Slow Phase Announce Debut Album; Post “Starlight” Video

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 23rd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

slow phase

Bringing together members of West Coast rockers Skunk and 3rd Ear Experience, Slow Phase are a new outfit who’ll look to release their debut album sometime this Fall. No word on an exact date yet — one assumes it’s done if they’re putting out singles? — but they’ve got a video up for “Starlight” that you can check out below that features the trio, some lyrics, bright colors, the whole bit. The song is likewise straightforward, no pretense about what it’s going for or how it’s getting there. That makes the according vibe easy enough to dig, and though one would suspect the album has a bit more going on than just a single approach, “Starlight” bodes well for what might be in store when it gets here. Only one way to find out.

In the meantime, dudes clearly have their artwork game on point, as the cover for “Starlight” single shows. Check that out right here with its beardo-thinker-in-the-desert thing, followed by some more background from the band itself.

Like so:

slow phase starlight

It was only after having spent 3 years woodshedding stuff like James Gang, KISS, Mountain, Zeppelin, Zappa, Grand Funk (and playing the occasional party) that we decided to start writing our own songs, and christened ourselves SLOW PHASE, after the coolest setting on my 1972 Maestro Phase Shifter.

The band includes Dmitri Mavra, the founder and songwriter behind SKUNK, on guitar, along with Anthony Pulsipher (bass/vocals) and Richard Stuverud (drums/vocals).

Pulsipher is a veteran of many bands, and in addition to SLOW PHASE he also plays guitar, writes, and sings for Oakland’s SPIDERMEOW, a country rock trio in the tradition of The Band and Gram Parsons.

Drum wizard Richard Stuverud, originally from Seattle, has played with the Fastbacks, RNDM, Tribe After Tribe, 3rd Ear Experience, Jeff Ament, and many more. With SLOW PHASE Stuverud gets to indulge his love of Bonham, Ward, and Moon to the fullest!

Also, Stuverud and Pulsipher are both great singers and it’s been cool to add some harmonies to the sound, a facet of early rock that’s often overlooked by today’s bands.

The album should be out later this Fall. In the meantime, I hope you can get a chance to check out our first track, STARLIGHT, either via Bandcamp (free download) or the video on Vimeo.

Slow Phase is:
Dmitri Mavra – guitar
Anthony Pulsipher – bass/vocals
Richard Stuverud – drums/vocals

facebook.com/SlowPhase/
slowphase.bandcamp.com/album/starlight

Slow Phase, “Starlight” official video

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Ealdor Bealu Announce West Coast Touring for September

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 19th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

I think I’ve made it pretty clear at this point that I did what Ealdor Bealu are doing on the earthy and progressive psychedelia of their second album, Spirit of the Lonely Places (discussed here and here), so even though I’ve no knowledge that next months run mostly through California will yield any further touring, I’m still glad the Boise four-piece are getting out to suppor the record at all, particularly if it means they’ll get the chance to sell a few records on the road and get the album to some people who might not have otherwise heard it. It’s a 10-show run in 12 days, and though, again, most of it is in Cali, they still cover a good amount of ground as they head north to finish out in Eugene, Oregon, on Sept. 21.

You can see the dates below, and if you go to this show, buy a t-shirt or something and tell them I said hi.

Here you go:

ealdor bealu tour

Ealdor Bealu’s Fall 2019 West Coast Tour kicks off [in less than] one month!! 10 dates all across California, Oregon, Nevada, and Idaho in some of raddest venues around with some truly amazing bands lined up to join us!! Tell your friends… We are coming.

