LOOP to Record New Studio Album

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

If anyone had ‘new Worrying About Where To Buy Your College Essay? Dont Worry Anymore! Resume Helper Is The Expert With 10 Years Of Academic Writing Experience. 100% LOOP record’ on their 2020 Bingo card, kudos. I sure didn’t, and yet of all the truly horrible shit that’s gone down and continues to go down this year, a new Order I Need Help Writing An Argumentative Paper from WritingSharks.net – Choose from Professional Academic, ESL & Business Proofreading Services LOOP offers promise of shimmer to come. The pioneering Britpsych outfit have put out word that their college application essay writing service my http://billiga-solglasögon.com/?help-with-management-science-homework i need help with my high school essay term paper writers needed Array series — begun with the release of the My friend told me this service Have Someone Essay On London and that is why I can pay to Write My Essay for Me UK. Array 1 EP some five years ago now — is dead-dead-deadski, but that they’ll instead embark on putting together a new long-player which will, as the headline below says, be their first since 1990. That album was – Who Can I Pay Continue Reading To Do My Homework for Me. TheHomeworkPortal Best online service that can do my homework for me. resume A Gilded Eternity. Put it on and it still sounds ahead of its time, but yeah, three decades later is probably fitting enough for a follow-up.

Not so much with the release dates or anything like that, but hell, what’re you gonna do, complain if it’s late? Get over yourself. It’s frickin’ new Read 175 customer reviews of the my review here - www.assignmentexpert.com & compare with other Education Websites at Review Centre LOOP. If you say you knew it was happening at all three days ago, and you’re not, like, related to dig this - Proofreading and proofediting help from best writers. begin working on your essay right away with qualified guidance presented by Robert Hampson or whatever, then you’re probably just lying.

Here’s what the esteemed Affordable Topic Sentence For Argumentative Essay from native English experts. Increase traffic to your website the easy way. Mr. Hampson himself had to say:

loop

LOOP CONFIRM FIRST ALBUM SINCE 1990…

2020
 ?

It’s been quite a while since a full length LOOP album release.

Perhaps too long?

Perhaps not long enough?

It’s possible to list an encyclopaedia’s worth of content of what has transpired since A GILDED ETERNITY in this battered and bewildering world of Prime Ministers / Leaders and the odd Demagogue here and there, who refuse to curtail their excesses until everything around them is completely shit and we are at each other’s throats over a piece of land or the colour of skin and a belief.

And then there’s just general bad behaviour by people who really should make way for others in their self serving lives and get with the fucking program.

Your liberty is not at risk for wearing a face covering.

Perhaps look at who you are voting for if you feel something like liberty is at risk first, then perhaps a bit of cloth might not seem so threatening.

Anyhoo…

Perhaps
 nothing really changes?

Forever changes.

“Always Forward” pretty much has been my motto for as long as I can remember.

Sometimes, you have to go in reverse, to manoeuvre around the odd thing here and there.

Bringing LOOP back into life has had its trials and tribulations as much as anything you can figure on as it had back in the day, but the desire to explore further hasn’t left me
yet.

So, back in the studio then.

Can’t tell you what it’s all about just yet, apart from the fact it’s a blast of high octane guitars, rattling drums and low frequency bass.

To clear the air, sadly the Array project has been shelved indefinitely.

It seems pertinent to think on new projects than ones that didn’t get finished.

This is NOT ARRAY 2 & 3

We’re working with our man Joe Garcia in his smart studio on cooking something righteous and I’m sure I’ll be allowed to spill the beans here and there in how it’s all going.

So, it is what it is, and once it is out there, it’ll be tangible and then maybe I can talk on it further.

Until then, we all have to wait and see on where it goes and where it’ll end up

RH x

LOOP is:
Robert Hampson (vocal, guitar)
Hugo Morgan (bass)
Dan Boyd (guitar)
Wayne Maskell (drums)

https://www.facebook.com/loopbandofficial
https://www.instagram.com/loopbandofficial/
http://soundheads.org/

LOOP, “Radial”

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Aphonic Threnody Premiere “Interrogation” Lyric Video; The Great Hatred out Oct. 16

