Truckfighters Post “Calm Before the Storm” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 23rd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

truckfighters

Swedish fuzz forerunners Truckfighters will release their fifth album, V, on Sept. 30 through their own Fuzzorama Records in conjunction with Century Media. The trio of vocalist/bassist Oskar “Ozo” Cedermalm, guitarist Niklas “Dango” Källgren and drummer Daniel “El Danno” Israelsson begin the record with “Calm Before the Storm,” and it’s a track that emphasizes the kind of duality that has come to take root in the band’s approach.

On the one hand, you have their stage show. Truckfighters live are like the human embodiment of an exclamation point. They are rightly known for holding nothing back: zero irony, all-in, 100 percent go. I’ve seen them play and been exhausted afterwards just from watching.

On the other hand, you have their albums. Really since 2009’s staggering Mania (review here), but certainly even more on 2014’s Universe (review here), the songcraft of Cedermalm and Källgren has taken on an increasing scope in texture and emotion. It’s true on V as well that while they still have their raucous moments, they’re just as likely to bring out a melancholy progressive feel, and no less at home in doing so.

“Calm Before the Storm” — its video with an oddly and offputtingly violent narrative — starts V and is the longest track on it (immediate points), and I think it emphasizes what I’m talking about pretty well in terms of the band Truckfighters have become and the multifaceted aspects of their approach. They will, of course, tour heavily to support the new long-player, and you can find the dates for that run under the video below.

Please enjoy:

Truckfighters, “Calm Before the Storm” official video

YEAHHH the new video for “Calm before the Storm” is out!

The new album “V” will be released worldwide through Fuzzorama in cooperation with Century Media Records on September 30th, 2016.

Naturally we will hit the road again to play an extensive European tour following the new album release. Support bands for first half will be We Hunt Buffalo and Witchrider, and the second half it will be Deville and Dot Legacy. Here are the tour dates confirmed so far:

20.10.2016 Berlin (Germany) – SO36
21.10.2016 Chemnitz (Germany) – AJZ
22.10.2016 Vienna (Austria) – Fuzzfest
23.10.2016 Munich (Germany) – Backstage Halle
25.10.2016 Milan (Italy) – Lo-Fi
27.10.2016 Bologna (Italy) – Freakout
28.10.2016 Puget (France) – Le Rats
29.10.2016 Bron (France) – Le Jack Jack
02.11.2016 Bilbao (Spain) – Stage Live
03.11.2016 Barcelona (Spain) – Razz 3
04.11.2016 Madrid (Spain) – Chango
05.11.2016 Lisbon (Portugal) – Stairway Club
06.11.2016 Porto (Portugal) – Cave 45
09.11.2016 Amsterdam (The Netherlands) – Melkweg Oude Zaal
10.11.2016 Groningen (The Netherlands) – Vera
11.11.2016 Tilburg (The Netherlands) – O13
12.11.2016 Hengelo (The Netherlands) – Metropool
25.11.2016 Cologne (Germany) – Underground
04.12.2016 Birmingham (UK) – Rainbow
05.12.2016 Glasgow (UK) – King Tuts
06.12.2016 Nottingham (UK) – Rescue Rooms
07.12.2016 Bristol (UK) – Thekla
08.12.2016 Manchester (UK) – Ruby Lounge
09.12.2016 London (UK) – Islington Academy
10.12.2016 Brighton (UK) – Green Door Store
27.12.2016 Hamburg (Germany) – Sankt Hell Festival

Truckfighters on Thee Facebooks

Century Media website

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Suma, The Order of Things: Chaos to Chaos (Plus Track Premiere)

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on August 23rd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

suma the order of things-700

[Stream Suma’s ‘Bait for Maggots’ by clicking play above. The Order of Things is out Oct. 11.]

A new Suma record doesn’t happen every day. Now in their 15th year, the Malmö, Sweden-based outfit have always stayed active through a variety of splits, compilations and EPs, and they even had a live tape out last year for a fortunate few who were able to grab one, but it’s been six years since their last proper studio full-length, Ashes, and that certainly feels like long enough. The four-piece of drummer Erik, bassist/vocalist Johan, guitarist Peter and noisemaker Rick traveled to Portland, Oregon, to track The Order of Things with Billy Anderson, who also helmed Ashes and the prior 2006 outing, Let the Churches Burn, and if that’s not enough to make the album an event — and it is, make no mistake — the fact that it arrives through no fewer than four different labels should say something about the level of support for Suma‘s churning, deeply atmospheric sludge.

