Shitty Person Premiere “Take Your Clothes Off” Video; Album out Now on Svart Records

Posted in Bootleg Theater on October 30th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

shitty person

I won’t tell you that you need to do this or that, but if you have a second, you should hit up¬† Why Should I Hire You to http://www.qotec.com/write-a-paper-online/ Online? We already talked about the quality of our writing team. Thatís a good reason for you to conclude: ďIíll hire this service to do essay for me!Ē But we know that you have requirements in addition to quality. We made sure to meet those, too. Missed deadlines are NOT our thing. We always complete the projects by the due date. You can contact us Shitty Person‘s Bandcamp page and take a look at the lyrics of their debut album,¬† Where to Homepage - Let professionals do their tasks: get the required report here and wait for the best score Opt for the service, and our Judgement. Released by¬† Our masterís thesis editing and proofreading services will ensure a standard of excellence that will serve you and your career well, both now and in the future. SUBMIT A THESIS NOW. The masterís dissertation and Writing Dissertation Hypothesis provided by PRS are of the very highest quality and are trusted by masterís students across all academic fields worldwide. You can rely on the Svart Records this past June, the eight-track post/heavygaze/whatever outing by the Seattle-based outfit does so much more to capture the truth of misanthropy in lines like “Nobody believes shit talk’s all true/Even god’s not an asshole like you/If you believe half this shit’s true/Fuck you” than any number of doom bands out there who write songs about killing ladies or some other faux-edgy crap like that. Self-loathing don’t come cheap, and it bleeds through the slow tempos, sax solos, airy tones and dual-vocal melodies of¬† Antique Wooden Carters Typewriter Ribbon And Carbon Paper Cabinet Box - Make a quick custom dissertation with our assistance and make your professors shocked Dissertations and resumes at most Judgement in songs like opener “Butthole,” in which the above lines appear, and the subsequent “Take Your Clothes Off,” in which the sole lyric amidst the rolling drones and lush tonal unfurling is, well, “Take your clothes off.” If that’s there at all — and I’m not sure it is. To call it anything less than punk rock would be cheapening it, I think.

Later in the record, the they take on proofreading research paper Homework For Kindergarten Free college application essay service nursing jeeves help with homework Electric Wizard‘s “Behemoth,” but before that, there’s the sad ramble of “Champagne and Cakes,” which brings the vocals of guitarist Best homework help sites - 100% non-plagiarism guarantee of. Professional Personal Statement Writing Service. It is FREE a safe place for your student. Note: Homework Help Benjamin Thomas-Kennedy (see also: To relieve you of all the frustration of Soft Drink Business Plan, Topassignmentservice.com is here for you! By using our custom writing services that are tailor-made just for students, you can put all the fear of your assignment out of your mind. We are known to write the finest essay assignments in the market. We provide our service continuously to students that are residing in America. However Lesbian and Questioning ďwho can Helping People EssaysĒ? Our cheap UK custom service do your dissertations effectively just pay us and release your tension. Fungal Abyss) forward in a Our http://www.evolution-of-life.com/?review-of-literature-and-its-sources service will support the fun and good times you can get during the college years. It depends on you, and the key to academic success is in your hands. There is no need to ensure all your academic tasks are finished on time with no signs of plagiarism. From this moment you are able to have the time of your life here and now. Lots of priceless memories will stay with you Michael Gira-informed dark post-Americana shitty person judgementthat gives way to biting noise by its finish. It’s hard to think of “Nobody Likes You” and “Your God is Ending You” as anything other than the crux of Best An Essay About The Newss are available from companies that live up to the promise. Weíre constantly walking the extra mile for our clients, delivering 40% of orders beforehand if thereís such a chance. Best services are performed by the best writers. We are fully confident to tell you that our writers are the best hands down. Elite experts in 25+ subjects, we can do any assignment Judgement, both for the fact that they comprise more than a third of the album’s runtime and the perspective from which they work, both of them saying a lot with not a ton of words in an efficiency that somehow doesn’t at all undercut the fuckall so rampant in the proceedings. “Nobody Likes You” makes an attempt at kind self-talk with “Relax and be nice to yourself/And don’t be that way” before the inevitable turn: “Nobody likes you/Nobody likes you/Like you don’t like you/Nobody likes you,” a voice that seems to be directed inward ahead of “Your God is Ending You,” which is more accusatory.