Posted in Bootleg Theater on September 15th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

aphonic threnody

need to buy a annotated bibliography enter site In Asia phd thesis antimicrobial activity college transfer essay help Aphonic Threnody will release their third full-length, Order your thesis or dissertation from the http://mvcv.org/?what-is-literature-essay on the market. And not only that – you can now enjoy 20% OFF on first order! The Great Hatred, on Oct. 16 through custom essay service org Sba Business Plan Examples Guide help writing essays english search hindi essays online Transcending Obscurity Records. It is a substantial offering of willful wretchedness, running six tracks and 56 minutes of death-doom malevolence, shifting between passages of beauty-in-darkness brooding and all-out pummeling assault. Recognizable ground for the style, to be sure, but the raw edge with which the UK/Chilean collaboration between multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Buy DISSERTATIONS, THESIS. We are the #1 http://www.pekarnaivanka.cz/?electrician-business-plan writing service. Highly professional custom thesis and custom dissertation writing service. We Juan Esteban Escobar Campillay and guitarist Our http://www.yoshikiminatoya.com/dissertation-on-women-in-the-media/ can help you to write an essay assignment in your own words. We provide this assignment help through our 3000+ qualified writers. Riccardo Veronese execute the material brings the songs to life in a way that death-doom is often too concerned with poise to encapsulate.

That’s not to say the album is haphazard. Far from it; from opener “Locura” through “Interrogation” and into “The Great Hatred” itself, the album flows on its downward path like blood down a drain, but the human core beneath those growls remains present in a particular way that offsets the angular noise or chug or even just the dirge-plod of the guitars, and in those moments where Get my blog for your college document writing task from professional writers to score top academic grades with money back guarantee offer. The Great Hatred pushes into a faster progression, as in the second half of the title-track, setting up a stretch of Legit paper phd thesis results and discussion will be open to its address, country, staff, etc. Paperwritingcompany.com is a staid company to purchase papers from at reasonable Katatonia-esque melody, they don’t lose sight of their expressive purpose. With “Locura” setting the stage for an airing of miseries, “Interrogation” follows and centers itself around the question “Does it even matter at all?” — the universe sucks so I’m going to say probably no — and is one of three aphonic threnody the great hatredtracks on the album to top 10 minutes. Make no mistake, however, it’s all a slog and that’s precisely how it’s intended.

For being aphonic — i.e., unable to make noise or be heard — the agonizing elements across The Great Hatred come through palpably, and that’s all the more true as the album plays out. The second half of the release, which is comprised of “Drowning,” “The Rise of the Phoenix” and “The Fall,” would seem to derive a narrative arc from its motive succession, and it’s telling that Aphonic Threnody end on “The Fall,” since that’s pretty emblematic of the level of hope on display across the record generally. “Drowning” plays up My Dying Bride/Paradise Lost-style ambience and “The Rise of the Phoenix” pushes even further (deeper?) into atmospheric murk while solidifying late around an emergent chug and dispersing gradually on a slow outward march.

As for “The Fall,” it’s made lush through both keys and a winding line of lead guitar, but if there’s a sense of hope to the thing, it’s well buried by the consuming weight of Aphonic Threnody‘s unmitigated downerism. Again, this is the point. It’s not like they set out to write pop tunes and wound up asking “What is kindness?/What is happiness?” like they’re encountering the ideas for the first time. The extremity throughout The Great Hatred isn’t just about the parts that are “more death metal.” It’s also the emotional crux on which the record is built, the sense of alienation even from oneself that comes through the material so expertly crafted, and the control with which Campillay and Veronese bring the songs to bear.

I still say death-doom is the perfect sound for 2020. If you disagree, I humbly submit the premiere of a lyric video for “Interrogation” below. Preorders for The Great Hatred are up now.

Enjoy:

Aphonic Threnody, “Interrogation” lyric video premiere

Members of Towards Atlantis Lights, Dea Marica, Arrant Saudade and more collaborate to conjure up the finest kind of death/doom metal that encompasses the best qualities this style has to offer – stirring melodies, heaving riffs, immersive atmosphere, and some of the lowest, most anguished vocals possible alternating with lucid, spoken passages. None of it is overbearing or lingers on for too long as the songs waft through the doom vacuum, making their presence felt and imperceptibly changing something inside the unsuspecting listener. Much happens during the course of the hour and Aphonic Threnody don’t follow a strict formula, leaving things open-ended and unpredictable as they keep changing things around without disrupting the emotional temperament. The Great Hatred makes for an engaging listen and will make you come back to unravel its richly layered and elegantly intertwined compositions. It’s akin to living life all over again. And again.

