Review & Full Album Stream: Greenbeard, Lödarödböl

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on June 23rd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

greenbeard lodarodbol

[Click play above to stream Greenbeard’s Lödarödböl in its entirety. Album is out July 1 via Sailor Records.]

One might have to stare a couple extra seconds at the title Lödarödböl before putting the proper long ‘o’ sounds where they should be, but once that’s deciphered, a good portion of Greenbeard‘s intent is revealed. The Austin, Texas-based three-piece of guitarist/vocalist Chance Parker, bassist Dan Alvarez and drummer Buddy Hachar follow-up their 2015 debut, Stoned at the Throne (discussed here), with six tracks of correspondingly weedian craftsmanship that balances straightforward hooks with jammier impulses in clear but fluid divide. That is, in listening, one looks at a song like the eight-minute “Lanesplitter” and can probably guess that Greenbeard are about to stretch out a bit, but the trio do well to tie their pieces together, whether it’s that song leading out of aptly-named opener “Swing” or into the driving “Young Concussion.”

All told, Lödarödböl comprises six tracks pulled off over a pretense-free 35 vinyl-ready minutes, and there isn’t a weak one in the batch. With subtle shifts in tone brought to bear through a production/mix job by Matt Bayles (Isis, Mastodon, so many others) — who also adds synth to “Swing,” “Lanesplitter” and 10-minute closer “Wyrm” — a few guest vocal appearances and variety of structure, Greenbeard keep a consistent groove from song to song while playing a kind of back and forth between shorter and longer-winded stretches. Momentum is built and well maintained, and ultimately, Lödarödböl succeeds in casting an amiable interpretation of modern stoner heavy: informed but not solely indebted to the likes of Kyuss and Queens of the Stone Age, and jammed out in all the right places.

With their road bowl loaded, Greenbeard set themselves in immediate motion with the introductory riff of “Swing,” calling to mind a fuzzier take on earlier Red Fang in their chug and straightforward, uptempo push. Even the verse is catchy, and the chorus itself is the first of several deceptively ear-worming melodies that Lödarödböl offers, but it’s also telling and somewhat foreshadowing that “Swing” moves into its second half with the aforementioned keys from Bayles and a more laid back, languid, semi-psychedelic spaciousness added on top of that initial core chug. That tension is essential to what makes Lödarödböl function, and to have it play out directly prior to the fadeout of the album opener shows consciousness on the part of the band in terms of informing their audience of their intent throughout. Was that what they had in mind when they wrote the song? Probably not, but it’s a crucial function “Swing” plays anyway, and likewise the transition into the nodding “Lanesplitter” is smooth enough that there’s no jarring moment where one track ends and the next one starts.

greenbeard

Parker‘s vocals about a minute in remind of Chris Goss in Masters of Reality in how they top the bounce, but “Lanesplitter” is headed outward, and after a little more than three minutes, the track crashes out to a just-guitar progression as the founding element of the likely-plotted jam that will carry through the rest of its eight-minute runtime, some righteous half-time drumming from Hachar and Bayles‘ organ work setting up a guitar solo while Alvarez holds the proceedings together on bass so that as they move into the more-improv-sounding next stage of the jam and build toward the crashing apex, the sense of motion remains prevalent. That turns out to be pivotal as Greenbeard shift method again into the shorter and more structured “Young Concussion,” rounding out the album’s first half with a strong hook that speaks to the Songs for the Deaf influence, stops to make room for a bit of rock-gasm, and ably returns to its chorus to finish.

Lest they be accused of not being stoned enough, ParkerAlvarez and Hachar start side B with “Battleweed.” Like “Swing” at the outset, there’s a certain amount of blending impulses in the five-minute-plus second-half leadoff, but “Battleweed” functions doubly in reinforcing not only the two different sides of Lödarödböl, but how readily Greenbeard are able to unite them into a functioning singular presentation. There may be a certain tongue-in-cheek aspect to the lyrics, but with its turn into and subsequently out of midsection boogie and casual rhythm, it’s a highlight all the same, and it comes backed by the “Love has Passed by Me,” the penultimate cut and shortest at 3:33. A sans-frills swing-and-hook masher, it thick-shuffles through its verse en route to the maybe-Kyuss referential chorus (though that was “…Passed Me By,” not “…Passed by Me” as it is here) and holds its pace for the duration, playing effectively into the bass-thickened start of “Wyrm.”

