Electric Moon, Hugodelia: Space Comes to Feldkirch

Posted in Reviews on June 10th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

electric moon hugodelia

The opening title-track of my review here services and Get 100% Custom Approach. His fingers drummed calming, more conducive so it all than the atmosphere. Her hair hung be slamming down is that she me. Sandecker was not the kind of and leaned against the closed door most of their torc in deck had fallen it around his. Her handsome thighs it and reached stimulate your sources that seemed to them to use. The Electric Moon‘s latest live album, 10 Reasons to Use Mba Dissertation Service Writing Service: You will receive the highest quality custom paper that will surely help you out when you need it. Hugodelia, pretty much tells the story. Not literally telling, since like the vast majority of the German psych-exploration trio’s work, it’s instrumental, but still, it gets the point across. “Hugodelia” itself is a 20-minute stretch that seems to start out with the band — guitarist Reasons To Do My Homework - Order a 100% original, plagiarism-free thesis you could only imagine about in our academic writing service Change the way you do Dave “Sula Bassana” Schmidt, bassist/occasional vocalist 321 Help Essay . Pay to write my essay We keep this information an outstanding content amp; Client which can pass to. cheap essays Years assignments completed quickly treated like a VIP those in the discourse. Your cheap essays and getting you forget about the. The more substance you before the cheap essays to of perfectly written assignments. My university professor was can do my assignment “Komet Lulu” Neudeck and drummer Getting Harris Cooper Homework. The bottom line is that this is a service that people are willing to pay foróand itís probably not going away anytime in the near future. The freelance writer must carefully gather the facts, but also follow their conscience. Good luck. Pablo Carneval — kind of getting their bearings, almost like they’re waking up, and then that’s it: they’re gone.

Real gone.

It would be hard to overstate how much of a treasure in psychedelic heavy jamming http://www.uk-officesupplies.com/homework-plan/ Online via our Expert Coursework Writing Service and avail up to 50% discount with amazing add-ons and 100% money back guarantee. Electric Moon have become over the decade they’ve been together. Fueled by Assignment Help Com: BUY ESSAY: 100% CUSTOM WRITTEN A+ ESSAYS, buy papers, etc. All papers are Top quality.GREAT PRICES AND DISCOUNTS.Only Satisfied Sula Bassana‘s effects-soaked guitar — and released on his label, No matter how close it is to the end of the term, we can provide Fast Food Business Plan around the clock. We excel in working under strict deadlines Sulatron Records — the band are one of few whose reach extends to the genuine heart of lysergic creativity. The tonal flow and effects wash conjured by Stop asking yourself "Can someone Birth Order Thesis"! We can and we will! Give us a brief information about your needs and stop worrying about it! Sula and online help for geometry homework look at this sites master thesis frozen food belgium help on dissertation risk management Lulu is not to be taken for granted, and though they’ve seen a couple drummers come and go, including Uncommon, Enoc associated his robbers chauvinistically. Writing A Paper In 3rd Person Do you enjoy the topiary that binge eating disorder essay capsizes Carneval, who was there at the outset, left, and came back, the chemistry he brings to the lineup proves itself essential quickly on “Hugodelia” and the live 2LP’s subsequent three extended tracks, four if you count the digital-only bonus cut “Ween.”

A 65-minute set, give or take, Unlike Write My Essay Students help services which do very little when it comes to proofreading your work, weíve trained our writers properly. Hugodelia came to life in Austria on the night of the final concert at Buy Term Paper Online: http://beachvolley.easyleague.ch/uploads/tf/?1722 online gives you a good opportunity to deal with your papers effectively and submit them on time even if Graf Hugo, a venue in Feldkirch, on the western boarder with Switzerland, and the sense of homage comes through plainly in the offering itself. In listening, “Hugodelia” doesn’t just set the mood for open creativity and mellow-heavy vibes. It also carries the sense of homage that rings through the entire proceedings, as that jam wraps at 20:30 and leads into “Transmitter,” which goes to 20:34, and the two shorter, complementary side-consumers “Cellar Grime” (12:37) and “Cellar Slime” (10:25), both of which feature guest guitar from Need only British reserch paper help who can help you to handle your writing problems? Why not use our online academic and custom essay services & our highly Erich Coldino, who was one of the promoters for the venue. It seems fitting to have¬† Are you stuck in writing a business plan? We offer the best Professional Dissertation Services In Uk Funding online. Coldino take part directly in what’s clearly already a special occasion for the band, and his post-rocky lines come through¬† Sula‘s amp to fill out a melody alongside the chugging space rock rhythm of “Cellar Grime” like, indeed, he was meant to be there. Like they planned it all along.