Line up –
Riccardo Veronese (Towards Atlantis Lights, Dea Marica) – Guitars
Juan Escobar C. (Arrant Saudade) – Vocals, Bass, Guitar & Keys

Artwork by Misanthropic Art (Xpus, Death Courier)

Track listing –
1. Locura
2. Interrogation
3. The Great Hatred
4. Drowning
5. The Rise of the Phoenix
6. The Fall

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Orange Goblin Postpone December UK Tour Dates

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

ORANGE GOBLIN

When Orange Goblin posted their Dec. 2020 tour dates in May, it seemed optimistic but not necessarily unreasonable to think they might happen. They’ve been pushed to 2021 in the hope that by the end of next year venues will once again be allowed to hold full capacities.

At this point, I’m wondering if that’s ever going to happen, or if the idea of “capacity” itself in a building, bar, venue, whatever, is going to have to be redrawn to allow fewer people in a given space. Does that look like a band playing the same room three nights in a row to three different crowds while on tour, each show holding a third of what it “used to?” I don’t know. Does that mean tours go three times as long? Is that remotely feasible? Or does live music become something that only happens in summertime, when it’s warm enough to be done somewhere outside?

How is it ever going to happen?

Maybe by the end of next year everything will be alright. In the UK. The US is fucked forever. I mean that.

Anyway, in a spirit of crossed fingers, here’s Orange Goblin‘s Dec. 2021 tour dates:

orange goblin dec 2021

ORANGE GOBLIN – UK TOUR RESCHEDULED DATES ANNOUNCEMENT

Legendary UK heavy metal four piece Orange Goblin have been forced to postpone their previously announced tour for December this year, until the same time period in 2021. In a move that will come as no surprise, the band have bowed to the inevitable and postponed their dates.

The newly scheduled shows will run as follows:

Orange Goblin UK & Ireland Tour 2021
(support Spirit Adrift & King Creature)
Wed 08 Dec – The Booking Hall, Dover, UK * (Orange Goblin only)
Thu 09 Dec – Tivoli, Buckley
Fri 10 Dec – Limelight 2, Belfast
Sat 11 Dec – Grand Social, Dublin
Mon 13 Dec – King Tuts, Glasgow
Tue 14 Dec – Gorilla, Manchester
Wed 15 Dec – Asylum, Birmingham
Thu 16 Dec – The Globe, Cardiff
Fri 17 Dec – The Underworld, London
Sat 18 Dec – The Underworld, London

All tickets purchased remain valid for the new dates, and both Dover and Buckley go on sale at 10am on Friday 11th Sept.

Vocalist Ben Ward explains the situation;

‘It is with a very heavy heart that we have to concede defeat and announce that due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and the subsequent venue restrictions, Orange Goblin are going to have to postpone our 25 Year Anniversary tour, scheduled for December 2020. We wanted to wait as long as possible to see whether we would be given the go ahead but with no clear indication that full capacity shows will be allowed by then we now have no choice but to reschedule for December 2021.

The safety and well being of our fans, crew, venue staff and bandmates is always the most important issue for us so we hope that you understand our situation. The new dates are already in place and any tickets already purchased will still be valid for the shows in 2021. We are also happy to say that both support bands, Spirit Adrift and King Creature, are behind this decision and will be with us when we return in 2021. We have also added a couple of extra dates, one at The Booking Hall in Dover, which will be a warm-up show for the tour (No Spirit Adrift or King Creature for that one!) and a show at the Tivoli in Buckley too. As always, we thank you for your continued support!”

https://www.facebook.com/orangegoblinofficial/
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http://www.orange-goblin.com/
https://www.facebook.com/spinefarm
www.spinefarmrecords.com/

Orange Goblin, Rough & Ready, Live & Loud (2020)

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The Brothers Keg Album Release Show Set for Sept. 17

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the brothers keg

A band playing a release show might not ordinarily be news, but this is 2020. Note that The Brothers Keg‘s celebration of their debut album, Folklore, Myths & Legends (review here), is taking place at London’s famed The Black Heart venue, and that it’s limited capacity, small-group seating only. 45 people get to go. I’ve been lucky enough to be in that upstairs room at The Black Heart where they do shows, and it’s by no means big, but I’d guess it holds about 150 when they’re crammed in, so 45 I guess is about right for these days. The show is put on by Desertscene — also known for Desertfest — and will feature The Grand Mal as well.

