Bellringer Post New Video for “Von Fledermaus”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 21st, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

bellringer

One could probably sit around all day and wait for Bellringer‘s new video for “Von Fledermaus” to start making sense. One could probably ask it nicely. The result would be the same: A presumably mid-coitus stare from a lady bouncing up and down — I wouldn’t quite call it NSFW, but if you’re in an office they might find you out for the weirdo you really are if you’ve got it playing — spliced in with old racing footage and some blasting lights, destruction, etc. The problem isn’t that the video doesn’t make any sense. The problem is that you want it to.

Austin three-piece (maybe four-piece? I saw something about a second bassist) Bellringer released a self-titled four-song EP (review here) earlier this year. Where is it now? Gone. “Von Fledermaus,” with its lurching riff and the subdued vocal from Mark Deutrom (formerly of the Melvins and Clown Alley) — who’s almost Mario Lalli-esque in finding the calm spot in the song’s storm — was on that EP, and whether or not that was removed because someone’s doing a physical pressing or what, I don’t know, but again, I think the problem here is really that not knowing is the whole idea. Wait and find out. It’s what the world does.

Like that offering as a whole, “Von Fledermaus” boasts a sense of balance between its chugging riff and stranger impulses. Seems fair to say the collage-style video by Jennifer Deutrom hones in on the latter, and rightfully so.

If you’re sensitive to bright flashing lights or anything like that, you might want to watch out for some of the middle and second half stuff here, as it gets pretty active. Otherwise, enjoy:

Bellringer, “Von Fledermaus” official video

Earth and Space Chick rocks the Universe, dirt track racing, cowboy ambush and general sensory overload in Bellringer’s first video.
Purchase tequila and project this onto your favorite wall !

“Ham spanky in the back of the train”

Directed and Edited By Jennifer Deutrom
using public domain imagery, and also
“”Weg Zum Nachbarn” by Lutz Mommartz.

Mark Deutrom : Guitar, Vocal
Corey Cottrell : Bass
Craig Nichols : Drums

Produced and Mixed by Mark Deutrom
Recorded By Chico Jones at Ohm Recording Facility

Bellringer’s website

Bellringer on Bandcamp

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Friday Full-Length: The 13th Floor Elevators, The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 14th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

The 13th Floor Elevators, The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators (1966)

I had a whole post written out talking about The 13th Floor Elevators‘ landmark 1966 debut, The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators, and its cross-generational impact on psychedelic rock, counterculture and so on. Wasn’t the best thing I ever wrote, but I was reasonably pleased with it, and it got the point across that it was an album that had considerable influence that continues to be felt today and that the work of vocalist/guitarist Roky Erickson, guitarist Stacy Sutherland, bassist Ronnie Leatherman (Benny Thurman also plays on the record), drummer John Ike Walton and jug-blower Tommy Hall is worth considering as a watershed moment in underground rock, along with being widely regarded as a nexus point for American psychedelia and garage. I had that all ready to go. Then underneath that, I was bitching about other stuff and the whole thing got deleted. No going back to a past draft or anything, apparently, as WordPress moves forward with its continuous improvement program to fix what wasn’t broken the first time around, so it’s gone. Poof. Bye.

Should I have saved the draft earlier? I should’ve done a lot of things.

Not a bummer to put on the album again and re-revisit “You’re Gonna Miss Me” — I’m missing that text right about now — and the bizarre strains of “Monkey Island,” but I’d call it on the whole a pretty fair summary of how the week has gone. I’d be more upset, but not only am I too tired to approximate the sentences I had before and try and make the most of it, but I’m too tired to even be actively bummed out. Shit happens. It is what it is. And whether or not I wax poetic about its legacy, The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators remains a great fucking album. The first of their three, and it’s more or less a blessing from the gods of acid. You can get that from listening whether or not I say so. No one reads this shit anyway.

Not even sure why I’m gonna put in a divider, since it’s not like I’m going from talking about the record to talking about something else, but whatever. One falls into these habits. Hope you enjoy the album.

