Roadburn 2020: David Eugene Edwards to Play Solo Acoustic Set; PH, Elizabeth Colour Wheel, The Flenser Showase & Much More Added

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 14th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

roadburn 2020 new banner

David Eugene Edwards. Solo. Acoustic. Every year I’ve been fortunate enough to go, there’s been one keeps-you-alive-until-April Roadburn set, from Saint Vitus with Wino in 2009 and Garcia Plays Kyuss in 2010 to Sleep playing Sleep’s Holy Mountain this year. There’s always one. At least. In 2020, for me, that’s David Eugene Edwards of Wovenhand and 16 Horsepower playing by himself on stage. Whatever else gets added, whoever else is playing, hell, even if Wovenhand end up playing, this is the one that got me. Well done, Roadburn 2020.

Also featured in this massive lineup addition are PH (whose announcement I wrote), Elizabeth Colour Wheel, familiar faces Primitive Man and a host of other, of course widely varied, incarnations of badassery. I’m not trying to take away from anyone else or anything like that, or anything that might still come by saying the above, you understand. Roadburn 2020’s already primed to push well beyond the common bounds of heavy. It was before this announcement, frankly. But from here on in, my schedule already has its circle, and whether we do the Weirdo Canyon Dispatch or not (every year I kind of wait for the shoe to drop on that like it’s something we’ve been getting away with for the last six editions), I’m there, and I don’t care who he’s up against or who’s on next on what stage. If I have to sleep in the gutter of Weirdo Canyon in order to be there, I’m not missing a minute of David Eugene Edwards‘ set. Period.

From the fest:

roadburn 2020 david eugene edwards

Roadburn 2020: new announcements, more curator picks, and a showcase!

– Less than 10% of 4 day tickets remain
– David Eugene Edwards joins Emma Ruth Rundle’s curated event
– James Kent picks a special collaboration for his curation
– The Flenser will present a label showcase

Less than 10% of 4-day tickets remain for Roadburn 2020, and single-day tickets will go on sale on December 10.

Artistic Director, Walter Hoeijmakers comments: “As we edge closer towards selling out Roadburn 2020, I am excited that we still have so much more to announce. This year we are putting an emphasis on the context and creativity of the artists we’re announcing and knowing that we have still more up our sleeves means I am delighted to see where Roadburn 2020 is heading.”

EMMA RUTH RUNDLE’S THE GILDED CAGE:

DAVID EUGENE EDWARDS
At Roadburn, David Eugene Edwards has graced us with his presence on two occasions as part of Wovenhand. Each performance pulsated with energy and elevated the sets to be highlights of each respective edition of the festival – in no small part due to David’s electrifying presence. We’re delighted to bring him back to Roadburn, this time as part of Emma Ruth Rundle’s curation, The Gilded Cage. David will perform an acoustic, solo set that promises to showcase the diversity of his delivery and the nuances of his craft. Emma comments:

“It’s been a secret wish to see DEE playing solo and delivering his songs in their most bare forms. This was the very first thing that came to mind when I was asked to co-curate Roadburn and it’s going to be a rare and precious jewel of a performance.”

JAMES KENT’S CURATION:
REGARDE LES HOMMES TOMBER
A product of the burgeoning French underground scene that has produced so much incredible music in the past few years, over the course of two records so far, Regarde Les Hommes Tomber have used scraps from the most sinister subgenres, from black metal to sludge to build up truly frightening epics. Always apocalyptic in feeling, emotional and ruthless in equal measures, drenched in religious imagery and references, and creating a sonic depiction of the fall of mankind… and its subsequent rising to replace the cruelty of the established gods. Not only will we be expecting all of this maelstrom of fiery feelings, but also a healthy measure of the unexpected as well, since Regarde Les Hommes Tomber will be playing their new not-quite-announced-yet album in its entirety.

HANGMAN’S CHAIR X REGARDE LES HOMMES TOMBER
Regarde Les Hommes Tomber will join forces with Hangman’s Chair for a collaboration at Roadburn 2020. Hellish, sludgy black metal will clash horns-first with cold, despondent doom, and the result will surely transcend even the most delirious of descriptions that we can come up with at this point. Originally commissioned by Red Bull, this unholy collaboration has occurred just once previously, in Paris. That performance lasted 45 minutes, but for Roadburn an additional 15 minutes of material will be debuted just for us.