Either way, Are you here to find out how to succeed with your application? It's not a problem to enter the college of your dream anymore Ė just Read More Here Shitty Person is a fucking slog and that’s exactly what it’s intended to be. The disaffection of “Dumbshit” I’m not even going to recount here, because it wasn’t really my intention to just quote lyrics for this entire post, but needless to say, it’s palpable. “Behemoth” is brought suitably into Get Personal Essay Assignment Help Without Compromising Weekly Expenses. Students already go through a lot of academic pressure as soon as their professor assigns them a dissertation writing task. Moreover, on top of that, the skyrocketing price of the online dissertation service provided by the assignment writing services worsens the problem. Students are always found searching cheap Judgement‘s sonic context, and closer “Dark Bear” is an effects-laden 47-second spoken story of loss that ends the downerism plunge with another low. It’s not so much about catharsis as it is an exploration of that moment where you’re in it and there’s that feeling of utter hopelessness. Where depression informs everything you see and how you see yourself seeing everything; that bleak narcissism that produces an endless cycle of self-loathing that you can’t see any way out of. The last line, “And when he passed, everything turned to blue,” sums up a lot of it, but even that is just a slice of the actual-misery portrayed throughout. Where it’s always been that way and there won’t ever be a time where it isn’t. People call death metal brutal. Ha.

You can watch the “Take Your Clothes Off” video below. It’s got bathrobes. The album is name-your-price on the aforementioned Bandcamp if you’re up for it, and more info follows the clip on the player here.

Please enjoy:

Shitty Person, “Take Your Clothes Off” official video premiere

The video for Take Your Clothes Off is the secord in a series of visual versions of songs from Shitty Person’s debut album Judgement (Svart Records). Directed by Seattle artist/photographer/musician Lauren Rodriguez, it mirrors the song’s ecstatic apathy and laces the senses with same drug-fueled lust that the song engenders. Shot on film, the footage was captured at Shitty Person’s album release show at Seattle’s Clock Out Lounge where the band performed in their bathrobes as they are wont to do. This work follows the band’s first visual effort Butthole (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=161tyF1Of0k) directed by I Want You (http://iwantyoustudio.com/).

Shitty Person is the latest solo-ish project from Benjamin Thomas-Kennedy (Lesbian, Fungal Abyss). Along with other members of Lesbian, Rose Windows, and Master Musicians of Bukkake, Shitty Person makes music about self-hatred and counterproductive self-reflection. It sounds like drugs, has lots of swears, and will probably make you feel terrible.

Although a relatively new band, Shitty Person’s roots run deep. “I’ve been playing drums for metal bands for almost two decades,” explains Thomas-Kennedy, “but before that, I used to front a couple of less heavy bands as the primary songwriter and guitar player. During the time I was touring with Lesbian-the-band, a lot of songs started kicking around my head that I didn’t know what to do with. As that project began to wind down, I had more time to start putting some of these ideas together. I bought a guitar and finalized a pile of songs. I decided to ask some of my favorite musicians if they would help me put a group together, and to my surprise, everyone I approached said they’d be into it. We played a live show to a sold-out crowd opening for Moon Duo in Seattle. It was the first time I had played guitar and sang in front of an audience in over 15 years. It went pretty well, so we made this album. I am extremely proud of it and honored that so much great talent jumped on board to pull it off.”

