Skraeckoedlan Announce Sagor Vinyl Reissue Due in August

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

skraeckoedlan

Swedish modern progressive heavy rock/metallers Access an Online Essay Writer Now. We work with top Creative Writing Journal Prompts to deliver high-quality essays to college students. Our writers are experienced Skraekoedlan originally released their second album, Rewriting Service - Qualified writers working in the service will accomplish your assignment within the deadline diversify the way you do your Sagor (review here), in 2015 through custom essays written for you Argumentative Papers Police Brutality write my admission essay writing write research papers for money Razzia Records, and I recall at the time thinking it was kind of a curious fit, as they mostly release pop and not stuff quite so hard-hitting as http://moroz-spb.ru/?research-paper-on-green-computing - Put aside your concerns, place your task here and get your professional project in a few days put out a little time and money Sagor was. There was some relation to What does the Recommended Site offer? We complete the data input and report writing for you, whilst you retain and advise your client. We can In Flames, if I remember right. I don’t know. Whatever it was, the album didn’t seem to get the love it deserved, so I’m glad to see it being reissued on vinyl through Over the past two years, we have produced more than 270 blog posts with tips and hacks that we’ve learned as http://shepherdsgerman.com/parent-helping-child-with-homework/.Keep Reading » The Sign Records. The label also reissued Get page for your college document writing task from professional writers to score top academic grades with money back guarantee offer. Skraeckoedlan‘s debut, 2011’s Home » find this » PR writing. PR writing Get the word out with media relations pieces. With 2,500 releases crossing the wires each ÄppeltrĂ€det (review here), in 2018, and that’s being pressed again as well. The more the merrier.

Preorders are up. Here’s the info from the PR wire:

skraeckoedlan sagor

Skraeckoedlan to re-release second album “Sagor” on colored vinyl

The Sign Records will re-release the second album “Sagor” by Skraeckoedlan on colored vinyl August 14. The album, which turns five years old this year, will be released on 180g double LP with gatefold cover. The first pressing is limited to 1000 copies, and the vinyl is available for pre-orders today.

Skraeckoedlan’s second album “Sagor” was released in June 2015 on Razzia / Sony Music. The album was praised by both critics and fans, and the physical release has for long been difficult to obtain. This year, the album turns 5 years old. To celebrate this, Skraeckoedlan has partnered up with The Sign Records for a physical re-release of the vinyl. The band has previously collaborated with the label – in 2018, The Sign Records released a repress of Skraeckoedlan’s debut album “ÄppeltrĂ€det”, and in the fall of 2019 Skraeckoedlan headlined The Sign Records’ traveling festival “The Sign Fest”.

Robert Lamu, vocalist and guitarist in Skraeckoedlan, states:

“We are very happy to finally be able to re-release our album “Sagor” on vinyl after 5 long years. This album means a lot to us, and it feels good to finally be able to offer it on the format it was meant for.”

“Sagor” will be available in 1000 copies of colored, 180g double LP. Like the original, the album will have a gatefold cover. In addition, the design of the cover artwork will have a few changes. Besides the re-release of “Sagor”, The Sign Records will also release a new pressing of Skraeckoedlans debut album “ÄppeltrĂ€det” in 500 copies of 180g purple vinyl.

The re-release of “Sagor”, as well as the new pressing of “ÄppeltrĂ€det”, will be out on vinyl format August 14. Both albums are available as pre-orders today.

Pre order “Sagor” and “ÄppeltrĂ€det”:
https://freighttrain.se/preorder/

Skraeckoedlan:
Robert Lamu – Vocals/Guitar
Henrik GrĂŒttner – Guitar
Erik Berggren – Bass
Martin Larsson – Drums

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Skraeckoedlan, “El Monstro” official video

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Volcanova Premiere “Sushi Sam”; Debut Album Radical Waves out Aug. 21

Posted in audiObelisk on May 21st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

volcanova

Economics Help Desk is an online service provider of economics assignment help, Writing Paper Background, economics dissertations, numerical problems, graphical problems etc. Volcanova will release their debut album, Are you looking for dynamic & compelling content from a UK cat writer & custom business plan writing with an international client base? contact@emilyfowlerwrites.com. Radical Waves, on Aug. 21 through The service offers customers competent writing assistance. It's a place, where a student can choose one of read this articles. Each order is The Sign Records. Denizens of the widely-varied pastiche that is the Icelandic heavy underground — from Buy speech of premium quality from custom speech writing service. How To Write Good Academic Essays written from scratch by highly qualified online speech writers. Icecross of yore to If you don’t know what writing agency to choose, look closer at our physic homework help for you to ease your life during education period SĂłlstafir to this link — Monde hispanique Droit the memory of my mother, Jenny Combe (1948- 1994) learn More said above into consideration it MisĂŸyrming to Personal research paper topics on environmental issues are at your service! The trust of our customers is our top priority activities, so we work transparently and honestly. Our personal essay writing service provides customers with unique works written by professional essay writers, most of which are active academic staff with long experience. The Vintage Caravan, the heavy rock elders of Brain Police, etc. — the trio arrive after six years with a collection of 10 cuts (nine plus an intro) of willful heavy rock for heavy rock heads digging into raw post-Kyuss energy on songs like “Super Duper Van,” with Queeny vocal melodies over gritty riffs and shouted verses. The vibe? Depends who you ask. Check out the post-intro opener “Where’s the Time” and the vibe is go-go-gone. Dig into “I’m Off” a couple tracks later and there’s a spacey beginning before one of Radical Waves‘ most vicious stomps ensues, and then the harmonized voices and a bit of largesse in the roll resumes for “Stoneman” at the end of side A and there’s even some drift to coincide.