I don’t know how The Black Heart will work it with the bar downstairs and upstairs, and stuff like that, but I assume there will be copious mask-age involved, and maybe even some of those plastic faceshields. If you’re in that part of the world and thinking about going — having recently attended a live performance myself, it was spiritually refreshing in the extreme — maybe you just want to go all out and get a welding mask. Whatever it takes. I also just read about the UK locking down on social gatherings of more than like six people starting next Monday, so I don’t even know how that will affect this. Could be REALLY limited capacity, I guess. Like two people in the crowd, which would make it like heavy rock shows in the early ’00s.

But the show’s sold out its 45 spaces, by the way, as one might expect. Good luck, you intrepid pavers of the way. I hope the gig happens.

Desertscene posted the following:

the brothers keg release show

***DESERTSCENE – THE BROTHERS KEG – NEW SHOW ANNOUNCEMENT*** FOR 2020!

We’re very excited to be teaming up with our friends at The Black Heart to dip our toes back into the world of non-virtual, actually in a room with other human beings, live music events. Next Thursday we will be bringing you a limited capacity, socially distanced album release show from The Brothers Keg, with support from The Grand Mal. The current capacity for this show is 45 people and seated tickets will be available in groups of 2, 3 or 4 only – with some tasty Stone & Wood Brewing + ticket combos to boot.

More details about the social distance guidelines & on-the-day protocols can be found via the event page or ourblackheart.com. We really hope you’ll join us in trying to kickstart our scene back into action!

Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1040600833040567/

The Brothers Keg are:
Tom Hobson – Guitar/Vocals
Paul Rosser – Bass/Vocals
Tom Fyfe – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/thebrotherskeg/
https://www.instagram.com/thebrotherskeg/
https://thebrotherskeg.bandcamp.com/releases
https://www.facebook.com/apfrecords
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https://apfrecords.bandcamp.com/
http://www.apfrecords.co.uk/

The Brothers Keg, “Moorsmen” official video

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Review & Full Album Premiere: The Kings of Frog Island, VI

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the kings of frog island vi

[Slick play above to stream The Kings of Frog Island’s VI in full. Vinyl is out Nov. 9 on Kozmik Artifactz.]

It’s not as if The Kings of Frog Island have been absent. Granted, it’s been six years since the band released their fifth numerically-titled full-length, V (review here), in 2014, which brought the “Sunburn/Every turn” hook and a host of jammed-out, vinyl-flowing psychedelic delights, but still. In 2016, the band oversaw a vinyl issue for 2013’s IV (review here) as a first step in their alliance with Kozmik Artifactz, and in 2019, they completed a new single and video for every month of the year (posted here) — plus one to grow on — and in March, they re-recorded “The Watcher” from 2008’s II (discussed here) and posted another video to coincide. With the advent of VI, however, the longest LP drought of their career comes to an end, and a perhaps-overdue proper album arrives to find them with a somewhat shifted focus.

Comprised of 10 songs split evenly onto two vinyl sides and released again through Kozmik Artifactz, VI completes a second trilogy of offerings for The Kings of Frog Island, with founding members Mark Buteaux (vocals/guitar) and Roger “Doj” Watson (drums) as well as Gavin Searle, Lee Madel-Toner and Tony Heslop working at their own Amphibia Sound Studios IV in the groups native Leicester, UK, over a period from 2017-2020 to construct the material, bringing together the mellow psych explorations in which they’ve basked since IV with the more structured songwriting of the earlier work of what one might call their Elektrohasch era — their 2005 self-titled debut, the aforementioned II, and 2010’s III (review here). That third album would force an adjustment with the departure of guitarist/vocalist Mat Bethancourt (also of Josiah) to focus on the garage-y leanings of Cherry Choke, but The Kings of Frog Island flourished in cosmic drift and made a space for themselves both in terms of sound and the studio where they captured it. In short, they dug in. Across its 42-minute span, VI carries the feel of an emergence.

