Wino Wednesday: Wino, “Shot in the Head” from Adrift

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 17th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

Not exactly the most uplifting message ever put into a song, but Wino‘s take on Savoy Brown‘s “Shot in the Head” was nonetheless a highlight of the 2010 acoustic debut, Adrift. That record (review here) came out four years ago this month, and had its fair share of melancholy, with songs like “Whatever” and “Old and Alone,” but despite its foreboding title, “Shot in the Head” was actually more upbeat — frustration rather than depression — and its road-weary lyric fit Adrift‘s personality well, Wino taking the lines, “I’ve had enough of getting shot in the head/I’ve had enough and I wish I was dead,” and presenting them not with a downer woefulness, but something closer to the bluesy humor of the original.

The track opened Savoy Brown‘s 1972 full-length, Lion’s Share, which was the British outfit’s ninth album in six years. Understandable at that point why they might’ve “had enough,” but it’s worth noting that guitarist/vocalist/founder Kim Simmonds has toured and released music ever since, working with well over 60 musicians in various Savoy Brown lineups since starting out in 1967 — up to and including this year’s Goin’ to the Delta – so apparently he was still a ways off from his fill. Wino isn’t quite there in the number of people he’s worked with, though if you count both bands he’s been in and bands with whom he’s guested, he’s got to be over 40, but it’s plain enough to see a correlation there, and he seems to have a good time with the song, doubling his vocals to create a kind of one-man blues chorus and sneaking a plugged-in solo into the second half.

I looked for a live version of “Shot in the Head,” but came up empty. Could’ve sworn I saw him do this song at some point, but there doesn’t seem to be video to back that up. The album version’s plenty raucous, and I hope you enjoy it and have a happy Wino Wednesday:

Wino, “Shot in the Head” (Savoy Brown cover)

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Wino Wednesday: Spirit Caravan, “Inside Looking Out” Live in Las Vegas, 2014

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 10th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

True, I said I’d hold off putting up more clips from the Spirit Caravan reunion tour. Or at least I think I said it. Or at least I think I thought it. Either way, it was a stupid idea. There’s an awful lot of footage out there of Wino, Sherman and Henry Vasquez kicking ass across the land, and I’d be a fool to not embrace it because I live under the delusion that anybody’s keeping count of how often one or another of Wino‘s bands appears here. Hell, I’m damn near three years into doing Wino Wednesday. Redundancy stopped mattering a long time ago.

With that in mind, here’s something a little different. Ha. “Inside Looking Out” was originally released as a single by The Animals in 1966. A couple years later, in 1969, Grand Funk Railroad took it on and switched the lyrics so it was talking about reefer, and that apparently did the trick in terms of making the song awesome. It’s been covered by many over the years and has a classic boogie riff with some start-stops, and anytime Wino and Sherm want to share vocals, that’s cool by me. At about the halfway point in the video, right before the solo, the dude filming decides to throw the horns right at the bottom of the shot. I kind of thought the song itself was making the point of its own asskickery, but I have a hard time arguing with the sentiment.

This tour wasn’t Wino‘s first experience with “Inside Looking Out” either. The Obsessed released it in 1996 as the A-side of their Altamont Nation 7″ on Bongload Records with “The Peckerwood Stomp” accompanying, and it was also included in their 1999 compilation, Incarnate, on Southern Lord, which made it somewhat more readily available. As you can see in the clip below, experience counts.

Enjoy:

Spirit Caravan, “Inside Looking Out” Live in Las Vegas, March 18, 2014

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Wino Wednesday: Saint Vitus, Full Set Live in Nipomo, CA, 04.16.87

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 3rd, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

I can’t imagine what it would’ve been like to see Saint Vitus on stage 27 years ago. The context of the time makes it nearly impossible. Vitus during the Reagan years? This show, captured here in its entirety on what I can only assume was a video camera sent back in time from an unknown future to document such a phenomenon, took place in Nipomo, California, which is south of San Francisco, north of Los Angeles. The room is basically a box. Those who showed up to see Saint Vitus at that point — touring on their third album, with their second singer — probably would’ve at least mostly already been into the band, so I don’t expect it would’ve been like those tales you hear of the band in 1985 surprising disgruntled punkers on tour with Black Flag and whatever else. But still, to think of Vitus not as Saint Fucking Vitus but just as another act coming through town is something I can’t really get my head around, as much time as the video spends on the audience of mosher dudes.