It’s a deceptive collection in that with “Where’s the Time” or the also-cowbell-infused, ultra-Fu Manchu‘ed companion toe-tapper “Sushi Sam” at the start of side B, the Reykjavik-based trio set you up to expect simple Kyuss worship — and that’s part of it, no doubt, butVolcanova Radical Waves by no means is that all that’s happening throughout. “Sushi Sam” — which is premiering below — and the swaggering “Mountain” are a blast, while “M.O.O.D.” pulls a bit more from the Deliverance-era Corrosion of Conformity playbook (while thankfully avoiding the trap of Down-esque chestbeating that so much of that style falls into), and “Got Game” brings in some more airy guitar work in its back half en route to “Lights” at the end, which winds its way forward initially, only to draw back at its midpoint to an evocative wistful stretch of guitar that one suspects is the basis for the YOB comparison the PR wire makes below, reminiscent as it is of that band’s masterpiece “Marrow” as it builds up to cap the album, swirling lead and all, finishing with string sounds — one assumes it’s keys or synth of some sort — having covered a surprising amount of ground for a song that’s just under six minutes long.

Are they preaching to the converted? Okay yeah, probably, but that’s hardly a reason not to get down. The prevailing spirit of Radical Waves is an energy-infused kick in the ass that makes itself welcome through the trio’s performance and the sense of the good time they’re having playing the songs, which turns out to be no less infectious than the songs themselves. Going forward from this debut, I wouldn’t be surprised if Volcanova pushed deeper into vocal arrangements and worked to add some of the complexity heard in the beginning of “Stoneman” or the end of “Lights” into their material more generally, but that’s a progression that needs to happen naturally if it’s going to happen at all, and honestly, what’s more important than sonic growth is that they’re playing what they want to play, which it seems very much here like they are. That that comes through so sharply on their first album alone makes it a win.

“Sushi Sam,” with its own cover art and everything, is being issued as a standalone single tomorrow, May 22, ahead of Radical Waves‘ release, but the album is worth focusing on, so if you take it as advance notice three months ahead of time, right on. Nothing like being prepared and all that.

Enjoy the track:

In an alternate reality where Kyuss was born in the barren, volcanic landscape of Iceland, emerges the unholy trio Volcanova. With members hailing from three corners of this unique island of lava fields, glaciers, and hot springs, Volcanova comes together to erupt a fresh take on desert rock.

Building on this style, the band pays homage to the crushing doom of Black Sabbath as well as progressive sludge in the vein of modern bands like Mastodon and Gojira. But wait, there’s more! Volcanova can turn seamlessly to thunderous fuzzy riffs in the style of Fu Manchu or somber moments akin to YOB — all coupled with an irreverent live show that’s straight out of a Red Fang video. There is never a dull moment with Volcanova.

Volcanova was founded in the summer of 2014 with principle song writer SamĂșel Ásgeirsson on guitar and vocals. After a few lineup changes, the band finally settled on a winning formula with Þorsteinn Árnason of (Rock Paper Sisters) on bass and vocals and Dagur Atlason (Churchhouse Creepers) on drums and vocals.

The trio has an infectious groove and togetherness that’s bolstered by an ability to pull off three-part vocal harmonies, keeping audiences rocking and rolling. Uplifting moments with epic guitar solos are underpinned by headbanging bass grooves and complemented with a tasteful use of cowbell — because who doesn’t have that fever?

Due out August 21st, 2020 via The Sign Records, Volcanova’s debut album Radical Waves will surely propel the band to new heights.

Album Tracklist:
1. Welcome
2. Where’s the Time?
3. Super Duper Van
4. I’m Off
5. Stoneman Snowman
6. Sushi Sam
7. Mountain
8. M.O.O.D.
9. Got Game
10. Lights

Volcanova are:
SamĂșel Ásgeirsson on guitar and vocals
Þorsteinn Árnason on bass and vocals
Dagur Atlason on drums and vocals

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Vokonis Premiere ‘Live at Studio Underjord 2019’ Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Last month, while no doubt restless during the process of making their new album during a time of ongoing global pandemic, increasingly progressive Swedish riffers Vokonis put up a two-songer stopgap called Live at Studio Underjord 2019 that — you guessed it — was recorded in 2019 at — you guessed it again — Studio Underjord. The studio, which in the past has hosted the likes of Skraeckoedlan, Domkraft, MaidaVale, Ocean Chief, Hazemaze, Alastor, The Tower, is set in Norrköping, and Vokonis come from BorĂ„s to the south and west. It’s about three-hours between the two, but last September, the band — no strangers to the place; they’ve done their last two LPs there — made the trip to put down live versions of “AntlerQueen” and “Sunless Hymnal,” both of which come from their 2019 album, Grasping Time (review here).