The final portion of Lödarödböl earns its extended stretch-out with a patient opening and loosely hypnotic flow, a particularly impressive vocal from Parker when the vocals arrive and a break at the halfway mark into an abbreviated crescendo. This makes for an especially welcome ending, because rather than build and jam their way out, Greenbeard actually turn back to the chorus and the central progression of “Wyrm” and ride that to the album’s end, working in defiance of expectation and easing the listener back to reality with a return from Bayles on keys and a last churning hum. In some ways, Lödarödböl is a quintessential second full-length. It clearly has learned from its predecessor, and it demonstrates mindful growth on the part of Greenbeard without giving the sense that they’ve finished the process of becoming who they’ll be as a band. That’s a convenient narrative, but they play well to it, and their preaching should have no trouble finding welcome among the ears of the already converted or those looking to be.

Greenbeard on Thee Facebooks

Greenbeard on Bandcamp

Greenbeard on Instagram

Greenbeard website

Sailor Records on Bandcamp

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Sailor Records webstore

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Pyreship Premiere Video for “Die/Sect”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 21st, 2017 by JJ Koczan

pyreship

Houston four-piece Pyreship made their debut this Spring with The Liars Bend Low on Black Bow Records. It’s a release that brings together sludge tones and groove with post-metallic atmospheres, and as you can see in the video for “Die/Sect” from the album, the Texan outfit keep a mindful approach toward live presentation as well as crafting a moody impression. Starting off with a clip from Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me — or at least one from the show that says the name of the movie; I haven’t watched the new episodes yet, so no spoilers please, as much as anything might ever possibly be explained — and featuring imagery of strafing bombs and other apocalyptic this-and-that as well as footage of the band on stage.

Here’s a fun fact: First time I watched the “Die/Sect” video, I was sitting on the couch with my lovely and loving wife, The Patient Mrs., and I pointed to a guy in the front of the stage and I said, “Hey, there I am.” I told her it was a little while ago, when I was still bearded, and you know what? She believed it was me. It’s not me. I don’t know who it is, but I’ve never had the pleasure of seeing Pyreship live. They make a good case for doing so with this song and this video, but still. I haven’t gotten there. It was hilarious though, because, yeah. Dudes all look alike.

If you missed where it was mentioned above, The Liars Bend Low came out on Black Bow Records, which is the label helmed by Jon Davis, guitarist/vocalist of UK demolition experts Conan. Not a minor endorsement to have, and Pyreship recently shared the stage with Conan and Forming the Void as well as part of supporting the album, so all the more of a connection there. One can hear some influence in the roll of “Die/Sect,” which if you haven’t already skipped to it, follows immediately here.

I’ve also included the full stream of the record at the bottom of the post, because why the hell not.

Enjoy:

Pyreship, “Die/Sect” official video

Official music video for Die/Sect from Pyreship’s album “The Liars Bend Low”. Released 5/26/2017 on Black Bow Records.

You can find all the latest Pyreship news and links to our music and merch at https://pyreship.com/ check it out!

Pyreship is:
Sam -Guitar and screaming
Jason – Guitar and singing
George – Bass
Steve – Drums

Pyreship, The Liars Bend Low (2017)

Pyreship on Thee Facebooks

Pyreship on Twitter

Pyreship on Instagram

Pyreship website

Pyreship at Black Bow Records Bandcamp

Black Bow Records website

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Review & Track Premiere: Destroyer of Light, Chamber of Horrors

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on June 15th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

destroyer-of-light-chamber-of-horrors

[Click play above to stream ‘Lux Crusher’ by Destroyer of Light from Chamber of Horrors, out July 14 via Heavy Friends Records.]

The last couple years have apparently done much to hone the focus of Austin, Texas’ Destroyer of Light. Chamber of Horrors is the third full-length from the four-piece and their first standalone outing since 2014’s Bizarre Tales Vol. 2, which was followed by the 2015 Endsville split/collaboration LP (video premiere here) with Godhunter, and its seven tracks mark a significant turn of approach and mood. This could well be the result of heavy touring undertaken since Bizarre Tales Vol. 2 came out, but it feels like a conscious decision one way or the other, and as guitarist/vocalist Steve Colca, guitarist Keegan Kjeldsen, bassist Jeff Klein and drummer Penny Turner elicit their most directed and longest offering yet at 44 minutes, they also find themselves holed up in a doomed swamp befitting the Adam Burke cover art, otherworldly and ruinous as it is.