That being the case, it’s all the better that footage like this exists, not so we can coopt its grainy look for our own empty-inside nostalgia for things we never knew, but just so we can get a look at what it might have been like to be there at that time. Invariably, our own place in time affects how we see it, what we read into the sounds, the fashion, the amateurish camera angles, the analog-looking date stamp checking off the minutes as they pass by. Still, even to watch as an outsider as Vitus rips into songs from Born too Late,  and the preceding two albums is impressive. Later in 1987, they’d release the Thirsty and Miserable EP, and it’s arguable this is the band’s peak era. I’m not sure I believe that or I’d say it more definitively, but you can make a good case either way, and this show would seem to be working in their favor.

Please note: I did some research on the purported name of the club where this show took place. I can’t find anything about it. If it’s a punk venue, I’m not sure how it might tie in with SoCal’s skinhead history, but the video seemed worth posting anyway.

Enjoy and have a great Wino Wednesday:

Saint Vitus, Live in Nipomo, CA, April 16, 1987

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Wino Wednesday: The Hidden Hand, “The Crossing” Live in 2004

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 27th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

According to the raw interwebular research I was able to put together — i.e., I Googled it — The Hidden Hand played the release show for their second album, Mother Teacher Destroyer, on Oct. 29, 2004, at the Black Cat in Washington, D.C. If I’m wrong about that, I hope you’ll at least give me credit for trying to track down when this clip of “The Crossing,” the opening track from that record, was played. Whenever it was, bassist Bruce Falkinburg absolutely nails the vocals, and even in the “uploaded five years ago” quality, the song sounds pretty righteous.

Their 2003 debut, Divine Propaganda, was rawer, and 2007’s swansong, The Resurrection of Whiskey Foote, more ambitious, but to me, Mother Teacher Destroyer was the quintessential outing from The Hidden Hand during their all-too-short run from 2003-2007. Not only did it have the rawness and progressive sensibilities in near-perfect balance, but the tracks themselves were so memorable, both individually and how they fed into each other, that the album remains high on my list of favorite Wino-related releases. I’ve featured the album before, so I won’t belabor the point, but it was the right offering at the right moment.

All the better, then, to get a glimpse of that moment nearly a decade later, by checking out this video of “The Crossing” from the release show. WinoFalkinburg and drummer Dave Hennessy are in top form — you can see them nail the tricky change shortly before the long guitar solo kicks in — and it seems fair to think this was if not as good as they got, then probably close to it. I still consider The Hidden Hand probably the least appreciated of the bands Wino has been in, the stalled-out and largely forgotten Premonition 13 notwithstanding, and something like this is a real treat at least for me, and I hope for you as well.

Please enjoy and have a great Wino Wednesday:

The Hidden Hand, “The Crossing” Live at the Mother Teacher Destroyer CD Release Show

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Wino Wednesday: The Obsessed, “Forever Midnight” from 1982 Demo

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 20th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

I’m kind of surprised that a band hasn’t come along that sounds like this yet. Don’t get me wrong, plenty of doom bands sound like The Obsessed (half the state of Maryland walks by and waves). But I mean exactly like this, the way that vintage ’70s production styles have taken such hold of heavy rock and doom these last several years. Moving into the murky, more obscure ’80s style of doom — when it buried itself underground to escape the blast radius of New Wave and glam much like the rodentia that survived the collision that killed the dinosaurs — would seem the next logical stage in that progression, wouldn’t it? And there’s a definite style at work in The Obsessed‘s earliest demos and others from that era that through whatever studio magic or lack thereof could feasibly be translated to a modern recording. I guess to some degree that’s what Revelation/Against Nature have been doing on their last couple outings, but seems to me there’s room for more than just one band in that terrain, at least if the glut of ’70s worshipers is anything to go by.

