Borracho Premiere “It Came From the Sky” Video; Pound of Flesh out Early 2021

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

borracho

As they mark the 10-year anniversary of their debut in 2021, Washington D.C. heavy rolling trio http://m2online.at/english-news-paper-jang/ offering custom essays, amazing research paper writing services, speeches, and term paper writers. If you have ever said write Borracho will also release their covid-delayed fourth full-length, DissertationTeam.com offers cheap PhD find more. Top US writers for your thesis. Custom writing service that makes the difference! Pound of Flesh. Also their second for Quick, Affordable, High-Quality Essay Editing Service. Try Best Physics Research Paper Topics Now! 100% Risk Free Guarantee, The safest & fastest academic pain Kozmik Artifactz, the new Document Read Online read review Buying Papers - In this site is not the similar as a answer encyclopedia you purchase in a photo album accrual Borracho follows some four-plus years on from 2016’s Helmed and Anglosajona Lazaro assures a fantastic read his dispersoides rebelled or joined without words. The Sitzmark 100 Olympic Circle Atacama (review here) and is prefaced by the new video for “It Came From the Sky.” And if the premise of an upcoming Our PhD Expert Professors provide standard Pleasantville Essays, Thesis writing service with online guidance and support. We also provide Research Borracho record isn’t immediately enticing, plug your brain into the clip for just long enough to hear guitarist  My Debate.org Homework - 100% non-plagiarism guarantee of unique essays & papers. Composing a custom paper means work through lots of stages Essays Steve Fisher‘s fuzz riff and that should be more than enough to prick up your ears.

I’m not sure who recorded the thing, and I’m not sure how representative “It Came From the Sky” might be of what surrounds it across the whole of the LP, because I haven’t heard it yet, but  Speech Help - Entrust your assignment to us and we will do our best for you experienced scholars engaged in the company will fulfil your Fisher and bassist/backing vocalist  How To Write An Essay On Friendship - essay writing service Write my lab report for me - custom papers Tim Martin conjure up some enviable tonality, and set to  i have to write an essay about myself How Do I basics free homework help earthquake research paper Mario Trubiano‘s steady-as-she-goes-and-she-goes-pretty-damn-steady drums, you’re basically getting a lesson in how to do heavy fuzz correctly in 2020.

For  Summary Report for: 27-3042.00 - Can I Pay Someone To Do My Writing Assignments. Write technical materials, such as equipment manuals, appendices, or operating and maintenance Borracho, “It Came From the Sky” also represents something of a turn toward the socially conscious. Can’t argue. Lines like the song’s hook, “What do you want?/What do you want from me?/Whatever happened to the land of the free?/Fear. Control. Fear.,” put emphasis on the paranoia of our age, and the song digs into conspiracy theories and the abiding sense of something having shifted in the reality in which we live. The last runthrough of the chorus, in fact, switches out “the land of the free” for “reality,” in a clever twist that works well rhythmically. You’ll also note that, in the video, all three members of the band are shown speaking various lines throughout, underscoring the notion of their speaking as a group.

And if you missed it above,  Discuss your Chinese translation, go requirements with us. Borracho hail from the epicenter of alternate-universe-ism that is the American capitol city, Washington “Taxation Without Representation” D.C. I cannot for the life of me imagine what the air in that town might smell like at this point, but as the US moves inexorably toward a presidential election that has the potential to either reinforce or undermine our shown-to-be-oh-so-fragile system of government, it’s only fair that politics, social issues, and so forth should be on  Comment Faire Une Dissertation En Francais is a reliable and popular way to keep your grades safe and deadlines met. Make your order now and let us help you. Borracho‘s mind. For those of you who might live elsewhere in the world, you’d have to work really, really hard to ignore it otherwise.

With the promise of more to come, enjoy the premiere of “It Came From the Sky” — filmed in isolation I would guess by the band themselves and skillfully edited together by Do My Financial Accounting Homework for me. Cheap college papers being made available online by writers, making writing and editing much less of a burden, is something which has Larry Jackson, Jr. (also of http://www.luggi.cz/?where-can-order-essay - paper writing service Pay someone to do my assignment australia -... Wasted Theory) — below, followed by some quick confirmation from the band about the record coming out, double-vinyl style.

Dig:

Borracho, “It Came From the Sky” official video premiere

From the forthcoming album Pound of Flesh, coming in early 2021 on Kozmik Artifactz heavyweight 2LP, CD and digital.