Patiently and with purpose, they roll out massive grooves like that of 10-minute closer “Buried Alive” or the preceding “Prisoner of Eternity,” on which Colca‘s vocal cadence and the march in general seems to be in direct conversation with Sweden’s Goatess more than the brash heavy rock Destroyer of Light offered on their previous outings. Flourish of organ in that track, guest vocals and samples on “The Virgin” and ambient pieces like the intro “Whispers into the Threshold” and the centerpiece/presumed side B opener “Twilight Procession” add depth and complexity to the morose vibe, and a mix by Matt Meli of Austin’s Orb Recording Studios sets up a suitable abyss into which the band can feel free to plummet. And plummet they do. Gloriously.

The first grim claw is raised not long after “Whispers into the Threshold” begins with a sample of a creaky, heavy-wood door opening into an echoing room and likewise echoing guitar (also actual whispers). It’s worth noting that at the end of “Buried Alive,” there’s a corresponding shutting of that door, and one assumes that’s the band putting their audience in the titular Chamber of Horrors. So be it. That bookend is one more example of the kind of cohesion and attention to detail Destroyer of Light bring to their third album, and the songwriting holds up to a similar standard, whether it’s the mournful wail of lead guitar and earlier shouts turning to moans in the second half of “Into the Smoke” that set the stage for more of what’s to come later or the more direct horror-worship of “The Virgin,” which with its guest vocals alongside Colca and even more dramatic take is something of an outlier in the tracklist, despite the engaging flow that’s already been crafted between the first two songs and which continues throughout. It’s almost as though, after years of being called a doom band, Destroyer of Light decided to turn around and become one.

destroyer of light

It suits them. The devil himself shows up on “The Virgin,” which almost feels like it was bound to happen somewhere along the line, and amid spacious lead guitar, the band unfurl an accordingly resonant melody and percussive thud to lead into the first creeper verse of an effective linear build. As with “Into the Smoke,” they’re telling a story. I don’t know if Chamber of Horrors would or should be considered a concept record, but it’s definitely thematic, and there’s a clear intent in the way it plays out piece by piece. A somewhat minimalist weaving of two guitar lines over a subtle dirge of drumming takes hold with “Twilight Procession,” and almost before the listener realizes what’s happened, Destroyer of Light have constructed a momentum that’s carried them through side A without misstep.

It’s one thing for a group to grow into a new sound. It’s another for them to arrive at it sounding already so well schooled in the tenets of the style and so readily knowledgeable about which rules they want to abide by and which they want to break. As they touch on post-Electric Wizard riffing to start “Lux Crusher” in a way that mirrors somewhat the progression at the outset of “Into the Smoke,” it again makes clear the level of nuance to which Destroyer of Light are playing, and though, as noted, “Lux Crusher” calls to mind the righteous swaying Vitusism of Goatess especially in Colca‘s vocal approach, the band bring this influence into their own sonic context, harsher shouts emerging as they roll toward the track’s chugging, feedback-laden conclusion and into its six-minute companion-piece “Prisoner of Eternity,” which begins with rim taps from Turner and clean-sounding guitar before its full rumble kicks in, signaling the end is near. Like “The Virgin,” “Prisoner of Eternity” centers more around its hook, but the addition of organ beneath and around its guitar solo adds an even more classic feel. That’s fair game for Destroyer of Light at this point, because with the 10-minute “Buried Alive,” which follows and rounds out, they engage an entirely different level of doomly traditionalism.

With perhaps the boldest take on clean vocals out front to start, “Buried Alive” reinterprets an ambience that brings to mind The Gates of Slumber, and though they’ll move into more extreme growls and a wash of noise before they’re done, the lumbering misery of their finale never gets lost in the slow-motion cacophonous melee that ensues. Once again, they cap with feedback before that door closes, and though it’s hard to know from the context of the audio whether we’re trapped in the Chamber of Horrors or we’ve managed to escape, one way or the other, the album makes a lasting and colorful impression such that, even if we’re out, we’re not unaffected by what’s been witnessed within. It’s not the most dramatic sonic turn that’s ever taken place — that is, Destroyer of Light had elements of doom even at their most psychedelic moments, and they have elements of psych here even at their most doomed — but Chamber of Horrors nonetheless represents a brazen reset on the band’s part and whether they continue to walk along this bleak path or head elsewhere aesthetically, what they’ve accomplished in pulling off the shift in these brave and willfully dismal tracks is not to be understated.