Quiet week. Unless you count that north-of-13 hours I spent sitting in traffic getting to and from work over the last five days. That was loud, at least in terms of the pounding in my head.

Gonna go see Godhunter and Destroyer of Light in Salem. Show is at a sushi bar. A sushi bar. Because even in Salem — a town quite literally most known for burning witches alive — no one has seen fit to open a metal venue. Massachusetts! Northeastern America’s capitol for living wrong. Anyone wanna not recycle and talk about Tom fucking Brady some more?

On NPR?

Jesus.

Whatever. Look for a review of that show Monday, and maybe one on Tuesday if I can get my ass out tomorrow night to see The Atomic Bitchwax vs. waiting to catch them next month in Providence. Not a huge fan of The Middle East, where they play tomorrow — what’s the matter, don’t like dark red lighting and nowhere to park? — but they’re the Bitchwax, so it’s at least a consideration. We’re actually staying in Mass. this weekend instead going to Connecticut, though to be honest I might strongly advocate to The Patient Mrs. tossing that plan out the window tomorrow morning and heading to the coast as quickly as possible. We’ll see. Vacuuming or the beach? Hmm…

But I figure fuck-everything mode is perfect for Godhunter, and I’ve yet to experience the affliction that sushi didn’t help, so it should be a decent night either way. And I just confirmed a Weedeater giveaway for next week, so right on for that as well. I’ll have a stream of the Shiggajon record too, and that’s pretty sweet.

See? It’s not all bad.

But losing drafts is. Save your work, kids.

Great and safe. Forum and radio.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

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Venomous Maximus, Firewalker: Fearful Symmetry

Posted in Reviews on August 13th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

venomous maximus firewalker

Natives of Houston, Texas’ well-populated heavy underground, the dual-guitar four-piece Venomous Maximus distinguished themselves early into their run with their first two EPs, 2010’s Give up the Witch and 2011’s The Mission (review here). Their subsequent debut full-length, 2012’s Beg upon the Light (review here), built upon the momentum they’d gleaned through touring and the response to their shorter offerings, earning a release through Napalm Records — their riotous live show made them an easy sell — and it seemed at the time like the band would issue their next album through that label as well. A quick follow-up was expected after the roll they got on between their EPs and debut LP, but it’s three years later that Firewalker, their sophomore outing, arrives, and it does so through Shadow Kingdom Records.

There has to be some question as to whether that three-year span cost Venomous Maximus in terms of the momentum they had coming out of Beg upon the Light, though they’d hardly been inactive in that time between touring, releasing videos, writing and so on, but to listen to the 10 tracks/46 minutes of Firewalker itself makes it clear the band — guitarist/vocalist Gregg Higgins, guitarist Christian Larson, bassist Trevi Biles and drummer Bongo Brungardt — haven’t missed a step in terms of their approach. Songs like “Dark Waves,” “Angel Heart” and “Fire in the Night” maintain the blend of classic metal precision and darker heavy rock atmospherics, bordering on doom but never quite crossing over, that the first album proffered, and build upon those achievements while further establishing Venomous Maximus‘ sound as distinct from the various influences of which it is constructed.

One could rattle off a list of those influences and come up with names as aesthetically widespread as Celtic FrostMötley Crüe, Uncle Acid and Samhain, but no single outfit or even a grouping of them really comes close to giving Venomous Maximus their due when it comes to the individualized stock they’ve boiled down from those component elements, taking a horror-minded vibe from here and a theatrical sense of drama from there and turning it into the post-“Intro” chug of “White Rose,” which gets the darkened bikerisms of Firewalker moving at a decent clip, setting the tone for what follows in natural sound and a persistent quality of songwriting that will be familiar to anyone who encountered Beg upon the Light.

venomous maximus

They are identifiable, and more so than one might expect for an outfit even on their second record, with Higgins‘ vocals shifting from the proclamations of “White Rose” and “Through the Black” to grittier, more punkish fare by the time the memorable “October 14th” rolls around to follow “Dark Waves” at the end of what’s clearly intended to be side A, Venomous Maximus making no secret of the album’s structure by means of dual intros — “Intro” for the first half, “Firewalker Theme” for the second — and a forward progression that pushes each half of the outing toward its most resonant hook at the end, whether that’s “October 14th” or the finale of the album as a whole, “Take on the Grave.” That’s of course not to take anything away from the surrounding cuts, as the entirety of Firewalker belts out quality craftsmanship that feeds into a full-length flow across its two sides, just to say that Venomous Maximus have a clarity underlying the curling smoke of their malevolence and that all the thrust the album brings to bear leads it to a worthy destination.

