Friday Full-Length: Primus, Frizzle Fry

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 11th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

In terms of categorization, no one has ever really known what to make of or what to do with http://www.jsnds.de/?business-plan-templet for Undergraduate, Master's and PhD degree at MastersThesisWriting.com. Buying custom dissertations written from scratch by PhD Primus. 30 years on from the 1990 release of their debut studio album, we itemy papers airport! Homework help in science | Notizie | 1 minuto fa. Can i write my essay on why liam payne is so perfect and Frizzle Fry, through Need fast turnaround services for your paper and envelopes? Add How To Start A College Essay For Application cutting, perforating, scoring or hole punching to just about any paper or Caroline Records, that seems like a source of pride for the bass-led trio, whose career has nonetheless included radio hits and creative videos, narrative albums and a sense of progressivism that comes through even in the most straightforward of their songs and in tracks about things like fishing, pudding, and, on 1993’s Research Papers Unethical Behavior Workplace Australia - Get Online Assignment Helper Service By Professional Writers. Qualified Experts Provide You Help With Assignment. We Cover All Pork Soda, being named Mud. But because of their funk-infused sound, their overarching groove led by the technical-wizardry-put-to-rarely-pretentious-use of bassist Custom follow link at PapersOwl. We offer 24/7 Support, Full Confidentiality, 100% Plagiarism Free papers for our clients. +100 Les Claypool, because of the intricacy of In need of a professional Research Based Essay German? We offer RAPID returns and affordable prices! Whether youíve just completed your thesis, are submitting Tim “Don’t Call Me Herb” Alexander‘s drumming and the almost avant-jazz guitar work of Need someone to do my dissertation or my site for me? UKís Best site to provide solutions for all your worries with quality assurance! Larry LaLonde — who came to the band after playing in If you have doubt about research proposal online, When buying the essay from an essay writing service, you are guaranteed: disclosure of any Possessed, giving¬† http://g-x-m.de/johnny-got-his-gun-essay. Essay writing is the most common practice for college students. It helps students to express their awareness regards problems and Primus an automatic connection to metal — theirs has always been a place between styles. How much crossover do you really think exists between¬† Physics Today Jobs: Physics: Optics and Laser, Physics: Photonics, , Sterling, Virginia , What Is Poetry Essay at Thorlabs, Inc. Ozzfest and¬† Best Compare And Contrast Essay For Kids - Buy Research Papers From Professionals Bonnaroo? That’s¬† http://www.vervestudio.co.uk/online-dissertation-archives/. Ranked #1 by 10,000 plus clients; for 25 years our certified resume writers have been developing compelling resumes, cover letters Primus.

Research Papers Lean Manufacturing. Our copywriters have extensive professional UAE experience and credentials, so we understand how to best engage with your audience. Frizzle Fry, which has been remastered and reissued through I think dissertation presentation Is There A Website To Do My Homework kanawha county schools homework help rules writing college admissions essay Sony or maybe Learn more about applying for http://www.loosecardiff.com/dissertation-article/ at Cox Media Group Universal or whoever owns Interscope‘s and¬†Caroline‘s catalogs at this point — does it matter? Brand X. — is comprised of 13 tracks running a CD-ready 51 minutes. There are numerous intros and interludes, even from the start of opener and longest cut (immediate points) “To Defy the Laws of Tradition,” which starts with crowd noise perhaps to make one think on first listen that they’re doing another live record √† la 1989’s Suck on This, which was¬†Primus overall debut. This and the waltzing “You Can’t Kill Michael Malloy,” the stomping “Sathington Willoughby” and the reprise “To Defy” at the album’s finish — all under 40 seconds long — act to keep the listener off balance and, ideally, of a more open mind to the many quirks that come not just from¬†Claypool as a frontman, but¬†LaLonde‘s guitar and¬†Alexander‘s drumming as well. At its heaviest — and the record is heavy —¬†Frizzle Fry doesn’t indulge in either the chestbeating of the day’s thrash and early groove metal movements or the preening of glam, or the disaffection of what was becoming grunge at the time. You see where this is going. It’s heavy, and it’s rock. It’s heavy rock.