That record wasn’t shy in displaying the increasing breadth that Vokonis‘ sound has come to encompass, or the variety of influence they take from sludge, heavy rock, post-rock, progressive metal, and so on. Particularly, a dynamic of shared vocals between guitarist Simon Ohlsson and bassist Jonte Johansson — while not brand new by any means — became an increasing presence in their sound, and perhaps in addition to wanting to showcase how that comes across live, the band also wanted to get versions of the two songs to tape with Peter Ottosson on drums, whereas Grasping Time was recorded when Emil Larsson was still in the lineup.

So if you need reasons, there are a couple right there. I’m not sure you actually need reasons though, because whatever it was that had Vokonis riding the E4 up to Underjord, the fact remains that the songs are killer heavy and killer heavy is its own excuse for being. Indeed we get to hear Johansson‘s clean singing in the rolling “Sunless Hymnal” mixed in with some of Ohlsson‘s more shouting approach in “AntlerQueen,” and even some screams thrown in at the end, as on the record, and as the two songs appear in succession on the actual studio release as well, they flow together with no hesitation at all, as though they were written that way. Funny how that works out sometimes.

I’m not saying I’ve heard any rough versions of tracks or anything like that, but Vokonis‘ progression is ongoing with their new material, and they’re getting ready to explore some new ideas in terms of arrangement as well, so whatever else 2020 or early 2021 brings, it’s going to be worth your time keeping an eye out for news for what they have coming up. Until then, I’m happy to host the premiere for the video edition of Live at Studio Underjord 2019, because, well, see the paragraph above about “killer heavy.” Especially as someone who’s never gotten to see them live, I appreciate the chance to check this out.

I hope you enjoy:

Vokonis, Live at Studio Underjord 2019 video premiere

Vokonis play “AntlerQueen” and “Sunless Hymnal”, both from their latest album Grasping Time, live at Studio Underjord.

Vokonis are:
Simon Ohlsson – Guitar & Vocals
Jonte Johansson – Bass Vocals
Peter Ottosson – Drums

Vokonis, Live at Studio Underjord 2019 (2020)

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Days of Rona: Simon Ohlsson of Vokonis

Posted in Features on April 9th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

vokonis simon ohlsson

Days of Rona: Simon Ohlsson of Vokonis (BorÄs, Sweden)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

It’s been pretty varied. The crisis have affected us mentally. I personally think it’s been very hard to handle the way media and people online are handling this. I’ve suffered from anxiety from a young age and since I was a teen have been obsessed with being clean, washing my hands and not getting ill/sick. Over the years I’ve gotten better with therapy and just trying my best to put myself out there. So it’s been a setback for me personally.

We’ve had to reschedule a bunch of shows. Stockholm, Oslo and Esbjerg Fuzztival in Denmark. Hopefully this blows over soon and we can get back to playing live again. I miss it very much. It’s been a source of energy and a way to challenge my anxiety for these past years. I can’t imagine not doing it.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

Sweden has been pretty much behind a lot of other countries. We’re not that affected by government restrictions yet. It feels like it’s gonna crash down soon though.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

It’s been a source of connectivity online for sure. I think it’s always going to be strengthening people. We managed to play a show just before all of this really broke out and that felt awesome. To be able to give some matter of relief to people in these troubling times gave a lot of perspective not really being offered online.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

That we’re still going strong. We try to keep motivated as we’re working on a new album. It’s been a great thing to be able to create right now. Not getting immersed in all of the negativity and trying to keep your head leveled above the water.

Due to us having to reschedule shows we’ve had a massive dent in the band’s economy though. Hopefully we’ll get out there again so the new album won’t be set back due to us not getting money. But know that over on the other side of all this, there lies a new Vokonis album!

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Review & Track Premiere: CB3, Aeons

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on December 19th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

cb3 aeons

[Click play above to stream the premiere of ‘Warrior Queen’ from CB3’s Aeons. Album is out Feb. 28 on The Sign Records.]

They never approach what-you-see-is-what-you-get level simplicity in terms of sound, but at least some of what you need to know about CB3 is there in the name. The acronym, which they seem to prefer to go by, stands for Charlotta’s Burnin’ Trio. Sure enough, there are three of them. They’re led by guitarist Charlotta Andersson. And the burn. Their style is rooted in heavy rock as some of Andersson‘s riffing and certainly her tone demonstrate, but there is a willful-sounding embrace of the progressive as well on their The Sign Records label debut and third album overall, Aeons. Andersson and fellow-founding member Natanael Salomonsson started out in jazzier territory on their 2015 self-titled debut, and across a 2016 live offering, the 2017 short release Adventures, early 2018’s sophomore LP, From Nothing to Eternity (discussed here), and the subsequent live EP, Cult of the Crystals, the Malmö, Sweden, outfit have continually ventured into broader and more psychedelic and weighted ground.