Or maybe a re-emergence would be more like it, but one way or the other, VI brings The Kings of Frog Island into alignment with all sides of their sound. The shimmering guitar in “Toxic Heart” seems to hint toward earlier days, while the immediately-prior “Bad Trip” is pure psychedelic in-studio experimentation, and the beginning that VI receives with the 1:37 ambient “Monotron” sets an atmospheric foundation that even the more straightforward chorus-making of the subsequent fuzz rocker “Ever and Forever” builds upon. Not only that, but the first two cuts also set up the back-and-forth sensibility that plays out on much of VI, with grounded riffs and progressions meeting head-on with spacier keyboard work sometimes even within a single track itself, as on “Pigs in Space,” perhaps named for the yawning sort of oink later in its proceedings.

the kings of frog island liner

And even as “Toxic Heart” picks up after “Bad Trip” — the two are presented as one song in the digital version of the album I have, but there’s a clear divide around five and a half minutes in — intertwining vocal lines, the already-noted airy guitar and even the generally languid pacing continue to harness the tripped-out feel, even if in less directly experimental fashion than on the song before. The Kings of Frog Island, then, are headed far out. They’re going. One way or the other, their goal is to get there, and they do precisely that with these songs. But it’s the level of interplay between structure and fluidity that makes VI a standout in their catalog and feel like a summation of their work not just over the three years they put into the record’s making, but the 15 years of their career to this point. That would be a lot to ask of a band whose approach and lineup has varied to the degree that The Kings of Frog Island‘s has over their time, but perhaps the patience that seems to come through in “Toxic Heart” or the side B opener “Sicario” is emblematic of the patience that went into making the record in the first place, and maybe that’s the ‘secret weapon’ here, such as it is. They took their time and made the album they wanted to make.

Easily said, harder done. “Sicario” has a moodier feel in its fuzzed lumber, slow, touching on doom but still maintaining enough lysergic tonality as it moves toward its final wash and shifts into “Brainless,” which is the shortest cut on VI apart from “Monotron.” In its 3:09, it builds up from a humming drone and ambient (amphibient?) noise to a quiet guitar line joined at 1:41 by a solo and soon thereafter by drums that continue the instrumental push by uncovering a funk that was there all along and had just gone unseen. Bell-ish sounds, forward and backward, consume the march at about 2:45 and there’s only ultra-soft resonance left over until Madel-Toner‘s vocals enter to begin “Murderer,” which seems to herald the arrival of a final movement of VI that stands apart from its two-sided configuration.

That is, the last three songs — “Murderer,” “I Am the Hurricane” and “Fine” — flow together particularly well, leaving an impression on the listener that underscores the ease of motion across the album as a whole. “Murderer” brings Monster Magnet-style riffing together with synthesizer breadth and multiple layers of vocals, while “I Am the Hurricane” shifts from its blown-out verses into repetitions of its title line over a jam that is about as much of a signature as The Kings of Frog Island‘s approach could ever ask for, and “Fine” closes with a fuzzgrunge shrug and playful tambourine bounce and a winding guitar line like the ’90s alt rock of some other, inevitably cooler, dimension. Even unto its elaborate cover art and we-have-a-logo-now logo, The Kings of Frog Island‘s VI speaks to a sense of creative purpose on the part of the band that, again, hasn’t necessarily been lost — they did put out 13 singles in 2019 — but that manifests here in a way that is engaging and only leaves one with the feeling that they have more to say. It might be another six years before they get to a seventh full-length and it might not, but a decade and a half on from their first release, The Kings of Frog Island keep exploring, keep experimenting and keep crafting a sound that is theirs alone.

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Album Review: Black Helium, The Wholly Other

Posted in Reviews on August 28th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

black helium the wholly other

The very first thing that The Wholly Other has to offer is tension. A chugging guitar begins the second album from London four-piece Black Helium — and the introduction of drummer Diogo Gomez to the fold — and it’s soon joined by a militaristic snare as the aggressively-titled “Hippie on a Slab” begins to unfurl. Offered up through Riot Season Records, The Wholly Other, both the name of the album and its execution, would seem to be deriving from Black Helium‘s drive toward individuality in heavy psychedelia and beyond.