The track “Forever Midnight” would show up again on The Obsessed‘s self-titled debut, released in 1990 by Hellhound Records, but as the demo shows, it predates the album by at least eight years. Of course, The Obsessed formed as Warhorse in 1976, and we’ve seen that band rocking out Led Zeppelin covers at high school in Rockville, Maryland, so “Forever Midnight” could feasibly go back even further than ’82, but I wouldn’t know how much. Even in the rough demo form, it’s a solid groover. Not much of an ending, really — it just kind of stops — but as an early showing of Wino‘s riffing style, it comes across as a feeling-out process for what later on became The Obsessed‘s ultra-straightforward, no frills doom metal. Structurally, the demo is just about the same as the finished version as well, so you can figure that Wino knew what he was going for at the time and was pleased with the results even eight years after the fact when the self-titled came out. Hard to argue.

Enjoy and have a great Wino Wednesday:

The Obsessed, “Forever Midnight” Demo (1982)

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Wino Wednesday: Wino & Conny Ochs Cover Joy Division, Live in Germany, April 2012

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 13th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

According to the numbers — and you’d best believe I go by the numbers rather than my own memory of such things — this is the 150th Wino Wednesday post. In a few short weeks we’ll celebrate three full years of the feature, and I’m glad to say that I think I’ve only missed one week in that time. It’s become a staple in my consciousness, which band, what song, live or studio, what’s out there to find, what’s new, etc., and I’ve enjoyed trying to chase down something different each time out, even if it’s just another live version of “Born too Late” or something like that, bound to be familiar no matter what the source is.

This week we dip back to 2012 for some Wino & Conny Ochs. They were on tour in Europe that spring, having played Roadburn in the all-too-appropriate church setting of Het Patronaat (review here), and it was as comfortable on stage as I saw them, though by the time they got around to doing US dates afterward (review here), the collaboration seemed no less fluid. Supporting their Exile on Mainstream debut, Heavy Kingdom (review here), they offered a look at raw folkish troubadour traditionalism, of course tempered with Ochs‘ bleeding emotionalism and Wino‘s inescapable heavy rock edge.

It might be the folk that comes most to the fore on “Isolation.” A cover of Joy Division, “Isolation” comes from that band’s 1980 swansong, Closer, and aside from extending it, Wino and Ochs take the British outfit’s post-punk/pre-New Wave melancholy and replace it with a righteous acoustic strum, so that “Isolation” sounds more like a public domain railroad song than something Ian Curtis penned before taking his own life. The build at the end is true to the original, but there’s room made for a solo that extends into a jam with the two guitars before bridging back to the chorus and finishing out, making “Isolation” — which also appeared on the Wino & Conny Ochs Latitudes release, Labour of Love – all the more distinctive in this interpretation.

The clip was recorded in Würzburg, Germany on April 3, 2012 at Cairo. Hope you enjoy:

Wino & Conny Ochs, “Isolation” Live in Germany, April 2012

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Wino Wednesday: Spirit Caravan, “Brother Blue Steel” Live in North Carolina, 1999

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 6th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

We’ve had a lot of Spirit Caravan around these parts lately for Wino Wednesday. Reasonably so, what with the reunion and the wealth of videos posted from their tours of the US and Europe. I thought maybe this week we’d run with it but change it up a bit and go back to the three-piece’s original run. Spirit Caravan as a working band rather than the returning conquerors, playing to small rooms and caving in the chest cavities of those fortunate enough to be in the know.

In March 1999, when the below version of “Brother Blue Steel” was recorded, Spirit Caravan hadn’t yet released their debut album, Jug Fulla Sun. That record, which came out through Joe Lally of Fugazi‘s Tolotta Records, was still two months off. They’d been kicking around for a couple years both as Shine and Spirit Caravan and had put the track “Darkness and Longing” on a split with Sixty Watt Shaman, but their full-length debut wouldn’t arrive until May. It makes more sense, then, that Spirit Caravan would take on a song like “Brother Blue Steel,” which Wino originally wrote and recorded with The Obsessed.