Aeons, which runs an utterly manageable 32 minutes across five tracks, continues this push into the uncharted cosmos perhaps most of all on its nine-minute centerpiece “Acid Haze” — an obvious focal point for the record — but also more generally throughout, as Andersson, Salomonsson and bassist Pelle Lindsjö enact organic-sounding instrumentalist fluidity and give their listeners a range of depths/reaches to explore in kind with the band. Songs are arranged for a journey, parabolically or like a mountain being climbed — though, again, at such a gracefully flowing 32 minutes, it’s not exactly a strenuous uphill — with opener “Zodiac” (3:51) and “Sonic Blaze” (6:50) which follows, building in runtime up to the already-noted longer stretch of “Acid Haze” (9:08), and “Warrior Queen” (7:26) and “Apocalypse” (5:00) paring back down from there in length if not in style or breadth.

Indeed, if anything, “Warrior Queen” answers the sprawl of “Acid Haze” with its own outbound push, particularly over the course of its first five minutes moving further and further from the ground as Andersson‘s guitar soars and shimmers above the solidified but still jammy groove beneath. From there, CB3 come together around a sequence of riffs, one into the next, and resolve the track’s final moments with a straightforward thrust that’s a standout moment even amid the sax and mellotron psychedelic wash of “Apocalypse” that follows — turns out the end of the world is kind of pretty; certainly much prettier than it feels living through it. The point, however, is that the second half of Aeons‘ unfurls itself no less gracefully than does the first. Listening to “Zodiac” at the record’s outset, the groove seems more grounded, toying around with a winding blues riff that wouldn’t seem out of place on a Clutch record even as CB3 manipulate it in various ways via shifts of tempo and effects wash, synth (or synth sounds), and so on, eventually finding their way into a slower nod that only pulls itself further down as it proceeds toward its own end and the more active start of “Sonic Blaze.”

One would hardly call these tracks grounded, even in relation to “Acid Haze” or the first half of “Warrior Queen,” and yet, the temptation to put a first/then narrative — as in, first they’re on the ground, then they’re not — to the progression of Aeons is hard to resist, especially with the sax and mellotron so clearly purposeful in their positioning in the final track. But the truth is more complicated, and, honestly, richer in terms of scope. “Sonic Blaze” flirts with some ambient drone before finding footing in a crash-laden YOB-style triplet gallop, which Andersson then moves up the fretboard before finally releasing into the ether, and eventually returns to the central riff of the track before capping with a winding conclusion on the way into the patient start of “Acid Haze” itself.

cb3

And yes, “Acid Haze” go-go-go-goes to new degrees of galaxial spaciousness in a way that CB3 didn’t do even a year ago, the guitar in eyes-closed-Hendrixian-style echo-shred leading the hypnotic wash that ensues on what is a genuinely gorgeous and singular moment on the album, running as far out as it can before Salomonsson‘s popping snare returns to bring momentum and set the stage for the more sweeping second half of the song, though that too has its due portion of noise before the last live-style crashout and the triumphant guitar intro of “Warrior Queen” commences.

Flow becomes central to the penultimate inclusion on Aeons, and in that regard CB3 are right at home, with some joyful headspinning solo fare after the three-minute mark and a generally languid vibe earlier on before, as noted, the more grounded, chugging end takes hold and builds up to the last charge, leaving just “Apocalypse” to round out, its strumming intro and quiet rim-tap snare serving as the initial foundation on which the fuller tonal impact is made. The aforementioned mellotron arrives earlier than the sax, which doesn’t come until just after the halfway mark and seems to show up in layers when it does, but both are central to the song’s statement and the album’s conclusion, bringing together CB3‘s jazz roots with their intent toward classic progressive rock in a way that, thanks to its atmospheric stylization, avoids the self-indulgence one might commonly associate with fusion or such jazzy impulses.

That is a line that CB3 walk well throughout Aeons, grounding themselves at the beginning and periodically afterward even as they venture into new, more cosmic and psychedelic places. Particularly as an instrumental unit, they’re able to bring an imaginative sense to what they do, but they don’t ever seem to lose focus on their central purpose either, and Aeons is a stronger record on the whole for it. I’m left wondering if there isn’t a storyline taking place between the songs as “Sonic Blaze” and “Acid Haze” and “Warrior Queen” flow in succession toward, well, the end of all things, but perhaps that’s a concern best left for the inevitable sequel. For now, Aeons clearly demonstrates CB3‘s ongoing commitment to evolving their sound, and their ability to meld progressive and psychedelic impulses with a rare and well-harnessed vitality. Would seem that’s plenty to ask of a record that’s just over a half-hour long, no?

CB3, Aeons (2020)

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CB3 Sign to The Sign Records; Aeons out Feb. 28

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 16th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

cb3

Cool band. Swedish trio CB3 have been picked up by The Sign Records — wasn’t it just yesterday I was talking about the label’s reliable taste? well here’s another example of it — to release their second long-player, Aeons, on Feb. 28 as the follow-up to 2018’s From Nothing to Eternity (discussed here) and the subsequent live EP, Cult of the Crystals. The progressive psychedelic instrumental outfit are led by and named for guitarist Charlotta Andersson — they’re Charlotta’s Burning Trio when go long-form — and though February 2020 feels like a great and unknown future somewhere off in the distance, actually it’s only a couple months and the band will unveil the new single “Sonic Blaze” from the five-track offering next week, so you don’t actually have to wait all that long to get at least a quick fix.