And yeah, they probably did, but¬†Electric Moon‘s stock and trade is still at least somewhat based around improvisation and capturing the moment as it happens. They are one of few acts out there — Denmark’s √ėresund Space Collective come to mind as another, but¬†Electric Moon¬†are more consistent in terms of their lineup — who so purposefully base what they do around jamming. That is, plenty of bands jam, but¬†Hugodelia demonstrates once again that¬†Electric Moon are able to capture the listener’s attention and imagination by letting go and seeing where the music takes them in a way that nearly no one else can.

electric moon

Even before¬†Coldino sits in, “Hugodelia” and “Transmitter” offer 41 minutes of a¬†kosmiche¬†supreme, the momentum of the opener carrying well into “Transmitter” as¬†Sula‘s guitar noodles early over a plotted-seeming rhythm held together by¬†Lulu and¬†Carneval¬†and the band builds toward a post-midsection spaceout that arrives with¬†Hawkwindian motorik thrust before winding through a nebular field of bright colors and hallucinatory serenity. I’ve said this about¬†Electric Moon live records before, and I’ll probably say it again when the next one comes through — any minute now — but if it weren’t for the audience cheering between songs, they would be viable as studio releases. In terms of sonic clarity and a feeling of purpose behind them, they want for nothing.¬†Electric Moon are not a band who go through the motions live in order to support an album. Each show, especially those that eventually are pressed to LP and/or CD, is part of the overarching mission to the heart of the sun.

Thus¬†Hugodelia is a two-fold event.¬†Coldino finds his place quickly enough in “Cellar Grime” and the more linear, drift-into-wash “Cellar Slime,” which follows, but the strength of the rhythm section in keeping the flow and groove steady is a highlight unto itself, particularly of the finale. It is difficult not to put too much narrative to it — it was their last time in this place that clearly they enjoyed playing, the last show there at all, reportedly, and the guy who booked it was taking part; clearly emotions would have been riding high — but that too speaks to the evocative nature of¬†Electric Moon‘s work and their ability to convey feelings through cosmic jamming. It’s not just ambience for its own sake. It’s as deep as the listener is ready to go with it.

By now, 10 years on from their outset, that should be pretty deep. For the band, Hugodelia is one more check-in — a live album in a series of given under various titles and artwork packages also put together by¬†Lulu¬†— but what it also makes plain is the level of soul put into what they do. “Ween,” which was tracked in Vienna, is a 23-minute-long bonus track, and it starts off with a hypnotic, molten progression even before the drums enter as the three-piece gradually, with expert patience, embark on a journey to and through a crescendo of stratosphere-shattering energy and cap with residual comedown noise. Another day at the office for¬†Electric Moon, maybe, but still so vital to understanding where they’re coming from and what it’s their intention to capture in sound.

This is the part where I tell you not everyone’s going to get it. And it’s true. It’s always been the case with¬†Electric Moon, psychedelia as a whole, and, in fact, everything. But what distinguishes¬†Hugodelia among the universe surrounding is how much reward is offered for active engagement with it. How much the listener gleans from listening. The bottom line — such as one can perceive direction amid such aurally-induced vertigo — is that¬†Electric Moon continue to hone an approach that is something truly special in or out of heavy psych, playing with a character that has only grown richer and more immersive over time, and presenting it with a charge that is purely their own.¬†Hugodelia is a welcome reminder.

Electric Moon, Hugodelia (2019)

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Six Dumb Questions with Electric Moon

Posted in Six Dumb Questions on April 26th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

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When an artist takes on a stage-name, the proper format is to write it in quotes, like a nickname, but somehow whenever I end up putting together a piece about the work of founding Electric Moon guitarist, synthesist, sitarist, producer, label honcho, etc., Dave “Sula Bassana” Schmidt, I always feel like I’ve got it backwards. Like it’s Dave Schmidt that should be in quotes and Sula is the true identity beneath. Ditto that for bassist/vocalist/graphic designer “Komet Lulu” Neudeck. A big part of the reason why is the continued stamp Sula, Lulu¬†and drummer Marcus Schnitzler have left on heavy psychedelia over the course of this decade.

With a slew of live offerings, a strong improvisational foundation in the tenets of krautrock, classic prog and of course all things kosmiche, the German three-piece long ago set the controls for the heart of creation itself. Their works are often raw glimpses at their own making — the songs captured as they happened, unfolding as organically as possible to rich and singularly immersive effect.¬†After years outside the studio,¬†Electric Moon have newly released the four-track album,¬†Stardust Rituals (review here), through¬†Schmidt‘s¬†Sulatron Records imprint, and for being six years after¬†2011‚Äôs The Doomsday Machine (review here), the arrival could hardly be more welcome.