Destroyer of Light on Thee Facebooks

Destroyer of Light on Bandcamp

Heavy Friends Records on Thee Facebooks

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From Beyond Sign to Candlelight/Spinefarm; Debut Album Coming Soon

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 13th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Been a minute since last we heard from Austin four-piece From Beyond, and by that I mean three years since they release their split single with ASG (premiered here) as a free download via Scion A/V. Remember those? Alas, the Scion era may be over, but From Beyond have apparently been working toward a bright future all the while, as the news arrives they’ve inked a deal to put out what will be their debut long-player this Fall via the combined efforts of Candlelight Records and Spinefarm Records. Not too shabby.

As it has been so long, I’m going to make the narrow-minded assumption the record — whatever it winds up being called — is already in the can and that it was duly shopped before being picked up, in part causing a delay. I don’t know any of that, of course, but it’s a narrative that fits. Could just be From Beyond took their time writing, or it’s still in progress. I know nothing about nothing.

Either way, it’s great news for the band, whose grim, suitably candlelit visages you can peep below, courtesy of the PR wire:

from beyond

Austin’s From Beyond have signed to Candlelight/Spinefarm.

With several EPs, including a split with ASG in their repertoire, the band is ready to take things to the next level by linking up with the label and releasing their debut album this fall.

With a tour history that includes gigs with The Sword, Purson, Truckfighters, and Saint Vitus, From Beyond make new fans and believers the minute they step on any stage.

Blending thundering amplifier stacks and massive drums with synthesizers and effects, the band create something hauntingly familiar in unexplored sonic territory.

Everything you love about horror and all things strange, dark, and heavy find their way into their music in a something-for-everyone approach that leaves no stone unturned — no matter how heavy.

From Beyond is:
Rob McCarthy – Guitar, Vocals, Synthesizers
Dave Grooman – Guitars
Anthony Vallejo – Drums
Brooks Willhoite- Bass

https://www.facebook.com/FromBeyondBand/
https://musicfrombeyond.bandcamp.com/
http://bandfrombeyond.com/
http://www.spinefarmrecords.com/usa/
https://www.facebook.com/spinefarm
https://twitter.com/Spinefarm

From Beyond, “The Fall to Earth”

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Friday Full-Length: Solitude Aeturnus, Beyond the Crimson Horizon

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 9th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Solitude Aeturnus, Beyond the Crimson Horizon (1992)

It’s like staring into the very gates of doom itself. Solitude Aeturnus weren’t the first American doom band, but they were definitely among the earlier pioneers Stateside playing doom metal, and when it came to the second part of that equation, they offered it in abundance. With heavy influences from Candlemass, Trouble and of course Black Sabbath, the Arlington, Texas, five-piece got their start with a well-received demo in 1989 before signing to what was then Roadracer Records — soon to be Roadrunner Records — for the subsequent 1991 full-length, Into the Depths of Sorrow. From where I sit, that record is also a classic, but the 1992 follow-up, Beyond the Crimson Horizon, is widely hailed as both their pinnacle work and as a standard-bearer in US doom. Aside from the massive influence it would have on the development of metal, doom and heavy rock in Texas’ own fertile underground, it’s a record that helped clearly demonstrate that American outfits could capture the same kind of majesty their European counterparts had been bringing to the style for years in the wake of CandlemassMessiah Marcolin era, which by then had hit its peak several years before. I’ll gladly argue that not only did Beneath the Crimson Horizon prove this thesis, but it showed a path by which that influence could lead to individualized growth and progression, that doom — that slowest and most morose of metals — need not stagnate or lack energy to be effective in its atmosphere.