PLEBEIAN GRANDSTAND
Plebeian Grandstand are a band that have morphed from a core of quite technical, hardcore charged metal to be the hulking beast of black metal fury we see before us today. The creative journey they have been on has led to an infusion of influences from outside the black metal sphere, resulting in nuance and depth that can sometimes be hard to find within the genre. On top of that, they eschew the cartoonish elements of extreme black metal – you’ll find no burning churches here – in favour of something rooted more firmly in reality. After all, what’s more nightmarish than the real world?

TRUE BODY
With a calculated sense of tension and just enough human touch to cut through their own cold post-punk atmospheres, Virginia’s True Body has built a following with their urgent and impassioned music. Instead of falling into melodramatic excess or disconnected affectations, the band manages to bring the best of each realm for something that leaves audiences rapt and thrilled. With this masterful take on such a beloved sound, we’re honored to announce that True Body will be performing at Roadburn 2020 as part of James Kent’s curation.

THE FLENSER SHOWCASE
In 2020, The Flenser will celebrate the tenth anniversary of the label’s first release. The San Francisco based label has been committed to releasing experimental, avant-garde music for a whole decade – which – naturally – has not escaped our notice here at Roadburn HQ. To celebrate this milestone and to acknowledge the impact that The Flenser has had on our record collections and the broader musical landscape we have invited several of the label’s current artists to perform at Roadburn 2020.

The Flenser label manager, Jonathan Tuite comments: “Roadburn is my absolute favorite festival in the world. The lineup is always diverse, the audience enthusiastic, and the curation is second to none. I can’t think of a more appropriate place for The Flenser to celebrate our ten years of existence.”

GILES COREY
For over ten years Dan Barrett has been cementing his role as a visionary in dark music history.Perhaps none of this work has resonated with more intimacy than Giles Corey, his acoustic guitar led, ghost noise-soaked songwriting vessel. While on paper an acoustic led-project sounds like a potentially low-key affair, Giles Corey is bursting with electric energy–recordings are awash in swirling organs, reverberating choirs, striking horns, and blown out drums. While Giles Corey has performed as a solo-act, Roadburn 2020 will mark the project’s first appearance as a full-band. Members of Have a Nice Life, including central figure Tim Macuga, will help bring the album’s haunted sounds to life: expect the stage and audience to be left in a scorched earth state of desolation.

ELIZABETH COLOUR WHEEL
“Otherworldly” is a description often applied to artists that evoke the ethereal, and whilst that is occasionally applicable to Elizabeth Colour Wheel, the otherworldliness they invoke is more to do with the fact that it’s not always clear if they really inhabit the same world as we do. Their debut album, Nocebo, laughs in the face of genre descriptors, forging a new path that may be tricky to describe but that offers a wildly enticing prospect.

DROWSE
Drowse is an outlet for Kyle Bates to explore his place in the world; his music echoes what he experiences on the varied paths of this internal-reflection. Sometimes those paths lead to extraordinary places – this year’s Light Mirror LP was inspired by an isolated trip to northern Iceland where he took up an artistic residency in 2018. The melancholic results are the sonic equivalent of a sliver of sunlight permeating an otherwise bleak and drizzly morning. The weight of Bates’ reflections is mighty, but it never quite succeeds in suffocating the shards of harmonious hope that glint in the winter sun.

MAMALEEK
Mamaleek have been unearthing truly uncategorizable sounds from the catacombs of black metal since 2008. Founded by two anonymous brothers, the Bay Area project has become known for both its wild experimentation and aesthetic cohesion. The use of left-field samples threads their discography together, with sound sources growing more bizarre with each release. The current lineup mixes childhood friends and total strangers. Their participation is an outgrowth of the core duo, an experiment in a live setting, using instruments and sounds that highlight experimentation and flout genre conventions. Who knows how long this iteration will last before the next metamorphosis.

MIDWIFE
As a multi-instrumentalist, Madeline Johnson AKA Midwife has sculpted a fuzzy take on experimental dream pop, drenched in melody and punctuated with distortion. Despite a central theme of “devastation” Midwife makes for nuanced and evocative easy listening that can’t help but feel like something of an audio honey trap. We’ll have to wait until April to find out exactly what lurks beneath the surface…

ALSO ANNOUNCED…

PRIMITIVE MAN
It is with great anticipation that we’re delighted to announce that Primitive Man will be playing twice at Roadburn. One set will be a business-as-usual, throat-ripping, bone crushing display of what makes them a must-watch band. And one set will be a run through of their 2017 album, Caustic. This is the kind of endurance test we relish – an audio pummelling so intense that there’s no way to come out the other side without a shift in our worldview.