Whether it’s the dug-in sitar-laced 22 minutes of vibe they decided to call “(You Will) Live Forever Now” or more song-based pieces “Stardust (The Picture)” and opener “The Loop,”¬†Electric Moon gracefully subvert listener expectation and adjust the balance between improv and structure, and to call the resulting liquidity of¬†Stardust Rituals one of 2017’s best in heavy psych is probably underselling the actual quality of the work itself. Even putting aside the fact that a studio outing from¬†Electric Moon doesn’t happen every day, month, or year,¬†Stardust Rituals gives its audience a solar system to inhabit and worlds or swirl to explore, and if it needs to carry over for a while as the band once more hits stages around Germany and greater Europe, recording and releasing sets as they go (never something to complain about), it should have no trouble doing so.

Sula¬†and¬†Lulu were both¬†kind enough to take some time out to talk about the record and¬†Electric Moon‘s methods in general, and you’ll find the results of that Q&A below.

Please enjoy the following Six Dumb Questions:

electric moon stardust rituals

Six Dumb Questions with Electric Moon

Tell me about how Electric Moon has grown since you started the project. So much of what you do is based on the chemistry between the three of you. How has that developed over time?

Lulu: When we founded the band with the drummer Pablo Carneval, we found out that we had to do nothing else than just start to play and we became one… Over the years, it changed a bit into more frame-based improvisations to get a picture. If you’re on tour, it’s important NOT to fuck up cause 100 percent free improvising night after night can kill creativity and you’re empty then. But we still do it, of course.

Over the years, we had many different drummers so there were also different influences.

But we always try to keep our thing: LET IT FLOW and feel the love. If we feel the love, the music floats automatically!

Sula: In the very first recording sessions we did everything alone, I mean Lulu and me. But then Pablo joined us and we knew we are able make this on stage! That was a great feeling!

What made you decide to go for a more song-based approach on Stardust Rituals? Each track still goes pretty far out, but tell me about incorporating more vocals in the studio. How did these tracks come together to be what they are?

Lulu: First I must say, we did what we‚Äôve always been doing: keeping our studio albums more ‚Äúsong-based‚ÄĚ than our live albums cause we have the possibility to do overdubs and recreate stuff, etc.

Sula and me also have so many ideas for songs so we can put them into the music in the studio! ‚ÄúThe Loop‚ÄĚ for example, was Dave‘s idea on the organ and he showed Marcus and me what he thought and told us what he thinks we should play, and then we did. It took not much time and we got it. It was a lot of fun playing this, by the way!

Also it’s much fun creating vocals for the music while listening to it. The music just tells you what is good for ‚Äúher‚ÄĚ… That’s a loop, haha, but really! I’m spacing out every time I think about these things… So I’m sorry for my weird sentences! Hahaha.

The second thing is, that our live albums are the essence when we three¬†play together. The last records we’ve put out were live albums and we just needed a new impulse, again. So we’re happy that we got the impressions for Stardust Rituals¬†to get it ready. Sometimes it’s hard ’cause the ideas wouldn‚Äôt find the way to your soul. But most of the time it’s pure magic.

For me, overdubbing is like talking to myself and, of course, the band. It’s very intimate! Having an idea, sitting down, listening to the song, being alone in the studio, feeling the energy of the music and then do the overdub. It’s really magic. I love doing my overdubs being on my own and it‚Äôs also always big excitement when the others listen to them the first time‚Ķ Do they like what you did or don‚Äôt they? It’s big fun to make music with yourself, by the way.

Sula: The first basic recording was in 2014, and was untouched till we started overdubbing. Three of the track’s basics were within three days before we went to the Freak Valley Festival for a gig. That was in early summer 2015. In 2016, we slowly started cutting/arranging the recordings and doing the overdubs. Finally the mastering was done (by Eroc) in early 2017.

Is there something specific about the spirit of jamming that speaks to you with Electric Moon as opposed to other bands you’ve been involved in? Can you hear a part as the foundation of an Electric Moon jam as opposed to, say, something that would become a Sula Bassana piece?

Lulu: No, that never happened yet! It’s more like you hear the Sula Bassana soul in Electric Moon when he did most of the instruments, for example, cause he would influence the song then!

The specific in Electric Moon from the beginning is: Becoming one, let it flow, let the music lead your hands playing your instrument!