Also not to be understated is the band’s attention to detail. Whether showing itself through the tape hiss that seems to pervade the record as a whole to more specific factors like the layered-in acoustics for the second half of “Fire in the Night,” the mad scientist yowl that marks the launch point for “My Machine,”  strange, almost taunting vocals on “Take on the Grave” or the fuzzer tone of “Dark Waves” that sits as well with that song’s ’70s swing as the layered shouts of “Angel Heart”‘s midsection do with its “Looks that Kill”-style riffing. Across the board, Venomous Maximus deliver a cohesiveness of concept and performance that seems in its complexity to justify the three years it took for Firewalker to surface, at the same time completely avoiding any kind of self-congratulatory indulgence and keeping their focus where it belongs: on kicking ass.

As “Take on the Grave” winds itself down and loses the drums, bass and vocals to the ether, the guitar remains to set a final moment of ambience in motion, giving Firewalker an appropriately cinematic conclusion. At the same time, though, I wouldn’t be surprised if — whenever it might surface — Venomous Maximus‘ next record didn’t start off with a similar progression to pick up right where they left off. That’s calling a shot in the dark, maybe, but something about that last minute or so feels just as much like a beginning as an ending, and time will of course tell if it winds up being precisely that. Either way, Venomous Maximus‘ second album should more than thrill anyone who got on board with the first, and it’s bound to turn plenty of new heads in their direction as well, as it grabs and holds attention with likewise ease and poise. They’d probably object to the album being called classy, but it is anyway.

Venomous Maximus, Firewalker (2015)

Venomous Maximus on Thee Facebooks

Venomous Maximus on Twitter

Venomous Maximus on Bandcamp

Shadow Kingdom Records

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Sweat Lodge Premiere “Heavy Head” from Talismana

Posted in audiObelisk on July 29th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

sweat lodge

Austin four-, maybe five-piece Sweat Lodge will release their debut album, Talismana, via Ripple Music on Aug. 7. A vinyl-ready nine-track/35-minute offering, its unpretentious oldschool-is-the-new-newschool rollout owes some of its modus to West Coast boogie, but true to their Texan roots, the sound across songs like opening hook-megaphone “Tramplifier,” “Bed of Ashes” and “Phoenix Ascent” is somewhat earthier, touching on classic heavy rock and psychedelic influences but refusing to play entirely to one or the other. There are times when the lineup — vocalist Cody Lee Johnston, guitarists Javier Gardea and Dustin Anderson, bassist Austin Shockley and drummer Caleb Dawson — call to mind what might’ve happened had Freedom Hawk and Graveyard ever decided to collaborate, most especially on cuts like “Slow Burn” and “Black Horizon,” but though their ultimate path is straight ahead, the well-vested Sweat Lodge work enough swing and swagger into their approach across the board that the only real choice is to get down and go along for the ride.

They make it a worthy endeavor across the board, and while perhaps in part because of the title one might wait for Sweat Lodge to veer into some vague cultish theatrics, Talismana keeps its all-seeing eye on the prize of ’70s-ish biker motor-riffing and rhythmic sweat lodge talismanasway, the title-track maybe touching lyrically on some of that finding itself fluidly enacting tempo shifts via either-call-it-stoner-or-don’t riffs and swirling leads and echoes. Like a lot of the record, it is not as simple as it first appears — a dreamout taking hold and liquefying the proceedings only to resolidify prior to the finish — but Sweat Lodge make short work of finding a cohesive vibe through such turns, nodding at Deep Purple with “Black Horizon” before the especially ’70s “Boogie Bride” takes hold as the longest cut on Talismana at a manageable 5:51, a summertime fuzz holding firm for the course even as the verses seem to be impatient in their move toward the inevitable leads, the two sides coming together ultimately as Johnston‘s vocals top the semi-psych apex and then let the rocker blues carry out to the whistling start of the penultimate “Heavy Head,” a somewhat more laid back mood but an irresistible roll all the same and one of the record’s catchiest moments.