Until then, here’s info courtesy of The Sign via the PR wire:

cb3 aeons

CB3 – Aeons – The Sign Records

We welcome CB3 (Charlottas Burning Trio) to The Sign Records! CB3 will release their new album “Aeons” the 28th of February 2020, and next Friday – the 25th of October, you’ll be able to enjoy the first cosmic frequencies of the album as the single “Sonic Blaze” reaches earth after a long journey through outer space.

CB3 is here to bring you on a journey with their explosive rock jams and mind-bending cosmic soundscapes. CB3 brings the spirit of psychedelic music to the 21th century; with a style that ranges from heavy psych rock jams like Jimi Hendrix to delicate atmospheric passages like Pink Floyd and progressive rhythms like King Crimson and Mahavishnu Orchestra. Close your eyes, set your mind free and drift away into the musical universe of CB3.

The autumn of 2018, CB3 celebrated a five year anniversary as a band in their hometown of Malmö, Sweden. Half a decade of constant exploration of the unconventional way of playing, fusing rock with jazz tonality and experimenting with rhythms, sounds and structures. After two self-released and self-produced albums, multiple collaborative projects and touring, CB3 signed with Lazy Octopus Records and Drone Rock Records for a cassette and vinyl release of their debut album “From Nothing to Eternity” in 2018. It was sold out immediately and received flourishing reviews.

In spring of 2020 they will release their new album “Aeons” on The Sign Records. Charlotta said of the process “It’s been an exciting journey. Me, Pelle and Nate has almost been living, eating and sleeping music, but above all experimenting with the idea of making the most exciting and kickass instrumental album ever.”. Since the beginning the trio has valued and nourished their thriving lust of exploring new ways in composing music and playing live shows.

The album is recorded by Björn Lindberg at Rabbit Holes Studios in Malmö and mixed and mastered by Joona Hassinen at Studio Underjord in Norrköping, Sweden. Björn is a sound engineer that worked with Hey Elbow. Joona is the sought after engineer in the underground scene in Sweden and has worked with bands like MaidaVale and Vokonis. The last track “Apocalypse” features Martin WirĂ©n on saxophones and Charlotta on mellotrones. Artwork by Robin Gnista (Brant Björk, Radio Moscow, Imperial State Electric). Press Photos by Gianluca La Bruna. Video animations by Matteo Nobis SandĂ©n (3D-artist, illustrator).

CB3 are:
Charlotta Andersson – Electric Guitar
Pelle Lindsjö – Electric Bass
Natanael Salomonsson – Drums

www.charlottasburningtrio.com
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CB3, “From Nothing to Eternity” (Live 2018)

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Hot Breath Stream Self-Titled Debut EP in Full; Out Friday on The Sign Records

Posted in audiObelisk on October 15th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

hot breath (Photo by Marcus Eriksson)

Swedish classic style heavy rockers Hot Breath will release their self-titled debut this coming Friday, Oct. 18, through The Sign Records. The conglomerate label has emerged as a home for retro-minded heavy (among other styles), from Hypnos and Heavy Feather to MĂ€rvel and MaidaVale, and in aligning with newcomer Göteborg four-piece Hot Breath, they continue the tradition of traditionalism, as well as specifically an association with Jennifer Israelsson and Jimi Karlsson. Both the vocalist and drummer of Hot Breath are former members of Honeymoon Disease, whose sophomore LP and apparent swansong, Part Human, Mostly Beast (discussed here), came out through the label in 2017, and the new outfit brings them together with Hypnos bassist Anton Frick Kallmin as well as guitarist Karl Edfeldt, whose other band, Grand, haven’t actually worked with The Sign (yet), but still, three out of four is a compelling enough statistic to tempt one to call Hot Breath a house band for their label. Nothing wrong with that, of course, and it only makes it more appropriate that as Hot Breath offer up the six tracks/21 minutes of Hot Breath just about a year after forming, they’re playing four dates over the next few weeks as part of The Sign Fest with labelmates in Skraeckoedlan, Vokonis, Children of the SĂŒn, and more. Clearly a family affair.

Super-groovy, as the kids might say, and the same applies to the EP itself, which in a song like “1,000 Miles” careens through speed-at-night winding late-’70s proto-metallic riffing, topped with the vocals of Israelsson (I wonder if she’s any relation hot breath hot breathto Truckfighters drummer Daniel Israelsson), whose melodies fit right in with the hard-corner turns in the guitar and the forward propulsion of the rhythm. Whether it’s the hooky “What You Reap” at the conclusion, the earlier “Maniac” or the build-up back at the start with “Still Not Dead,” Hot Breath bring an infectious sense of energy to their tracks, here and there tapping into some non-glam/non-NWOBHM ’80s worship but as likely to pull influence from Joe Walsh as Scorpions as Electric Citizen as Death Alley, the latter seeming specifically to inform “What You Reap” and “Slight Air” before it, wrapping up the quick offering with some of its most fervent and insistent thrust, though that’s not at all to take away from “Got it All,” which is no less brash when it comes right down to it, and boasts some choice backing vocals in the chorus, adding to the already so prevalent catchiness thereof.