LANKUM
When The Livelong Day – the latest offering from Dublin four piece, Lankum – passed over our desks, our ears pricked up and we knew we had to invite them to Roadburn next year. It’s not uncommon to find us feeling effusive about noise, drone and ambient projects in the Roadburn world, but it’s a much rarer prospect to find such tonal qualities on what is undoubtedly, most definitely a folk album. Uilleann pipes and harmonium come together to create a cinematic soundscape that many Roadburners will feel right at home with. The album makes for an appropriate gateway for those attending Roadburn, regardless of which side you’re approaching from – a folk fan heading towards darker territories, or a heavy music fan lured by the promise of a genre steeped in history and countless traditional flourishes.

HILARY WOODS
Hilary Woods wrote her debut full length, Colt, alone – before before taking her recordings to Berlin to work with James Kelly (Wife, Altar of Plagues). The solitude is palpable, and listening to what she has made feels like a cautious invitation into a quiet place that she has created. Imagine a soft cocoon of sound, enveloping you as you step through into the netherworld of her making.

FÖLLAKZOID AND ATOM TM
Spearheading Chile’s vibrant psych scene, Föllakzoid will transport Roadburn 2020 on an all-encompassing voyage. Joined once again by German electronic artist and producer, Atom TM, the band will make their Roadburn debut, aiming to, “modulate the gravitational waves in order to alter the temporality perception and get sucked into the timeless space continuum,” as guitarist/singer Domingæ Garcia-Huidobro aptly puts it.

TORPOR
Rhetoric Of The Image showcases Torpor’s confidence; lengthy post-metal tracks smoulder whilst shorter, more experimental cuts punctuate the album. The three piece will expand a little for Roadburn in order to do justice to the full fifty one minutes that make up Rhetoric Of The Image as they perform it in full for us at Roadburn.

SUM OF R
The current incarnation of Sum of R already sees Reto teamed up with Jukka Rämänen (Dark Buddha Rising, Hexvessel, Waste Of Space Orchestra), which has allowed them to forge even more adventurous paths from their dark ambient/drone of yore, but now yet another figure from that particular Finnish scene will be adding his own very particular twist to the proceedings and giving them a new voice, quite literally, as it is none other than vocalist Marko Neuman (Dark Buddha Rising, Waste Of Space Orchestra, Convocation, Ural Umbo).

PH
Earlier this year, PH released Osiris Hayden, their second offering through Svart Records and fifth overall in their prolific decade together. Their latest work finds them embracing new reaches of the cosmic infinite, taking on electronic charge as they never have before and exploring the connection between organic and inorganic audio experiences.

MANY BLESSINGS
Those of you familiar with Ethan McCarthy will know him as the formidable frontman for Primitive Man. Under the banner of Many Blessings, Ethan performs a much less frenzied kind of music – and yet somehow it manages to be no less disturbing and spine-chilling. Many Blessings has seeped into our consciousness – a slow, creeping threat of sonic menace. Whilst the ferocity we are are perhaps more accustomed to is not present, the wordless missives are brooding and visceral.

EYE FLYS
After listening to their blistering debut album Context, and considering the fact that guitarist Spencer Hazard was already roped in for Roadburn 2020 as a member of one of our artists in residence, the wonderful Full Of Hell, how could we ever pass on Eye Flys? The Backslider rhythm section of Jake Smith – here on guitar and vocals – and Patrick Forrest plus Triac’s Kevin Bernsten complete the line-up.

ROADBURN 2020 TICKETS

Weekend tickets for Roadburn are on sale now (3-day tickets are sold out, 4-day tickets remain on sale). Single day tickets will be on sale on December 10. More information about tickets and accommodation options can be found HERE.

Already announced for Roadburn 2020 is: Emma Ruth Rundle and James Kent as curators, commissioned projects from James Kent & Johannes Persson, Jo Quail, and Vile Creature & Bismuth, the return of Julie Christmas, Red Sparowes, Russian Circles, Torche, Brutus, Bada, Dool, Health, Hide, She Past Away, and two Artists In Residence: Full of Hell and Lingua Ignota. Check the full line up HERE.