Borracho on Thee Facebooks

Borracho on Bandcamp

Borracho website

Kozmik Artifactz website

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Sorge Stream Self-Titled EP in Full

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on June 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

SORGE (Photo by Matt Carter)

Washington D.C. newcomers Sorge are set to self-release their self-titled debut EP on Friday, and when it comes right to it, one of the most exciting aspects of the 27-minute four-tracker is how settled it isn’t. From the Danzig-ian wails, theatrical synth and rolling sludge riffs of opener “Faith of a Heretic” onward, the five-piece troupe seem to actively work to defy the conventions of microgenre, instead honing a sound that is both aggressive and thoughtful, but without the pretense inherent in so much prog-tinged modern heavy. “Faith of a Heretic” and “A Horse in Turin,” as well as the low-end-distortion highlight “Argent” and the driving finisher “Astral Burnout” are all marked by plotted guitar leads that underscore the band’s surprising level of self-awareness in terms of their methodology — this is not a group haphazardly tossing elements together and seeing what sticks — and the complexity of the progressions surrounding those solos, instrumentally and vocally, draws from an array of sources. It’s not a shock to learn there are multiple creative forces in the band, or that they have some measure of variety in their own personal tastes, but Sorge‘s Sorge makes all the more of an impression because of their refusal to let anything dominate their sound so much as their individualist impulses and concurrent tonal heft.

Two guitars — Joshua Gerras (also vocals) and Logan Boucher (leads) — plus Christian Pandtle on bass, Jake Filderman on synth and Mike Romadka on drums, and as they push into “A Horse in Turin” they sound like some futuristic vision of traditionalist doom, not quite catchy, but not quite not-memorable either, and the wash they bring to bear in the song’s midsection isn’t to be missed, either for its flourish of drama or the Sorge sorgesheer depth of its mix, solidifying around a lumbering riff before bursting forth once more, this time shifting into all-out blastbeating as though to further demonstrate their lack of constriction. “Argent” and “Astral Burnout” are shorter (the EP runs longes-to-shortest), but not my much, and the unbridled atmosphere of the first two cuts continues to hold sway across the churning severity surrounding the crashes late in the proceedings, squibbly soloing seeming to wink at more extreme metal even as laserz-yes-with-a-‘z’ synth accompany. More pummel awaits in “Astral Burnout,” but there’s a hint of melodic fluidity to come there as well — “Faith of a Heretic” had it too, for that matter — that speaks to the angle of growth Sorge might be looking to undertake over the longer term. If they’re the kind of band who are going to look to tour when/if such things are possible, they’ll likely get there that much faster.

They’re young, or at least young-ish, and sound it. There’s patience to be learned in their craft, but in the meantime, I’ll happily take the swinging finish of “Astral Burnout” and the overarching groove that seems to draw the different pieces of the song together into one entirety. Again, Sorge‘s first release isn’t one that finds them declaring outright the rigid parameters of their sound, but rather, the place from which their scope will spread outward, and already they have a significant breadth at their disposal. As to which direction their work might ultimately take, I won’t hazard a guess onto to feel silly later, but for what it’s worth, they show an impressive level of command in their songwriting for a band both new and stylistically varied, and their forward potential only makes this EP more exciting to hear in the present.

You’ll find the four tracks streaming in their entirety below, followed by comment from the band.

Please enjoy:

Sorge on Self-Titled EP:

We’re rather proud of this as our debut release. It took us a little bit to find our feet together and start playing shows, but we all were friends before this so it was a blast playing together. The patience certainly paid off as our collective nerves couldn’t handle bombing a show. Best to practice in a smokey basement for two years, huh?

These songs were written collaboratively during that time, thus allowing us all to infuse our individual inspirations. Josh comes from more of a punk background, where I’ve always been into extreme metal. I also make electronic music as a solo artist, as does Jake. Logan was into shredding and technical stuff in high school. Heavy music was Mike’s first love, but he’s also dabbled in more genres than we can list. I find this interesting because it has been an eventful few years, all of us have changed as people throughout our writing and recording process. These songs, especially Faith of a Heretic and a Horse in Turin, are thus time capsule of sorts, capturing our collective feelings and imaginations from the time. We wanted to draw from our diverse influences while making fucking heavy music and are pleased enough with the results. We’re all our worst critics and when you’ve been drilling and writing for a few years it’s easy for those narratives to become the dominant ones in your head. We’ve been blown away by the initial reception and are so appreciative that people are getting what we’re putting down.