This careening, deceptively efficient, swinging but not reckless and aesthetically coherent course ends out with “Banshee Call,” somewhat more atmospheric at its start and maybe a bit moodier but still nowhere near overblown. If anything, it underlines the control that Sweat Lodge exercise over the span of Talismana as a whole, which — especially considering it’s the band’s first full-length — is doubly impressive given how poised they manage to remain while letting loose.

I’m thrilled today to host a track premiere for “Heavy Head,” which you’ll find on the player below, followed by some more info off the PR wire.

Please enjoy:

The Austin, TX outfit have made good on their promise with a record that delivers more than you could possibly ever ask from it. Pillaging and plundering some of the most explosive eras of hard rock, heavy psychedelia and proto-metal with a conviction and execution rarely found this side of the millennium, in short, Sweat Lodge’s potential is one that knows no bounds.

Seizing on the southern grooves of Fu Manchu, Saint Vitus and the blues-driven majesty of 70s legends Mountain and fellow Texans ZZ Top, across Talismana – riff after punishing riff, howl after soulful howl – the vintage sound of rock ‘n’ roll reigns supreme, sparked through an engine of uncompromising youth. As anyone who witnessed the band’s debut TV appearance on Last Call With Carson Daly in March will testify, charismatic front man and vocalist Cody Lee Johnston’s ability to bring it on home is hypnotic. Backed by the gnarled bass fuzz of Austin Shockley, the Bonham-esque drum play of Caleb Dawson and guitar interplay of Javier Gardea and Dustin Anderson, the band will be unstoppable in 2015 and Talismana an essential record for fans of the genre.

Talismana by Sweat Lodge will be released on 7th August on Ripple Music.

Sweat Lodge on Thee Facebooks

Sweat Lodge on Bandcamp

Sweat Lodge webstore

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music

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Friday Full-Length: Bloodrock, Bloodrock

Posted in Bootleg Theater on July 10th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

Bloodrock, Bloodrock (1970)

The crucial relationship involved in Bloodrock‘s self-titled 1970 debut is that between the band and Terry Knight, who at the same time he helmed these tracks was the producer and manager for Grand Funk Railroad. That band’s self-titled had been issued in Jan. 1970 and wound up going Gold, and so when Knight approached Capitol Records with Bloodrock‘s Bloodrock, which came out that March, he had some clout behind him. The Fort Worth five-piece would make more of a splash with their second outing, later 1970’s Bloodrock 2 — which Knight also produced — but by then the first of a slew of lineup changes for the band had taken place, putting Rick Cobb on drums so Jim Rutledge could concentrate on lead vocals, and while that was a plenty worthy endeavor for Rutledge, I’ve always dug the vibe of the first album, the way “Fatback” rocks and swings around its backward guitar and early Rainbow-style vocals, the keyboard work throughout from Steve Hill, Eddie Grundy‘s bass and Lee Pickens‘ and Nick Taylor‘s bluesy riffing on “Wicked Truth” and the strange, key-driven turn that song takes, the multiple singers on “Double Cross” and how deep side B seems to roll with “Fantastic Piece of Architecture” and “Melvin Laid an Egg” at the end.