It was the opener from The Obsessed‘s 1991 return outing, Lunar Womb, and it seems fair to expect that if someone’s in the crowd at a Spirit Caravan show before the band has an LP out, they’ve probably heard The Obsessed, so yeah, a take on “Brother Blue Steel” is understandable. While there’s always some stylistic bleedthrough between Wino‘s bands because of his tone and songwriting process, I still think you can see in the below some of the differences in character between the two groups, bassist Dave Sherman and then-drummer Gary Isom hitting into a bounce that foreshadowed a big part of Spirit Caravan‘s sonic personality as Wino chugs out the verse riff. For being the same song, it’s definitely a different take.

Hope you enjoy and have an excellent Wino Wednesday:

Spirit Caravan, “Brother Blue Steel” Live at The Caboose, Garner, NC, March 27, 1999

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Wino Wednesday: Spirit Caravan, “Dove-Tongued Aggressor” Live at Hellfest 2014

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 30th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

As an American, it’s hard for me to imagine the scale of an event like Hellfest, which takes place every June in Clisson, France, but certainly easy enough to admire it. The Valley stage seems to be here Hellfest hosts its Heavy, and from the likes of Black Pyramid to Neurosis to Unida, it’s a stage that’s been graced by some of the best bands the underground has to offer. This year, as part of their European reunion tour, Spirit CaravanWino on guitar/vocals, Dave Sherman on bass/vocals, Henry Vasquez on drums — made a stop at Hellfest as well, which seems only fitting. Wino had played there with The Obsessed a couple years back, and after appearances this spring at Desertfest and of course across the US, it’s a natural stop.

Perhaps it’s because I didn’t get to see them on their North American tour with Pilgrim that I’m so hung up on footage from the Spirit Caravan reunion gigs this year, or maybe it’s just that there’s so much video out there that I have a lot to choose from. Either way, the more the merrier as far as I’m concerned. The clip below of “Dove-Tongued Aggressor” finds the three-piece locked into one of their most satisfying rolling grooves, Vasquez killing it on drums as he will while Sherman tilts his head back for the ride and Wino stands poised at the microphone like he’s about to fight it. Very, very cool video.

The song was featured earlier this year around the time the US dates were announced and comes from Spirit Caravan‘s swansong 2003 compilation, The Last Embrace. It’s one of the last tracks they’d record before splitting up, and echoes some of the themes Wino would later explore in The Hidden Hand, but as they showcase here, is still definitively a Spirit Caravan nod.

Enjoy and have a great Wino Wednesday:

Spirit Caravan, “Dove-Tongued Aggressor” Live at Hellfest 2014

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Wino Wednesday: Spirit Caravan, “Dead Love/Jug Fulla Sun” at London Desertfest 2014

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 16th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

Yeah, I know this isn’t the first Wino Wednesday clip culled from the video evidence snagged at this year’s Desertfest in London. Not even close, actually. But unlike Wino‘s sit-in with Weedeater (seen here) and his acoustic set with Spirit Caravan bandmate Dave Sherman (seen here), this week’s video is actually of Spirit Caravan performing. If that’s too minor a distinction, I apologize. Stick around and it’ll be something else next week.

For now, shot from the side of the stage in a rather nostalgic black and white, we see Sherman, drummer Henry Vasquez and, deep in the shot, Wino himself performing “Dead Love/Jug Fulla Sun” from Spirit Caravan‘s classic 1999 debut, Jug Fulla Sun. In a big way, the album would define the band going forward, and while their 2001 follow-up/swansong, Elusive Truth, brought new edges to the sound and they continued to progress right up to the new studio tracks they included with their final offering, the 2003 The Last Embrace compilation, Jug Fulla Sun remains a standout 15 years later in capturing the trio as they were in a natural, heavy rolling state. It’s hard to imagine the smooth instrumental “Dead Love” section and “Jug Fulla Sun” without each other, and as Sherman stomps out the groove in the early going of the latter, I can’t help but agree. Simply one of heavy rock’s best nods.