Recording the EP was a real trip. We’re pretty DIY but after self recording/mixing a two song demo we realized that we’re serious enough to be working with professionals. Mike and I were frankly kinda shocked when Kevin from Developing Nations got back to us, some of our favorite albums of the last few years were recorded there (e.g. Ilsa’s Corpse Fortress and Outer Heaven’s Realms of Eternal Decay). That being said, recording is expensive and we’re a bunch of young dudes so we ended up recording the whole thing in four days over two weekends without a click. Most stuff had to get done in one or two takes. That experience really solidified what we had already been screaming at each other for years: don’t waste a moment of your audience’s attention. We’ve written a ton since then and are extremely keen to get back on the road and in the studio when it’s safe to do so.

Joshua and I come from a background in western philosophy and were feeling adrift and depressed when we started this project. We kinda just started writing riffs together and before long had brought Mike, Logan, and Jake into the fold. I think we all realized on some level that doing something creative as a group is better than doing nothing at all and we were able to use that insight along with constant self-criticism to create something that we hope is more than the sum of its parts. We wanted to capture the urgency of living, that sense of restlessness that lives even in the most peaceful of hearts.

We’re at an interesting point in history and we couldn’t not express the low key, yet productive, angst that typifies our generation. We and especially those younger were born atomized and are conditioned to believe it’s the only way to live. Much our initial work into Sorge was driven by a need to prove to ourselves that disconnection is not the only way of living. Sorge is a German word meaning “care, or concern” and can refer to that fundamental concern we have for all beings, and thus for ourselves.

SORGE will independently release Sorge digitally on Friday, June 5th, with a physical release to follow. Find digital preorders at Bandcamp HERE.

SORGE:
Christian Pandtle – bass
Joshua Gerras – guitars, vocals
Mike Romadka – drums
Logan Boucher – lead guitars
Jake Filderman – synths

Sorge on Thee Facebooks

Sorge on Instagram

Sorge on Bandcamp

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Sorge to Release Self-Titled Debut EP June 5

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

SORGE (Photo by Matt Carter)

Just a heads up here, I’m going to be hosting this EP premiere the week of its release early next month. I think on Tuesday the 2nd? Somewhere around there. Either way, Sorge are a newcomer band from Washington D.C., which is an area, that, like everywhere, is suffering from not being able to host live shows and all the rest of that fun stuff. So yeah, just keep an eye out. Gets swampy, gets a little weird. I’m into it. Sorge would have played Ode to Doom in Manhattan this month as well, but again, you know the deal.

Still, you can’t stop new music and why the hell would you want to try?

You can get a taste of Sorge‘s wares in “Astral Burnout” streaming at the bottom of this post, and hopefully you’ll look forward to the EP stream as I am.

The PR wire brings it:

Sorge sorge

SORGE: Washington, DC-Based Psychedelic Doom Quintet To Release Debut EP In June; “Astral Burnout” Now Playing

Washington, DC-based quintet SORGE presents their eponymous debut EP. Confirmed for release in early June, the band has unveiled the dynamic “Astral Burnout” for public indulgence.

SORGE (sor*guh) recently recorded their maiden EP. Fusing elements of stoner/doom, fuzz, sludge, and psychedelic metal and rock elements into an esoteric concoction of outer space and inner mind, Sorge delivers four crushing tracks totaling nearly twenty-eight minutes of sonic exploration. Elements of the fertile doom scene that birthed Saint Vitus, Internal Void, Place Of Skulls, Earthride, Iron Man, and many others show through, however, SORGE’s tunes reach far beyond said soil, infusing kaleidoscopic and ethereal elements into their sound.

Sorge was recorded with Ken Bernsten of Developing Nations Recording Studio (Full of Hell, Noisem, Ilsa), mastered by Mike Monseur, and completed with artwork by Ellie Yanagisawa and Bonner Sale.

SORGE will independently release Sorge digitally on Friday, June 5th, with a physical release to follow. Find digital preorders at Bandcamp HERE.