9.10 Boise, ID @ The Olympic Venue w/ darsombra + Lucid Aisle
9.12 Reno, NV @ Dead Ringer Analog Bar w/ Kanawha + BLUNDERBUSST
9.13 Pasadena, CA @ Old Towne Pub Pasadena Metal Assault Presents w/ House of Rabbits + Solar Haze + Dusky Wing
9.14 San Diego, CA @ The Tower Bar w/ Nebula Drag + Mortar + Vedic
9.15 Oceanside, CA @ Pour House Oceanside w/ Deep Sea Thunder Beast + Francis Anger Roberts
9.17 San Luis Obispo, CA @ Pour House Hail Yourself Metalzine Presents w/ Stone Mountain SLO + Hemisphere
9.18 Santa Cruz, CA @ The Blue Lagoon w/ Birdo + Heavyskies
9.19 Oakland, CA @ Elbo Room Jack London w/ BURN RIVER BURN + Supernaut + Phantom Hound
9.20 Chico, CA @ The Maltese w/ Shadow Limb + Solar Estates + You Poor Devil
9.21 Eugene, OR @ Luckey’s Club w/ Childspeak + Long Hallways

SEE YAH ON THE ROAD

Ealdor Bealu is:
Carson Russell: Guitars, Vocals
Rylie Collingwood: Bass, Vocals
Travis Abbott: Guitars, Vocals
Craig Hawkins: Drums, Percussion

https://www.facebook.com/ealdorbealu/
https://ealdorbealu.bandcamp.com/

Ealdor Bealu, Spirit of the Lonely Places (2019)

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Pinewalker Premiere “Sentinel”; Migration out Sept. 6

Posted in audiObelisk on August 15th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

PINEWALKER Photo by Carly Page

Thrice-guitarred Salt Lake City riff metal five-piece Pinewalker will issue their debut full-length, Migration, on Sept. 6. It is an album that makes its mission plain from the moment opener “Sentinel” reworks the signature riff of Sleep‘s “Dragonaut” and later taps into Goatsnake during its apex, and the brazen manner in which it goes about bringing together metallic aggression with stoner and doom influences — even a bit of post-metal ambience at the start of sprawling nine-minute album centerpiece “Maelstrom” — only underlines that as their ultimate stylistic aim. Formed in 2014 under the moniker Yeti and with a 2016 EP, Wasteland, to their credit under that name, Pinewalker burl their way through seven tracks and 43 minutes on Migration, alternating between a song like “Bone Collector,” which draws a line between extreme metal thrust — something “Burning Earth” soon brings even more forward — and Sabbathian shuffle in a kind of Entombed-via-Rocky-Mountains revamp, and longer form pieces like “Maelstrom,” the subsequent instrumental roller “Space Witch” and closer “The Thaw,” the latter two of which top eight minutes as the record moves through its second half.

The purposeful-seeming impression there is that the further you go, the more there is to find. Pinewalker — guitarist/vocalists Tarran MeadJason Kennington and Sam Roe, bassist Ethan Jentzch and drummer Nate Perkins — insert “Self vs. Self” PINEWALKER migrationbetween the last two longer cuts as the penultimate track to return to some of the more grounded metal fare of “Bone Collector,” finding room for some Maiden-style guitar histrionics along the way, but the prevailing spirit of Migration is in the overarching blend that unites the broader and more directly-punishing material. Melody is engaged most of all in “The Thaw,” the central riff of which seems to reinvent Neurosis‘ “Given to the Rising” before offsetting it with post-rocking airiness in the verse, but the death-doom stomp that emerges, soaring leads that take hold, and willfully over-the-top crescendo that follow are hardly the work of a band simply looking to ape their influences. Rather, the relief that “The Thaw” seems to find in relation to the rest of the record is all the more palpable for the individualized stamp they put on it.

And that that is the final impression Migration gives — aided in no small part by the production of Andy Patterson (SubRosaDØNE, many more) — speaks to the successful realization of the aesthetic meld that’s at the core of the record. They play heavy, they play metal, and sure enough, it works. And whether they’re bludgeoning their way through “Burning Earth” or hinting at a more progressive future in the tense buildup in the early going of “Maelstrom,” the simple fact that they’re able to execute their ideas with such clearheaded certainty is emblematic of the achievement they’re making as they emerge from their mountainous bailiwick. They run the risk over the longer term of falling into a place between — too aggro for the rockers, but more rock than the headbangers can fully embrace — but they have several advantages on their side in things like the potential their songwriting shows here and their relative youth, and as positioned as they seem to be for future growth, Pinewalker leave one with a resounding sense of hope for what might come as well as a black eye from what has already manifested in these tracks. Go on tour, gentlemen. Go on tour and don’t look back.