Spirit Caravan just reissued Jug Fulla Sun on a limited, hand-screened LP — Exile on Mainstream had them for sale — and they looked absolutely gorgeous. It’s a worthy investment as the band’s reunion continues and they promise work on a new album, which would be their first studio outing since Elusive Truth. More on that to come, I’m sure, but until then, hope you enjoy “Dead Love/Jug Fulla Sun” and get a sense of just how much vitality there is at the heart of this band.

Happy Wino Wednesday:

Spirit Caravan, “Dead Love/Jug Fulla Sun” Live at Desertfest London 2014

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Wino Wednesday: Saint Vitus, “The Troll” Live in Portland, OR, 2010

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 9th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

I’m not gonna say I’m posting Saint Vitus‘ “The Troll” only because I feel like I haven’t left the house in two weeks, but I will allow that was the original impetus behind my selecting the song, which originally appeared on 1988’s Mournful Cries. The blinds pulled down, the window air conditioner blasting, my ass firmly planted on the couch for untold hours to come, I’m nothing if not consistent. Oh sure, I’ll emerge to take a bag of trash out, or to pour water from a pot when, say, the pipes under my kitchen sink start leaking water all over the floor this morning for no apparent reason, but having been unemployed for over three solid months and having been sans The Patient Mrs. for two weeks, I’ve more or less reverted to shut-in status. I try not to put the tv too loud so the neighbors won’t hear which baseball team I like. Their front door is about six inches from mine and people judge you for that shit.

So yeah, if the theme I want to work with is self-removal from human society, then “The Troll,” albeit exaggerated, fits that. As a complementary motivation for this clip in particular, which was filmed June 26, 2010, in Portland, Oregon, drummer Henry Vasquez absolutely kills it here. This was earlier into his tenure behind the kit for Vitus, and I remember seeing them in Brooklyn later in 2009 when he’d first joined and thinking he was playing some of the parts fast. He’s more settled in this video, but still has a killer swing in giving his ride cymbal a workout. There was no way he wasn’t going to come across loud, but of course Dave Chandler‘s guitar and Mark Adams‘ bass hold their own, and Wino gives an excellent retelling of the lyrics, to which, if I haven’t made it clear, I’m having an easy time relating these days.

Enjoy and have a great Wino Wednesday:

Saint Vitus, “The Troll” live in Portland, Oregon, June 26, 2010

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Wino Wednesday: The Hidden Hand, “The Hidden Hand (Theme)”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 2nd, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

I know I’ve gone on at length about the underrated nature of The Hidden Hand among the pantheon of so-called “Wino bands,” and it’s true, the project that I think introduced a lot of people to the style and frontmanship of Scott “Wino” Weinrich — their being active when Dave Grohl‘s Probot record was released likely had something to do with that — often gets downplayed. They weren’t as influential as The Obsessed or Spirit Caravan, and Saint Vitus is a different animal entirely. But The Hidden Hand was more than just some band Wino was in for a few years before getting back with Vitus. True, they had a half-decade run from about 2002 until 2007, but in that time they produced three vibrant, distinct albums that showed a commitment to stylistic progression and offered top notch riffing and a vocal collaboration between Wino and bassist Bruce Falkinburg that I think stands out as the best of Wino‘s career.

Maybe that’s not saying much since Wino hasn’t often shared vocal duties, but in my head, that only makes The Hidden Hand a more special band. Falkinburg, also a producer who’s worked with J. RobbinsWooly Mammoth and many others, brought something to The Hidden Hand completely distinct from any other group in which Wino had taken part up to that point. Their songwriting showcased a rich partnership beginning with the De-Sensitized 7″ and subsequent full-length debut, Divine Propaganda, released by MeteorCity in 2003. While my impression of that album has always been rooted in its rawness compared to its 2004 follow-up, Mother Teacher Destroyer, a revisit to the band’s eponymous song — or their theme, as the parenthetical has it — finds it a celebration of various elements. The heavy riffing and anti-authoritarian drive are both there that would become staples of The Hidden Hand‘s sound, the album’s title mirrored in the mysticism counteracted by worldly manipulations transforming into dogma amid the political turmoil of the early part of the last decade.