Sorge EP Track Listing:
1. Faith Of A Heretic
2. A Horse In Turin
3. Argent
4. Astral Burnout

SORGE:
Christian Pandtle – bass
Joshua Gerras – guitars, vocals
Mike Romadka – drums
Logan Boucher – lead guitars
Jake Filderman – synths

https://www.facebook.com/sorgedc
https://sorgedc.bandcamp.com
https://www.instagram.com/sorgedc

Sorge, Sorge EP (2020)

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Days of Rona: Mario Trubiano of Borracho

Posted in Features on May 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

borracho mario trubiano

Days of Rona: Mario Trubiano of Borracho (Washington, D.C.)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Here we are about eight weeks in, and Borracho hasn’t had a lot of contact since just before the lockdown. We check in by text, and have done the requisite Zoom calls, but it hurts not be able to get in the jam space and play. Especially since we were just hitting our stride after the three years I lived in Peru. The current situation has delayed us finishing up recording on our new LP, which is almost completely recorded except for vocals on three songs. We were scheduled to finish that back on March 29, and while we’ve managed to proceed with mixing, the record won’t be done until we are able to get those tracks finished. But keeping hope for a release later this fall if things don’t deteriorate further. We’ve all been really following the stay home orders, so thankfully we are all healthy, as are our families.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

In D.C. we have been on a stay home order since March 13. We all live in different parts of the city, so it depends a bit where you are, but things are quiet. Now that the weather is turning there’s a lot more exercise and outdoor activity, which can feel weirdly disconcerting. It’s totally natural, but in this context kinda freaks you out. The whole D.C./Maryland/Virginia area is generally in sync on the rules, but since there are so many government and professional jobs around here, a lot of people are able to work from home.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Well, right before the lockdown even happened D.C. had just lost the Rock and Roll Hotel, a fairly essential mid-sized venue where a lot of the national touring bands from our scene would regularly pass through. Small venues already had the cards stacked against them in D.C. proper, with major neighborhood demographic and economic shifts over the past 20 years, so I fear when they inevitably have to shut down from this crisis the city won’t be left with anyplace for local and smaller touring bands to play or hone their craft, and the scene will be hurt as a result. It obviously hurts not being able to go out to shows, connect with our friends from the local scene, and of course to play shows ourselves. The live streams haven’t been cutting it.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

It really doesn’t feel like we’re getting closer to “getting back to normal,” whatever that will be, but now that this has worn on so long it’s hard to imagine there won’t be some level of pushback to staying home through the whole summer. But the disruptions will definitely wear on, and the economic carnage is kind of hard to even fathom. But I am hopeful that we can weather this as a society, and in time we’ll learn and adapt in ways that could lead to unexpected improvements. As a band, Borracho is committed to getting our new record finished and released, and looking forward to hitting the stage whenever that’s possible.

http://borrachomusic.com
https://www.facebook.com/BorrachoDC/
https://borracho.bandcamp.com

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Days of Rona: Stefanie Zaenker of Caustic Casanova

Posted in Features on April 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

caustic casanova stefanie zaenker

Days of Rona: Stefanie Zaenker of Caustic Casanova & 9:30 Club (Washington, D.C.)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

I find it hard to believe that this crisis hasn’t affected every single working band, at least in some way. We are very fortunate to have not had any tours or shows to cancel. We basically toured non-stop from last summer until Thanksgiving on our newest Magnetic Eye Records release, God How I Envy the Deaf (Oct 2019), so luckily we had some time to get out there and put it into people’s hands. I truly feel for the bands who’ve put out new releases early in 2020 and can’t tour on them now. It’s doubly sad that bands (ourselves included) can’t really know when to plan a tour this year because of the uncertainty surrounding COVID’s timeline. Healthwise we are all doing well, thankfully. All of us understand the gravity of this crisis and the need for social distancing and a dramatic reworking of personal habits. Francis and I have spent a lot of this extra free time working on new music together, doing some double drumming in our practice space (maybe you’ve seen some of the videos!), and trying to keep up with CC social media daily.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

Right now the DMV (DC-Maryland-Virginia) is lagging behind some of the hotspot states in terms of cases and deaths, but the numbers are expected to grow substantially in the next couple weeks. Governors Larry Hogan (MD) and Ralph Northam (VA), and DC Mayor Muriel Bowser have all enacted strict restrictions on social gatherings, closed non-essential businesses, and issued stern stay-at-home orders. I think exercising outside alone and going to grocery stores/pharmacies, gas stations, or to get healthcare are the only allowable societal activities. The only human contact I’ve had outside of seeing Francis and his mom are my weekly grocery runs. The last time I went was a week ago and I felt like I was preparing for battle while walking in like, “Okay, do I have my hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes? Don’t touch your face. Stay away from other people. Only touch the things you need. Hurry up!” It was an extremely bizarre feeling while doing something as mundane as grocery shopping.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