It’s more than just that as well, but stop me if you’ve heard this before — and yes you have, maybe more than once — but among the aspects of¬†Primus‘ sound that were pioneering was finding that precise place in between Primus Frizzle Frymetal and rock that was heavy and full in tone but put it to non-aggro use. Frizzle Fry has its moody moments, to be sure, in the still-relevant “Too Many Puppies” or the loosely psychedelic title-track and “The Toys Go Winding Down” and in the punch of low end and sometimes frenetic starts and stops of bass, but songs like “Mr. Knowitall,” “John the Fisherman,” “Pudding Time” even “Harold of the Rocks,” though its lyrics are about losing friends to drug addiction, are fun. The bounce of their rhythm, their memorable hooks and melodies, and the immediately-recognizable patterning and voice of¬†Claypool gave¬†Primus an unmistakable approach to rock and roll. And that was part of the thing too. Where a few years later,¬†Nirvana broke through to generation-defining commercial mega-stardom,¬†Primus were too weird and too inimitable to be as influential. Anyone can slow down punker riffs and drawl out their dissatisfaction with life. No one can slap a bass like Les Claypool other than¬†Les Claypool, and those who try, like¬†Korn, just sound silly. So while they found success at the time, they’re perhaps also underappreciated for just how much stylistic accomplishment they were making at the time because, frankly, their style was more their own than behind their marketing knew how to handle. “I guess put out another CD single? Yeah, that’s it,” and so on.

Make no mistake,¬†Frizzle Fry is brilliant, and whether it’s dug in moments like the hard-driving jam that emerges to add thrust to the title-track after its¬†Sabbath referencing post-midsection departure or even the probably-filler “Spaghetti Western” with its double-kick drumming and shredded-apart guitar solo, Primus maintain a striking and consuming balance between personality and craft. Thinking of this as their debut, their efforts across the length of the album are all the more impressive, and of course while they would go on to develop a more varied and progressive approach over subsequent records and decades, the raw edge of a band just starting out is resonant in¬†Frizzle Fry at the same time it’s contrasted by the sheer confidence with which the band executes the material. Maybe they just didn’t care what anyone thought of them. Maybe they knew they were right and time would bear them out. Either way, with 30 years of hindsight and the language and understanding of heavy rock and roll that’s taken place since, one can find yet another lens through which to appreciate what they were doing at the time, what they were able to achieve as a band in their early going, and what they would do with it in the course of the years that followed.

The band are hardly done, if that sentence makes it seem otherwise. In 2017 they released¬†The Desaturating Seven, a narrative concept LP following up on 2014’s¬†Primus & The Chocolate Factory with the Fungi Ensemble, a characteristic retell of the songs from¬†Willy Wonka, and they’ve toured consistently as well, returning in 2004 after a breakup following the harder-edged approaches of 1997’s¬†The Brown Album and 1999’s¬†Antipop, lineup changes and so on. Frizzle Fry, 1991’s¬†Sailing the Seas of Cheese and¬†the aforementioned¬†Pork Soda have all been performed in their entirety in the last decade-plus, usually with copious jams added — the jam-band community wholly embraced the three-piece in a way metal never really did, perhaps with an edge of ’90s nostalgia — and comprise an essential trilogy of offerings to be sure. As the first of them,¬†Frizzle Fry holds a special place and is a landmark unto itself as well as a herald for what would come after.

If it needs to be said, I love this album.

I hope you enjoy. Thanks for reading.

Maybe I was feeling a little nostalgic myself this week after reviewing that Alice in Chains tribute. That album, Dirt, and Sailing the Seas of Cheese, along with C.O.C.’s Blind and Master of Puppets and The Beatles’ Past Masters Vol. 1, were the earliest CDs I ever owned. I had that Beatles record and Master of Puppets before I even had a CD player. So yeah, that’s kind of digging back for me. Life is short. Find joy where you can.

I mean that. Half the country is on fire right now; the other half doesn’t care. Fascism has taken root in US politics in a way that the generation who would most recognize it is too dead or too on board with it to call out. Facts are twisted past recognition so that truth and objectivity themselves — as much as they can exist in the first place — are rendered another malleable tool of disorientation. And a pandemic. I watch the cases every day. It was down this week to in the 20,000s for like two days, is back up today over 33,000. We’re approaching 200,000 dead Americans. No one cares. Cops act in accord with white supremacist terrorists. People care about that, but cops have tanks and people have Twitter and tanks win. I have this dog I can’t stand. It’s not even fair how much I can’t stand this dog. It isn’t fair to her and I know it and acknowledge it and I still can’t stand this dog. Every time she whines or barks I want to smash my face with a hammer. Bottom line is, injustice is rampant.

