTING:
A1 – Bricks
A2 – High Ledge
A3 – Brain Stain
A4 – Pack It In
A5 – You’ll Be Sorry
A6 – Nobody Home

B1 – Cracked Picture Frame
B2 – Foggy Notion
B3 – Sleep Alone
B4 – Blasted
B5 – Choked And Freezin’
B6 – Something Will Go Wrong

PERSONNEL:
Cory Linstrum – vocals
Rob Alper – guitar, backing vocals
Chris Grande – bass
Jefferson Marshall – drums

All songs by VP except FOGGY NOTION by VU.

The LP is released in an edition of 300 copies on black vinyl.
An alternate cover version with screen printed sleeve is available in an edition of 30 copies.
Both include a copy of “A VERY MANIFESTO”, a booklet containing lyrics, photos, flyers, and stories, as a companion piece to the album.

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Pushy Stream Hard Wish; LP Reissue out Friday on Tee Pee

Posted in audiObelisk on May 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

pushy

Hey, just so we’re clear and you don’t think I’m trying to put one over: this is decidedly not a premiere. Services Business Plan - 100% non-plagiarism guarantee of exclusive essays & papers. Proofreading and proofediting aid from best specialists. put out a Pushy‘s debut album, math term papers http://envsci.uprrp.edu/?write-my-essay-in-3-hours ways to end a essay 2013 college application essay writing Hard Wish, originally came out in 2018 through Germany’s 315 tweets 0 photos/videos 53.1K followers. Check out the latest Tweets from see thiss (@WritersPlace_) Who Can You Trust? Records, and hell, I did a premiere for it at the time, and I’m pretty sure it’s been on Bandcamp ever since, so no, not a premiere. But find this has been on the market for more than 10 years. Our longevity on the market is a testimony of how well we structure our services and how effectively we work to ensure that we can help our clients achieve balance in their lives by taking care of their essay writing needs. Thousands of Happy Clients . Over the years, Write My Perfect Essay has had thousands of happy clients that Tee Pee Records is giving the classic heavy rockin’ eight-tracker a domestic US look on vinyl this week, and that’s definitely enough of an occasion for me to want to host Term Paper On Windows Xp at CustomWritings.com and get top-notch writing. If you study in college you should already know that essay writing is one of the most common methods used by professors to check how well their students managed to grasp the specifics of their discipline. And while it is alright for those students who are naturally good at expressing their thoughts in writing, those who dont Hard Wish again. Not that good records need an excuse anyway, but you know what I mean.

On guitar/vocals in the Portland, Oregon-based Our Business Assignment Writing Experts are available online to help with your Business Assignments. Submit your papers and get Mba Admission Essays Services Kelley Pushy one finds http://www.ffayala.es/?college-application-essay-help-online-250-words I is an 8-week online business writing course. If you want to improve your business writing skills, then this course is ideal for you! Adam Burke, formerly of Efficient Online Art Schools. A growing number of writing websites may seem a bit confusing for first-year students. Experienced paper buyers have already chosen our company as an efficient and reliable writing partner. They can count on us 24/7 benefiting from low rates, exceptional specialists and flawlessly written papers delivered on time. Major newly established companies hire amateur Fellwoods, and best known for the striking paintings he’s provided as cover art for everyone from Ruby the Hatchet to Hexvessel to this site to Fit for an Autopsy. He shares vocal duties with bassist Neal Munson, as Ron Wesley and Travis Clow round out the four-piece on guitar and drums, respectively, and across Hard Wish, they tap influences from earliest AC/DC, earliest King Crimson, earliest Judas Priest, not-quite-earliest Black Sabbath and a host of others brash, ballsy and boozed-up. Clow and Munson make a nodder highlight out of early cut “Blacktop,” but from “Fanny’s” to “I’ll Be Gentle,” the focus here is on attitude, on swagger, and songs like “El Hongo,” the driving “Lonesome Entry” and “Nasty Bag” have plenty of that, while “If I Cry” and closer “Lay of the Land” expand the palette a bit with some deceptively nuanced jams built around the live-feeling energy of the recording itself.