They’ll play the release show for Migration on Sept. 13 at Urban Lounge in Salt Lake City, and I’m happy today to host the track premiere of “Sentinel” below for your streaming pleasure. Album preorders are up on Bandcamp.

Please enjoy:

Pinewalker on “Sentinel”:

Sentinel was a tricky beast for us at first. We had a lot of ideas that we wanted to play around with and it took a lot of our attention during the writing process, but we are super happy with how it turned out. Thematically, this is the starting point of the record. This is where we are introduced to the character that we follow through the rest of the music. To us, the song tries to capture the fear of the unknown with a power that emanates anger. We like old monster movies a lot, and thought about their cinematography and design while coming up with this song as kind of our main theme for our monster.

Salt Lake City, Utah-based quintet PINEWALKER is preparing to release their sprawling debut album, Migration. Completed for release in early September, the album boasts a cathartic concept, an homage to loved ones lost to cancer, delivered through a crushing display of thundering, groove-heavy doom/sludge metal.

The five members of PINEWALKER all met and began playing together in high school and have grown tighter as a group ever since. Now in their fifth year since inception, the band has solidified and honed their own approach to performing the music they love.

With forty-four minutes of music spanning seven expansive tracks, Migration was recorded, mixed and mastered by Andy Patterson at his The Boars Nest in Salt Lake City (Subrosa, Gaza, Theories), and completed with artwork by Charles Bogus and design by Ashley Fairbourne.

PINEWALKER will self-release Migration on digital formats on September 6th with a CD version to follow.

PINEWALKER Live:
9/13/2019 Urban Lounge – Salt Lake City, UT *Migration release show

PINEWALKER:
Nate Perkins – drums
Tarran Mead – guitar/vocals
Jason Kennington – guitar/vocals
Sam Roe – lead guitar/vocals
Ethan Jentzsch – bass

Pinewalker on Thee Facebooks

Pinewalker on Instagram

Pinewalker on Bandcamp

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Sleeping Giant, Sleeping Giant: Awake in Visions

Posted in Reviews on August 7th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

sleeping giant sleeping giant

Sometimes a band comes right out of their second rehearsal with a batch of songs, ready to hit the studio and make a record — or at least that’s how it feels. That’s not the case with Sleeping Giant, who emerge from Australia’s crowded heavy underground some six years after forming as Lowpoint. Their self-titled and self-released-but-probably-not-for-long debut album is the result of the subsequent half-decade of writing and woodshedding, and comprises a clean eight tracks and 42 minutes of solid-foundation fuzz rock, turning influences from earlier Queens of the Stone Age, Lowrider, Kyuss and more rolling fare into a collection of original songs that bask in their fuzzy familiarity but still feel geared toward their own approach, perhaps because they’ve been so worked on. Even the recording process for Sleeping Giant‘s Sleeping Giant took a year, which sounds excruciating, but the resultant long-player finds guitarist/vocalist Steven Hammer, bassist James Wright and drummer Pali Emond-Glenn sounding well aware of who they are as a band and able to manifest that in their material without losing their first-album edge.