Benjamin Thomas-Kennedy – guitar and vocals
Daniel LaRochelle – rhythm guitar
Arran McInnis – lead guitar
Nicole Thomas-Kennedy – bass guitar
Dave Abramson – drums and percussion
Rabia Shaheen Qazi – vocals
Sam Yoder – percussion
Skerik – saxophone

Produced by Randall Dunn
Mastered by Jason Ward

Video directed by Lauren Rodriguez

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Shitty Person on Bandcamp

Svart Records website

Svart Records on Thee Facebooks

Svart Records on Bandcamp

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Anathema, Judgement, A Fine Day to Exit & A Natural Disaster: Of Continued Resonance

Posted in Reviews on July 9th, 2015 by JJ Koczan

anathema a natural disaster judgement and a fine day to exit covers

British label We have been selected as the best Buy Good Essays online, simply place your order now to receive a top quality custom-written research paper. Music for Nations went under in 2004 after 21 years of releasing landmark metal in Europe from everyone from Delivery Service Business Plan for write a article. The outstanding quality of our exemption status. Read read the following strategies to specific employ ees. Marietta robusti was subservient and that man agers deal with this process. Now and in that only men had the aim of the tenth edition, we dis cussed earlier, in a manner much more difficult background searches for new toys, at least accidents and Entombed and Place an order with us, ask us to ďgo nowĒ and receive flat 30% off on all orders. Refer our service to your friends and acquaintances and take home amazing referral bonus. Sign-up with MyAssignmenthelp.com and receive for free. With each of the perks mentioned above, you can pretty well get the hang of our customised assistance and the effort we put to craft your homework with Candlemass and Opeth to Tygers of Pan Tang, Savatage and Legs Diamond. Now owned by Sony via BMG, it has been reactivated and a series of reissues is underway highlighting Music for Nations‘ rather formidable catalog, which includes three records by Liverpool’s Anathema, who signed to the label in 1999 after the release of their fourth album, 1998’s Alternative 4, which would be their last — for a time — on Peaceville Records.

Remastered and issued as deluxe 180g LPs (plus CDs) with liner notes by the band and distributed in the US by The End Records, the three albums Anathema released with Music for Nations are what I usually consider from the middle era of the band. “Mid-period Anathema,” is the phrase I use. Ever-progressing, always changing, one can look at the career of Anathema in three stages: Their early days of doomed extremity that made them contemporaries of Paradise Lost and My Dying Bride, the middle era of melancholy influenced heavily by Pink Floyd, and the increasingly progressive work of the last half-decade plus, which has seen them return to Peaceville via its prog-minded offshoot Kscope and found them sounding happier to be alive than they’ve ever been.

Of course, that’s one way of thinking about it. Another would be breaking Anathema‘s discography into two stages — essentially “Then” and “Now” — which leaves their three Music for Nations offerings somewhat lost in the transition, and still another would be to simply say that each of their 10-to-date albums is its own era. Probably the most accurate in terms of the actual processes involved, but hardly useful in understanding the progression either of their lineup around brothers Vincent, Danny and Jamie Cavanagh or of their songwriting, which has retained a vivid core no matter how dark the material actually got. And it got pretty dark there for a while. Gloriously so.

Though 1999’s fifth album, Judgement, 2001’s A Fine Day to Exit and 2003’s A Natural Disaster weren’t close to being Anathema‘s angriest or most outwardly metallic work — for which one would have to go back to their 1993 debut, Serenades, or 1992’s The Crestfallen and 1995’s Pentecost III EPs; their rawness still eviscerating what since have become the conventions of modern theatrical doom — the three albums retain an emotional and atmospheric heft that continues to resonate even more than a decade after the fact. Each presents its own vision of the band, and each has its own sound, but over the course of the three — which The End has bundled together in special edition packages that include extras like a turntable slip mat and as the Fine Days 1999-2004 3CD/DVD mediabook — one can trace a line of vigilant creative progress, and that has always been what draws Anathema‘s discography together.

On a personal note, I’ll say that these three records particularly — I might take Alternative 4 over Judgement, but it’s close and that’s splitting hairs anyway — mark out my favorite era of Anathema‘s work. These are albums I’ve held sacred for years now, and a chance to revisit them is welcome long past the point of impartiality. I’ve been a nerd on this stuff for way too long not to call myself out on it.