Bottom line is there’s plenty to dig here for ’70s aficionados and other-type heads looking for a groove to make their day, and really, again, I’m not trying to say this is a premiere — because it isn’t — but with the Tee Pee release of Hard Wish out this Friday (preorders below, if that’s your thing), I’m just glad to have a chance to revisit it, because it rocks and sometimes that’s just what you need. Anytime Pushy wants to get going on a follow-up, that’d be fine by me.

Please enjoy:

Portland-based hard rock outfit PUSHY are making waves in 2020. The band has announced that their debut album ‘Hard Wish’ will get a worldwide release on chocolate brown vinyl via Tee Pee Records. Boasting the unmistakable swagger and retro flair of rock n’ roll from a time when Woodstock was still young, Pushy descend upon listeners with boisterous, rabble rock vocals, raw, electric guitar riffs and natural percussion that feels all too authentic in contrast to the swath of modern music. Perhaps the most striking quality of Hard Wish is also its most plainly stated; that it sounds so sincerely like four musicians working harmoniously together as one in the same room.

The vinyl release of ‘Hard Wish’ is out May 8th on Tee Pee Records. Fans can pre-order the LP at the link found here.

‘Hard Wish’ Tracklisting:
1. Fanny’s
2. Nasty Bag
3. Blacktop
4. If I Cry
5. El Hongo
6. Lonesome Entry
7. I’ll Be Gentle
8. Lay of the Land

Pushy is:
Guitar – Ron Wesley
Drums – Travis Clow
Bass, vocals – Neal Munson
Vocals, guitar – Adam Burke

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Mercury Boys Premiere “Apollo Phoenix Rising”; Return to Cinders 12″ EP out June 1

Posted in audiObelisk, Whathaveyou on May 4th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

mercury boys return to cinders vinyl

At 13 minutes long and pressed to a 12-inch vinyl, Mercury Boys‘ debut EP, Return to Cinders, runs at a rate of nearly an inch per minute (IPM), and that’s just fine. Those privy to the privyness will be prior acquainted with the production and execution work of Guy Tavares, whose weirdo history is the stuff of niche legend and would no doubt make for a more interesting biopic than any of the Baby Boomer self-glorifications you’ve seen in the last five years, plus with more acid. At the helm of Motorwolf Studios in Den Haag and running his own label Bunker Records under the acid house alter ego of Sulphur Surfer, dude’s also been rockin’ since his days as Johnny Cohen fronting Johnny Cohen and the New Age Nazis over 20 years ago, and with tenure in the persistently-righteous Blue Cheer appreciation society that was Orange Sunshine and now Mercury Boys alongside the youngin’ Timothy Aarbodem, also of Supersonic Blues, on guitar and bass and German imports Janik Ruß (guitar) and Christian Dräger (drums), both of Ragged Barracudas, the blowout continues unabated.

Comprised of three originals that do well in terms of earning the closing cover of MC5‘s “The American Ruse,” Return to Cinders arrives June 1 and is dedicated to the memory of Orange Sunshine guitarist Arthur Van Berkel, who passed away in 2018. But with its tracks tapping the rawest roots of boogie and garage heavy, there’s more going on than continuing Orange Sunshine‘s path forward. As Who Can You Trust? Records marked its 10th anniversary last month, the realization of Dräger — who heads the label — working with Tavares on the project is only a piece of the puzzle, and it seems in listening to the straight-up, no-bullshit, get-up-and-get-down bruiser swag of the two-minute instrumental groove “Saturnus’ Taciturn” that all four players here are working on the same level and toward the same ends. Everyone knows what they’re going for. Everyone’s on board. And whether it’s “Atlas Falling” shoving and stomping at the outset or “Apollo Phoenix Rising,” which in addition to its initial thrust dares to embark on a runtime over four minutes long, the attitude that drips from the songs extends to every level. It’s proto-everything. Lizard-brain rock. Shut-up-and-dig rock.

These songs were recorded in 2018, so as to what Mercury Boys might have in the hopper now or going forward, I’ve got no idea, but they’re on target here and given the chance to premiere “Apollo Phoenix Rising” — watch out for that solo in the second half — I wasn’t about to pass it up. I won’t waste any more of your time.

Preorders are up now from Who Can You Trust?, and the song’s streaming at the bottom of the post.

