Roadburn 2015: Sets from Monolord, Argus, Uzala, Anthroprophh, Svartidauði, Bell Witch, Oozing Wound and The Osiris Club Available for Streaming

Posted in audiObelisk on June 12th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

argus at roadburn 2015 (Photo by JJ Koczan)

Some good stuff here, but that’s pretty much like walking outside and noting all the oxygen in the air. Roadburn 2015’s newest batch of audio streams continues the thread from last time around in including one of the most talked-about performances at the festival in Tilburg, the Netherlands, this past April — namely Bell Witch. Many American bands head over there and make a special impression on the largely European crowd, but Bell Witch, the Seattle duo who were traveling abroad to herald the arrival of their 2015 sophomore outing, Four Phantoms (review here), on Profound Lore, seemed to earn extra acclaim from those who caught their performance. I wasn’t lucky enough to be one of them, but the response was universally positive.

Likewise the impact made by Monolord, who also feature here, but for my money, one of the highlights of the entire weekend was watching Uzala slay the Green Room. The ethereal doom trio who trace their roots to Boise, Idaho, were a surprise even though I’d seen them before, to the point that I did something I don’t often do at Roadburn, and that’s stay put for the entire set. Massive sound. Killer. Argus (pictured above) were a fist-pumping launch for the Afterburner on Sunday after the fest proper came to a close, and their classic metallurgy is no less welcome now as I pay it a revisit with the live stream.

Hope you enjoy the whole bunch:

Anthroprophh – Live at Roadburn 2015

Argus – Live at Roadburn 2015

Bell Witch – Live at Roadburn 2015

Monolord – Live at Roadburn 2015

Oozing Wound – Live at Roadburn 2015

Svartidauði – Live at Roadburn 2015

The Osiris Club – Live at Roadburn 2015

Uzala – Live at Roadburn 2015

Special thanks to Walter as always for letting me host the streams. To read all of this year’s Roadburn coverage, click here. For the first and second batches of streams, click here and then click here.

Roadburn’s website

Marcel Van De Vondervoort on Thee Facebooks

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Death Alley, Black Magick Boogieland: Study in Kinetics

Posted in Reviews on June 8th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

death-alley-black-magick-boogieland

By its nature, you can’t have an alley without something on one side and something else on another, so if we apply the same logic to Amsterdam four-piece Death Alley and their Tee Pee Records debut full-length, Black Magick Boogieland, they’re running right down the middle somewhere between classic, Motörhead-style boozy heavy rock and roll groove — “Dead Man’s Bones,” “Bewildered Eyes,” and the early going of “The Fever” — and grander stylistic aspirations of psychedelia, (relatively) lush arrangements and spacey flourish — “Golden Fields of Love,” the back half of opener “Over Under,” 12-minute closer “Supernatural Predator” — ultimately refusing to give into one over the other and not so much balancing between them as working to convince the square peg and the round hole they’re made for each other. It turns out to be a more satisfying fit than one might initially think, in no small part because the four-piece of vocalist Douwe Truijens, guitarist Oeds Beydals, bassist Dennis Duijnhouwer and drummer Ming Boyer (all four interviewed here) are able to make such a fluid case by means of their songwriting. Part of that can be attributed to their experience. TruijensBoyer and Beydals played together in the hardcore punk band Gewapend Beton — the latter also handled guitar in The Devil’s Blood alongside vocalist Farida Lemouchi, who makes an appearance here on the aforementioned “Supernatural Predator” — while Duijnhouwer toiled in cosmic doomers Mühr, so they’re not new to their craft and they’ve come by their stylistic blend honestly. Their first 7″, Over Under/Dead Man’s Bones (review here), was released early in 2014, and already one can hear the progress underway in their sound on Black Magick Boogieland in both the raw and the expansive moments on hand.