Argonauta and Init Records have CDs, Throne Records the LP and Tartarus Records the cassette, so The Order of Things is nothing if not well represented, and Suma pay back the faith shown in them with 57 minutes of destructive post-metal spread across seven tracks. I’ve talked before about how something oppressively heavy can feel like it’s filling your lungs, and Suma do a better job of that than most. Their fourth album doesn’t necessarily reinvent their methods from what they conjured on Ashes, which Argonauta also reissued last year, but in the interim, they also parted ways with vocalist Jovan, moved Johan into that role and brought in Rick for samples, drones and other assorted ambient contributions, so some measure of sonic shift is inevitable.

Mostly it sounds like progression. To wit, the 13-minute “Education for Death” late in the record. I’m not sure “highlight” is the word for something that seems to plunge so deep, but either way the thudding tension Suma create is gloriously excruciating, cave-echo vocals swirling in the background behind apocalyptic tone and stomp. Much of the album plays back and forth between longer-form material and three shorter atmospheric pieces, the first of which, “The Sick Present,” opens. I’d call it an intro but for the fact that it’s still over the four-minute mark, but it does the work of immersing the listener in the darkened space Suma will continue to build and tear down across the subsequent pair “Bait for Maggots” and “RPA.” The sense of discomfort is almost immediate, and as “Bait for Maggots” begins its chugging pulsation, Suma seem right at home in the midst of that tempest. Johan‘s shouts are commanding throughout but far back enough in the mix to be obscured by the paramount groove that emerges, led by Peter‘s guitar.

suma

Mercifully, “Bait for Maggots” gives due payoff to its onslaught, and in so doing sets up the key dynamic for the rest of The Order of Things, which is the play between foreboding, tension, and release. “RPA,” which follows directly, isn’t quite as linear as “Bait for Maggots” or the later, aforementioned “Education for Death,” but it too offers a thrust built on making the listener’s blood boil before finally letting go. Because it’s so inhuman(e)-sounding and because of the samples and effects wash, etc., there’s an almost industrial element to “RPA,” but the crux of Suma‘s effect on their audience still comes from the madness that seems to be at the root of their delivery and the weight and density with which their material lands.

While, again, that’s probably not new for anyone who’s dug into AshesLet the Churches Burn, their 2003 self-titled debut or any of their sundry shorter outings, it does still feel like the band has pushed forward, and the direct contrast of heft with atmospherics moving from “RPA” into the dream-haunting samples of “Being and/or Nothingness” shows that well leading into “Education for Death” itself, which is the longest inclusion at 13:36 and doesn’t even begin to think about releasing its grip around the listener’s throat until nine minutes in, and even then, it’s another minute-plus before they get there. Beautifully crafted, challenging in the hearing, but when they do finally roll out the apex, building to an all-grey swirl of noise, the result is fitting. The penultimate “Disorder of Things” continues to push forward at a faster clip from where “Education for Death” tore itself to shreds, the wash and crash becoming overwhelming. There might be vocals, and that’s the most honest assessment I can give you. Its ferocity is just about unmatched by anything else on The Order of Things, but “Disorder of Things” is also a lead-in for the quiet post-rocking guitar squibblies that give a spacious start to 12:37 closer “The Greater Dying.” Not a minor title and not a minor way to finish their record either.

That righteous space will continue to open up as Erik enters on drums, and Suma roll out a patient, masterful and consuming groove as they thrust ahead toward the crash-heavy peak of the song, bringing about something of a change in structure as they hit that crescendo closer to the middle third and dedicate about the last three minutes to a long fade of guitar, cymbals and other ambient noise. I wouldn’t speculate on how long they could actually keep that line going past the fade, but the impression is perpetual all the same, and the sheer fact that after all that bludgeoning, Suma would let their listeners go so gently, drifting, into the album’s finish can really only lead one to conclude that the overriding message of The Order of Things is death. I don’t know if that’s what they were going for, but it’s certainly the takeaway from the work itself, and Suma‘s contemplation thereof resonates in its intensity and breadth alike. They are a rare band, and woefully underappreciated.

Suma on Thee Facebooks

Suma on Bandcamp

Argonauta Records website

Init Records website

Tartarus Records website

Throne Records website

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Magnus Pelander of Witchcraft to Release Solo LP on Nuclear Blast

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 22nd, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Witchcraft spearhead Magnus Pelander released a solo EP, A Sinner’s Child, through Svart Records in 2010. As I recall, it was only four songs, but it didn’t need any more than that to showcase a folkish side that hadn’t shown up in Witchcraft at all since even their earliest going. Having dropped his first name to operate under the solo moniker of Pelander, he’ll release a full-length before the end of the year through Nuclear Blast, also now the label home of Witchcraft, who released their fifth album, Nucleus (review here), earlier in 2016.

Not that I’ve heard it or anything, but it’s got some pretty gorgeous moments in string arrangements atop a current of acoustic guitar, and I don’t know what Pelander‘s voice has ever sounded better. Not that I’ve heard it or anything.