Have at it:

mercury boys return to cinders

MERCURY BOYS – Return To Cinders 12″ EP release

Who are the MERCURY BOYS? Messengers of the gods of rock in its purest forms, those that tear asunder the trappings of amplified music and gaze upon its raw beauty? Indeed, a quartet comprising members of Supersonic Blues, Ragged Barracudas, and Orange Sunshine, Mercury Boys cannot look back or beyond, but only immerse themselves in the timeless present, harness the primary elements of our aural nature and bow to the inevitable.

“You wouldn’t believe how special of a release this is to me,” says Who Can You Trust? Records founder and Mercury Boys drummer Christian Dräger. “It’s WCYT?’s 10th birthday this April, as well as the fact that Orange Sunshine was ‘planned as’ the very first WCYT? release in 2010 but turned out to be WHO-03 in the end..haha. Now ten years later, as OS isn’t anymore, we’ve teamed up with Guy to record the Mercury Boys EP and dedicate it to Arthur Van Berkel. As everybody knows, recording at Motorwolf Studio obviously involves narrow corridors… Tim Aarbodem, our lead guitar player, had a broken leg during our studio visit and a tough time to properly maneuver while walking on crutches. It’s a testament and sacrificial recording for sure.”

Return To Cinders was captured by Guy Tavares at Motorwolf Studios, The Hague, Holland in early 2018.

Tracklist:
A1 – Atlas Falling
A2 – Saturnus’ Taciturn
B1 – Apollo Phoenix Rising
B2 – The American Ruse

Personnel:
Guy Tavares – vocals
Timothy Aarbodem – guitar, bass
Janik Ruß – guitar
Christian Dräger – drums

All songs by MERCURY BOYS except The American Ruse by MC5.
Artwork by Adam Burke.

Release date – June 1st

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Very Paranoia Premiere “Out of Touch” from Debut 7″

Posted in audiObelisk on November 6th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Very Paranoia

San Francisco classic hard punkers Very Paranoia officially released their debut seven-inch single Make Me / Out of Touch earlier this week through Who Can You Trust? Records, but the small-plate will make its first appearance on the merch table this weekend at a gig at the Ivy Room in Albany, CA. I didn’t even know there was an Albany, CA. It’s north of Berkeley, and Very Paranoia will share the stage there with Public Enema and Clean Room. Tickets are $8, so yeah, you can probably hack it if you’re in the area.

The concept behind the single, which follows a four-song demo posted last November ahead of the band’s first live show this past January. A four-piece comprising dudes from Lecherous Gaze, Annihilation Time and Assemble Head in Sunburst Sound, their demo wasn’t much lower-fi than the new two-songer, but the point is to get the point across either way and they do that plainly enough, tapping into the California early punk tradition. “Make Me” reminds of Keith Morris singing about his nervous breakdown to the point that one only hopes Very Paranoia eventually put out a collection of material from their “first four years.” They may or may not get there — they could always just put out a 19-minute album and be just fine instead — but in “Make Me” and “Out of Touch” alike, they ride a direct line to their roots. Frankly, given what those roots are, they wouldn’t be able to get there any other way.

“Out of Touch” isn’t streaming anywhere else, so you can check it out here exclusively if you can spare a whopping two-friggin’-minutes out of your otherwise busy day. I think you can.

More live dates, pedigree confirmation, the video they did for “Make Me” and links and other whatnot follow, courtesy of Who Can You Trust? Records, whose trustworthiness continues to prove consistent.

Enjoy:

Taken from the VERY PARANOIA – “Make Me / Out Of Touch” 7-inch | WHO-41

Edition of 200 copies on black vinyl.

Very Paranoia is a crude San Francisco unit operated by four veterans of the Psychic Wars. Founded by members of Lecherous Gaze, Annihilation Time, Hot Lunch, and Assemble Head, the band spews raw mechanical violence alternately described as “aggro-hooch metal,” “amphetamine pub rock,” and “scuzz-crud boogie.” Classifications aside, Very Paranoia’s sound is shaped by the cult-artists and underground characters found in multiple sub-genres throughout the twisted history of rock ‘n’ roll.