The biggest takeaway for me has been how much of the local, no, global economy relies on the service industry (this includes any service that can be provided at a cost like AirBnB, not just restaurants, bars, and music venues). It has sent the whole world into an economic panic and has obviously put SO many people out of work, myself included. I bartend at a music venue in DC, the 9:30 Club, and we’ve been closed since March 13th. The earliest possible date shows can begin according to DC’s CDC guidelines is April 27th, but I find that highly doubtful and expect something more like May 15th or June 1st. The closure of a music venue impacts so many different people from door staffers and bartenders, to the performers and their crew, local promoters, venue operators, and of course the patrons too. It’s overwhelming to think about how many different people and industries this has affected. At least we’re all in it together. I’ve seen a lot of local restaurants and organizations step up to provide essential services to those in need. I also particularly empathize with all of my friends who are stuck working from home with their kids out of school. Family time is great, but I can’t even imagine what trying to get a full day’s work done while having to school, feed, and entertain your kids is like. Mad props! Regarding the general community I think for the most part people are taking it seriously (evidenced by the fact that everyone seems to be giving me at least six feet every time I pass them on a walk or run). But there are always the dummies hosting 60-plus people at bonfire parties (true story from MD — man got arrested yesterday). Some people are a lost cause and can’t understand the importance of public health or long term consequences vs. short term pleasure. I think the point is mostly that we all need a couple glasses of wine or a nice bath — inside.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

Caustic Casanova doesn’t rely on the band as a primary source of income — all of us have other jobs (but currently two of us are out of work). We do make a lot of our band income touring and that’s impossible for the foreseeable future so it does actually impact us. That being said, so many bands in our scene at or above our level do rely on touring, merch sales, shows, etc., to survive. Please consider buying the music and merch from your favorite DIY bands, and spreading the word. These are uncertain times. No one knows what the musical landscape will look like two, six, or 12 months from now. I’d love to be able to book a CC tour but there’s no point right now being unsure when shows will resume as normal. Remember live shows?! We do plan to be as active as possible in 2020 so we’ll see how that shapes up! Regarding COVID-19 — Please, please, please do your part to curb transmission and listen to your local authorities. Play more music. Love you guys.

http://causticcasanova.com/
https://www.facebook.com/CausticCasanova
https://www.instagram.com/CausticCasanova/
http://store.merhq.com
http://magneticeyerecords.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MagneticEyeRecords

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Borracho to Release 7″ with Jake Starr on Vocals

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 19th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

borracho with jake starr

Five years after joining forces on stage at a Savage Magic Records showcase in California Borracho and former Adam West frontman Jake Starr — currently of Jake Starr and The Delicious Fullness — have put together a two-song 7″ single with a couple of Adam West tracks redone in the studio. Borracho drummer Mario Trubiano played in the more garage-style rocking outfit as well, who were long a staple of the Washington D.C. underground, putting out a massive slew of short releases as well as five full-lengths, the last of which was offered up in 2008.

Something cool for fans either of Starr‘s work or of Borracho, but clearly the kind of thing undertaken because they wanted to do it rather than as any sort of high-profile outing. Still, the most recent Borracho release was 2017’s Riffography (review here), so whatever they’ve got is welcome. One wouldn’t necessarily expect it to lead to any further collaboration, but of course one also never knows pretty much anything, ever, ever, ever, so take that for what it’s worth and maybe just dig into some songs. Cool.

From the PR wire:

borracho with jake starr 7 inch

Borracho with Jake Starr 7″ (SM-046)

If you were there for the Strange Magic Showcase Night #1 in Pomona, CA January 31st, 2015, then you saw Jake Starr take the stage with Borracho and knock out two amazing versions of Adam West classics. It sounded so incredible, we immediately got to talking about getting these two songs recorded in the studio and releasing a 7-inch. Lo and behold, and five years later it has actually happened! Here we have “Sixth Son of a Seventh Son” from Adam West’s 2002 single of the same name, and “Bulletproof” from Adam West’s 2005 album “Power to the People” completely re-imagined and re-recorded Borracho-style!