If it needs to be said, songwriting is a feature throughout Hot Breath‘s Hot Breath, and though one has to factor in that they’re still basically a brand new band, it shouldn’t be a mystery as to why they seem to have their wits about them in terms of what they want to be doing. It’s because they do. And whether it’s Israelsson and Karlsson‘s prior experience together in Honeymoon Disease or everyone’s experience more generally heavy rock bands of various stripes, clearly the effect of it all is that Hot Breath hit the ground running on their first outing in terms of style and substance both, with tight, high-quality songcraft and an energetic, natural performance captured that serves these tracks well and gives the listener notice of more to come. I don’t know how long it’ll be before Hot Breath get around to a debut album, but if one takes the Hot Breath EP as an advance warning of that, the heads up is indeed all the more appreciable. The converted will have no trouble digging in, and even those less experienced with Sweden’s classic/boogie set will find plenty to grasp onto in the songwriting and delivery.

So, uh, have at it.

The full stream of Hot Breath‘s Hot Breath is available on the player below, followed by more background from the PR wire and live dates, including those at The Sign Fest in the coming weeks.

Please enjoy:

the sign fest

Hot Breath delivers a six track K.O that is set for release the 18th of October on The Sign Records. Blending that immortal sound of 70s classic rock with their own pure attitude, add a bit of all those influences that you like, and you get Hot Breath’s self titled debut. Guitar solos stand side-by-side with Jennifer Israelsson’s (previously seen fronting Honeymoon Disease) swagger-filled vocals and a brilliant rhythm section in Jimi Karlsson (also ex-Honeymoon Disease) and Anton Frick Kallmin (Hypnos). Every track is a hit of its own accord, and by the time “What You Reap” rolls around, it’s clear that Hot Breath provides the soundtrack to the last drink that never ends.

Recorded and mixed by Jamie Elton (ex-Amulet) in Gothenburg during the summer of 2019. Axel Söderberg (Horisont) helped out on keys on the recording. Mastered by Hans Olsson Brookes at Svenska Grammofon Studion. Artwork by Jimi Karlsson. Cover photo by Marcus Eriksson.

Formed in October 2018 (with members from Honeymoon Disease, Hypnos and Grand) the band wanted to mix their various pasts into one vibrating sound. With a common ground of heavy rock Hot Breath quickly took shape and turned into a wicked animal that will twist your hips.

The release will be available on CD in Digipack, 180g Vinyl and Digital formats. Hot Breath is touring and kicks off their first Swedish tour joining a four-date The Sign Fest throughout Sweden.

Live:
18 October, Skylten, Linköping, Sweden (The Sign Fest)
19 October, Slaktkyrkan, Stockholm, Sweden (The Sign Fest)
25/26 October – Skövde, Sweden, In Rock Festival
8 November – Musikens Hus, Göteborg, Sweden (The Sign Fest)
9 November – Plan B, Malmö, Sweden (The Sign Fest)

Hot Breath are:
Jennifer Israelsson – Vocals and Guitar
Karl Edfeldt – Guitar
Anton Frick Kallmin – Bass
Jimmy Karlsson – Drums

Hot Breath on Thee Facebooks

The Sign Records on Thee Facebooks

The Sign Records website

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Quarterly Review: Monkey3, Asthma Castle, The Giraffes, Bask, Faerie Ring, Desert Sands, Cavalcade, Restless Spirit, Children of the SĂŒn, Void King

Posted in Reviews on September 30th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

quarterly review

Call two friends and tell them to tell two friends to tell two friends, because the Quarterly Review has returned. This time around, it’s 50 records front to back for Fall 2019 and there are some big names and some smaller names and a whole lot of in between which is just how I like it. Between today and Friday, each day 10 album reviews will be posted in a single batch like this one, and although by Wednesday this always means I’m totally out of my mind, it’s always, always, always worth it to be able to write about so much cool stuff. So sit tight, because there’s a lot to get through and, as ever, time’s at a premium.

Thanks in advance for keeping up, and I hope you find something you dig.

Quarterly Review #1-10:

Monkey3, Sphere

monkey3 sphere

It’s a full-on Keanu Reeves “whoa” when opening track “Spirals” kicks in on Monkey3‘s sixth album, Sphere (released by Napalm), and that’s by no means the last one on the cinematic six-tracker. The long-running Swiss mostly-instrumentalists have been consistently, persistently underappreciated throughout their career, but whether it’s the aural scope of guitar and keys in “Axis” or the swaps between intensity and sprawl in 14-minute closer “Ellipsis,” their latest work is consuming in its sense of triumph. Even the four-minute “Ida,” which seems at first like it’s barely going to be more than an interlude, finds a thread of majestic cosmic groove and rides it for the duration, while the proggy immersion of “Prism” and the harder drive of “Mass” — not to mention that shredding solo — make the middle of the record anything but a post-hypnosis dip. I won’t pretend to know if Sphere is the record that finally gets the Lausanne four-piece the respect they’ve already well deserved, but if it was, one could only say it was for good reason. Blends of heft, progressive craft, and breadth are rarely so resonant.