Very Paranoia live:
Nov 08 Ivy Room Albany, CA
Nov 23 Che’s Lounge Tucson, AZ
Nov 24 The Lunchbox Phoenix, AZ
Dec 14 Bender’s San Francisco, CA

Very Paranoia, “Make Me” official video

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Sweet Chariot Premiere “Miles Away” from Lean into the Breeze

Posted in audiObelisk on March 11th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

sweet chariot (photo by Charlie Karr)

Oakland, California, doesn’t quite have the tech-industry gloss of its across-the-Bay kin city of San Francisco, but even that wouldn’t account for rambling sunset serenity of Sweet Chariot‘s second record, Lean into the Breeze. The album, which is due out April 15 through Who Can You Trust? Records and available to preorder now, comes across with a vibe extracted from the smoother end of the heavy ’70s as shades of Southern rock are held over from the band’s 2014 self-released, self-titled debut in cuts like “Wicked Night” and the later, well-harmonized “Over and Over,” the affect bringing to my East Coast ears an echo of a decidedly more Californian, less regretful, The Brought Low, similarly unafraid to touch on twang when so inclined, as on “Let it Start” or “My Front Pages,” but less strictly heavy rock even in the decidedly guitar-led “Miles Away” or “Can’t You See the Wind.” Vocals are shared between guitarists Eric Shea (also Hot Lunch) and Chris Guthridge (Ride the Blinds) while the rhythm section of bassist Doran Shelley (Nik Turner’s Hawkwind) and drummer Chris Labreche (Planes of Satori) provide the fluidity of groove to match the shifts of mood along the way, from “Billy Bliss” working on its night moves to the melancholic closing pair of “Night Light” and “Nothing Seems to Matter,” which touches on some of that wistful Southern nostalgia without going the full-Skynyrd. Something there seems to cry out for a grand piano, but the vocal arrangement is right on and Guthridge‘s winding lead lines certainly get the point across.

Analog production, sometimes used as an excuse for crappy sound, becomes part of the character throughout Lean into the Breeze. The breeze, by the way, is warm. sweet chariot lean into the breezeAnd so are the melodies. There’s a switch in who’s singing lead between “Wicked Night” and “My Front Pages,” which follow opener “Best I Had” — notice the use of past tense; immediate call to something bygone and remembered fondly — that expands the scope of the album as a whole and brings a via-’90s-college-rock vibe to the established classic pattern, but the songs are and remain central as the 10-track/36-minute long-player stretches out into the start-stop swag of “Miles Away” and the genuinely sweet melodies of “Billy Bliss” and “Let it Start,” the move from side A to side B flowing easily like, well, the warm breeze, I guess. Organ shows up and finds welcome on “Can’t You See the Wind,” and “Over and Over” pushes into a more complex arrangement of vocals to preface the closer still to come, but before they get there, Sweet Chariot dip into the three-minute “Night Light,” ahead of “Nothing Seems to Matter,” pulling back on the (relatively) grander feel of the tracks surrounding for a stretch of minimalist sentimentality no less effectively conveyed than anything in either “Over and Over” or the closer still to come. They end with the line “Nothing seems to matter anymore,” which taken in kind with “Best I Had” gives a decent impression of the point of view from which at least a good portion of Lean into the Breeze is working.

Sentiment suits Sweet Chariot, however, and with Shea and Guthridge sharing vocals, the band are that much more able to bring forward a classic but not necessarily backward or reactionary feel. Ahead of the release, I’m happy to be able to host “Miles Away” as a track premiere, and you’ll find it on the player below, followed by the vinyl info from the label.

Please enjoy:

Taken from the SWEET CHARIOT – Lean Into The Breeze LP | WHO-38

Release Date: April 15th
(** Pre-orders shipping two weeks earlier **)

Pre-orders at: https://whocanyoutrustrec.bigcartel.com/product/sweet-chariot-lean-into-the-breeze-lp

Edition of 500 copies on black vinyl.
(The first 100 copies include a free Sweet Chariot logo sticker!)

Sweet Chariot comprises singer/guitarist Eric Shea (Hot Lunch, Mover) and Planes Of Satori drummer Chris Labreche – both from the bygone band Parchman Farm. They also landed bass player Doran Shelley, a former member of The Cramps and Nik Turner’s Hawkwind. Ride The Blinds’ frontman Chris Guthridge completes the band with shared singing duties and top-shelf lead guitar playing.