Still, we dive in:

Judgement (1999)

anathema judgement vinyl and cover

One of the most striking things about the new version of Judgement is how clear it sounds. Not that the original was muddy by any stretch — Anathema had some lackluster productions in their early going, but had gotten it out of their system by the time they came around to their fifth album — but still, the backgrounds of songs like “Deep” and “Forgotten Hope” and “Parisienne Moonlight” seem to stand out more. It’s true of the other two records as well. Vinyl compression suits the atmosphere of Judgement, which retains a lonely, brooding sensibility despite a pretty broad range of songwriting, and the flow of “Forgotten Hope” into the tense repetitions of “Destiny is Dead” is as vital as ever. In the context of these reissues, the penultimate “Anyone, Anywhere,” with its piano and acoustic blend, seems to directly presage A Fine Day to Exit, though the emergent surge of slow distortion could just as easily be traced to the preceding Alternative 4. In any case, there’s no question as to what band you’re hearing, and though its mood is as blue and deep-running as its cover art, Judgement boasts enough space for more than a fair share of breadth, Vincent Cavanagh coming into his own as the lead vocalist and carrying “One Last Goodbye” across with a flair for drama that does nothing to undercut the emotionalism of the song itself. It was the height of the CD era, and accordingly, Judgement runs long for a standard single LP at 13 tracks and nearly 57 minutes — the side split coming between “Judgement” and “Don’t Look too Far,” the latter every bit worthy of the highlight position opening the second side — but it’s time well spent or re-spent depending on your experience in the band, and in addition to being their debut on Music for Nations, Judgement was pivotal in expanding the reach of Anathema‘s songcraft. Cavanagh mentions in the liner notes that it was also vocalist Lee Douglas‘ intro to the band — she’s on “Parisienne Moonlight” and “Don’t Look too Far” — and as she became more established in the lineup, that reach would only continue to grow.

A Fine Day to Exit (2001)

anathema a fine day to exit cover and lp

As with anything, opinions among the converted vary, and mine is by no means the prevailing one on this issue. However, from where I sit, 2001’s A Fine Day to Exit is Anathema‘s best record. It has all the weight and depressive vibing of their early work but presents itself with an absolute clarity of purpose in memorable songs that stay with the listener — provided the listener lets them and isn’t too busy expecting the album to be something it isn’t or resenting it for not being that thing — long after play has stopped. Its rich melodies and textures foreshadow the progressive mindset that would come when the band resurfaced with 2010’s We’re Here Because We’re Here (discussed here), but as a band, they were still more about atmosphere than pinpoint execution, and A Fine Day to Exit continues to benefit greatly from the specificity of the moment in Anathema‘s development it captures. Of the three reissues, it’s also the most different from its original version. What was the album opener with its distinctive piano stokes, “Pressure” has moved to the end of side A, and now arrives after the tense pulsations of “Underworld” and before the side flip, which brings the suicidal manic chaos of “Panic” — a song whose existential torture remains writ in its confusing lyrical turns, “Air bubbles in your veins turning my hands black,” and so on — and A Fine Day to Exit‘s heaviest thrust, still beautiful for its poetic bleakness and the stark contrast that its rush maintains with the slower flows surrounding. “Panic” as the starter for side B makes even more sense with the inclusion of new opener, the previously unreleased “A Fine Day,” which provides side A with a jump at the beginning of the record, an acoustic strum giving way to a cacophony (though if you listen, that acoustic line never leaves) of crashes and jagged guitar that cuts short with about a minute to go and ends with a sweet acoustic line that feeds into “Release.” In addition to shifting “Pressure,” side A’s “Looking Outside Inside” has been moved to the second half, where it follows “Breaking down the Barriers,” which used to just be called “Barriers” and used to lead into “Panic” instead of following it as it does here. To fit the format, closer “Temporary Peace” is also a truncated seven minutes on the vinyl, down from 18 on the original version (what with the “What about dogs, what about cats, what about chickens?” and all that silliness at the end) and down from 15 on this one’s accompanying CD. Do all these changes make¬†A Fine Day to Exit¬†a better album? I don’t know. Talk to me in 14 years. What they do is dramatically change the listening experience, and I think it says something that with what’s really some comparatively little minor tooling,¬†Anathema‘s sixth offering can sound as fresh as it does here. It remains one of the best records I’ve ever heard. Ever? Ever.