EUROPEAN FESTIVAL AWARD NOMINATION

Roadburn has been nominated in the best small festival category (less than 10,000 visitors) at the European Festival Awards 2019. Votes can be cast HERE. Votes and spreading the word are appreciated as it would be a huge honour for us to win such recognition.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1081424195382564/
https://www.facebook.com/roadburnfestival/
http://www.instagram.com/roadburnfest
http://www.roadburn.com

David Eugene Edwards, “Straw Foot”

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wovenhand, Refractory Obdurate: Sit Down and Eat

Posted in Reviews on May 15th, 2014 by JJ Koczan

Whatever genre tag one might want to saddle Wovenhand with, I’ve yet to come across one that doesn’t leave some integral facet of their sound uncovered. Like the cover art of their latest outing and first for Deathwish Inc. (their alliance with Glitterhouse Records continues outside North America), Refractory Obdurate, their aesthetic is a patchwork. Always in progress, it draws from world music influences, from folk, from indie (whatever that means), and increasingly over the last several albums, 2012’s The Laughing Stalk (review here) and 2010’s The Threshingfloor (semi-review here) particularly, from heavier-toned rock, but they are not a band to be pinned down to one modus or another, and that’s as true on Refractory Obdurate as it has been all along. Driven by the songwriting of guitarist, vocalist, founder and oft-perceived figurehead David Eugene Edwards (formerly of 16 Horsepower) and featuring guitarist Charles Edward French, bassist Neil Keener, percussionist Ordy Garrison and organist Jeff Linsenmaier, the 10 songs/43 minutes of Refractory Obdurate have some sonic carryover from The Laughing Stalk, but as ever for Wovenhand, there’s progression as well. They are immediately recognizable. There’s no one who sounds like Wovenhand both because of Edwards‘ vocal style and because of the fluidity of the band’s arrangements. All but Keener appeared on the last album, so there’s some consistency of approach in the bright, joyous rush of “Good Shepherd” or the brooding spaciousness of the later “Obdurate Obscura,” but more than last time, what stands out here is the feverishness of the builds and payoffs in the material’s structure. That is, to bring a song to an apex isn’t really anything new for the band, but in “Masonic Youth” (get it?), “The Refractory,” “Salome,” the bass-fueled “Field of Hedon,” and the penultimate “Hiss,” which provides the climax for Refractory Obdurate as a whole as well, the tension is more of a focal point than it’s ever been in Wovenhand‘s approach. At this point, they’ve also gotten heavy enough to allow for that.

I’ve said before that I have trouble thinking or speaking about Wovenhand in anything other than hyperbole. Refractory Obdurate provokes that response as well since Edwards and his companions emerge from it no less a singular sonic entity than they went in. They are unique, and as that’s an absolute term, Refractory Obdurate is bound to cause a strong reaction. As a fan, I looked forward to the release, and listening to it, was pleased to discover no dilution in the quality of songwriting, whether it’s more bombastic material like “Masonic Youth,” the culmination of which is punkish in its intensity, or “King David,” which holds firm to the acoustic strum around which its rumble builds, Edwards‘ vocals echoing in an impeccable mix. It is a long way sonically from Wovenhand’s 2002 self-titled debut, but traced over the course of their albums, which have been released on even years since with the Blush Music score arriving in 2003, Refractory Obdurate is a next logical installment in the development of their take. One wouldn’t expect them to repeat themselves, and they don’t, but neither is Refractory Obdurate turning the feel of The Laughing Stalk completely on its head. As a whole, its vibe reads darker because the art is darker and the songs are by and large heavier, but it’s a step, not a jump from one to the other, and their sound remains utterly distinct, opener “Corsicana Clip” hinting as the higher acoustics give way to lower-toned electric guitar in the chorus at some of the relative pummel to come. An essential component running a thread through all of Wovenhand‘s work is Edwards‘ faith, and his penchant for turning dogma into deeply personal portraits remains firm in “Good Shepherd,” “The Refractory,” “Salome,” “Field of Hedon,” and the other cuts included, coloring lyrical perspective even in moments without direct reference and making the overarching feel all the more individual. Many of the album’s loudest moments are also its most fervent testimonials, and emotional and spiritual weight play as much if not more of a role than anything coming from the guitar on “Hiss.”