The band — here guitarist/vocalists Stuart Gray and Davey Mulka and bassist/vocalist/graphic artist Beck Harvey alongside Gomez — made their debut in 2018 with the likewise ambitious and confrontational Primitive Fuck (review here, and it wouldn’t necessarily be correct to call The Wholly Other classier in its delivery, but it is obvious in listening to its six-track/41-minute run that Black Helium learned a few crucial lessons from their time in the studio and were able to translate those into this batch of material.

They didn’t lack confidence before — one does not call a record Primitive Fuck in a timid spirit — but there’s an element of direction to The Wholly Other that comes through likewise in its individual pieces and in the front-to-back listening experience. Tonally and melodically rich, they are brazen enough stylistically to require their audience’s attention and grab it without asking, and the effect of “Hippie on a Slab” is to do precisely that, with the already noted tension of its rhythm as well as its deceptively memorable chorus. It is a clever opener, with a short intro of birdsong before the guitar and hi-hat kick in — there’s a floor tom thud that starts off as well — and the ensuing energy buildup that seems headed toward release over the song’s first 90 seconds before… it stops. Dead.

It’s just for a few seconds, but it’s a really important few seconds. In the first minute and a half of The Wholly Other, Black Helium are telling their audience to broaden their expectations, and maybe even to raise them somewhat. This isn’t going to be simple genre fare, a runthrough of well trod clichĂ©s and familiar elements. In subsequent side A tracks “Two Masters” and the 10-minute “Death Station of the Goddess,” respectively, they directly reference Nirvana‘s “Drain You” in another build and make the likewise pivotal choice of keeping the established vocal chant mellow even as the track hits into one of the album’s most consuming washes of tone. In making choices like these, Black Helium simply put themselves on another level of songcraft, and whether this is done in calculated fashion — a kind of progressive decisiveness behind each nuance throughout — or in the raw spirit of what comes out of the jam room by collaborative instinct, the same holds true.

black helium (photo by Steve Gullick)

There are, of course, holdover aspects from Primitive Fuck that carry into The Wholly Other. “Hippie on a Slab”‘s later reaches play cacophony over atmospheric spaciousness, and even the Britgrunge of “Two Masters” rampages through a dense fuzz as it makes its way back toward its central riff to close. “Death Station of the Goddess” is an inevitable focal point in its graceful procession and ensuing mania, which is something that its 10:34 side B counterpart “Pink Bolt” — positioned as the centerpiece of that side’s three tracks rather than as the album’s finale; another clever move to contradict genre convention — doesn’t try to match, instead playing out in less linear fashion as it moves from heavy post-rock airiness into a wandering jam and resolving in a lumbering plod that tops the Electric Wizard-style horrormaking of the sample-topped roller “One Way Trip” just before and rumbles beneath its own noisy crescendo.

Shit is massive. Tell your friends or someone else will.

Can it be that after all this, Black Helium find some kind of collective resolution? “Teetering on the Edge,” which rounds out The Wholly Other feels like a peace offering in following “Pink Bolt.” As though the four-piece were scooping up the melted remnants of their audience’s psyche and saying, “Sorry about that, here’s this now, everybody take a breath.” Assuming the purposeful nature of how the two sides of The Wholly Other play out, with the first two tracks leading into “Death Station of the Goddess” and “Pink Bolt” surrounded on either side — these two more extended pieces playing off the shorter cuts around them — the flow with which Black Helium cap off, as though harnessing the ethereal presence of an ultra-mellow Dead Meadow, isn’t to be understated. They’ve already blown out the airlock. It’s time to explore the vacuum.

So they do, with no less aplomb than they brought to The Wholly Other at its noisiest and most sonically forceful. They never quite return to the tension of “Hippie on a Slab,” even in “Two Masters,” which has its own chug, but the album remains informed by it nonetheless, and the sense of not knowing what to expect at any given turn throughout is something they use masterfully to their advantage when it comes to carving out their sonic persona in the manner they seem to have set as their goal. That too is an outgrowth of the work they did on the debut, marking out a range of avenues they might traverse and, here, forging a modus that fluidly or strikingly draws from among them as best serves the songs. This is harder than it sounds, rarer than it sounds, and certainly ‘other’ enough to be noteworthy.