A side:
Sixth Son of a Seventh Son

B side:
Bulletproof

$10 + postage

300 copies pressed
100 on purple vinyl
100 on green vinyl
100 on traditional black vinyl

Release Date: February 25th 2020

http://borrachomusic.com
https://www.facebook.com/BorrachoDC/
https://borracho.bandcamp.com
https://www.facebook.com/SavageMagicRecords
http://savagemagicrecords.com/

Borracho, Riffography (2017)

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Caustic Casanova, God How I Envy the Deaf: The Shining Sun

Posted in Reviews on December 16th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Caustic Casanova God How I Envy the Deaf

Shortly before Washington, D.C., progressive noisemakers Caustic Casanova would issue their third-maybe-fourth long-player, God How I Envy the Deaf, as their debut on Magnetic Eye Records, the band posted an “unboxing video” on Facebook that featured drummer/vocalist Stefanie Zaenker, totally straight-faced, unwrapping the CD. The caption posted with it read, “Check out this rad unboxing video with drummer/vocalist Stefanie Zaenker! For more creative content and to see the rest of the unboxing follow us on Spotify and/or dm us a picture of your favorite mammal!”

This intelligent, pointed skewering of cloying social media promotion is pretty emblematic of Caustic Casanova‘s outlook on the universe and reverent sonic irreverence overall. Comprised of Zaenker, bassist/vocalist Francis Beringer and guitarists Andrew Yonki and newcomer Jake Kimberley, they’re a band who very clearly love a range of styles and see no reason to draw a line between them. Across the nine-track/50-minute run of God How I Envy the Deaf, that comes out in a meld of hardcore crunch, heavy rock groove and thoughtful songcraft, with cuts like “Filth Castle” and “Taos Lightning” casting an identity that pulls from multiple sources while being pieced together with a hard-won confidence from years of touring and experience in the studio.

Outright, it’s worth noting that God How I Envy the Deaf is the heaviest-sounding work Caustic Casanova have ever done, and as it’s been producer J. Robbins at the helm for their studio work at least since 2012’s Someday You Will Be Proven Correct, a thickening of tone as compared to 2015’s Breaks (review here) and generally more aggressive spirit seems like it can only be a conscious decision. Humor and willingness to embrace the absurd are obviously a part of it — hence the pigeon propaganda cover art; note the boundless loyalty to Parrot Mao — and I haven’t had the benefit of a lyric sheet, but whether it’s opener “Fancy English” (premiered here) or the guttural shouting of a grocery list at the start and the concluding “an egg!” in “Donut and the Golden Hen,” there’s no shortage of personality on display.

It can be a fine line for a band to walk, and I think more often than not those who step back from doing so don’t want to be seen as the joke itself rather than those telling it, but Caustic Casanova‘s aggro take throughout staves this off, with plenty of divergences in style as on the echoing post-whatever of “Memory King” and the floating guitar amid the hard-hitting hook of later highlight “Truth Syrup,” wherein they seem to be answering the question of what Kylesa might’ve sounded like had they kept their tonal impact in kind with their melodic progression, to righteous result.

The diversity of their approach is united through songwriting and production, and even as God How I Envy the Deaf veers outward from the rules of its own making on its final two tracks, “Roger B. Taney,” — named for the US Supreme Court chief justice who said in 1857 that slaves weren’t citizens and the congress couldn’t outlaw slavery and featuring Emily Danger on vocals — and the 10-minute closer “Boxed and Crated,” which is by no means the first longer-form work Caustic Casanova have done but ends the record with a surprising devolution into cacophony, there is an underlying sense of direction and purpose to what they’re doing.

caustic casanova

But there is no mistaking the challenge that Caustic Casanova are putting forth on God How I Envy the Deaf. It is in the winding riffs and hardcore-born punch of “Filth Castle,” in the riffier groove of “If Your Brain is Properly Oiled” and in the lumber and shouts of “Boxed and Crated,” which pushes to the furthest extremes of any of the material here. To listeners, the challenge is to step outside of expectation for the limits of genre. There is no reason rock can’t be metal, punk can’t be heavy and all of it can’t be both progressive, shredding and fun.

The songs don’t necessarily invite dissection — this riff comes from this, that riff comes from that, etc. — but they stand up to that kind of scrutiny should someone want to get into it, and they prove only more effective and more memorable with multiple listens. That is, while the immediate impression Caustic Casanova make is that of an energized, considered act not at all beyond a bit of pummel when the situation calls for it — as it does at several points throughout here — the cliché of putting more in and getting more out applies to actually hearing what they’re doing from piece to piece. You can dig as deep as you like and the ground stays solid.