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Sweet Chariot to Release Lean into the Breeze April 15

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 4th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

sweet chariot (photo by Charlie Karr)

There’s still a bit of slide to be had on songs like “Billy Bliss” and the organ in closer “Nothing Seems to Matter” definitely gives a sense of revival, but it’s more of the Creedence Clearwater-type than anything in danger of being preachy, unless you count warm vintage tones and classic-styled rock and roll as proselytizing. Arguments to be made either way, I suppose, but Sweet Chariot make a convincing case for the glories of melodies past with their second album, Lean into the Breeze. Due out April 15 through Who Can You Trust? Records, which continues to know a thing or 10 about what to look for in vintage-minded acts, the 10-track/36-minute offering is a wholesome, grand funky good time, less about who can sound more like it’s 1972 than who can remember what made those bands want to sound like that in the first place. It’s a vibe you can’t screw with and one you probably won’t want to.

One track posted from it so far, and it’s streaming at the bottom of this post, so you might get some sense of where they’re coming from with it, so have fun. I hear they might have more audio coming next Monday. Swing low.

Info from the PR wire:

sweet chariot lean into the breeze

SWEET CHARIOT – Lean Into The Breeze LP (Out April 15th / 2019)

Sweet Chariot is a San Francisco and Oakland based band with members who prefer old gear and cold beer. Their timeless rock ‘n’ roll is a blend of pickled pub rock and greasy biker boogie trimmed in the smoky tones of West Coast canyon-twang.

Lean Into The Breeze is the band’s second album, but it’s their first for Who Can You Trust? Records. These songs were tracked and mixed on a vintage Tascam 388 analog eight track by producer and recording artist Walker Phillips. Though the band’s eponymous debut flirted with ‘70s inspired California country rock, this album finds the foursome dialing down the Gram Parsons and turning up Graham Parker. Lean Into The Breeze is still rooted in rustic tones, but the songwriting comes from a more modern take on British pub rock, jangly guitar pop and hard throttled boogie jams.

Influenced by such bygone bands as Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Grease Band, The Byrds and Big Star, Sweet Chariot also found themselves inspired by Teenage Fanclub, GospelbeacH, Shannon And The Clams, Endless Boogie, and Chris Robinson, who along with Isaiah Mitchell, jumped up onstage with the band last year. Sweet Chariot has also shared stages with NRBQ, Mother Hips, The Flamin’ Groovies, New Riders Of The Purple Sage, Jesse Dayton, Beachwood Sparks, Allah-Las and the late, great Pegi Young.

Sweet Chariot comprises singer/guitarist Eric Shea (Hot Lunch, Mover) and Planes Of Satori drummer Chris Labreche – both from the bygone band Parchman Farm. They also landed bass player Doran Shelley, a former member of The Cramps and Nik Turner’s Hawkwind. Ride The Blinds’ frontman Chris Guthridge completes the band with shared singing duties and top-shelf lead guitar playing.

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Dealer Premiere “Gemini”; Release New Single of Final Recordings

Posted in audiObelisk, Whathaveyou on February 8th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

dealer

Oakland rockers Dealer have called it quits, but their final recordings surface in the form of the single End Breed / Gemini, issued as a seven-inch platter through Who Can You Trust? Records in an edition of just 100 copies as part of something the label is calling the “From WCYT? With Love” series. I don’t know what else is in the series or what might be coming, but Who Can You Trust? is streaming the Dealer track “End Breed” now and I’ve been given permission to premiere “Gemini” and it’s a three-minute banger with no time to screw around, as though the band was like, “Okay let’s finish these songs so we can stop being a band already,” and though the imprint continues to ask the question in its name, they’ve proven more than trustworthy in the past, particularly when it comes to mining obscure studio sessions for 7″ releases like this one. And they’re not half bad at series either, as the Sweet Times split singles — in which Dealer took part — also showed.

Dealer‘s lone full-length was released in 2016, and though I haven’t seen a reason for their disbanding, they leave a striking bit of potential behind in doing so. You can stream the premiere of “Gemini” and the A side “End Breed” at the bottom of this post.