And when considering the attention to detail Black Helium bring to their second album, one shouldn’t ignore Harvey‘s cover art either, the freaked-out freneticism of it and the geometric shape beneath. The font and positioning of the band’s name would seem to be important as well, and at least to my eyes it recalls the staging of the Now That’s What I Call Music series of top 40 pop compilations. If that is the standard to which Black Helium have set themselves against and what they’re reacting to, their second LP could not be better named. Perhaps most exciting of all, though, is that even after this collection of songs is over, it’s hard to guess how the band might continue their forward creative growth, but whatever manifestations may lay ahead, The Wholly Other is a beast unto itself.

Black Helium, The Wholly Other (2020)

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Korb Set Sept. 30 Release for Korb II

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 25th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

I happen to know what kind of spacial distortions and temporal displacement await those who travel to Korb II, having, you know, heard it, and it is with due dimensionality that the UK duo present their second offering through Weird Beard Records as the follow-up to their self-titled, self-released 2018 debut. Expect weirdo psych, krautrock inflections, and signs of alien intelligence to persist, but with an underlying core of human exploration that speaks to the best possible futures while representing our pitiful species well in the present. Putting us in a good light, as it were, despite the grimness of our times.

While you’re digging into the debut below, also check out Korb‘s even more krautified alter-ego, Arboria. The other project released its self-titled third full-length last year and it’s another planet in the system that’s ready for habitation. I’ve included that stream too, just for the extra curious among those venturing into the unknown.

Have at it:

korb ii lp

KORB – II – Release Date: 30th September 2020

Following on from their self released debut album in 2018, Weird Beard are proud to bring you the next instalment of KORB’s sonic journey. II builds upon the solid kosmiche foundation laid in their first album and expands on it exponentially. Using vintage instruments and effects, KORB provide a soundtrack that harks back to classic sci fi films, drawing you in and placing you firmly in a futuristic landscape.

KORB – II will be released in a limited edition of 250 copies on splattered vinyl that perfectly compliments the sleeve and will come with a gatefold insert featuring more of Rob Gower’s sublime artwork. The first 50 copies will be hand numbered and contain a bonus signed CD.

Weird Beard is the perfect home for Korb II, with both label and band continuing to forge their own unique and uncompromising paths outside of the constraints of the mainstream.

Bio:

After playing in a jazz quartet together Jonathan Parkes and Alec Wood took their shared love of Krautrock and spent years experimenting with a wide range of instruments, including vintage analogue synths, creating a huge body of diverse music which eventually distilled into Korb.
The first album was released in 2018 on their own label Dreamlord Recordings – which is also home to their other projects, Mutante (synth/electronic) and Arboria (electro/acoustic).

Korb create their instrumental music using vintage drums, percussion, bass, guitar, analogue synths, organ, and a range of fx pedals. While Korb has its roots in 70s Krautrock and Kosmische music they have spent long enough creating their own sound to ensure that they tread their own path.

https://www.facebook.com/korbdreamlordrecordings/
https://korbmusic.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/WeirdBeardRecs/
https://theweirdbeard.bigcartel.com/

Korb, Korb (2018)

Arboria, Arboria (2019)

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Bill Fisher Premieres “The Dark Triad” From Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad

Posted in audiObelisk on August 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Bill Fisher Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad

[Click play above to stream ‘The Dark Triad’ from Bill Fisher’s Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad. Album is out Aug. 21 on Septaphonic Records.]

Church of the Cosmic Skull founder and frontman Bill Fisher is set to release his first solo album, Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad, on Aug. 21. It is a complex and multifaceted release for one that boasts a relatively unassuming 31-minute runtime, and its eight songs quickly distinguish themselves from Church of the Cosmic Skull with the crunch of the opening riff to “All Through the Night” at the outset. In tone and progressive twist, it stands apart from Fisher‘s main outfit, and as his LP liner notes explain, there are some snippets that go back to his time in Mammothwing (whose lone full-length came out in 2015) and before that. In terms of philosophy, the album centers around its two titular concepts.

The former being more straightforward, the latter is the ‘dark triad,’ which is comprised of three personality traits Fisher, as he notes, is bringing to light in hopes that we — humans — might see them in ourselves and swear them off. They are psychopathy, Machiavellianism and narcissism, and Fisher — via an in-album graphic — presents a Venn diagram wherein these ideas intersect along with factors like money, power, status, the past, present and future. Mass hypnosis itself is represented by an all-seeing eye, and perhaps missing is a discussion of capitalism as a driving force behind said psychopathy and status-craving greed, but it’s not hard to look around in 2020 and understand where his point of view is coming from. In the UK and in many other countries, including my own, a rise of nationalist populism and open disdain for intellectualism, science and the like, has acted not so much as a wrench halting the gears of progress but one systemically undoing the bolts holding those gears together. Perhaps, at the least, it is fair to say Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad is an album that wants context, lines like “And the empty voices fill the brain/To guide the hands in such a way” from the penultimate “Message in the Sky” not at all pretending to occur in a vacuum.