And by the way, as righteous a title as Black Magick Boogieland is, it also fits. Beydals‘ time in The Devil’s Blood notwithstanding — and the elephant in the room is the 2014 suicide of that band’s founder, Selim Lemouchi, whose influence can be felt in some of the swirl of the closer — Death Alley aren’t really gearing themselves toward cultistry, unless one counts a cult of alcohol and the manner in which distortion, when thrust at driving speeds at an audience’s eardrums, might compel one to pump their fist. There’s no shortage of that kind of “magick,” and one isn’t past the shuffling and stomping of “Over Under” before it’s clear any quota of “boogie” is going to be duly met and exceeded. The record lives up to that promise, with Truijens‘ command of the hooks as a grounding force running at a fair clip in songs that get in, leave an impression, and get out in punkish tradition, and as for the “black” speaking to something darker atmospherically or a sense of threat, there’s an element of that as well. Two songs mention eyes — “Bewildered Eyes,” on side A, and “Stalk Eyed,” on side B — so there’s a feeling of confrontation underscoring at least some of the proceedings, but both tracks are more of party than malevolence, with Beydals‘ lead work a key factor in conveying that ideology. His work throughout is stellar, and somewhat unsurprisingly is best met by Duijnhouwer‘s bass in the later reaches of “Supernatural Predator,” with Farida Lemouchi‘s vocals deep in the mix as Boyer holds a tension in rolls in his snare for a space rock exploration that’s dynamic and engrossing in kind, cleverly moving back toward a resurgent verse to end out in a manner that only underscores the victory at hand. That’s not the band’s first impressive turn of craftsmanship, but it says something about their mindset that they’re not willing to let you go without one last kick in the ass.

death-alley

If the 41-minute entirety of Black Magick Boogieland relies on any singular element to make its case, however, it’s motion. Whether it’s the quick turns of “Over Under,” the strut of the title-track, the drive of “Bewildered Eyes” that seems to crash through the windshield and into classically heavy soloing within its brief 2:26 span, or the more winding course taken by “The Fever,” with suitably frenetic falsetto backing vocals, Death Alley make these songs move. The only place one might accuse them of coming up for air is on “Golden Fields of Love,” which downshifts in tempo and takes an atmospheric break as it heads into its second half, but even that has a last-minute surge of NWOBHM chug-riffing and some over-the-top vocal harmonies, Truijens developing a melodic sensibility to go with his gruff approach that will only make the band a stronger unit as they continue to progress. From that momentary inhale, “Stalk Eyed” bursts out with more swing and push, “Dead Man’s Bones” fully revives the hook-and-thrust of earlier cuts, and even in its most cosmic stretching, “Supernatural Predator” holds firm to its kinetic side, and if Death Alley are exploring, they’re doing it at light speed. With the already noted core of songwriting as their foundation — that is, writing songs that are both catchy when they need to be and varying in their construction — the four-piece meet their ambitious aesthetic target head on. I had some fairly high anticipation for their first full-length after the 7″, and with the added complexities in pieces like “Golden Fields of Love” and that finish in “Supernatural Predator,” any expectation I had has been easily blown out of the water. No doubt Black Magick Boogieland will stand as one of the best heavy rock debuts of 2015, and in keeping with that, it ignites the imagination as to what Death Alley might go on to accomplish in its wake.

Death Alley, “Black Magick Boogieland”

Death Alley on Thee Facebooks

Death Alley on Bandcamp

Death Alley at Tee Pee Records

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The Machine, Offblast!: Coming to Light