From the PR wire:

pelander

PELANDER – WITCHCRAFT main man’s solo project signs to Nuclear Blast

We are happy to announce that WITCHCRAFT main man, Magnus Pelander’s solo project PELANDER has officially signed to Nuclear Blast Records.

After his latest journey with WITCHCRAFT, Nucleus, multi instrumentalist and lyricist extraordinaire, Magnus Pelander, returns to his solo career which without a doubt can be recognized as being tied to the cult doom/rock band, still exploring other paths and going full on acoustic.

Magnus Pelander comments: “At last my first solo album is done and soon to be released. I cannot believe this is true.”

Commented Nuclear Blast A&R representative Markus Jakob: “We’re thrilled to not only work with a gifted artist as Magnus on his main band but now also on his solo career. Both WITCHCRAFT and PELANDER have always stood for variety, artistic freedom and development which we’re more than happy to support. Prepare yourself for another deep and intense look into the mind and musical vision of a genius!”

Today, PELANDER also announces the as of yet untitled successor to 2010’s A Sinner’s Child EP to be released later this year. More details about Magnus Pelander’s second solo album will be revealed soon.

www.nuclearblast.de/pelander
https://www.facebook.com/nuclearblastusa/

Magnus Pelander, “Hope”

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Deville Announce New Lineup

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 11th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

One listen to just about anything founding guitarist/vocalist Andreas Bengtsson writes for Deville, and you know the guy enjoys some symmetry. The songs are impeccably constructed and even when they change up the form, the quality stays high. To wit, last year’s Make it Belong to Us (review here). Still, as Bengtsson announces the new rhythm section joining he and guitarist Andreas Wulkan in the band, it’s hard to ignore the fact that he’s trading out an all-Markus battery — bassist Markus Åkesson and drummer Markus Nilsson — for an all-Martin one. No substitute for working on a theme, I suppose.

Deville welcome bassist Martin Nobel and drummer Martin Fässberg (see also sludge destroyers Suma) with the promise of more touring and writing. The band made it public/official on the social medias thusly:

deville

It is time to announce the new line-up!

DEVILLE welcomes two familiar faces of the music scene in Malmoe. On bass we are now proud to have Martin Nobel, last known from soul rockers Bad Barber. He is, as many of you might know, one of Malmoe’s best rock guitarists so having him on board on bass will for sure add new dimensions to the riffs.

And last but definitely not least we are, after months and months of searching, excited to announce Martin Fässberg on drums. This is a guy who has been touring the world with punk rockers, Quit Your Dayjob and has the routine and skills to take the drum chair in Deville. Being in the underground rock scene for a while he is also known from bands such as SUMA and Psykonauten.

A big welcome guys! Now, let’s tour!

Deville lineup:
Andreas Bengtsson: guitar/vocals
Andreas Wulkan: guitar
Martin Nobel: bass
Martin Fässberg: drums

http://deville.nu/
https://www.facebook.com/devilleband
http://www.fuzzoramastore.com/en/

Deville, Make it Belong to Us (2015)

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Ponamero Sundown Call it Quits

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 11th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Swedish heavy rockers Ponamero Sundown have decided to call it a day. Hung up their spurs. Punched out. Insert other cliche for not being a band anymore here. Their disbanding was announced via Thee Facebooks, and they took care to dub it a “hiatus” and leave open the possibility of playing together again if the timing and offer were right for a farewell show. As of now, so far as I know, nothing is planned.

Based in Stockholm, Ponamero Sundown released three albums during their time together. The latest of them was Veddesta, which came out last year on Transubstans and Ozium Records. Their third full-length, it was preceded by 2011’s Rodeo Eléctrica (review here) and their 2009 debut, Stonerized (review here), both of which were also issued by Transubstans.

They leave having recently posted the track “Black Widow” to mark their 10th anniversary as a band. Originally recorded in 2007 and reportedly a regular feature of live sets, the song was included as a bonus cut on the CD version of Veddesta and brings up a lot of the strengths they showed throughout their tenure in songwriting and energetic execution. New projects from members are reportedly in the works, so when and if I hear of anything, I’ll pass word along.

Until then, best of luck to the dudes who used to be Ponamero Sundown. Here’s their announcement, short, sweet, and Band-Aid-esque:

ponamero sundown

It’s time to release the clutch and move on…

So from today we’re on a hiatus until further notice.

There’s no bad blood, musical differences or anything, just life itself.

If any festival or similar would like to book us one last time we would be open for that. Other than that some of us got other plans…

Thanks for the support over the years! Much love to you all!