Even without knowing it was so long in coming together, the songs don’t feel off-the-cuff. They feel worked on, thought out, considered, and that’s by no means a detriment to their execution, which remains plenty energetic. That’s an achievement unto itself, but it’s just one of the ways Sleeping Giant ultimately impress throughout, as they move through a tracklisting that’s no less impeccably arranged than the songs themselves in terms of bringing out the different sides of the band’s approach, growing richer as it goes from side A to B in what’s clearly a vinyl-intended progression — the cover by Emond-Glenn would seem geared toward that as well — that nonetheless flows smoothly throughout, making its way toward the three-part finale, “Visions I,” “Visions II” and “Visions III,” which together introduce new elements of atmosphere and aggression to the proceedings, taking the straightforward core of heavy rock from which Sleeping Giant work and using it as a basis for exploring different ideas. However long it took to make it happen, there’s little more one could reasonably ask of a debut album.

Sleeping Giant opens, suitably enough, with “Sleep,” which begins an initial salvo that will continue basically through the first four songs to one degree or another. A mid-paced groove takes hold with effective, laid back vocal melodies overtop from Hammer and a fuzz that’s both warm-sounding and right on in terms of capturing a desert-style feel while still giving Wright‘s bass room to make an impression. One is reminded early on of Sungrazer to a degree, but Sleeping Giant are on a less jammy trip overall, and the roll of “Sleep” is offset by the sheer thrust of “Temptress,” which pushes the vocals forward in the mix and offers as support for them a fervent push and tempo kick, the trade from one to the next crucial to understanding how side A works, since the subsequent “Empire” and “Serpent” will essentially make the same moves, though of course there are changes in the approach to be considered.

sleeping giant

“Temptress” resolves itself in a nod and final shove before dropping out to a series of curses — somebody’s mad about something, comically — and leading to the six-and-a-half-minute “Empire,” which is a highlight for its blend of bounce and roll, the chorus reminding of some lost late-’90s/early-’00s gem from somewhere in Northern Europe, even as the tones and production by Erek Ladd and Jarod Meadows remains modern. Guitar drops out in the second half of “Empire” for a moment to let the bass introduce the apex nodder riff and the slow-motion swagger that ensues is more than welcome upon the return of the full tonal breadth. In comparison, “Serpent” — also the most direct source of the Lowrider comparison above — is arguably the highest-energy of the bunch, with a careening Homme-style central riff and sense of movement brought out all the more by the shift into a slower section at the midpoint, only to return to a speedier finish. Again, not by any means revolutionary, but effective in conveying Sleeping Giant‘s priorities, which are clearly geared toward songcraft.

The basic structure of side B changes, thanks largely to the aforementioned “Visions” trilogy. “Gypsy” unfolds very much in the character of side A’s tradeoffs between longer and shorter songs, finding Hammer‘s malleable vocals in a lower register over a slower riff before opening up for the chorus, trading tempos much in the spirit of “Serpent,” only reversed. In the overarching progression of the record, “Gypsy” is inherently outshined by “Visions,” but its being there makes sense and the work it does to tie the two halves of the album together isn’t to be forgotten. Still, it’s a significant turn when the instrumental “Visions I” begins its subdued unfolding, reminding of progressive-era Truckfighters‘ less jumpy moments, with a linear build toward the heavier guitar’s full brunt.

They get there before the track’s three minutes are up, and turn directly into “Visions II,” which unfolds a King Buffalo-y psychedelic blues vibe until a more severe riff leads at 2:42 to harsher growling in post-hardcore fashion — actually, the voice reminds me of Elegy-era Amorphis, but I’m willing to chalk that up to sonic coincidence — gradually working in clean and harsh layers effectively to carry Sleeping Giant to a genuinely unexpected crescendo, leaving “Visions III” to pick up immediately from there, which it does by shifting into another engaging nod-roll as a bed for a return of sung vocals and the gradual build of a melodic wash of tone, which acts not so much as an epilogue to the prior part’s payoff, but as a different stage of the same idea — in that way, “Visions” is all the more well executed as a whole. And it’s in that last three-parter that Sleeping Giant most show the potential in their sound for bringing a range of styles together under a fuzzy banner and crafting an identity of their own from them. After six years and a name change leading to this debut, I won’t speculate on where they might go from here or when they might get there, but the obvious care they put into the writing and honing and construction of this material shows through one way or another in each track, which is no less than they deserve.