Posted in Reviews on May 28th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

the-machine-offblast

In the works on one level or another since the second half of 2013, The Machine‘s fifth album arrives in the form of the 50-minute Offblast! via Elektrohasch Schallplatten, and marks a distinct turn for the band. The delay? A mix of technical trouble during mixing and personal life, and while that could easily mean the jam-prone Dutch trio have another batch of songs in the works to follow it up, Offblast! nonetheless resonates with a maturity that even 2012’s Calmer than You Are (review here) or their 2013 split with likeminded countrymen Sungrazer (review here) couldn’t claim, their songwriting process proving more cohesive as they explore the roots of stoner and desert riffing on songs like “Dry End” or “Gamma” and keeping the instrumental chemistry that even their early work — 2007’s debut, Shadow of the Machine, 2009’s Solar Corona (on Nasoni) or their first for Elektrohasch, 2011’s 80-minute jamfest Drie (review here) — housed, the lead guitar work of David Eering (also vocals and recording) as much of a calling card as the band has amid the fleshed out roll and bounce provided by bassist Hans van Heemst — whose tone has always been The Machine‘s secret weapon and is most of all on Offblast! — and drummer Davy Boogaard, who shows himself again malleable to whatever the changes in the six included tracks might require of him, be it the quick stops early in “Off Course” or the jazzy ride work in the spacious midsection of “Chrysalis (J.A.M.),” the sprawling, 16:25 opener that acts as the record’s immersive and in some ways defining statement.

With six tracks, it would just about have to be the longest of the bunch, and it is (immediate points to them for starting with their longest cut), living up to its spelled-out parenthetical with a breadth to match its runtime, shifting between its raucous first half and more swinging second fluidly, launching its later movement with a quiet break with some choice, naturally-toned wah from Eering. His affinity for Hendrix shows itself early and often on Offblast! as it has throughout The Machine‘s five LPs, but the influence seems more like an afterthought to the band’s identity here than it ever has. By the time “Chrysalis (J.A.M.)” is over, one feels as though they’ve listened to an entire album, and in a way, it’s true, but that’s only the beginning of the tale, and before the Rotterdam natives bookend their latest with the similarly-directed but noisier-finishing 12-minute closer “Come to Light” (the name of the song submitted by yours truly), they dance with sandy demons on “Dry End,” “Coda Sun,” “Gamma” and “Off Course,” which don’t add up to the two extended pieces time-wise, but still provide some of Offblast!‘s most lasting impressions in their hooks, fuzzy drive, and flourishes like sitar in “Dry End” and Boogaard‘s snare work in “Coda Sun” — not to mention vocals, which neither the opener nor the closer has. It’s not so outlandish a scope for a band to have, with two bigger jams and more straightforward material to complement each other, but it’s much to The Machine‘s credit in how they’ve structured the album that it not only flows front-to-back, but is so hypnotic at the start and still so memorable by the end. If you’re looking for evidence of the band’s maturity, it’s right there.

the-machine

“Dry End” (3:06) and the winding “Coda Sun” (5:34), Eering‘s vocals compressed and watery for use as another element in the psychedelic overtones, are met by “Gamma” and “Off Course,” both over six minutes, and while one comes to feel by the end of the latter that The Machine are setting the listener up for a return to heady reaches in “Come to Light” — and they are, make no mistake — both retain a distinctive feel. “Gamma” is marked out by van Heemst‘s bassline, which emerges in the second half of the song and seems to pay direct homage to Queens of the Stone Age‘s “You Can’t Quit Me Baby” from their 1998 self-titled. That album makes a solid comparison point for the tonal impression of Offblast! overall, as it happens, so the feel is purposeful and The Machine take the familiar line and work in layers of guitar building in volume en route back to a last measure of the chorus. While it has a longer solo from Eering, “Off Course” follows a similar structure, but its vibe carries some of the punkish undertone the band held aloft on their 2013 split thanks to the sharp starts and stops and an added layer in the chorus either of piano or keys (or something that sounds like them) deep in the mix, giving further urgency to the already forward progression. And when they get there, “Come to Light” is a more gradual unfolding than was “Chrysalis (J.A.M.),” but the end result carries no less vitality, the dynamic between Eeringvan Heemst and Boogaard writ large over its organic and laid back but still engaging course. Perhaps most satisfying of all is that while it works on varying levels between its songcraft and its jams, Offblast! comes across with no lack of cohesion or choppy shifts. As “Come to Light” inevitably descends to effects noise and feedback to end the album, it seems to do little more than highlight the level of execution that The Machine have brought to their fifth outing and the satisfying path down which their development has led them and those who’ve been fortunate enough to follow along the way. If you’ll pardon the cliché, it was worth the wait.