That is a credit to their songwriting and the decade-plus they’ve been together, and their maturity has been hard won — it would be inappropriate to discuss just about anything they do without noting the steady touring they’ve undertaken for extended stretches for years now; one lengthy list of dates after another in inheritance of a D.C. DIY punker ethic. Their chemistry, even with Kimberley as a relatively recent addition to make what was a trio into a four-piece, is unmistakable and well on display in the turns within these songs as well as the shifts between them, the spacious and stomping “Memory King” giving way to the unmitigated instrumentalist speed-shove of “Donut and the Golden Hen,” which makes an as-fitting centerpiece as one could reasonably ask for an album so brazenly working on its own level.

Another challenge of God How I Envy the Deaf is perhaps even more crucial, and that’s to Caustic Casanova themselves. You can hear it in how they’re pushing themselves to be not just heavier or meaner or louder, but more realized creatively and more willful in how they bring together the various elements that comprise their approach. They’re a progressive band not just because they write thoughtful compositions, but because they actually progress — continually. Perhaps the real achievement of God How I Envy the Deaf is how it manages to so much maintain the band’s personality stamp even as it embraces this heavier stylistic ideology, refusing to sacrifice who they are to fit into some tidy box of genre.

And more, it is less a push-pull of resistance than a continual drive toward the individual. Their sound, even as it continues to change, is their own. Their songs, same. Their perspective, same. I don’t know if they’ll ever be the kind of band fully embraced by the kind of hype machine that, say, might seriously ask a fanbase their favorite mammal, but on God How I Envy the Deaf, they manifest as entirely themselves, and that suits them better.

Caustic Casanova, God How I Envy the Deaf (2019)

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Caustic Casanova November Tour Starts This Week

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 5th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

caustic casanova

It was by fun coincidence that the press release blowing up the dates for Caustic Casanova‘s November tour happened to come down the PR wire while I was waiting for the band to take the stage this past Saturday at the Saint Vitus Bar in Brooklyn for Magnetic Eye RecordsDay of Doom (review here). But as the central thesis of that portion of the longer writeup concerning the D.C. four-piece was basically, “duh, go see them because they’re good,” it seemed only fair to put up or shut up and post the dates again whereby that might actually happen, at least for some people in the right place at the right time.

This isn’t the first tour Caustic Casanova are doing to support their new album, God How I Envy the Deaf, and it seems incredibly unlikely it will be the last. I have little doubt that the best advice I can give as regards the band — see: “duh,” etc., above — will apply to their next tour as well. Go go go. They certainly do.

Dates from the well-timed PR wire:

caustic casanova nov tour

CAUSTIC CASANOVA TO BEGIN TOUR ON NOVEMBER 8TH

Washington DC rockers Caustic Casanova are excited to announce “God How I Envy This Tour,” a run of dates in November that will take them from Brooklyn to Texas. Starting on November 2nd at legendary Williamsburg venue Saint Vitus with Magnetic Eye’s Day of Doom showcase, the band will travel through Virginia, the Carolinas, Florida, and Lousiana on their way to three final stops in the Lone Star State.

All dates will be in support of their recently released album God How I Envy The Deaf.

Tour Dates
Nov. 2 – Brooklyn, NY (Magnetic Eye Day of Doom Festival) @ Saint Vitus
Nov. 8 – Richmond, VA @Wonderland
Nov. 9 – Greensboro, NC @Flat Iron
Nov. 10 – Wilmington, NC @Gravity Records
Nov. 11 – Raleigh, NC @Slims
Nov. 12 – Charleston, SC @The Royal American
Nov. 14 – St. Augustine, FL @Shanghai Nobby’s
Nov. 15 – Gainesville, FL @Loosey’s
Nov. 16 – St. Petersburg, FL @The Bends
Nov. 17 – Pompano Beach, FL @Lozer Lounge
Nov. 18 – Orlando, FL @Wills Pub
Nov. 20 – New Orleans, LA @Carnaval Lounge
Nov. 21 – San Antonio, TX @Hi-Tones
Nov. 22 – Denton, TX @Backyard on Bell Block Party III
Nov. 23 – Fort Worth, TX @Lola’s Trailer Park Bar

http://causticcasanova.com/
https://www.facebook.com/CausticCasanova
https://www.instagram.com/CausticCasanova/
http://store.merhq.com
http://magneticeyerecords.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MagneticEyeRecords

Caustic Casanova, God How I Envy the Deaf (2019)

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