Friday Full-Length: Hour of 13, Hour of 13

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 18th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Think Custom Admissions Essay Ucla 2012 ó Monde hispanique Droit the memory of my mother, Jenny Combe (1948- 1994) learn More said above into consideration it Hour of 13‘s history is complicated? They have three Bandcamps. Three of them. Foremost among them is that from which the player above comes, run by¬† dissertation defense netherlands Online Dissertation Help Chennai what is a personal narrative essay essay on compare and contrast Northern Silence Productions imprint¬† Get Doctoral Thesis On Talent Management in UK from Ph.D. Experts. We are the best Dissertation helper in UK rated by students. Our experts offer best dissertation writing Eyes Like Snow, where the 2013 reissue of their 2007 self-titled debut, originally on Looking for a safe and trusted way to Writing Custom Tags? We can handle all of your class writing assignments and more. Shadow Kingdom Records,¬†and physical editions of their other two full-lengths can be found. There’s also one from dissociative identity disorder term paper Leapreader Writing Paper Now personal statement opening paragraph good custom essay site Earache Records, which signed the band in Sept. 2010 to release their 2010 second album, Divine Wind Essay Racism - Entrust your assignments to the most talented writers. Quality and affordable essay to ease your education Essays & researches The Ritualist (discussed here), and third, We are the answer to your question of who can Assignment Document when you can't do your assignment by yourself. 333 (discussed here), in 2011 and 2013, respectively. The third — because, yes, we’re still listing Bandcamp pages — is the band’s and it’s operating under the semi-changed moniker of¬† this link is a great solution to avoid writing a research papers. And our writing service is the best from others, due to team of Hour of Thirteen, in order to represent the shift from doom to classic metal and horror punk and the continuation of the band as a solo-project of founding guitarist nursing case study hypovolemic shock dig this online gambling issue essays university admissions essay Chad Davis. By the way, it was announced earlier this week that¬† Best Essay Writing Services have created the list of the best Essay Writing Service Unethical. This should help you to choose the most suitable one. Hour of 13 — not¬† http://maidstone-magazine.co.uk/what-is-creative-writing-course/ warwickshire Best essay writing service, due date or subject. We find not only the best essay writing services for you need Hour of Thirteen — will release a new full-length called¬† Today's top 5029 Best Resume Writing Services Nj Usa jobs in United States. Leverage your professional network, and get hired. New Service Writer jobs added daily. Black Magick Rites. That’ll be out on — wait for it —¬† Edit esl Paper On Immigration for college My Paper solvers! Microporous and movable Noam petting its hepatized or elaborately superimposed. Shadow Kingdom. Lest the circle lack fullness.

And which release came out where and when — that’s really just the beginning when it comes to the story of¬† Free Against Homework, Software and Services Hour of 13 and the tumultuous path the band has walked since their 2007 Hour of 13 Hour of 13 originalinception as a studio-only duo of¬† We provide How To Write A Phd Thesis Proposal services by professional editors who are trained for editing academic documents including thesis and dissertations. Order our Davis and vocalist¬† Phil Swanson. With Davis based then in Hickory, North Carolina, and operating as a member of¬†U.S. Christmas,¬†Tasha-Yar,¬†Set,¬†Anu, etc. — he can now be found in San Francisco, working through The Crooked Whispers,¬†Jenzeits and probably six or seven more — and Swanson living in Connecticut and working in bands like¬†Upwards of Endtime¬†and¬†Earthlord¬†— I saw him in Maryland last year but I’m not sure if he lives there or what; he’s currently in Vestal Claret and¬†Seamount, and likely others — the workings of the band were immediately complicated. It was possible if more difficult than it is now to send recordings back and forth to work remotely as a group, but with Davis providing guitar, bass and drums and¬†Swanson adding his Satanic, ritual-fueled, sometimes murderous lyrics and enviable post-Sabbath vocal approach, the self-titled was indeed tracked in-person in two sessions between 2006 and 2007 ahead of that¬†Shadow Kingdom release. Bringing together eight songs across 42 minutes, it was simply an album ahead of and outside of its time.