Read more »

Tags: , , , , ,

Wovenhand Unveil “Hiss” from Refractory Obdurate; New Album out April 29

Posted in Bootleg Theater on March 26th, 2014 by JJ Koczan

I have a particularly hard time speaking about Wovenhand in terms other than hyperbolic praise. The David Eugene Edwards-fronted genre-defiers will release their new album, Refractory Obdurate, through Deathwish Inc. and Glitterhouse Records on April 29. It’ll be Wovenhand’s seventh full-length, following 2012’s The Laughing Stalk (review here), which continued to push their sound into new places in terms of influence and arrangement, the band getting progressively heavier, more joyful, more intense as they go along. Their style, though it always shifts from record to record, is distinctly their own, and the new single “Hiss” follows that pattern with a fullness of tone and spaciousness in the recording.

On the sheer level of its chugging riff and furious tension, “Hiss” is up there with the heaviest output Wovenhand have had to date, though in the bigger picture of their work overall, that’s a tertiary consideration. I wouldn’t expect “Hiss” to speak for the entirety of Refractory Obdurate more than I’d expect the river to speak for the lake, but it’s a clear signal that Edwards as the principal songwriter has maintained a fascination with what weighted sound can bring to Wovenhand‘s aesthetic. They continue to be on a level of their own in both their mastery of what they do and their drive to push beyond that mastery, out of their comfort zone, and into new ground.

Release info follows the video. Enjoy:

Wovenhand, “Hiss”

Brought to you by a partnership of Deathwish and Glitterhouse Records, release dates are as follows:

April 29th: Deathwish Release Date (World)
April 25th: Glitterhouse Release Date (Europe)

Wovenhand is a band led by dedicated life-musician and lyricist, David Eugene Edwards. Over the last two decades, his prolific work in both Wovenhand and the legendary 16 Horsepower has influenced and inspired a generation of musicians throughout the expansive alternative music world.

Wovenhand cannot be described in traditional terms. Their sound is an organic, weavework of neo-folk, post rock, punk, old-time, and alternative sounds. All coming together as a vehicle for David’s soulful expression and constant spiritual self exploration. Sometimes sad and sorrowed and at other times uplifting, Wovenhand are always unforgettable in spirit and sound.

“Refractory Obdurate” is the latest album from Wovenhand. Joining David on this album are longtime percussionist Ordy Garrison, along with musicians Chuck French and Neil Keener (Planes Mistaken For Stars, Git Some).

“Refractory Obdurate” is a moving masterwork that shows Wovenhand exploring louder roots hinted at on prior albums. As they maintain their melodious course, “Good Shepherd”, “Field of Hedon”, and “Hiss”, stomp forth with a newly amplified punk rock heart. While “The Refractory”, “Salome”, and “Obdurate Obscura” each ascend epically into a multi-layered haze. Ten songs in all, “Refractory Obdurate” plays as a beautifully crafted patchwork that transcends genres and expectation; a true artistic achievement, that only Wovenhand could offer.

Track Listing:
01. Corsicana Clip
02. Masonic Youth
03. The Refractory
04. Good Shepherd
05. Salome
06. King David
07. Field of Hedon
08. Obdurate Obscura
09. Hiss
10. El-bow

Wovenhand on Thee Facebooks

Deathwish Inc.

Tags: , , , ,

Frydee Wovenhand

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 3rd, 2013 by JJ Koczan

Wovenhand, Wovenhand (2002)

This isn’t the first time I’ve ended a week with Wovenhand, but I cracked open the laptop and after half an hour of perusal nothing else seemed to do the trick, so the self-titled it is. Still one of the best performances I’ve ever caught was the David Eugene Edwards-fronted outfit at Roadburn 2011. I haven’t gone to see them since because I think the crowd would be too cool and bum me out. I know that makes me a loser. Insert some cliche about losers losing here.

They’re not a band I talk about a lot, but I love this album. There aren’t a lot of discs in my collection or out I’d trade it for.

Speaking of my CDs, they’re in boxes in the next room. We moved yesterday — oh my fucking god was it really only one day ago? — and while I had to basically go back to work today, of course without actually going, The Patient Mrs. stepped up and did a ton of unpacking. There are a lot of house-y things we need — from HDMI cables to a mat for the bathroom floor to one of those plastic things you put in the drawer to stop the forks and knives and spoons from getting all mixed up; also I need a desk to work at so I’m not on the dining room table all next week like I was today — but at least we’re up here, in Massachusetts. The development in which resides this condo we rented is also close enough behind a Lowe’s that I could walk to all my home improvement needs should I decide to do so. I haven’t yet, but again, we’ve only been here a day.