I think if you look at it and even go beyond the bands who are directly trying to mimic a ’70s sound in terms of their production or presentation, there are a lot of parallels between the boom of the early ’70s and now. Heavy rock and roll is certainly a less commercially viable property than it was at that point, but it seems like as rock was turning away from the psychdelia of the mid and late ’60s and toward something rawer in sound — what would gradually become metal, heavy rock and punk — there was a seemingly endless string of acts adopting the mode of expression, and substitute words like “private press” for “limited edition” and the situation isn’t really much different today. You could listen to brand new records every day for a year and still not hear everything that’s come out. It’ll thin out over time, but I think if the continued proliferation of ’70s rock shows anything, it’s that stuff like Bloodrock‘s Bloodrock never really goes away. Shit, look at Texas today. The state is huge and I still don’t think you can go five feet and not walk into a heavy band of one stripe or another. I like the thought of, 40 years from now, someone finding that stuff and being able to explore a world they didn’t really know about, or if they did, had only touched the surface. An awful lot of stuff has been dug up over the last decade or so, including Bloodrock, which was put out last year on vinyl by Kotay, but however much seems to come out, there always seems to be more underneath.

Not a hardship at all, especially when stuff like this record winds up experienced by and influencing another generation of heavy rock and rollers, even if it’s just influencing them to hunt down an original copy. A call to action. Ha. I hope you enjoy.

I’m traveling next week, going out to San Francisco for a conference for work. I know I’ll be able to do some record shopping while I’m out there — Amoeba Music and Aquarius Records, I’m comin’ for you — but not sure how much else. In any case, I’ll be in town from Monday night to Thursday night. If you’re around, hit me up and we’ll figure something out. I’d be happy to talk rock and roll over some iced tea or a nice caesar salad, all responsible-like.

I absolutely mean that, by the way.

A lovely bit of genius on my part: Traveling next week, I’ve lined up a premiere for every day Monday through Friday. Look out for new audio from Agusa, Yellowtooth, Wildlights and Pastor and a new video from Atavismo, because god damn it, if I sleep, I lose.

Don’t think I’ve mentioned it yet, but I also joined Instagram last week and have been posting stuff there, if you’re into that kind of thing: https://instagram.com/hptaskmaster/

Still kind of figuring that one out.

Work is going well, if you’re wondering. It’s been an adventure to say the least, but I feel like I’m at the point where I’m starting to get settled in and but for the hour-plus it takes me to get to or from the office, I have no real complaints. The people here are nice and seem willing to kind of let me do my thing so long as the work is done, which as far as I’m concerned is the best-case scenario. I’m pretty lucky, all in all. Just got business cards today. They have my name as “J. J.,” but other than that, are fine. Somehow Massachusetts doesn’t really know what to make out of “JJ Koczan.” I should’ve told them to put H.P. Taskmaster on there. Ha.

Have a great and safe weekend. I’m heading down to Connecticut for the next couple of days, which is always a good time, and may or may not put together a new podcast while I’m down there. We’ll see how it all shakes out. In any case, thanks for reading, and please check out the forum and the radio stream, which has been absolutely killing it today.

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

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Greenbeard Release Debut Album Stoned at the Throne

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 9th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

greenbeard

And now, a play:

Officer McWhitey: Uh, do you know why I pulled you over?

Me: Nope.

Officer McWhitey: You were driving erratically. Swerving all over the place. What’s that you’ve got there?

Me: Oh, it’s a CD by this band from Austin called Greenbeard.

(Officer McWhitey, as portrayed by the douchiest buzzcut-looking motherfucker you can find, takes the CD, examines it.)

Officer McWhitey: Stoned at the Throne, huh?

Me (Looking at Officer McWhitey and realizing he’s at least eight years my junior): Yup.

Officer McWhitey: Step out of the car, sir.

–END SCENE–

I hope you enjoyed this original play. I bet you didn’t know I wrote plays. I don’t. Greenbeard, however, write riffs, and that’s even better. The Austin, Texas, four-piece list July 10 as the release date for their full-length debut, Stoned at the Throne, but you can stream the thing now and since you can, you probably should.

Background follows, culled from the internets:

greenbeard stoned at the throne

We present to you, “Stoned at the Throne”! Our first full length album. This collection of music represents everything we stand for. 8 tracks of blistering riffs, heavy grooves, hard hitting beats, and tastefully meticulated song writing. We urge you to sit back, clear your mind, turn up the volume, ready the rig, and get stoned at the throne with us. Enjoy!