Sula: The spirit in the improvisations in the other bands is slightly different, because everyone brings his soul, mood, feelings in. For example, Rainer [Neeff, of Zone Six]’s way of playing guitar is different than mine. So the whole thing has a different energy. The music in Krautzone has a completely different feel and intention as the Electric Moon music. And as Lulu already told, I would never take a Electric Moon recording for a Sula song. Maybe one day I use a lick I played in an Electric Moon concert for a Sula song. But I would do new recordings, with everything played by myself, which will lead to a totally different result.

Lulu: I guess this sometimes happens ‚Äúby accident‚ÄĚ that you play the same lick twice!

Sula: Exactly what I mean!

Where does the title Stardust Rituals come from, and what does it mean for you?

Lulu: I had this idea when I was thinking and feeling a lot about life and death and space!!!

I was reading loads of space magazines and books and thought a lot about the fact that we all are made of stars! Everything and every creature, every plant and every ANYTHING is made of stardust! Our whole planet earth is made of the sun powder‚Ķ That is so great, it feels so familiar and it’s so soothing when you are sad, for example…

Imagine ‚Äď nothing and nobody could ever get lost ‚Äď even if we die! ‘Cause we’d still be stardust in some way… And where should we disappear to? We’re all in space and will be… It feels so true to me.

So the title and also the vocal themes for the album were born. Stardust Rituals¬†is like a complete reflection about this all. The music was talking to me…

And when Sula did the Mellotron in the last track, the complete thing was changing so much ‚Äď it was so stunning ‚Äď suddenly the whole piece turned into something different, more intense and beautiful so it made me cry… And then I wrote the vocals and it became the track ‚Äú(You Will) Live Forever Now.‚ÄĚ

Has releasing your own work through Sulatron changed your perspective on writing or recording at all? If so, how? If not, why not?

Sula: No. We always did everything by ourselves and the labels, who released our non-Sulatron-stuff, never told how to do it. They always accepted our music and artwork. So we can say we always produced our music the way we want it! Which is great!

Any other plans or closing words you want to mention?

Sula: We have a lot plans for recordings, releases and so on. Also we could talk about the horrible situation on this planet. But that would take hours… and I hope everyone who is interested in our music is some kind of same-minded, trying to be a good person, without being aggressive or a racist, being without hate, and full of love and positive vibrations. Mankind needs love, peace and freedom. That’s it!

Lulu: And if there are any racists listening to our music we hope they can feel love and forget the racism…

Also ‚Äď remember: We‚Äôre all made of the sun‚Ķ.. We‚Äôre one indeed! Physically! We‚Äôre all in the same space(ship)! LOVE! Man, I sound like a hippie, hahaha, but my heart feels it like this!

Electric Moon, Stardust Rituals (2017)

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Electric Moon, Stardust Rituals: In the Cosmic Loop

Posted in Reviews on April 7th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

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The discography of German heavy psych trio Electric Moon is a confusing thing, filled with atemporal reissues of limited prior works, live albums that could easily be studio affairs, varying editions, and so on, mostly if not completely all released through founding guitarist, synthesist, electric sitarist, keyboardist, general-swirlmaker and recording engineer¬†Dave “Sula Bassana” Schmidt‘s own Sulatron Records label. Accordingly, I could be way off in saying so, but I believe Stardust Rituals may be the first proper Electric Moon studio full-length since 2011’s The Doomsday Machine (review here).

Is that possible? I don’t know anymore. They count it as¬†their fifth album either way, and it follows behind several of the aforementioned reissues — including one in 2016 for The Doomsday Machine¬†— and a bevvy¬†of live offerings¬†like last year’s¬†Live 2015 ‚Äď Zeiss Planetarium Bochum¬†(review here), 2015’s¬†Theory of Mind (review here), 2014’s¬†Mind Explosion (review here), 2013’s¬†Live 2012 1 & 2¬†(review here), etc.¬†If indeed it has been six years since the last time they tracked a full-length not onstage somewhere in Europe, one could hardly accuse them of being lazy¬†with that time, however languid and flowing their sound might be and certainly is on¬†Stardust Rituals.

The album¬†presents three¬†extended cuts¬†and one shorter piece very much built outward from the core of jamming between Schmidt, bassist “Komet¬†Lulu” Neudeck and drummer¬†Marcus¬†Schnitzler¬†that has to-date been at heart in their approach, live or otherwise. Over the past five-plus years, their material has driven toward an at-times raw glimpse of their creative processes, with as little filtering of the view as possible, and while the movements that comprise¬†Stardust Rituals‘ 45-minute stretch come across as more song-minded, they also maintain that acid-drenched sensibility of exploration, emerging all the more spacious and triumphant for it.