Not only that, but Beyond the Crimson Horizon gave outlet to influences from the NWOBHM in cuts like opener “Seeds of the Desolate” and immediately met them head on with grittier chugging in “Black Castle,” setting up a dynamic that would continue to play out across its span. It wasn’t any more afraid to thrash out in the second half of “The Hourglass” than it was to directly confront the march of Candlemass‘ “Mirror Mirror” in the preceding “It Came upon One Night,” a seven-minute highlight of the record distinguished by its epic flourish of gong and spoken vocals from otherwise soar-prone frontman Robert Lowe, who would remain a defining presence in Solitude Aeturnus for their duration along with guitarist John Perez. Both shine in these tracks, it should go without saying, but the drumming of John Covington, the guitar of Edgar Rivera and Lyle Steadham‘s bass aren’t to be discounted either, as much as the latter might be mixed down as was the wont of the era. For what was still just their second album since forming in 1987, Solitude Aeturnus presented themselves as a complete, cohesive unit with the poise and confidence to execute their material in the face of otherwise-leaning trends both in and out of the underground and metal as a whole. To listen to a song like the Trouble-style “The Final Sin” or the penultimate chugger “Plague of Procreation,” one can hear the band’s reach expanding even as the tracklist makes its way from front to back, but at no point do Solitude Aeturnus relinquish their hold on a melodic sensibility or crushing atmosphere, the latter shown by the Metallica-esque stomp in the midsection of “Plague of Perception.” They would save the slowest and most grueling nod for last in the closing semi-title-track “Beyond…” and add suitable funeral bells over a long fade that dirge-plodded the record to its finish.

Dramatic? Oh yeah. Of its era? Most definitely — but also a blueprint from which future US doom metal would be and still is derived, either directly or indirectly. With Perez and Lowe as its founding anchors, Solitude Aeturnus would go on to issue Through the Darkest Hour in 1994 before embracing more of a groove metal feel on 1996’s Downfall and 1998’s Adagio, and a 2000 EP titled Justice for All would be their final release until 2006 brought a return both of the band generally and of their classically doomed form on the righteous Alone, which was offered through Massacre Records and topped an hour of prime darkened reveries that showed Solitude Aeturnus‘ core approach was not just still relevant, but vital in Texas metal and the wider sphere of what doom had become and was about to become in the social media age. Alone was followed by a 2009 live record titled Hour of Despair and the 2011 In Times of Solitude compilation, and Poland’s Metal Mind Productions had done a series of maybe-licensed reissues of Solitude Aeturnus‘ material, including Beyond the Crimson Horizon, in 2006, but as essential as Alone found Solitude Aeturnus to be, it hasn’t received a proper follow-up in the 11 years since. Perez works as a tour manager — he’s been out with Saint Vitus and Venom Inc. and recently accompanied Candlemass on the road — and Lowe did a stint in Candlemass from 2006 through 2012 after their fallout with Messiah Marcolin, but Solitude Aeturnus has languished, their final album (to-date) a testament to what Perez and Lowe could still accomplish if they decided to move forward with a new batch of material. One continues to hope that at some point they do.

Doom on and enjoy Beyond the Crimson Horizon. Thanks for reading, as always.

This was a four-day week for me and it was still too long by at least a day. Possibly two days. My work situation has devolved to the point where in about an hour when I go to the office I’ll be bringing my cheapie tablet with me in order to spend the bulk of the day playing and maybe even finishing Final Fantasy V. I took Monday off for a doctor’s appointment and since Tuesday have basically spent the days reading downloaded Shatnerverse ebooks and listening to baseball games (Tigers vs. Angels yesterday was a good time unless you’re a Tigers fan). Sounds like paradise except for existing in a cubicle. They’re still paying me until next Friday though, so I’ll be there.

Whatever. It’s almost over.

Then it’s back to being broke. How’re we gonna pay the mortgage? How’re we gonna pay the oil? How’re we gonna feed this baby? And so on. All completely valid questions, by the way, and the only reason I didn’t include the tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of student loan debt The Patient Mrs. and I share between us is because it makes me too sad and/or panicky to think about it. So yeah. Back to that.

But at least I won’t be going to an office anymore. Losing two hours every day to a commute. Missing out on life in the meantime. More time to write. More time with the Little Dog Dio. Time with The Pecan when he arrives in October. All of that is good. Will be good.

Five workdays left.

Plenty of Obelisk stuff to keep me busy in the meantime. Here’s what’s in the notes for next week, subject to change of course:

Mon.: Top 20 of 2017 So Far; BardSpec video.
Tue.: Radio Adds; The Necromancers video premiere.
Wed.: Lee Van Cleef Six Dumb Questions; Witch Charmer video.
Thu.: Destroyer of Light track premiere; Wren video.
Fri.: Abrams Six Dumb Questions; hopefully some other audio premiere or review.

That’s about where we’re at. Put my head down, keep writing. Everything else is distraction.