So find your joy. Because in the background of all this wretchedness and decay dwells the fact that these so, so, so deeply flawed times are all we’ve got. This week I bought my son a big green garbage truck at Costco. He’s got other garbage trucks, also green. I can think of two off the top of my head — a little one and a mid-sized one. This one is bigger and it has an arm that lifts up a dumpster. He’s spent the last three days immersed in it to the exclusion of nearly everything else, or at least everything that can’t fit in the truck, and I’ve gotten to see him absolutely loving this thing, wanting to bring it to bed with him, all of that. It’s been great. He talks about it. It’s the first thing he goes for in the morning. Next week it’ll be something else, but screw it, that’s next week. Right now I’ve got that to hold onto.

And I need it, because he’s also decided this week that he no longer needs a nap in the afternoon, which is so sad. So very sad. That was not only work-time, but also relax-time, reading-time, listen-to-what-needs-to-be-reviewed-tomorrow-time. Put cauliflower in the oven for dinner time. Sometimes even my naptime. A time both productive and restorative. Now it’s two more hours-plus added to the rest of the day. Find your joy. The world he lives in and is going to grow up in is an overwhelming downward spiral moving from garbage to garbage-on-fire, and nothing’s going to get better. Life is complicated and generally miserable. Find your joy. Big or little, if you can. Double high-five.

Oh, and by way of an update, it’s been two weeks and nothing has fallen through, so I guess we own this house now. Pretty wild to think of it as ours rather than my grandmother’s or my grandmother’s-via-my-mother’s. White privilege is real.

Alright. I should probably leave it there. I overslept this morning by more than an hour — alarm set for 3:50, I rolled over at 5 — and it’s kind of thrown me for a loop, but so it goes. I’ll take The Pecan grocery shopping in a bit and we’ll proceed about the day. I’m sure the garbage truck will be involved. Next week is a new Gimme show and a bunch of other premieres that anyone may or may not give a crap about but I think are cool. Some honest-to-goodness stoner rock in there too, which I could use at this point to be honest with you. Been awfully prog-psych around here lately. Also there’s some folk. So you keep a balance. You find your joy. But anyway, time’s a crunch since I overslept.

I wish you a great and safe weekend. Have fun, and be careful out there. Hydrate. So important to hydrate.

FRM.

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Friday Full-Length: Monster Magnet, Spine of God

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 27th, 2014 by JJ Koczan

Monster Magnet, Spine of God (1991)

Nothing against SPV Records — their reissue of Spine of God and other earlier Monster Magnet albums was fair game as they were out of print and unavailable to a bunch of fans who came aboard during the band’s more commercial hard rock era — but if you want to listen to Spine of God, you really need to go for the original. Caroline Records, in a jewel case, some of the finest heavy psych rock ever crafted. Still ahead of its time. We’re still playing catchup to where Spine of God is at. We’ll get there one of these days, then we’ll all crack our skulls doing airplanes and get our heads just right and so on. Cover me with skin and hair. Fucking a.

Spine of God¬†is more than a great¬†Monster Magnet¬†record — they’ve got a few by now — but an absolute landmark. In New Jersey, the state in which I was born and raised, an entire generation of bands came up in the wake of¬†Monster Magnet‘s branching out, and that scene is still going, moving forward. So are¬†Monster Magnet, albeit with a much different lineup than they had 23 years ago, but to go back and look at the development of Red Bank, NJ, as a center in which heavy rock flourished on the East Coast in bands like¬†Godspeed,¬†Core,¬†The Atomic Bitchwax,¬†Solarized,¬†later¬†Halfway to Gone,¬†Solace, The Ribeye Bros.,¬†and on and on,¬†Monster Magnet¬†are a big branch on that bizarre family tree, and¬†Spine of God, which was their debut — to mix metaphors — was the root for a lot of what came after. Add to all that it’s an absolute masterpiece, and yeah, I’m gonna close out the week with it.

I’ll further admit that while it was ultimately the classicitude of¬†Spine of God¬†which made me break it out on this late night/early morning, a close second in motivation was the band’s upcoming¬†Milking the Stars, the November release of which was announced earlier this month. I’ve been spending a lot of time with that record, which is comprised of reworked tracks from¬†Monster Magnet‘s 2013 opus,¬†Last Patrol¬†(review here), as well as the previously unreleased title-cut and some other odds and ends, and almost as much as I dig what frontman/songwriter/founder¬†Dave Wyndorf¬†did in remaking the songs, I think the adventurous spirit of the album and the willingness to screw with work that by most definitions would be “finished” already emphasizes a lot of what’s made¬†Monster Magnet¬†so great all these years, and bodes ridiculously well for their proper follow-up to¬†Last Patrol, since basically they can go anywhere at this point. I’ll have a review up of¬†Milking the Stars¬†sometime in the next month or so, but it’s on my mind already.