Sleeping Giant, Sleeping Giant (2019)

Sleeping Giant on Thee Facebooks

Sleeping Giant on Instagram

Sleeping Giant on Bandcamp

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Oak and 1968 to Embark on Weekender Next Month

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 6th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

OAK

Who the hell doesn’t want to get out for a weekender every now and then? Next month, London’s Oak and Cheshire’s 1968 will head off together for a three-day stint, starting out at The Black Heart in Camden Town and heading to the continent-proper in order to make stops in Ghent, Belgium, and Paris, France. Decent amount of ground to cover in not a huge amount of time, but the way it’s split up is hardly insurmountable, even with the inevitable traffic of a major urban center. Should be good shows, is what I’m saying. And I dig a weekender tour, so yeah. Right on.

Oak released their third EP, the aptly-titled Oak III, last Spring and have been steadily supporting it around the UK since, while 1968 issued their Ballads of the Godless debut album last year through Black Bow Records, having recorded at Skyhammer Studios1968 also were in America earlier this year, making a stop at Planet Desert Rock Weekend in Las Vegas, which hosted a range of international bands. Good gig to get.

Maybe you’ll be in London, Ghent or Paris to catch these two bands, maybe you won’t. I won’t be. But sometimes I’m just glad to see people getting out to do shows. That’s pretty much the story here. That and a cool poster.

Here it is, speaking of:

oak 1968 tour

OAK – MAJOR UPDATE

We are proud to announce that we will pay a short visit to Belgium and France alongside 1968 in September. Oak is a stoner rock band from London. We tried to sound like Kyuss but fucked it all up. We take retro blues rock riffs influenced by the likes of Cream, make it filthy and downtuned and then get an actual mad man to yell over the top of it.

12th of Sept: London UK, The Black Heart
13th of Sept: Ghent BE, Muziekcentrum Kinky Star
14th of Sept: Paris FR, L’international

Event links below:
https://www.facebook.com/events/2320505784674597/
https://www.facebook.com/events/310172116575644/
https://www.facebook.com/events/2815744091833722/

Poster by Jo Riou Graphic Designer

Oak is:
Clinton Ritchie: Drums
Richard Morgan: Bass, Backing Vocals
Kevin Germain: Guitars
Andy Valiant: Vocals

https://www.facebook.com/oakstoner/
https://oakstoner.bandcamp.com/

Oak, Oak III EP (2018)

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MØNSTRØID Premiere “Lost in the Haze” Video; New Album in the Works

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 6th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

monstroid

There is a date-stamp on the top right corner of the VHS/camcorder-looking video for the new single from South African four-piece MØNSTRØID, and I can’t help but wonder to what it might be alluding. Their first album, Set 1, was self-released in 2017, so obviously that wouldn’t have much to do with 1994, and though that indeed is the year Kyuss released Sky Valley, that record came out in June 25 years ago, not December. Fu Manchu‘s first record was earlier in ’94 as well. So what’s Dec. 8? Maybe someone’s birthday?

I’m sure there’s a perfectly rational explanation for the choice — or at least an explanation, rational or not — but I don’t know what it is. Fun to speculate though, and the hooky, driving desert-style heavy rock of “Lost in the Haze” makes for easy company while pondering. The song is the opening track of Set 1 and speaks to MØNSTRØID‘s general songwriting modus operandi, their focus on straightforward, ’90s-style desert idolatry, guided by riffs toward the inevitable chorus impression of cuts like “Shake Down” and “Navigator,” the latter of which turns its defining Kyuss influence into more of a Roadsaw vibe, though “Life Lost” adds more atmosphere and chug in kind and “My Mind” slows things down — my mind would — ahead of the tempo revival in “Cruiser” and the instrumental closer “’80s TV Show,” which is one of two sans-vocal inclusions along with the earlier “Rocket.”