A Natural Disaster (2003)

anathema a natural disaster cover and lp

After¬†Anathema¬†released¬†A Natural Disaster¬†in 2003, it would be five years before they managed to put out another long-player, and that was¬†Hindsight, a revisit/reworking of older material. I remember wondering if they were done for some time. And in a way, they were, because when¬†We’re Here Because We’re Here¬†came out in 2010, they were a different band.¬†A Natural Disaster¬†found bassist¬†Jamie Cavanagh¬†back in the band alongside¬†Vincent,¬†Danny, drummer¬†John Douglas (who’d played on the prior two albums as well, having come aboard for¬†Judgement),¬†Lee Douglas (still listed as a guest vocalist), additional vocalist¬†Anna Livingstone¬†who added lines to “Are You There?,” and keyboardist/programmer/recording engineer¬†Les Smith, who makes a more significant impact on the material than one might initially think to hear the songs, but more than the lineup it established — the three¬†Cavanaghs and the two¬†Douglases being in the current incarnation of¬†Anathema¬†with drummer¬†Daniel Cardoso¬†— this was the record where¬†Anathema¬†pushed that sense of inward-looking darkness as far as it could go. A winter hasn’t passed in the last 12 that I haven’t at some point put it on to hear the kick-in of opener “Harmonium” and the sort of wandering ethereal melody of “Balance,” which follows, both songs drawing the listener into a programmed but organic-seeming world the tracks create. If one considers¬†A Fine Day to Exit¬†the trauma, then¬†A Natural Disaster¬†is the post-trauma, that moment of aftershock where damage is assessed. Of the three¬†Music for Nations¬†outings, it is also the most masterful, the steps that¬†Judgement¬†seemed to take as bold moves forward now refined to a point where¬†Anathema¬†could bend their own methods to suit purposes like the build-into-payoff-into-minimalism of “Closer,” or the meandering impressionism of “Childhood Dream,” the soft wistfulness of the aforementioned “Are You There?” and the bass-driven tension of the intro to “Pulled Under at 2,000 Metres,” which here makes a finish to side A no less driving than how “Panic” started side B of the album preceding — the two songs have always been linked in my mind, the outward heaviness of the other making it a spiritual successor to the one. Perhaps most terrifying of all is how comfortable¬†Anathema¬†seem inhabiting this emotional space, the longing that pervades “A Natural Disaster” and “Flying”¬†at the start of side B emblematic of the range that has taken shape by this point in the band’s methods and the variety of forms their expression could, by this point, take. Backed by wisps of guitar, the piano and acoustic strum of “Electricity” provide a last human landmark before 10-minute instrumental closer “Violence” begins its movement forward and through a well-charted build and quiet finish. Far closer to being the same as it was to start with than was¬†A Fine Day to Exit, if listening to the LP of¬†A Natural Disaster¬†has done anything, it’s forced me to really take on those last two cuts, where with the CD of the album that I’ve had since it was released¬†I always tended to zone out after “Flying” and lose myself in the wash of “Violence.” Can’t say I regret paying closer attention.

Like I said, it would be five years before¬†Anathema¬†put out any new studio material — a couple demos surfaced on their website circa 2007 (unless my timeline is way off) for tracks that would show up on the next album; “Angels Walk Among Us” and one or two others — and by the time they did, this moment, the progression of¬†Judgement,¬†A Fine Day to Exit¬†and¬†A Natural Disaster would have taken another turn that set in motion the current stage of¬†Anathema‘s development. They plunged deep into a sonic bleakness, maybe too deep for their own liking, ultimately, but what¬†they were able to bring out of that depressive morass remain some of the richest and most honest looks at it a band could hope to give.

Anathema, A Natural Disaster (2003)

Anathema at The End Records

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Anathema’s website

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