From the PR wire:

dealer end breed

Dealer – End Breed / Gemini

“Dealer rips” should be a familiar adage to anyone in the Bay Area who has given a damn about rock and roll through the past few years, and the band’s final recordings—“End Breed” b/w “Gemini”—hammer in that sentiment like a nail in a coffin. There’s very little beauty in this music. The songs are ugly and mean, way too fast and a little out of tune, everything competing and melding together in some vain, chaotic display of ignorant bravado. You might even call it Dealer at their finest.

1. End Breed
2. Gemini

Edition of 100 copies on black vinyl, housed in a hand-stamped recycled cardstock sleeve.

Part of the “FROM WCYT? WITH LOVE..” series.

The exact moment of Dealer’s formation is almost impossible to pin down. Lost in a fug of thick smoke, alcohol and noise; somewhere and someplace out of time and mind.

Tentatively starting out life as Sexless – featuring founding member Kevin Klausen on guitar/vocals and fellow Los Angelean Samantha Mancino on drums – the duo would make a habit of throwing open jam sessions to anyone in earshot. Years prior and by his own admission, Klausen had lost heart after numerous false starts attempting to form his own band and gave up on making music to assume the mantle of tour manager for close friends, The Shrine. Helping the band across Europe and struck by their professionalism, after years on the road he returned in the Spring of 2013 with a handful of songs and a newfound focus.

Relocating to Oakland, Sexless performed a first few shows with whatever bassist could be landed until the night the band met Aaron Cundy of local outfit Easy Living. Followed soon after by the conscription of John Zamora on drums after the departure of Mancino they soon hit upon the sound they were seeking. Sorely shredding their way through discordant moments of pre-punk history – often in a crazed reverie of hard rock solos and cocksure hellfire – they stalked the grooves of Black Flag’s “Slip It In” and the riffs of Voivod’s “Killing Technology.” All the while, sporting the sharpest Canadian tuxedos they could find.

When Zamora eventually chose to leave the band in May 2015, Klausen and Cundy sought total reformation. Drafting in new drummer Darien McKinney for shows, they performed their final gig as Sexless on the 4th of June 2016 before entering Earhammer Studios to record a debut album with producer Greg Wilkinson (Iron Lung, Graves at Sea, Lecherous Gaze) just two days later.

A proposed “cocktail of heavy metal, punk, grunge and rock and roll,” the trio emerged with “Billionaire Boys Club” in hand as Dealer. With the journey at its end, the album is now available worldwide through the band’s own imprint, Wicked World Records.

Dealer:
Kevin Klausen – Guitar/Vocals
Aaron Cundy – Bass
Darien McKinney – Drums

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Dealer, “Gemini” premiere

Dealer, “End Breed”

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Review & Track Premiere: Pushy, Hard Wish

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on June 19th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

pushy hard wish

[Click play above to stream the premiere of ‘Blacktop’ by Pushy. Their debut album, Hard Wish, ships in July from Who Can You Trust? Records and is available to preorder now.]

Classic heavy rock played with conviction, heart and an obvious appreciation for the finer things in life when it comes to riffs — there’s a lot to like immediately about Pushy‘s debut album, Hard Wish. Delivered like their prior split 12″ with Ragged Barracudas (review here) through Who Can You Trust? Records, the awaited release from the Portland, Oregon, outfit conjures a fuzzy vision of ’70s heavy that does more than just boogie, though of course there’s plenty of that as well. From earliest AC/DC to Thin Lizzy, to ZZ TOP, to King Crimson, to a sudden turn from stripped-down KISS strut into an atmospheric prog-out on “If I Cry,” it’s record that makes a point of going where and doing what it damn well pleases, and it even manages to include a wah-drenched revamp of their catchy original demo, “El Hongo” (discussed here) and its eight-track/40-minute run makes for an engaging, organic, live-sounding listen that makes the advice “take it easy” seem like time-honored wisdom.