Monkey3 on Thee Facebooks

Napalm Records website

 

Asthma Castle, Mount Crushmore

Asthma Castle Mount Crushmore

When you call your record Mount Crushmore, you need to bring it, and much to their credit, Baltimorean sludge-rocking five-piece Asthma Castle do precisely that on their debut full-length. Issued through Hellmistress Records, the 37-minute/six-track outing is a wordplay-laced pummeler that shows as much persona in its riffing and massive groove as it does in titles like “The Incline of Western Civilization” and “The Book of Duderonomy.” Trades between early-Mastodonic twists and lumbering sludge crash add a frenetic and unpredictable feel to pieces like the title-track, while “Methlehem” trades its plod for dual-guitar antics punctuated by metallic double-kick, all the while the vocals trade back and forth between growls, shouts, cleaner shouts, the odd scream, etc., because basically if you can keep up with it, Asthma Castle wouldn’t be doing their job. One shudders to think of the amount of Natty Bo consumed during its making, but Mount Crushmore is a wild and cacophonous enough time to live up to the outright righteousness of its title. If I graded reviews, it would get a “Fuckin’ A+,” with emphasis on “fuckin’ a.”

Asthma Castle on Thee Facebooks

Hellmistress Records website

 

The Giraffes, Flower of the Cosmos

the giraffes flower of the cosmos

Some day the world will wake up and realize the rock and roll powerhouse it had in Brooklyn’s The Giraffes, but by then it’ll be too late. The apocalypse will have happened long ago, and it’ll be Burgess Meredith putting on a vinyl of Flower of the Cosmos in the New York Library as “FAKS” echoes out through the stacks of now-meaningless tomes and the dust of nuclear winter falls like snow outside the windows. The band’s tumultuous history is mirrored in the energy of their output, and yet to hear the melody and gentle fuzz at the outset of “Golden Door,” there’s something soothing about their work as well that, admittedly, “Raising Kids in the End Times” is gleeful in undercutting. Cute as well they pair that one with “Dorito Dreams” on this, their seventh record in a 20-plus-year run, which has now seen them find their footing, lose it, find it again, and in this record and songs like the masterfully frenetic “Fill up Glass” and the air-tight-tense “Like Hate” and “Romance,” weave a document every bit worthy of Mr. Meredith’s attention as he mourns for the potential of this godforsaken wasteland. Oh, what we’ll leave behind. Such pretty ruins.

The Giraffes website

The Giraffes on Bandcamp

 

Bask, III

bask iii

In the fine tradition of heavy rock as grown-up punk, North Carolina’s Bask bring progressive edge and rolling-Appalachian atmospherics to the underlying energy of III, their aptly-titled and Season of Mist-issued third album. Their foot is in any number of styles, from Baroness-style noodling to a hard twang that shows up throughout and features prominently on the penultimate “Noble Daughters II – The Bow,” but the great triumph of III, and really the reason it works at all, is because the band find cohesion in this swath of influences. They’re a band who obviously put thought into what they do, making it all the more appropriate to think of them as prog, but as “Three White Feet” and “New Dominion” show at the outset, they don’t serve any aesthetic master so much as the song itself. Closing with banjo and harmonies and a build of crash cymbal on “Maiden Mother Crone” nails the point home in a not-understated way, but at no point does III come across as hyper-theatrical so as to undercut the value of what Bask are doing. It’s a more patient album than it at first seems, but given time to breathe, III indeed comes to life.

Bask on Thee Facebooks

Season of Mist on Bandcamp

 

Faerie Ring, The Clearing

fairie ring the clearing

Listening to the weighty rollout of opening cut “Bite the Ash” on Faerie Ring‘s debut album, The Clearing (on King Volume Records), one is reminded of the energy that once-upon-a-time came out of Houston’s Venomous Maximus. There’s a similar feeling of dark energy surging through the riffs and echoing vocals, but the Evansville, Indiana, four-piece wind up on a different trip. Their take is more distinctly Sabbathian on “Lost Wind” and even the swinging “Heavy Trip” lives up to its stated purpose ahead of the chugging largesse of finisher “Heaven’s End.” They find brash ground on “The Ring” and the slower march of “Somnium,” but there’s metal beneath the lumbering and it comes out on “Miracle” in a way that the drums late in “Lost Wind” seem to hint toward on subsequent listens. It’s a mix of riff-led elements that should be readily familiar to many listeners, but the sheer size and clarity of presentation Faerie Ring make throughout The Clearing makes me think they’ll look to distinguish themselves going forward, and so their first record holds all the more potential for that.

Faerie Ring on Thee Facebooks

King Volume Records on Bandcamp

 

Desert Sands, The Ascent EP

Desert Sands The Ascent

Begun as the solo-project of London-based multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Mark Walker and presently a trio including Louis Kinder and Jonathan Walker as well, Desert Sands make their recorded debut through A Records with the three-song/half-hour The Ascent EP, a work of psychedelic existentialism that conveys its cosmic questioning even before the lyrics start, with an opening riff and rhythmic lurch to “Are You There” that seems to throw its central query into a void that either will or won’t answer. Does it? The hell should I know, but The Ascent proves duly transcendent in its pulsations as “Head Towards the Light” and 11:45 closer “Yahweh” — yeah, I guess we get there — bring drifting, languid enlightenment to these spiritual musings. The finale is, of course, a jam in excelsis and if drop-acid-find-god is the narrative we’re working with, then Desert Sands are off to a hell of a start as a project. Regardless of how one might ultimately come down (and it is, by my estimation at least, a comedown) on the question of human spirituality, there’s no denying the power and ethereal force of the kind of creativity on display in The Ascent. One will wait impatiently to see what comes next.