And with “The Hidden Hand (Theme),” it’s Falkinburg up front. Wino joins in on the chorus, but it’s worth noting that on the song The Hidden Hand chose to represent who they were and what they were about, it was the bassist in the frontman role.

Enjoy and have an excellent Wino Wednesday:

The Hidden Hand, “The Hidden Hand (Theme)”

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Wino Wednesday: The Obsessed, “Skybone” Live at Maryland Deathfest XI

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 25th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

Of all the bands Wino‘s played guitar in, The Obsessed have always struck me as the most stripped down. If it wasn’t so slow and thick, you could almost call it punk in form. Riffs, verses, choruses, solos — The Obsessed never got too fancy, never strayed from rock and roll, never fell into pretense. They just rocked. Then they stopped. Then they started again. Then they stopped again. And so on.

That cycle seems to have hit a “stopped again” point, particularly with the reunion of Spirit Caravan this year. When they got back together in 2012, The Obsessed did a full European tour, but nothing in the US to compare with the month-plus Spirit Caravan spent on the road this spring. Maybe that’s due in part to Spirit Caravan‘s higher profile — they’ve always been a fan favorite, and bassist Dave Sherman‘s stage presence and tenure fronting Earthride has only increased interest in Spirit Caravan since their early ’00s breakup — but either way, aside from the appearance at Maryland Deathfest XI last year, from which this week’s Wino Wednesday clip comes, The Obsessed haven’t done much in the States for their reunion. With both Spirit Caravan and Saint Vitus currently active, it’s hard to know where The Obsessed might fit in.

Still, the safe bet is that they will — if not now, at some point — reemerge. Formed as Warhorse in 1976, The Obsessed has been a home base to which Wino has returned several times over his journeyman’s years between projects, and “Skybone,” which was the centerpiece of their to-date final outing, 1994’s The Church Within, shines light on a lot of what has always worked best about the band. It is unremittingly straightforward, an easy groove to ride along with and that asks little indulgence in return. Obscure lyrically, but irresistibly riffed, and bassist Reid Raley and drummer Greg Rogers, though both lower volume in the video than Wino‘s guitar (it was filmed on his side of the stage), nail down the nod on the sleeper favorite.

Enjoy:

The Obsessed, “Skybone” live at Maryland Deathfest XI, May 25, 2013

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Wino Wednesday: Spirit Caravan Live in Columbus, Ohio, April 2014

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 18th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

I’ve spent probably an inordinate amount of time these last couple months living vicariously through YouTube clips of the Spirit Caravan reunion. I didn’t get to see the reformed trio during their US run — I expect if they do more dates, I’ll travel to wherever they happen to be that’s closest, be it Rhode Island or New York or wherever — and they’re on the road now in Europe, having first gone over to perform at Desertfest in London and Berlin before starting the US tour with Pilgrim opening, so maybe they’ll come back and do more, maybe not. I’m trying to be cautiously optimistic about it.

In the meantime, there’s no shortage of video documentation of the US tour to wade through. This week’s Wino Wednesday clip was recorded video and audio by Michael “Lucifer Burns” Lindenauer, and it’s the full Spirit Caravan set, more than an hour long, from Columbus, Ohio, at Skully’s Music Diner, from April 9. Pretty much any classic you could ask for — from “Fang” to “Cosmic Artifact” to “Brainwashed” — they’re all in there, and the three-piece of Wino, bassist/vocalist Dave Sherman and drummer Henry Vasquez were air tight by then, just six days before the tour wrapped at the St. Vitus bar in Brooklyn.