Comprised of guitarist/vocalist Adam Burke (formerly of Fellwoods), who’s also responsible for the paintings on the front and back of the LP, as well as having done art for this site and a universe of others, Crag Dweller‘s Travis Clow, Neal Munson of Billions and Billions and Ron Wesley of Hosmanek, the four-piece set an easygoing vibe from the very first crashes and shuffling grooves of opener “Fanny’s,” and while they might careen from one influence to the next and offer a bit of zleaze (yup, spelled with two ‘z’s) here and there, it’s all in good fun and Hard Wish succeeds in casting its own identity from the varied elements that make it up, whether that’s the gallop of “Nasty Bag” or the arena-rock grandiosity in the beginning of “If I Cry.”

And there’s a flow at work. Wrapping up side A after “Fanny’s” and second cut “Nasty Bag,” with its nyah-nyah-nyah opening and street-rocking swing, “Blacktop” offers a first glimpse of Pushy‘s progressive side, digging back to the first King Crimson record like it ain’t no thing and pairing that with a proto-burl riff that in most hands would be repelled from the prior stretch like magnets refusing to touch but is absolutely made to work here. By the time they’re rushing through delivering the title-line, Pushy have expanded the context of “Blacktop” an album’s worth, and the fuzzy nod that emerges from there and turns back to the central riff is pure gravy. Only then does “If I Cry” build on the prog edge of “Blacktop” with its own relatively patient beginning and midsection break, the guitars leading the way through about a minute of instrumental exploration that gives way to silence before a volume-swelling solo emerges to wind the way back to the central rhythm, which gets topped with its own victory-lap of a lead before they noodle their way to the end. From that somewhat hypnotic finish, “El Hongo” eases its way in to start off side B with room for a bit of its own psychedelic meandering amid a landmark-feeling hook that’s a standout from the album as a whole.

Pushy 2018

The boogie is writ large over the secondary leadoff, but at five minutes, it’s not necessarily a mirror of “Fanny’s” at the start of the record, which had a shorter clocktime and more straightforward structure without the midsection departure that some of the longer songs make. In that regard, “If I Cry” is something of a foreshadow for the 10-minute closer “Lay of the Land” that follows “El Hongo,” “Lonesome Entry,” and “I’ll Be Gentle,” the latter two of which are also of the shorter variety. No doubt that vinyl considerations came into play when putting together the tracklisting with four songs per side, getting the runtimes close, and so on, but it’s worth pointing out that it works exceedingly well in terms of the front-to-back, with “Fanny’s” setting the tone literally and figuratively while smoothing the way into “Nasty Bag” and the three tracks that follow before “Lonesome Entry,” which is the shortest of the bunch at 2:27, ignites a speedy Cactus-style brashness with Burke‘s vocals hitting a higher register to match the more frenetic pacing of the verses.

Naturally, those are offset by more midpaced transitional sections and though it’s the shortest inclusion at 2:27, Pushy still squeeze in those tempo shifts before the before the cold ending brings on “I’ll Be Gentle” brings forth more boogie vibes and hooks in both its verse and chorus. There’s a tongue-in-cheek aspect to the lyrics — if I’m not mistaken there’s a reference to a “velvet hand” — but the classic feel of the songwriting and the live-style vibe of the recording come through just the same as on “Lonesome Entry” and really everything else before it. And it’s fitting that the two shorter cuts should give way to “Lay of the Land” at the end of the record, which not only makes the most of its two guitars but brings the rhythm section as well to some of its finest moments.

It’s an unenviable task to summarize what Hard Wish has thus far brought forth in its scope of formative heavy, but most if it appears within the more extended finale, from the patient and progressive opening to the subdued verses and the greater build and release that happens later on. Some parts seem to be begging for organ accompaniment, but I guess one has to leave some ground to cover on a sophomore outing, and as their debut, Hard Wish basks in its inspirations without falling into boogie rock cliché — except where it wants to, as on “I’ll Be Gentle” — and sets up a balance of straight-ahead and more exploratory movements to be toyed with from here on out. It’s a sound that, should Pushy be interested in such things, they can keep growing and expanding, since as we know the realm of classic heavy rock is by no means relegated to the past, and the chemistry between players on display throughout Hard Wish is of the sort that can’t be faked, least of all in such a stage-born-sounding context. From a Pacific Northwest so bent on partying, Pushy bring just a touch of class to the proceedings and remind that not all good times need to be overblown to be memorable.

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Pushy LP preorders from Who Can You Trust? Records

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