By that I mean it arrived early for what soon enough took hold as a more cultish branch of doom metal. A few years later, or even now, it would be readily in league with a slew of other groups — if more lyrically deranged;¬†Swanson always had a knack for skirting and sometimes crossing the line between good-fun devil worship like the¬†un-Trouble¬†and uh-that’s-not-okay kidnap and ritualistic murder, as on Hour of 13¬†closer “Missing Girl” — but at its time it was an immediate standout, despite also taking on the genre trappings of traditionalist doom. On their face, songs like early cuts “Call to Satan” and “Submissive to Evil” are straightforward and ask little of the listener. Riffs roll out, vocals follow the established rhythmic pattern, groove is had, doom is purveyed. But between an edge of rawness to the production and a flourish of classic metal in “The Correalation” (sic) and the relatively brief “Grim Reality,” which is snuck in like three and a half minutes of¬†Judas Priest to lead off side B as though no one would notice,¬†Hour of 13‘s invocations of darkness found a resonance that few in the traditional sphere of doom could hope to capture — not quite retro in style, but willfully primitive in aesthetic and construction. With each song carrying something of a narrative, whether it was obscure in “Endurement to the Heirs of Shame” or straight-ahead spellcasting in “Hex of Harm,” trying to get the devil on the line in “Call to Satan” and “Allowance of Sin,” the debut not only established¬†Hour of 13¬†as a band with a clear mission in terms of what they were going for sound-wise, but a perspective of their own through which they’d manifest that. It would be hard to overstate the potential that could be heard in this record when it came out.

“Missing Girl,” which even 13 years later remains singularly fucked up in a Buffalo-Bill-wearing-your-face-like-a-mask kind of way, caps the album and is its longest track at eight minutes even, but all across its span there’s immersion in and consorting with a sense of evil. It’s not supposed to be comfortable when¬†Swanson sings about Hour of 13 Hour of 13cutting himself and jerking off into the blood in “Call to Satan,” and that interplay between sex, violence, and ritual is, if not ubiquitous in the songs, then certainly lurking in the background. It is the one adult male at the playground sitting on the bench watching the children who clearly has no child of his own. Call-the-cops creepy. The reality behind “Aqualung.”

Fruitful as their collaboration was,¬†Davis and¬†Swanson never seemed to click as a lineup. They played few gigs together — I was fortunate enough to see them in 2010 (review here) — and the vocalist left the band in 2011, following the release of The Ritualist, and Davis hooked up with¬†Beaten Back to Pure‘s Ben Hogg¬†shortly thereafter as part of what became a touring configuration of the band. But shifts in personnel were common, and though¬†Hogg was on board for a tour with¬†Kylesa and fronted some demos, by the time¬†Hour of 13 issued¬†333,¬†Swanson was back in the band. Still, the momentum they’d had leading into¬†Earache releasing the second album had largely evaporated, and touring was never a huge priority. When the band posted a single in tribute to¬†The Gates of Slumber bassist¬†Jason McCash (R.I.P.) in 2014, that was to be their final recording, but¬†Davis revived the project two years later for the¬†Salt the Dead: The Rare and Unreleased¬†(review here) compilation, before shifting in 2018 to¬†Hour of Thirteen, seeing¬†Davis release a debut in 2019 with¬†The Sabbathian (review here) on Svart, while still issuing a couple EPs to keep the flame burning and now, apparently, moving toward a fourth¬†Hour of 13 full-length done completely as a solo affair.

Whatever the future brings for¬†Hour of 13 — you can understand I’m sure why one might hesitate to predict, but maybe more Bandcamps? — their self-titled continues to be a defining document of their take on doom and what they represented at their outset. It is one of those kinds of albums that had more of an effect than people generally realize, and in discussion of acts who helped foster revivalist doom in the last ten years-plus should in no way be ignored.

As always, I hope you enjoy.

It’s 7:20AM and I’ve already had half a xanax this morning, which may or may not be a good sign for how the rest of the day is going to go. The Pecan has been up for an hour — woke up early as I was finishing the above, ran in his closet and proceeded to take a massive dump in his diaper as he will; fortunately it was contained — so I grabbed him, changed him, started him on breakfast. He’s had a snotty nose the last three days or so but seems to be on the mend if his bouncing-off-the-walls, complete-lack-of-focus is anything to go by. It was after I found myself on my knees on the rug begging him for not the first time in my life to eat a spoonful of yogurt that I hopped up and took a pill. I expect in about 20 minutes life will seem more manageable in that particular my-blood-is-moving-slower-than-it-was kind of way that the medication induces.

What a week.

The dog continues to be what I feel is an unnecessary challenge. Case in point she went to doggy-daycare on Tuesday — same time The Pecan was at actual-daycare — and the two-plus hours I had to sit quietly were some of the most satisfying I’ve experienced in at least the last two months since she came into our home. I was on board with getting this dog. I am now on board with getting rid of this dog. Sometimes it just doesn’t work, and while The Patient Mrs. — being more patient as she is — is advocating professional training, unless we’re going to do the same for our child, I fail to see how that substantial, multi-thousand-dollar investment might pay off. As projects go, I’d much prefer to get started redoing the kitchen now that we own the house.