The band readily acknowledge their influences as you can see in the quote below, and indeed, as the clip for “Lost in the Haze” finds them out in the desert, magically rocking without amps as one might have in a mid-’90s era video, they would seem to pay homage on multiple levels. Kind of curious that the clip would come out some two years after the album it’s promoting, but hell, I missed the record the first time it came out, so I’ll take it however it comes, and they’ve got a new one in the works, so all the better.

Do you think they’ll call it Set 2?

Enjoy:

MØNSTRØID, “Lost in the Haze” official video premiere

Cape Town based stoner/desert rock band MØNSTRØID have released the video for their track Lost In the Haze, taken from their 2017 debut album Set 1.

Shot in both South Africa and the Namibian desert the band comments on the video, “We love where we live, and we wanted to position the Western regions of Southern Africa as the African counterpart to California’s desert rock scene, from where we draw so much inspiration. The video puts the band driving through it. From the dried-up desert pans, to the water flowing out of rocks sustaining life when all around it is dry, to the semi desert where the water flows freely. All the vast desert beauty we should celebrate.”

MØNSTRØID is the love child of 4 dudes from Cape Town, born out of a deeply shared appreciation for writing, making and sharing tectonic plate-shifting music. From the rumbling depths emerges a melodic molten soundscape. From the skies a flaming fireball of fuzz. MØNSTRØID resides where these forces collide. For lovers of growling guitars, distorted groove laden bass, melodic vocals and exploding drums of thunder.

The band are in studio at the moment working on their new album which is set to release early 2020.

MØNSTRØID, Set 1 (2017)

MØNSTRØID on Thee Facebooks

MØNSTRØID on Instagram

MØNSTRØID on Bandcamp

MØNSTRØID website

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Lamassu Debut Album Into the Empty Due Sept. 2

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 2nd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

lamassu

Pretty heavy vibe going on in Lamassu‘s latest single, “Killing Someone,” which comes from their debut album, Into the Empty. The record is due out Sept. 2 and I have no reason to believe that’s not when it’ll show up, and though I’ll admit my eye was caught by “features members of Motherslug…” below, the relative newcomer four-piece had no trouble holding my attention for the duration of what will serve as the centerpiece of the record — telling in itself. Though the title conjures images of metallic celebrations of violence, the actual lyrics are more of a social comment — the title-line arriving as, “Those in power always killing someone” — which is certainly a fair enough general assessment of human history to-date. I haven’t hit up the previously-posted “Under the Watch of a Crow,” but that’s next, so just give me a minute. I’ll get there.

Preorders for Into the Empty are available from Bandcamp, as the PR wire tells it:

lamassu into the empty

LAMASSU Stream Single “Killing Someone” From Upcoming Debut Album

Australian hard rock band Lamassu are proud to present “Killing Someone,” the first track from their debut album Into The Empty. Singer and guitarist Chris explains, “Matt wrote an amazing riff, heavy and full of groove. We jammed it at rehearsal a few times and musically it all came together pretty quick. Lyrically I wanted to express a realisation I had one day when seeing horrible injustice on the news, that too often the people who have the power to change this type of thing are often the ones who create it in the first place.”

“Killing Someone” is now streaming on Bandcamp with the full album set for release on September 2nd. Listen and preorder here: https://lamassuband.bandcamp.com/album/into-the-empty

About Lamassu:

Australian heavy rockers LAMASSU are preparing to release their debut full-length album Into the Empty this September. This collective of musicians features members of Motherslug, Field, Borrachero, and Olmeg, all stalwarts of the Melbourne stoner/doom scene.

On Into the Empty, Lamassu offers heavy yet restrained guitars, thick bass, and unforgiving drums, all glued together with vocals that channel almost ‘Cornell-ian’ reach and delivery. The songs are exactly as long as they need to be, drawing upon themes that challenge human existence in our modern lives.