The Machine, “Coda Sun” official video

The Machine on Thee Facebooks

The Machine’s BigCartel store

Elektrohasch Schallplatten

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Roadburn 2015: Sets from Bongripper, Lo-Pan, Goatwhore, The Golden Grass, Bast, Primitive Man, Black Anvil, Sammal, Salem’s Pot and Scott H. Biram Available to Stream

Posted in audiObelisk on May 27th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

The Golden Grass (Photo by JJ Koczan)

It’s been more than a month now since Roadburn 2015 ended, and that means it’s time to really start digging into the audio aftermath. As always, this batch of streams was captured by Marcel van de Vondervoort and his team, and there are more than a few gems here, from Bongripper playing all of their 2014 album Miserable (review here) to The Golden Grass closing out the fest in the Green Room during the Afterburner.

I was particularly stoked this year for the Afterburner, and not the least because it meant Lo-Pan were rolling into town. The Ohio fuzz four-piece were on their first European tour at the time, capping the first leg of it with Abrahma, who played at Cul de Sac, and soon to pick up again with Black Pyramid and continue their roll, but being a fan of the band and having seen them the many times that I have, it was special to watch them take the stage at Roadburn and level the place as vigorously as they did. That set is included here, along with the devastatingly heavy likes of Primitive Man and Goatwhore, the weird stoned occultism of Salem’s Pot, and Scott H. Biram‘s one-man outlaw idolatry.

They’re all good batches, but I know I’ll look forward to reliving the Lo-Pan set and whether you hit that up or something else, I hope you enjoy:

Bast – Live at Roadburn 2015

Black Anvil – Live at Roadburn 2015

Bongripper – Live at Roadburn 2015

Goatwhore – Live at Roadburn 2015

Lo-Pan – Live at Roadburn 2015

Primitive Man – Live at Roadburn 2015

Salem’s Pot – Live at Roadburn 2015

Sammal – Live at Roadburn 2015

Scott H. Biram – Live at Roadburn 2015

The Golden Grass – Live at Roadburn 2015

Special thanks to Walter as always for letting me host the streams. To read all of this year’s Roadburn coverage, click here. For the first batch of streams, click here.

Roadburn’s website

Marcel Van De Vondervoort on Thee Facebooks

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The Machine Post New Video for “Coda Sun”; Offblast! out June 1

Posted in Bootleg Theater on May 19th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

the machine

Two weeks after the initial announcement of their awaited fifth album’s Summer release date, Dutch heavy rock trio The Machine unveil a new video from Offblast!, for the song “Coda Sun.” Directed by guitarist/vocalist David Eering, it’s a trippy performance clip captured at Elektra in Sliedrecht and is the premiere audio to be made public from the upcoming full-length, which will be out on Elektrohasch and finds the three-piece of Eering, bassist Hans van Heemst and drummer Davy Boogaard grooving easily around a fuzzed-out central riff, watery vocals trailing the turns as a jammy vibe pervades following an initial verse/chorus split, an extended guitar solo taking hold and carrying the track through the better part of its second half before a quick return to the verse provides a neat bookend reminding of the songwriting still at work no matter how far out The Machine are willing to let their wanderings roam.