Work was stressful, but it’s going to be for a while, and it’s stressful anyway, so there you go. I was glad to get a review up, even if it was short and later in the day — again, The Patient Mrs. was doing me favors as I chipped away at our first Friday night in our new place with the clacky-clacky — since it’s that kind of thing that keeps me sane through a bigger change than my never-lived-anywhere-but-the-county-I-was-born ass has ever known. One I wanted and needed to make, but still. Big. I hooked up the coffee maker this morning, had three cups. Still fairly beat though. One in the morning. Dog snoring. Music on. There’s a farmer’s market in town in the morning that we might try to hit up. Fingers crossed for pesto.

Monday I’m going to my first show as a resident up here. Admiral Browning are coming up from Maryland to play in Leominster, and I’ll hit that up for a good time, review it on Tuesday. Also look out for a review of the Ape Machine record, that Blaak Heat Shujaa interview, a list running down some of my picks for the rest of 2013 and plenty more as I continue to get settled in the new environs.

Have a great and safe weekend.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

Tags: , , , , , ,

This Video of David Eugene Edwards Playing “Straw Foot” is My Favorite Thing on the Internet

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Buried Treasure on March 26th, 2013 by JJ Koczan

“Straw Foot,” written by David Eugene Edwards during his time with 16 Horsepower, was released on that band’s 2000 album, Secret South, as the closer. It’s one of the record’s more memorable tracks — 16 Horsepower‘s take on the traditional “Wayfaring Stranger” is also particularly striking, as are several others; “Poor Mouth,” “Silver Saddle,” etc. — and this performance was filmed in 2009, some four years after they disbanded and some seven after Wovenhand, Edwards‘ subsequent and current outfit, released their landmark self-titled outing.

The two bands exist on such different wavelengths it’s hard to think of them running concurrently, though in many ways Secret South was the last 16 Horsepower album, followed by the live album Hoarse (2000), 2002’s Folklore, half of which was takes on traditional folk songs à la the aforementioned “Wayfaring Stranger” (no less brilliantly done; see “Single Girl” and “Outlaw Song”), and their swansong compilation Olden, which brought out material from early sessions in 1993 and 1994. But they did run for a while at the same time, Wovenhand releasing their sophomore album, Consider the Birds, even as 16 Horsepower embarked on some of their final touring. Hindsight gives smoothness to what at the time are often jagged transitions.

There’s a lot of great stuff on the internet. I’m particularly fond of this site, for example. There’s a lot of crap too. I’ve had a hard time coming up with something better than the clip above of Edwards playing “Straw Foot.” The raw, organic performance showing the song’s roots. Edwards‘ voice, which I’ve no doubt generations to come will fail to imitate. How the camera seems to dance in and out of focus to the music. It’s something I keep going back to, so I wanted to post it here in case anyone else had missed it along the way. I know sometimes we all get busy, and not in the fun way.

I recently had occasion to pick up Wovenhand‘s latest album, 2012’s The Laughing Stalk, on CD from Glitterhouse Records. Psych heads might recall their early Monster Magnet releases. After The Laughing Stalk (original review here) was released last fall, I spent some pretty significant time with the then-available digital stream via Bandcamp. There was a special edition LP/CD version available, but for someone like me — I hope you’ll pardon the melodrama, but I sometimes feel like the Omega Man of the CD-purchasing market — a straight-up compact disc was what I was looking for, so when I saw the Glitterhouse version available, digipak-style, I jumped on it, and no regrets.

It hadn’t been that long since I heard it anyway, but I still felt like I was somewhat revisiting tracks like “King O King” — the line “The people, a vain thing” standing out even more this time around — and the building spiritual energy of “Coup Stick,” which bides its time amidst organ tones to open up with Edwards vocals in its second half. I didn’t even know the album was recorded live (no easy feat given the variety of arrangements), so for that little piece of knowledge, it was easily worth the price for a purchase I was going to make anyway. And if the worst that happens is I spent more time hypnotized by Ordy Garrison‘s drums on “Maize” and “In the Temple,” chances are I’ll live.

Probably this isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but it’s mine, so for a bit of symmetry with where we started this post, here’s the title-track to The Laughing Stalk to finish:

Tags: , , , , ,