Desert Sands on Thee Facebooks

A Recordings on Thee Facebooks

 

Cavalcade, Sonic Euthanasia

Cavalcade Sonic Euthanasia

Say what you want about New Orleans or North Carolina or wherever the hell else, Midwestern sludge is another level of filth. To wit, the Carcass-style vocals that slice through the raw, dense riffing on “Aspirate on Aspirations” feel like the very embodiment of modern disillusion, and there’s some flourish of melodic guitar pluck there, but that only seems to give the ensuing crunch more impact, and likewise the far-back char of “Freezing in Fire” as it relates to the subsequent “Dead Idles,” as Cavalcade refute the trappings of genre in tempo while still seeming to burrow a hole for themselves in the skull of the converted. “Noose Tie” and “We Dig Our Own Graves” tell the story, but while the recording itself is barebones, Cavalcade aren’t now and never really have been so simple as to be a one-trick band. For more than a decade, they’ve provided a multifaceted and trickily complex downer extremity, and Sonic Euthanasia does this as well, bringing their sound to new places and new levels of abrasion along its punishing way. Easy listening? Shit. You see that eye on the cover? That’s the lizard people staring back at you. Have fun with that.

Cavalcade on Thee Facebooks

Cavalcade on Bandcamp

 

Restless Spirit, Lord of the New Depression

restless spirit lord of the new depression

Long Island chug-rockers Restless Spirit would seem to have been developing the material for their self-released debut album, Lord of the New Depression, over the last couple years on a series of short releases, but the songs still sound fresh and electrified in their vitality. If this was 1992 or ’93, they’d be signed already to RoadRacer Records and put on tour with Life of Agony, whose River Runs Red would seem to be a key influence in the vocals of the nine-track/39-minute offering, but even on their own, the metal-tinged five-piece seem to do just fine. Their tracks are atmospheric and aggressive and kind, and sincere in their roll, capturing the spirit of a band like Down with somewhat drawn-back chestbeating, “Dominion” aside. They seem to be challenging themselves to push outside those confines though in “Deep Fathom Hours,” the longest track at 7:35 with more complexity in the melody of the vocals and guitar, and that suits them remarkably well as they dig into this doomly take on LOA and Type O Negative and others from the early ’90s NYC underground — they seem to pass on Biohazard, which is fine — made legendary with the passage of time. As a gentleman of a certain age, I find it exceptionally easy to get on board.

Restless Spirit on Thee Facebooks

Restless Spirit on Bandcamp

 

Children of the SĂŒn, Flowers

Children of the Sun Flowers

An eight-piece outfit based in Arvika, Sweden, which is far enough west to be closer to Oslo than Stockholm, Children of the SĂŒn blend the classic heavy rock stylizations of MaidaVale, first-LP Blues Pills and others with a decidedly folkish bent. Including an intro, their The Sign Records debut album, Flowers, is eight track and 34 minutes interweaving organ and guitar, upbeat vibes and bluesier melodies, taking cues from choral-style vocals on “Emmy” in such a way as to remind of Church of the Cosmic Skull, though the aesthetic here is more hippie than cult. The singing on “Sunschild” soars in that fashion as well, epitomizing the lush melody found across Flowers as the keys, guitar, bass and drums work to match in energy and presence. For a highlight, I’d pick the more subdued title-track, which still has its sense of movement thanks to percussion deep in the mix but comes arguably closest to the flower-child folk Children of the SĂŒn seem to be claiming for their own, though the subsequent closing duo of “Like a Sound” and “Beyond the Sun” aren’t far off either. They’re onto something. One hopes they continue to explore in such sĂŒnshiny fashion.

Children of the SĂŒn on Thee Facebooks

The Sign Records on Thee Facebooks

 

Void King, Barren Dominion

void king barren dominion

Having made their debut with 2016’s There is Nothing (discussed here), Indianapolis downtrodden heavy rock four-piece Void King come back for a second go with Barren Dominion (on Off the Record Label), a title of similar theme that finds them doom riffing through massive tonality on “Burnt at Both Ends,” asking what if Soundgarden played atmospheric doom rock on “Crippled Chameleon” — uh, it would be awesome? yup — and opening each side with its longest track (double immediate points) in a clearly intended vinyl structure hell bent on immersing the listener as much as possible in the lumber and weight the band emit. Frontman Jason Kindred adds extra burl to his already-plenty-dudely approach on “Crippled Chameleon” and closer “The Longest Winter,” the latter with some harmonies to mirror those of opener “A Lucid Omega,” and the band around him — bassist Chris Carroll, drummer Derek Felix and guitarist Tommy Miller — seem to have no trouble whatsoever in keeping up, there or anywhere else on the eight-song/46-minute outing. Topped with striking cover art from Diogo Soares, Barren Dominion is deceptively nuanced and full-sounding. Not at all empty.

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Off the Record Label BigCartel store

 

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