I’ll have a review of the album at some point soon, but “Coda Sun” is a welcome first look from The Machine, whose evolution beyond 2012’s Calmer than You Are (review here) stands them out from the heavy psychedelic pack in terms of their chemistry and the fluidity of their jams. I don’t at all mind telling you I’ve been looking forward to the album for some time, and between its lengthy jams at the front and back and the flowing earliest Queens of the Stone Age vibes that persist between, it’s one that’s been well worth looking forward to. So, with the June 1 release date solidified and the promise of more to come, please find the video for “Coda Sun” below, and enjoy:

The Machine, “Coda Sun” official video

There were some technical difficulties during the mixing stage (a.k.a. the phasing phase), a number of various things had to be sorted out, band members were having babies, etc. In other words: it took a while but it’s finished. Needless to say, we’re very proud to present you the final details of Offblast!.

Although we had a lot of positive reactions after posting the April Fools version of the artwork, we still decided to proceed with Jakob Skøtt’s beautiful piece. Wait until you see the fold out vinyl cover. Speaking of vinyl: due to a popular demand for wax discs, the production time for the LP will take a couple of months. But hey, it will be summer by then so we’ll take it easy.

The Machine – Offblast!
Elektrohasch Records
CD – June 1, 2015
LP – August XX, 2015

01 – Chrysalis (J.A.M.) [16:25]
02 – Dry End [03:05]
03 – Coda Sun [05:34]
04 – Gamma [06:48]
05 – Off Course [06:36]
06 – Come To Light [12:11]

Recorded and produced again by David, we’re super happy with the final result. It is by far our best sounding album to date. And we’re most certainly not done yet.

The Machine on Thee Facebooks

The Machine’s BigCartel store

Elektrohasch Schallplatten

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The Machine Announce Summer Release of New Album Offblast!

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 5th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

the machine (Photo by Paul Verhagen)

If you were to go back and look at the two latest posts prior to this one about Dutch trio The Machine, you’d see that it was the 2015 and 2014 most anticipated albums lists, respectively. Their fifth full-length, the title of which has been revealed to be Offblast!, has now been given June (CD) and August (LP) release dates through Elektrohasch, and arriving three years after 2012’s Calmer than You Are (review here), it serves as the longest stretch between outings The Machine have had since they made their debut with 2007’s Shadow of the Machine.

In that 2014 list linked above, I remarked that they were hosting a contest on Thee Facebooks for naming their next record and that my contribution was Come to Light, which sounded all spacey and psychedelic but was also a reference to The Big Lebowski, as was the title Calmer than You Are. They didn’t use it for the name of the album, obviously, but apparently they liked the idea well enough to use it for the final track. Very much looking forward to checking out the closer, “Come to Light,” and thanks to The Machine for the shout and giving me credit for the title.

Artwork by Jakob Skøtt of Causa Sui and details about the release follow, courtesy of the band:

the machine offblast

You guys got teased for what is it? Over a year? We can finally give you an update about our new album, which we already dubbed our very own Chinese Democracy.

There were some technical difficulties during the mixing stage (a.k.a. the phasing phase), a number of various things had to be sorted out, band members were having babies, etc. In other words: it took a while but it’s finished. Needless to say, we’re very proud to present you the final details of Offblast!.

Although we had a lot of positive reactions after posting the April Fools version of the artwork, we still decided to proceed with Jakob Skøtt’s beautiful piece. Wait until you see the fold out vinyl cover. Speaking of vinyl: due to a popular demand for wax discs, the production time for the LP will take a couple of months. But hey, it will be summer by then so we’ll take it easy.

The Machine – Offblast!
Elektrohasch Records
CD – June 1, 2015
LP – August XX, 2015

01 – Chrysalis (J.A.M.) [16:25]
02 – Dry End [03:05]
03 – Coda Sun [05:34]
04 – Gamma [06:48]
05 – Off Course [06:36]
06 – Come To Light [12:11]

Recorded and produced again by David, we’re super happy with the final result. It is by far our best sounding album to date. And we’re most certainly not done yet.

We’re also in the middle of editing a music video for the track Coda Sun, you can expect that one within a week or two.