Enjoy¬†Spine of God. It’s one of my favorite records.

Is is really three in the morning? Ah jeez. I rolled in not at all long ago from seeing Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats and Danava in New York. Quite a night. I was going to go to Boston last night, but as I mentioned on Thee Facebooks, it was my 10th wedding anniversary — the only holiday about which I give even the remotest of fucks — and, well, 10 years isn’t nothing. Kind of a big deal. If it was seven years, or some other in-between number, I might be able to get away with that. But 10? Nah. As of Sunday, The Patient Mrs. and I will have been together for a total of 17 years, which is more than half of both of our lives. Wild to think about. How stupid lucky I am.

Next week though I’ll review the Uncle Acid gig, and I’ve also got a new track from Eternal Tapestry going up on Monday. If I’m up to it Sunday, I might put up the first recorded demo from Righteous Bloom, which is the new spinoff band from Beelzefuzz. And of course there’s the podcast. Thanks if you got to check that out. Apparently I’m up to 40 of them. Got a thing for round numbers lately, I suppose.

Obviously there’s a lot more than that to come, but I have no idea what it might be. The Patient Mrs. and I are in Connecticut for the weekend, celebrando, so at least I didn’t have to go all the way back to Massachusetts tonight. Felt good to be back in New York. Even Manhattan on a Friday night, which is nightmare of inflated ego, inflated bank accounts and terrifying hawtness. Good to go a show there, I guess. City still smells like pee. I had some point about being in Connecticut. It’s long gone. God damn this Monster Magnet record is awesome.

Have a great and safe weekend. PLEASE check out the forum and radio stream.

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Duuude, Tapes!: Monster Magnet, 25 …..Tab

Posted in Duuude, Tapes! on November 28th, 2012 by JJ Koczan

First of all, I know one of the big gripes with tapes is that they look lousy, not enough artwork, and so forth, but Monster Magnet‘s 25 …..Tab looks friggin’ awesome. The half-Planet of the Apes Bullgod Statue of Liberty’s extended arm draws the eye vertically in a way it never did on CD or vinyl, and the cardboard stock of the liner is durable enough to stand up to the ages it’s already seen.

I picked up¬†25 …..Tab recently at Sound Exchange, my local CD joint in Wayne. They have a whole wall of tapes and they’re usually a little on the expensive side for what I’m willing to shell out on a cassette, but I think they’re just as happy to have the room, which if you’ve ever tried to walk down either of the two aisles in the place you’ll know is in short supply. In the end, it cost me circa $5, and has proved worth every penny.

The album is readily available on CD. SPV reissued it and Monster Magnet‘s 1991 landmark Spine of God debut in 2006, and it was out before that as well. I have those editions, but this tape is the original US issue on Caroline Records from 1993. That’s still two years after it came out in Europe on Glitterhouse, but it’s the earliest domestic release and it’s 20 years ago either way and I was stoked to find it. With just the four tracks “Tab…,” “25,” “Longhair” and “Lord 13,” it’s as psychedelic as Monster Magnet ever got during this era of the band.

Or, you know, any other, since it was their most psychedelic era.

And their ultra Hawkwindian jamming on “Tab…” comes across excellently on the tape, sounding all the more raw and classically compressed. The song is an EP unto itself at over half an hour long, and it takes up the entirety of side A, which makes “25,” “Longhair” and “Lord 13” something like an incremental return to earth, the latter being the most straightforward of the bunch, despite all the backing mouth noises and echoes from Dave Wyndorf, whistles and guitar effects and the rest built around a solid guitar strum and percussion line.

By the time they get there, it’s been a long trip. “Tab…” was always considered an EP even though technically speaking it’s has more of a runtime than Spine of God, and its relative obscurity in the Monster Magnet catalog is no less a factor two decades on than it ever was, considering nobody’s sure yet what to call the damn thing, whether it’s Tab, Tab 25, 25 Tab, or 25 …..Tab, which I took right off the cover. Any name you give it, however, it remains unique in the band’s discography and as warped a tape as you could ever hope to find.

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