Greenbeard assembled to honor and celebrate all things heavy, riff driven, stoner, desert, and above all else, rock and roll. “Greenbeard” was recorded in the spring of 2014. Chance Parker, Alex Smith, and Buddy Hachar collided visions to manifest a sonic liquification of heavy riffs, dark grooves, and hypnotic beats.

“Greenbeard” dove deep into the blueprints of heavy rock. Tracks like “Sludgito” will melt your mind with their never ending slow roasting bass groove. “Eris” shuffles through the Texas desert soil with driving riffs and hard hitting drums.

Desert rock from the sun stricken soil of Austin, TX. Greenbeard brings prolific vibrations to the universe via drums, bass, and guitar.

Stoned at the Throne comes in a CD jacket with custom artwork by Headbang Design of France. Stoned at the Throne was mixed by Adam Hamilton (Brian Jonestown Massacre/Counting Crows/LA Guns), and mastered by Paul Tavenner (Cleopatra Records). Recorded at Ohm Recording Facility and engineered by Chico Jones. Produced by Alfonso Gonzalez.

Chance Parker: Vocals/Guitar
Ethan Thayer: BG Vocals
Buddy Hachar: Drums
Marc Maddox: Bass

https://www.facebook.com/greenbeardtheband/
https://greenbeard.bandcamp.com/album/stoned-at-the-throne

Greenbeard, Stoned at the Throne (2015)

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Bayou Doom Fest III Full Lineup Announced

Posted in Whathaveyou on July 9th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

One thing Texas always has an ample supply of is heavy. Actually, Texas has all kinds of things, but riffs are definitely in there as well. To wit, the newly-announced lineup for Bayou Doom Fest III in Houston next month is a Texas-centric all-dayer with the varied likes of Las CrucesProject ArmageddonSwitchblade JesusFuneral HorseKin of Ettins and more that pretty much looks like it should be a two-day event with such a packed lineup, but nope. That’s just how they roll down there.

Helstar will headline, as you can see in the announcement below that came down the PR wire:

bayou doom fest iii

Helstar to Headline Third Installment of Bayou Doom Fest

The Houston Doom Brigade is pleased to announce that this year’s edition the Bayou Doom Fest will be headlined by none other than Houston legends Helstar. Bayou Doom Fest III will take place on August 8th at Fitzgerald’s in Houston, TX. In addition to Helstar, the fest will feature Century Media’s newest signees, Oceans of Slumber, plus Las Cruces, Sanctus Bellum, Project Armageddon, Funeral Horse, and many more.

Speaking on the festival, Helstar vocalist James Rivera stated “Although most people wouldn’t consider us to be a doom band in the traditional sense, doom is a style of music that is very near and dear to our hearts and it’s one that’s been a big influence on us. Doom metal has a darkness to it that we incorporate into our sound as well. In honor of the occasion, we’ve got a very special set planned that will showcase some of our doomiest tracks. We’ve also got some surprises planned around the theme of the late, great Christopher Lee as Dracula. Godfathers of Doom and Nosferatu anyone?”

Houston Doom Brigade co-founder Doomstress Alexis commented “There’s been no bigger friend to the doom scene in Texas than Helstar. Though they may a somewhat unorthodox choice as headliner, there’s not a doom fan in the state that isn’t a big fan of Helstar. That makes them a great fit for the fest.”

Now in its 3rd year, Bayou Doom Fest has showcased the best talent that the Gulf Coast region has to offer. Festival alumni include Venomous Maximus, Warbeast, Wo Fat, Cauldron (ex-Gammacide), Mothership, and Destroyer of Light.