Oh and remember the album title contest we once had? That was just for our own fun. We already had this title. HA! JJ Koczan sort of won the thing though… Thanks for Come To Light!

https://www.facebook.com/themachine.nl/
http://www.themachineweb.com/
elektrohasch.de

The Machine, Live at Keep it Low, Oct. 19, 2013

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Cigale, Cigale: The Time of Harvest Begun

Posted in Reviews on May 4th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

cigale cigale

It is a humble start in just about everything but its sound. Cigale‘s self-released, self-titled debut full-length is flush with gorgeous melodies, resonant soulfulness and an airy psychedelic sensibility that’s prone to taking off in one direction or another but never loses itself completely or drifts farther from the song than it wants to. The Dutch four-piece craft an engaging sweetness throughout, the intertwining vocals of guitarist/keyboardist Romy Endeman, bassist Roel Imfeld and guitarist Rutger Smeets working fluidly to provide not only variety, but moments of engrossing richness no less lush than the guitar or bass tones. One might recognize Smeets or drummer Hans Mulders from taken-too-soon next-gen fuzz hopefuls Sungrazer, and Smeets‘ guitar retains its Gary Arce-worthy sound, but Cigale is a much different band with a much different dynamic, and what they’re doing across the seven songs/37 minutes of their first album is immediately their own. You can draw a line from one otherworldly sensibility to another, but it’s an easier and more satisfying listen to take songs like “Grey Owl,” “Random Day” and “Eyes Wide Shut” as they are rather than trying to fit them somewhere they don’t want to be. Endeman‘s strength as a vocalist makes her a major presence throughout — the Celtic flair she brings to “Eyes Wide Shut” over Mulders‘ far-back percussion and the subtle but building wash of cymbals, toms and guitars stands that song out as a highlight — and if a challenge before Cigale was establishing a personality of their own apart from what those who heard Smeets and Mulders‘ might expect coming into a new band featuring the both of them, then it’s a challenge Cigale meet well across their self-titled’s flowing, hypnotic span.

They open quietly, with the fitting melodic hum that eases the listener into “Grey Owl,” warm bassline from Imfeld and what sounds like brushed if it’s not drumbeat from Mulders arriving as a precursor to the dreamy guitar tone and Endeman‘s vocals for the first verse. Her command is palpable immediately amid the echoing lines, but backed by Imfeld and Smeets, she is hardly carrying the song by herself. “Grey Owl” has an exploratory feel, lyrics repeating in the second half to lead the way into an open section of atmospheric guitar interplay and tom runs from Mulders, who flourishes in Cigale‘s quiet spaces as well as its louder moments, the track moving toward a still-understated apex that drops out to make way for one of the record’s defining hooks in “Steeplechase,” a somewhat moodier atmosphere emerging, but the tones remain bright as the vocals run through a processor at first then step out for a more forward, upbeat verse and chorus. Ultimately, the structures of the first two cuts are similar, but the impression they give is much different between vocal arrangements, general lushness and ambience, Cigale using their spaciousness and songwriting well to bring the listener into the album and not so much try to hold attention with cloying hooks as to slow everything down so that attention doesn’t wander in the first place. The subsequent “Feel the Heat” might be the strongest piece included — it’s also the longest at 5:54 — offering a particularly soulful progression with Smeets‘ guitar rumbling in a vast, open movement behind, the bass and drums tying the whole thing together so subtly that one almost forgets there is a build underway. Some improvised-sounding guitar weaving stretches out over an instrumental finish that’s less crescendo than thematic exploration, and a few seconds’ silence stands between “Feel the Heat” and “Random Day,” the centerpiece of Cigale and its quietest, most contemplative-feeling moment.