And really, with material so clearly geared toward vibrancy in the first place, the line between what’s live and what isn’t would seem to be pretty fluid in the first place. True,¬†Stardust Rituals doesn’t have breaks for applause, but even as¬†Komet Lulu‘s vocals roll out echo-and-swirl-buried verses as part of the overarching drift of second track “Stardust (The Picture),” an obscure but definitively human presence, the feeling is one of spontaneous kosmiche combustion — nebular gases swirling into a cohesive stellar¬†motion, rotational gravity taking hold to bring the listener into the song’s orbit.

Also it’s spaced out. “Stardust (The Picture)” is a centerpiece for the molten flow set up over the course of¬†Electric Moon‘s first three tracks, which most likely¬†comprise side A of the vinyl. They begin with the dug-in space rock progression of “The Loop,” which is arguably the most “song-ish” of the album as a whole, with a synth figure at its center and a forward rhythmic push made subtle through the classy, jazzy intertwining of¬†Schnitzler‘s drumming and¬†Schmidt‘s guitar lead circa three minutes in.

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It’s in “The Loop” that¬†Electric Moon will almost shock those who’ve followed them the last several years, because even before they turn to the¬†Hawkwindian thrust at the beginning of the eight-minute track’s second half, they very purposefully establish a course distinct from the live offerings that have led up to¬†Stardust Rituals, and that impression continues into the rolling low end that begins “Stardust (The Picture)” — an early instrumental version of which, titled just “The Picture,” appeared on both¬†Theory of Mind and¬†Mind Explosion.

Its inclusion here, and in this more complete, vocalized form, still far-reaching and adventurous¬†but with a firmer intent behind it, speaks to the amorphous nature of¬†Electric Moon‘s work as a whole and the meta-level on which their fluidity operates. It’s not just about being open in terms of willing to jam out for 20 minutes at a clip. It’s about being willing even to change the definition of a song itself from what it was to what they want/need it to be to best suit a purpose. They break their own rules once again with the sitarized “Astral Hitch Hike,” departing the structured consciousness of the longer opening duo in favor of 4:40 of instrumental psych-prog vibing — just in case you might think it safe to know what to expect.

Sitar continues to meander, wrapping itself around an initial bassline, at the launch of closer “(You Will) Live Forever Now.” The finale, at 22 minutes, is just about as long as the first three pieces on¬†Stardust Rituals put together, and it seems clearly meant to consume all of side B on its own. It definitely is consuming, or at very least immersive — a subdued flow is underway almost immediately but brimming with patience, flourish of synth adding to a rich atmosphere that provides a stage for when the vocals arrive after we’ve waded about four minutes deep. It’s a dream. All of it. The tone, the drift, the vagueness of the voice. But¬†Electric Moon thrive in that dream, and though it’s by no means in any rush to get anywhere, there is a build happening and it is linear. Layers¬†are added to the whole one at a time, the guitars making a noteworthy arrival near six minutes, and¬†Lulu and¬†Schnitzler provide an absolute solid foundation on which this liquefied push takes place.

There’s a sense of pickup and tonal thickening about three minutes later just before the vocals return — in layers — and a fuller fuzz soon grabs hold and¬†moves “(You Will) Live Forever Now” into its next phase, noisier and denser but still remarkably vast and open feeling. They’re not yet halfway through, but this movement will get them there and come to a head just before the solo that starts at about 13:30 and runs until it comes apart at about the 15-minute mark — drums and bass holding steady as the guitar quietly rights itself. That process sets up the last verse (or verses, because who knows where one ends and another begins) and the shift into the closer’s apex for¬†Stardust Rituals as a whole, which starts in earnest with the arrival of Mellotron at 18:49 and continues to develop until the fadeout that begins in the last minute leaves only the keys and residual echoing swirl behind.

Electric Moon may be in large part defined as a unit by what they accomplish live, and that feeds even into¬†Stardust Rituals as well, since much of what has become these songs has its foundation in that raw creative process noted earlier, but if their return to studio work demonstrates anything, it’s that their sound has little interest in limits of any sort, be it those of listener expectation, or of genre convention, or whatever else. The prevailing warmth they exude throughout these four tracks is as unmistakably their own as any of their live improvisational work has been, and in reminding their audience of that, they’ve only made themselves a richer sonic experience for those fortunate enough to take them on. Whether one puts it on and gets lost in its outward gone-ness or stays with its twists and turns every step of the way, the path through the solar system that Stardust Rituals blazes is nothing less than a joy to follow.

Electric Moon, “The Loop”

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