At the same time Fisher has put these ideas to work across Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad, he’s also made an utterly accessible collection of songs. It’s not the spirited, harmony-laced pop of his main outfit, or the heavier post-rock of Dystopian Future Movies — which is led by Church of the Cosmic Skull‘s Caroline Cawley and in which Fisher features; the drums were reportedly recorded while making that band’s latest album — but the material he presents is deeply melodic and that acts to ground some of the proggier twists, as can be heard in “Psychopathy” at the outset of side B, or again, in the mathy stops and turns of “All Through the Night.” Affecting a full-group style while playing all the instruments himself, Fisher crafts an impression that stands beyond decreed genre boundaries, toying with the balance between heavy rock, progressive metal, progressive rock and touches of psychedelia.

BILL FISHER CHURCH OF THE COSMIC SKULL

“Mirror of Tomorrow,” which follows the opener, complements its crunch and impact with melody of layered vocals as well as fuzzy lead guitar, rolling through a crisp 2:47 before “Celador” — the title of course being derived from the sounds said to be the most pleasing to the human ear — dives into the realm of metaphor and storytelling, a tense chug like a ticking clock behind an initial verse pushing into an eventual unveiling of the hook that finally explodes in the final minute of the song, Fisher having expertly swapped one structure for another ahead of the crashing roll that begins the side-A-ending semi-title-track “The Dark Triad.” The two together, “Celador” and “The Dark Triad,” are the longest songs on Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad at 4:44 and 4:35, respectively, but neither could rightly be accused of any more indulgence than the rest of what surrounds, Fisher discussing ideas on his own terms, certainly, but keeping his audience engaged in that conversation through craft and touches like the harmonized soloing and vocals, let alone the underlying bassline, of “The Dark Triad” as it moves into its gracefully flowing second half, something of an aural wash, but one effectively grounded by the drums as it enters its fadeout.

“Psychopathy” picks up on side B and boasts enough Rush and King Crimson-style chase to satisfy any quota Fisher might have imagined, and accordingly, it’s only fair that its bounce and quick-cut style should be complemented by the ensuing “Days of Old,” a quiet, folky beginning manifesting the sentimentality of the title. It is as close as Fisher comes to Church of the Cosmic Skull as more layers of vocals enter, but the song stays softer, and even the guitar solo that arrives later on feels subdued and contemplative as it fills out overtop of the central figure. These outward-directed reaches aren’t placed by accident, as Fisher is well acquainted with a classic LP structure, and it should accordingly be little surprise that the subsequent closing duo, “Message from the Sky” and “Mass Hypnosis,” bring the proceedings back to their hooky center, much as an individual song might branch outward with a bridge before turning back to end on its chorus. “Mass Hypnosis” of course serves double-duty as the finisher and a complement to “The Dark Triad,” and its central question, “How many more/How many more to make it?” echoes the “I wanna know” repetitions of the earlier track.

These touches make Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad no less sonically fluid than it is thematically so. The production is a surprisingly organic presence in the recording for something so progressive in its makeup, but that only feeds the atmosphere of the entire piece as a solo work, lending an air of intimacy to what might otherwise come across as cold or lacking personality. Despite the variety of ideas being presented in the material, though, what remains at the core is Fisher‘s own take on songwriting, and it is the songs as much as the overarching statement of the LP as a whole that make an impression. Fisher has set himself up for a new creative exploration alongside that of Church of the Cosmic Skull. The possibilities for how he might bring that to bear are another exciting factor emerging from his work here.

Bill Fisher website

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Church of the Cosmic Skull website

Church of the Cosmic Skull on Thee Facebooks

Church of the Cosmic Skull on Soundcloud

Church of the Cosmic Skull on Bandcamp

Church of the Cosmic Skull on YouTube

Church of the Cosmic Skull on Instagram

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