cigale

Percussion, which might be keyboard-programmed initially, is intermittent, guitars quietly noodling, bass minimal, cymbals washing every now and again, but Endeman‘s vocals croon over a quiet key line and that turns out to be more than enough to carry the soft flow of “Random Day,” which picks up in the guitar, adds some background singing, but never comes close to the rhythmic push even of “Feel the Heat,” which seems a world away about three minutes later. No matter how far out or spacious Cigale get, there seems to be one element responsible for providing the foundation — much to their debut’s benefit, that element changes — and on “Random Day,” it’s the keyboard built upon, but “Harvest Begun,” which follows, offers another shift. The shortest song on Cigale at 3:54 and arguably as close as the four-piece come to heavy psychedelia, it offers another album-defining hook and a satisfying lockstep of organ sounds and bass initially before opening its fluid motion and shifting into a wash, first of vocals, then lead guitar, coming to as much of a head as anything does across the record, but still ending quietly and giving way to the peaceful plucked notes, slide ambience, cymbal wash and percussion of “Eyes Wide Shut,” a linear build playing out in probably the most direct a-to-b included, the earlier structural similarity cast off in favor of a more stark turn, Endeman and the backing vocals topping the ending with suitable, tasteful energy, leaving closer “Pieces” to develop that momentum and finish out the album with all the rhythmic swing of “Harvest Begun,” but a more patient progression overall, unfolding through keys and guitar as the rhythm section sets the bed for the jam that winds “Pieces” to its last fadeout, the final statement of Cigale‘s Cigale finding a balance between catchy songcraft and (purposeful) instrumental meandering. The soothing atmosphere of that ending is as much easing out as “Grey Owl” was easing in, and it demonstrates the prowess either conscious or not of Cigale for creating an undercurrent of structure for their sonic expanse. As they continue to develop sound-wise, that’s likely to act as the keys, guitar, bass and drums do throughout the tracks of Cigale — as a foundation from which absorbing, varied and colorful explorations are launched. For now, it serves as one of 2015’s most promising debuts, and that seems like plenty to ask.

Cigale, “Feel the Heat”

Cigale on Thee Facebooks

Cigale on Bandcamp

Cigale on YouTube

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Roadburn 2015: Sets from Minsk, Lazer/Wulf, Coltsblood, Domo, Eagle Twin, Agusa, Mortals and Sun Worship Available to Stream

Posted in audiObelisk on April 30th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

coltsblood-4-Photo-by-JJ-Koczan

You know, I went back and looked. Last year, it wasn’t until May 21 that the first batch of audio streams from Roadburn 2014 surfaced. Here we are, it’s April 30. We’re not even a full month removed from Roadburn 2015, and already eight sets are out from the festival. Kudos to Marcel van de Vondervoort, who no doubt will spend the next few months going deeper into the heart of Roadburn — at least from a musical standpoint — than anyone else as he continues to mix the live recordings and make them ready for streaming. The expediency of the arrival of the first audio is just one more example of how special this fest is. Hell, reviews are still being posted.

I’ve been kind of jealous seeing those reviews, actually. Part of covering the fest in the way I do — writing the review of the show that same night and posting it before the next day starts — sort of robs me of being able to step back and really look at the bigger picture of Roadburn and particularly what it means to me and of being able to express that, whether for fatigue or just being so close to it at the time. It’s a tradeoff, and ultimately I think the point gets across anyway perhaps even with that process as a part of it. Maybe I just feel like it all needs to be said again afterwards.

Part of the Roadburn after-experience is listening to these streams and hearing what you missed. To that end, I’m very much looking forward to digging into Minsk, Eagle Twin and Sun Worship. Whatever you caught or didn’t, I hope you enjoy:

Agusa – Live at Roadburn 2015

Coltsblood – Live at Roadburn 2015

Domo – Live at Roadburn 2015

Eagle Twin – Live at Roadburn 2015

Lazer/Wulf – Live at Roadburn 2015

Minsk – Live at Roadburn 2015

Mortals – Live at Roadburn 2015

Sun Worship – Live at Roadburn 2015

Special thanks to Walter as always for letting me host the streams. To read all of this year’s Roadburn coverage, click here.

Roadburn’s website

Marcel Van De Vondervoort on Thee Facebooks

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