Bayou Doom Fest III
August 8th, 2015 Doors at 5PM, Show at 5:30PM
Fitzgerald’s, Houston Texas
$13, all ages

Helstar
Oceans of Slumber
Las Cruces
Sanctus Bellum
Project Armageddon
Deguello
Switchblade Jesus
Funeral Horse
Dirty Seeds
Kin of Ettins
Funeral Shroud
Dead Hawke
Gallion

https://www.facebook.com/events/502558536559224/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Houston-Doom-Brigade/462658783800700

Sanctus Bellum, “Parallax” Live at Bayou Doom Fest I

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Mothership Announce Tour Dates with Crobot; Live over Freak Valley Due in Nov.

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 24th, 2015 by H.P. Taskmaster

mothership

Not sure I’m the person to make this kind of declaration, but Mothership are about as much a candidate as Ripple Music has for being a “flagship band.” They rock, first and foremost. They break their collective ass putting in work on the road, and their reach only seems to be expanding as they grow creatively. They’re as representative an act for what appeals most about Ripple as I can think of, and that’s not to take away from anyone else on the label at all, just to say that in the wake of their 2014 sophomore outing, Mothership II (review here), there’s an awful lot the Dallas trio are doing right.

To wit, they’ll release the new live album Live over Freak Valley in Nov., and they’ve just announced yet another US tour, this time with Crobot and Wilson. The PR wire has it like this:

mothership-the-drunk-as-sht-tour

Mothership to release Mothership Live Over Freak Valley this November | Announce US dates for The Drunk As Sh*t Tour with Crobot and Wilson

After the rerelease of their momentous second album and a storming start to 2015, Mothership – the hard rocking supersonic/intergalactic Texan trio – are pleased to announce the arrival of Mothership Live Over Freak Valley this coming November on Ripple Music.

Recorded at their debut European appearance at the iconic German rock festival, brothers Kyle and Kelly Juett along with Judge Smith have captured their steaming hot stew of UFO and Iron Maiden inspired metal; southern Molly Hatchet and ZZ Top swagger, and deathly Sabbathian doom. A concoction that should by all accounts prove too heavy to handle on record, but as fans will soon discover, Mothership Live Over Freak Valley will deliver the filth and fury of the full Mothership live experience.

Since 2013 the band has travelled non-stop, playing live across the USA, Canada, United Kingdom and Europe; taking to festival stages, nightclubs, and under the sun at whatever motorcycle parties they could find. They are for all intents and purposes a heavy rock juggernaut that has only just begun to tear a hole in the cosmos. And guess what? They have no plans of slowing down for anyone.

Over the coming months Mothership also embark on The Drunk As Sh*t Tour with fellow rockers Crobot and Wilson where the band will have CDs of Mothership Live Over Freak Valley on sale ahead of its official vinyl release on Ripple Music at the end of the year. To catch them live and for the full list of dates see below.

Mothership Live:
10th July – Blue Fox Billiards, Winchester, VA
11th July – Ziggy’s By The Sea, Wilmington, NC
14th July – Trick Shot Billiards, Clifton Park, NY
15th July – The Studio at Webster Hall, New York, NY
17th July – Chameleon Club, Lancaster, PA
18th July – The Met, Pawtucket, RI
19th July – The Lost Horizon, Syracuse, NY
21st July – The Outpost, Kent, OH
23rd July – Frankie’s Inner-City, Toledo, OH
24th July – Cheers Pub – South Bend, IN
25th July – The Stache @ The Intersection, Grand Rapids, MI
26th July – Alrosa Villa, Columbus, OH
28th July – Venue 3405, Joplin, MO
31st July – Q&Z Expo Center, Ringle, WI
1st August – Pov’s 65, Spring Lake Park, MN
7th August – Bourbon Theatre, Lincoln, NE**
8th August – Black Sheep, Colorado Springs, CO**
9th August – The Bluebird Theater, Denver, CO**
18th August – Rockbar Theater, San Jose, CA**
** w. Crobot only

Mothership is Kelley Juett (guitars/vocals), Kyle Juett (bass/vocals) and Judge Smith (drums).

http://www.mothershiphaslanded.com/
https://www.facebook.com/mothershipusa
https://twitter.com/mothershipusa
https://www.youtube.com/user/MOTHERSHIPUSA

Mothership, “Serpents Throne” from Live over Freak Valley

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