I hope you have a great and safe weekend, whatever you might be up to. I’ll be in Connecticut tonight and tomorrow and then back to Massachusetts on Sunday. I have some travel coming up in the next few weeks — Maryland for a wedding next weekend, then down to North Carolina, then back up to New Jersey before finally heading back home; family stuff all — so it will be a bit of an adventure coming up, but I’m looking forward to getting through next week and getting to it. I’m sure we’ll have some fun in the meantime.

Thanks again for reading, and please check out the forum and radio stream.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

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Elliott’s Keep Announce New Album Lacrimae Mundi

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 31st, 2017 by JJ Koczan

It’s been a good long while since the last time we heard from Dallas, Texas, trio Elliott’s Keep. Their third record, Nascentes Morimur (review here), arrived in 2013, and, well that was four years ago, so yeah. It was the doom metallers’ harshest offering to-date at the time, and one wonders what the intervening years will have done to their sound. It’s a relevant question, of course, because they’re recording a fourth long-player as we speak.

Okay, maybe not this second, but it’s in progress. Once again working with producer J.T. Longoria (Mercyful Fate, Absu, King Diamond, Solitude Aeturnus), once again keeping on theme in the medieval imagery of their cover art and once again holding true to their penchant for Latin album titles — Lacrimae Mundi translates, as noted below, to “tears of the world” — Elliott’s Keep seem to be signaling a sticking to form rather than any radical changes, but each of their outings has been a creative step from its predecessor and I’d expect no less this time around as well, whatever other elements may persist. The band, as you’ll recall, were formed in homage to mutual friend Glenn Riley Elliott, whose passing continues to inform their thematic and overall style.

Not sure on the exact timing of the release, but the band sent over the following so we can all be in the loop on the art and tracks. Here goes:

elliotts-keep-lacrimae-mundi

Elliott’s Keep – Lacrimae Mundi

Just a quick Elliott’s Keep update.

We have been recording the new album over the past few weeks and the guitar, drums and bass tracking is now complete. We will go back to Nomad Studios in a few weeks for Ken to do his vocal tracking.

The new album is titled Lacrimae Mundi (Latin for Tears of the World). We are again working with JT Longoria.

The track listing is as follows:
Carpe Noctem
Tempest
The Doom of Men
Banished to Shadow
Ninestane Rig
Moments of Respite
Reflection
Remembrance

Elliott’s Keep is:
Joel Bates – Drums
Kenneth Greene – Vocals and Bass Guitar
Jonathan Bates – Guitar

https://www.facebook.com/Elliotts-Keep-126537660738233/
https://elliottskeep.bandcamp.com/

Elliott’s Keep, Nascentes Morimur (2014)

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Mothership European & UK Tour Starts June 17

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 24th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

mothership (Photo Jason Goodrich)

Next month, Texas heavy rock exports Mothership will head back to Europe and the UK for a tour to support their 2017 third album, High Strangeness (review here). Launching with a revisit to Germany’s Freak Valley Festival, from which they previously released a live album, the power trio will make their way in the company of desert legends Yawning Man to the UK for a stretch alongside Ripple Music compatriots Poseidon, after which they’ll meet up with Karma to Burn and Egypt and work their way toward the finish of the run July 14 at Stoned from the Underground, also in Germany. Almost a full month on the road, shows all around Europe, and it comes full circle at German fests. Awesome.

Word came through the PR wire about the UK shows, and I’ve added the complete European run info here — because one likes to be thorough about these things. Check it out:

mothership euro tour square

MOTHERSHIP Set to Storm the U.K. for the HIGH STRANGENESS’ UK Album Tour 2017

Mothership took the world by storm with their latest album, “High Strangeness”, their 4th release for California Heavy Rock leader, Ripple Music. After months of non-stop touring in America, now the Texan hard rockers take their high energy, guitar-mad show to Europe. Be sure not to miss ‘HIGH STRANGENESS’ UK Album Tour 2017. Tickets on sale now!