Lamassu released their debut single “Under The Watch Of A Crow” in July 2018, which was featured on 2019’s Doomed & Stoned Australia compilation. They recorded Into the Empty in late 2018 with producer/engineer/musician Mike Deslandes (High Tension / YLVA) at The Black Lodge Studios in Brunswick, Melbourne.

Into the Empty comes out digitally on September 2nd, 2019 via independent release, with 12” vinyl and CD formats to follow.

Lamassu is:
Chris Fisher– lead vocals/guitar
Matt Dawkins — lead guitar/back-up vocals
Nick Rad — drums
Ant Smith — recorded bass
Al Cooke — live bass

https://www.facebook.com/LamassuBand/
https://lamassuband.bandcamp.com/

Lamassu, Into the Empty (2019)

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Pelegrin to Release Al-Mahruqa Sept. 13; Streaming “Majoun”

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 1st, 2019 by JJ Koczan

With a meld of heavy post-rock and Eastern-inflected psychedelia, Parisian trio Pelegrin will self-release their debut album, Al-Mahruqa, on Sept. 13. I happen to know that the song they’re streaming from it, “Majoun,” is the opening track both because I can see the tracklisting below and I’ve got the record on while I’m writing this — first listen — and thank you very much its warm melodies, patient psych songcraft and immersive stylistic blend is hitting the spot nicely. It’s a first record, fair enough, but clearly one made with aesthetic intent and a ready sense of spaciousness, as the three-piece go exploring through not just “Majoun,” but the expansive rollout of “Farewell” and the progressive drift of “Home Again,” balancing longer and shorter pieces off each other as they make their way through “Dying Light” toward the closing title-track. Immersion is the idea and Pelegrin provide plenty of depth for it. I’m looking forward to getting to know Al-Mahruqa better.

The PR wire brings album details and the aforementioned stream:

pelegrin al-mahruqa

Psych rock adventurers PELEGRIN share details about imposing debut album “Al-Mahruqa”, out September 13th on digital.

The bazaar crowd hails, haggles, ruffles. Life at its most, screeching and hustling. Gradually, the ruckus fades away. In the vacuum that’s created, a bass roars, answers its own call. A guitar string vibrates endlessly. The note hangs on ominously, then slips up. Percussions soar and the engine starts running… The listener’s fate is sealed. No turning back; he is bound for a 42 minutes-long sonic tale. He will follow the footsteps of an ailing war veteran, from the bazaar of Tangier to a millenary temple, carved into the rock at the very end of a desert valley: Al-Mahruqa.

On the way, the listener will encounter mesmerizing ambiances. Melodies soaked with eastern influences. Rock-solid riffs. Unsettling songs, always on the move. References, wink, nods? Of course. But no obvious comparison will jump to mind. If the power trio PELEGRIN (“pilgrim” in ancient French) roams the lands of stoner, prog and heavy psych, it is with the intention of making a few steps into the unknown. What drove François (guitar/vocals/production), Jason (bass) and Antoine (drums) is the will to play the music that they would have liked to hear. To fill a tiny space that seemed vacant in the ever-expanding galaxy of distorted music.

The road to “Al-Mahruqa” was long and winding, covering almost five years. The creation of its followup should be a smoother affair… And PELEGRIN is already hard at work on it. Where the three friends are the most comfortable: in their own bubble, away from stages. Where ideas fly, sweet smoke rises, and stories are written.

“Al-Mahruqa” was recorded and mixed by François Roze. It was mastered by Kent Stump (Wo Fat) at Crystal Clear Sound. The artwork was designed by Hadrien Virima.

Tracklisting:
1. Majoun
2. Farewell
3. The Coldest Night
4. Dying Light
5. Al-Mahruqa

PELEGRIN is
François Roze – guitar, vocals
Jason Recoing – bass
Antoine Ebel – drums, percussions

https://www.facebook.com/PelegrinMusic/
https://pelegrinmusic.bandcamp.com

Pelegrin, “Majoun”

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