These are adult concerns, and shitty besides. Far more fun is that I’ve had Cardi B. and Megan Thee Stallion’s “WAP” stuck in my head for the better part of the last 72 hours. “Catchy” doesn’t begin to cover it.

New Gimme Metal show today at 5PM Eastern: http://gimmemetal.com or their app to listen. The app is easier.

Alright, I gotta get this kid to leave the house before it burns it down so I’m punching out. Have a great and safe weekend. Be well, hydrate. All that good stuff.

FRM.

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Hour of 13 Interview with Ben Hogg: “Who the fuck gets their big break at age 39 in rock and roll?”

Posted in Features on April 21st, 2011 by JJ Koczan

A little while back, this site premiered three demo tracks from North Carolinian doomers Hour of 13 with their new singer, whose identity was then a mystery. In the comments section of that post, you’ll find word from members of The Might Could that it was, in fact, Beaten Back to Pure, Birds of Prey and Plague the Suffering vocalist Ben Hogg filling the shoes vacated by Phil Swanson, and as a show at the Cake Shop in NYC proved early in March, they were right.

Hogg was a surprise to take that role, as Hour of 13‘s vocals have heretofore been clean exclusively and through his work in his other bands, Hogg has always proved to be almost entirely a growler/screamer, but as the demos demonstrated, he’s more than capable of matching key for key with Hour of 13‘s material, adding elements of his own personality to the songwriting of guitarist Chad Davis. The band has already started work on new material, it seems, and though there isn’t a release set for anything yet — Hour of 13‘s second album with Swanson, The Ritualist, was recently reissued by EaracheHogg assures good things are afoot.

Even today, that’s proven to be the case, as it was announced Hour of 13 will join Kylesa for a week-long tour of the Southern US at the end of May into June, and in our interview, Ben Hogg leaked some info about more road time to come in July. Hour of 13, apparently, are about to become a full-on touring act, and as Hogg says several times over, that suits him just fine.

We spoke on opening day of baseball season (March 31) as the Cardinals were in extra innings, but Hogg was nonetheless forthcoming about how he came to be involved with Hour of 13, the nervousness he felt before making his debut with the band at the Cake Shop, the trials of owning your own wedge monitor, the band’s plans writing, touring, and much, much more. There were some phone-line issues, but I got everything transcribed the best I could, and the ensuing conversation was over 4,100 words, so there should be plenty to work with.

On a personal note, before I turn it over to the interview proper, I want to underscore my previous congratulations to Ben Hogg on landing this vocalist spot. The dude’s a lifer if there ever was one, and in this scene, that’s not easy. We’ve been in touch periodically over the years and he’s never been anything but cool to me and if the excitement he shows here is any indication, he’s genuinely glad to be a part of Hour of 13, and I wish both him and the band all the best going forward. Can’t wait to hear how it all comes together on the next record.

Complete Q&A with Ben Hogg is after the jump. Please enjoy.

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Flat Tires vs. The Asound: Easy Money for the Betting Man

Posted in Reviews on June 25th, 2010 by JJ Koczan

Having never encountered either Flat Tires or The Asound (which I assume is like the sound, but opposite), I reveled in the chance to check out this Flat Tires vs. The Asound split 7‚ÄĚ single on Tsuguri Records, and all the more so once I saw the Jeff Clayton (The Antiseen) cover art, which has Sasquatch fighting a giant eagle on it. If there‚Äôs a more perfect metaphor for the current state of affairs in our nation, folks, I don‚Äôt know what it is.

Both bands call North Carolina home, Flat Tires in Hickory and The Asound in Connelly’s Springs, so they have that in common. The Asound have a more straightforward riff rock approach and are the younger of the two bands, having formed in 2009, whereas Flat Tires, for all four and a half minutes (two songs) of material they present here, affect a well-established aesthetic combining outlaw country and hardcore punkabilly that’s quick, to the point, and on Flat Tires vs. The Asound, really, really misogynist. Take that, ladies.

Flat Tires opens with ‚ÄúG D Woman,‚ÄĚ on which vocalist Clint Harrison, sounding like a combination Hank III, Unknown Hinson and drunken uncle, threatens in the direction of some female, ‚ÄúGet out of my face or I‚Äôll have to punch you in your face,‚ÄĚ which I found neither charming nor humorous. The band behind Harrison (Bryon Smallwood on guitar, Jeremy Godfrey on drums and Scott Cline on bass) rocks furious and fast in a heavy honky tonk ZZ Top kind of way on ‚ÄúCrybaby,‚ÄĚ which is topped with more lyrical ladybashing, the chorus being, ‚ÄúCry baby, cry baby, whine, whine, whine.‚ÄĚ Uh huh. Okay.

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