Joining them on the U.K. highways are Ripple Labelmates, post-metal doomsters, Poseidon, who’ll be touring their Ripple Music debut, “Prologue”

17 June – Siegen, DE – Freak Valley Festival (SOLD OUT)
18 June – Berlin, DE – Badehaus*
19 June – Hamburg, DE – Hafenklang*
21 June – Landgraaf, NL – Oefenbunker
22 June – Utrecht, NL – dB’s
23 June – Bourlon, FR – Rock In Bourlon
24 June – Brussels, BE – Magasin 4
25 June – Milton Keynes, UK – Craufurd Arms+
26 June – Coventry, UK – The Phoenix+
27 June – Manchester, UK – Factory+
28 June – Edinburgh, UK – Bannermans+
29 June – Cardiff, UK – Fuel+
30 June – Bournemouth, UK – The Anvil+
01 July – London, UK- The Black Heart+
03 July – Paris, FR – Le Glazart**
04 July – Nantes, FR – Le Scene Michelet**
06 July – Barcelona, ES – Rocksound
07 July – Turin, IT – Blah Blah
08 July – Povegliano Veronese, IT – Art Pollution Festival
09 July – Parma, IT – App Colombofili
10 July – Treviso, IT – Benecio Live Gigs***
11 July – Vienna, AUT- Arena
12 July – Nuremberg, DE – MUZclub
13 July – Munich, DE – Feierwerk
14 July – Erfurt, DE – Stoned From The Underground Festival
* W/ Yawning Man
+ W/ Poseidon
**W/ Karma To Burn & Egypt
***W/ Karma To Burn

Mothership is:
Kelley Juett – Guitars/Vox
Kyle Juett – Bass/Vox
Judge Smith – Drums

mothershipusa.bandcamp.com
mothershiphaslanded.com
facebook.com/mothershipusa
twitter.com/mothershipusa
ripple-music.com
ripplemusic.bandcamp.com
https://www.facebook.com/HEAVYPSYCHSOUNDS/
www.heavypsychsounds.com

Mothership, High Strangeness (2017)

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Mr. Plow Announce Return and Plans for New Album Maintain Radio Silence

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 17th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Welcome back, Mr. Plow.

I always liked the Houston-based post-Fu Manchu heavy rockers, from whose lineup the likes of Sanctus Bellum and Blues Funeral at least in part sprang. Aside from the quality of their songwriting across their three records, 2000’s Head On, 2003’s Cock Fights and Pony Racin’ and 2006’s Kurt Vonnegut-themed Asteroid 25399, the charm of their references to Carlo Rossi, The Big Lebowski, and of course The Simpsons — among many others — went a long way in presenting a down-to-earth attitude that made it that much easier to relate to where they were coming from. Just a group of dudes having a good time playing cool tunes. Zero pretense.

Last time I wrote about them in more than an off-hand referential way was in 2009, so yeah, it’s been a minute, but Mr. Plow have announced they’re back and will hit the studio this September to record a new album, to be titled Maintain Radio Silence. Seems to me more likely it’ll be out in 2018 than 2017, but it’s one to watch for nonetheless, as these guys were always underrated as songwriters and after more than a decade, I’m intrigued to hear the glut of material they’ve apparently come up with and how it’s evolved from where they ended their initial run, which was some of their best work.

They posted the following on their website:

mr plow

Mr. Plow – Breaking Our Silence

Well, folks, it’s been a long time since we’ve recorded. Our last album, Asteroid 25399, was released in 2006. We then went into a long hiatus while I (Greg) moved to Florida for three years. But the time has come. We’ve now written 14(!) new tunes, and have been regularly playing more than half of them live. We’ve got studio time on the calendar for the last two weeks in September at Lucky Run studios in Houston, where our bandmate, Cory Cousins, recorded with his other band, Blues Funeral.

The title of the new album will be Maintain Radio Silence. It will be the first album with Cory on drums. Cory’s energy and musical inventiveness have given us renewed life and drive to rock. The new songs are clearly Plow songs but are also a clear evolution in our sound: shorter, punchier, and maybe heavier than anything we’ve done before. We’ve all been recording demos of ideas and sharing them back and forth, building the songs up before we even get together to work on them as a unit. And the ideas just keep coming. We’re talking about releasing this on vinyl as a double album. We’re also in the process of getting our first three albums on iTunes and Spotify and other streaming services.

I’ve never been more excited about the music we’re creating. Hope to see you at a show soon. The pic [above] is from our recent gig at Rudz with Ape Machine, Pyreship, and The Dirty Seeds.

Mr. Plow is:
Greg Green – Bass
Jeremy Stone – Guitar and Vocals
Cory Cousins – Drums
Justin Waggoner – Guitar and Vocals

http://mrplow.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Mr.PlowRock/

Mr. Plow, “Mexican Smoke” Live in 2011

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