Spirit Caravan play this weekend at Hellfest in Clisson, France. On Sunday, June 22, they play The Valley stage with Unida and a slew of enviable others. I’m sure I’ll be looking out for video of that too when the time comes. Until then, and without knowing how long the Spirit Caravan reunion is going to go, if it’s going to result in a new batch of songs or just sort of wrap up and dissipate, I’m glad to have videos like this one to tide me over. Hope you enjoy and have an excellent Wino Wednesday:

Spirit Caravan, Full Set at Skully’s Music Diner, Columbus, Ohio, April 9, 2014

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Wino Wednesday: Wino, Punctuated Equilibrium in Full

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 11th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

I understand why the Wino trio only lasted as long as it did, what with drummer Jean-Paul Gaster‘s neverending tour commitments with Clutch and the death of bassist Jon Blank after the three-piece’s return from their successful European run, and as much as the solo acoustic material Wino has released since working under his own moniker has been a fascinating progression to witness and has resulted in no shortage of brilliant songwriting and performances, I still really dig the hell out of Punctuated Equilibrium. It’s not an all-the-time album, but it’s definitely a fit for summer, and as it’s started to warm up here in the desolate north, I’m finding it worth yet another return listen, the catchy, sunshiny opening of “Release Me” telling of some of the good-time vibes to follow.

Punctuated Equilibrium came out early in 2009 on Southern Lord Recordings, and aside from uniting Scott “Wino” Weinrich and Gaster at the top of the bill, it also tied together a lot of Wino‘s songwriting as demonstrated throughout the years in his various bands. “Smilin’ Road” had some of the upbeat vibes of Spirit Caravan, while the following “Eyes of the Flesh” tapped into the classic doom of The Obsessed and both “Gods, Frauds, Neo-Cons and Demagogues” and “Secret Realm Devotion” touched on themes and a more mystical take on heavy rock evocative of The Hidden Hand. Of course, the constant running through all of those bands is Wino‘s songwriting itself, and front-to-back, Punctuated Equilibrium demonstrated plainly that whatever the context, Wino‘s guitar and vocals were among the most distinctive in heavy.

The shame of it is that as Wino moved on to solo work, his collaboration with Conny Ochs and reunions with Saint Vitus, The Obsessed and Spirit Caravan, these songs were left behind. Maybe one of these days they’ll get picked back up for an acoustic reinterpretation or something. Till then, have a great Wino Wednesday.

Wino, Punctuated Equilibrium (2009)

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Wino Wednesday: Covering Motörhead and Lynyrd Skynyrd Acoustic, Oct. 2010

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 4th, 2014 by H.P. Taskmaster

Of the various covers Wino did on his solo tours earlier this decade and tours in the duo collaboration with Conny Ochs, taking on songs from Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Townes van Zandt, and Lynyrd Skynyrd as he does here, I don’t think any cover was quite as steady as Motörhead‘s “Iron Horse.” Performing on Oct. 15, 2010, in Manchester, England, at the Star and Garter, Wino talks a little bit about finding Motörhead‘s woulda-been 1975 debut On Parole after its release in 1979 and how “Iron Horse” has stayed with him since. We all have those songs, and he treats the Motörhead cut with due reverence, here pairing it with Skynyrd‘s “On the Hunt,” taken from 1975’s Nuthin’ Fancy.

While it may or may not have the same kind of emotional attachment with it as “Iron Horse,” the second cover in this medley is particularly interesting because “On the Hunt” is also a song The Obsessed tackled, some nine years earlier on their 2001 split with Jimmy Bower of Eyehategod‘s The Mystick Krewe of Clearlight. That split was the last studio material The Obsessed put out — never say never — and the song also appeared on their 1999 compilation, Incarnate, and he performed it live with Solace in 2000, so it’s obviously the product of a long-standing appreciation as well. All the better to put them back to back.

Wino would’ve had more than a few months on the road on his own at this point, and his comfort level on stage shows it. He’s joking with the crowd, getting some laughs, telling stories, and in the middle of ‘On the Hunt,” he feels loose as he works his way through what it took Skynyrd upwards of 18 guitarists (give or take) to get across.

The video cuts off at the very end, but it’s still more than enough to make the point. Hope you enjoy and have an excellent Wino Wednesday:

Wino, “Iron Horse/On the Hunt” Live in Manchester, UK, Oct. 15, 2010

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