Cheers and stay fuzzed!
Anders, Peter, Nicke and Robban

https://www.facebook.com/ponamerosundown/
http://ponamerosundown.bandcamp.com
http://www.transubstans.com
http://www.recordheaven.net
http://oziumrecords.com

Ponamero Sundown, “Black Widow”

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Domkraft Sign to Magnetic Eye Records; The End of Electricity Due this Year

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 10th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Swedish heavy psych-noise rockers Domkraft have inked a deal to release their debut album on Magnetic Eye Records. The Stockholm-based trio have titled the record The End of Electricity, and while a plan to have it out before the end of the year seems ambitious unless it’s already in production — which it might well be — that’s what’s been set and I’m no one to argue. Their self-titled EP came out last year and can be streamed in full via the Bandcamp player below. One finds commonality immediately with other Magnetic Eye fare in the sense of space in the songs and the heft of groove Domkraft elicit. Interested to hear how the album plays out.

If you think maybe you can dig it, the PR wire offers the following:

domkraft

MAGNETIC EYE SIGNS SWEDEN’S DOMKRAFT

We are indescribably stoked and honored to announce the newest addition to the MER stable: Sweden’s DOMKRAFT. A bit of background on them:

The seeds for monolithic Stockholm band DOMKRAFT were planted in Gothenburg, where bassist/singer Martin Wegeland and guitarist Martin Widholm met while studying film. They bonded over the likes of Spacemen 3, Monster Magnet, Sleep and Hawkwind, not to mention a fascination with 10-minute/three chord songs). Playing in various musical constellations, together and apart, each eventually moved to Stockholm.

Independently, drummer Anders Dahlgren, who had established his chops playing a form of slow-burning proto-post metal that was perhaps too far ahead of its time, had also moved to Stockholm from Gothenburg. Having once actually shared a rehearsal space in their former home, the three finally came together in Stockholm, and drew from the heaviest of their combined influences to cultivate a spacious yet crushing approach based on cyclical, pounding grooves.

After years spent shaping and crafting their sound, DOMKRAFT at long last released its debut EP in late 2015. Check it out here for a sampling of their unique vibe.

DOMKRAFT, whose name combines the Swedish “DOM” for judgement and “KRAFT” for power, blasts forth towering dirges of annihilating doom, mindbending psychedelia, and hypnotic minimalism.

From Loop to Sleep, Sabbath to Neu!, Hawkwind to Neurosis and Swans to Spacemen 3, the DOMKRAFT sound is an unsettling mix of grinding riffs, blistering power, and inexorable motion. Their forthcoming Magnetic Eye full-length, The End of Electricity, promises to decimate in a way that their debut EP only hinted at. Says Martin Wegeland:

“Our songs build from the same stem; one riff, played LOUD, and then we just try to add and lose parts to mold it all into something powerful. We also focus on the dramaturgy of the song, rather than classic song structures, and have clear images in mind when writing. Inspiration was taken from films like Jake Paltrow’s Young Ones, Stephen Fingleton’s The Survivalist and The Road Warrior. Of course, everyone takes inspiration from films, but we’d never allow that to be at the expense of groove and energy. The results of our songwriting approach may differ in shape from one song to the next, but the foundation is always the same – repetition and volume! You’ll eventually get sick of every melody, but grooves are forever.”

Couldn’t be happier to have DOMKRAFT as part of the Magnetic Eye family. Stay tuned for more on the late 2016 release date for The End of Electricity!

Martin Widholm – Guitar
Martin Wegeland – Bass & Vocals
Anders Dahlgren – Drums

https://www.facebook.com/domkraftband/
https://domkraft.bandcamp.com/
http://www.merhq.net/

Domkraft, Domkraft (2015)

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Friday Full-Length: Sgt. Sunshine, Sgt. Sunshine

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 5th, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

Sgt. Sunshine, Sgt. Sunshine (2003)

It is somewhat in the nature of heavy rock and roll to be the underdog, and there are few records in the post-Kyuss era of the genre that emphasize this as well as Sgt. Sunshine‘s self-titled debut. Released in 2003 on Abstract Sounds, it arrived at the tail end of one era of Swedish heavy rock — Dozer and Lowrider were already years out from their debut, to say nothing of the likes of Spiritual Beggars or Mother Superior, both of whom debuted in the ’90s — but were part of a wider swing through Europe in general for sure. In the laid back grooves of “Kosmo Terra” and “Mountain Song” one could hear similar movement to what Colour Haze brought to Ewige Blumenkraft in 2001. There are countless bands from the post-2000-but-pre-Facebook years who’ve been lost, and I’ve done my best to highlight some of them here, but the trio of guitarist/vocalist Eduardo Fernandez, bassist Pär Hallgren and drummer Christian Lundberg were able to capture something of their own in the funky push of “Rio Rojo” that predates the emergence of jam-based heavy psych by years and yet moves fluidly into and out of a structured feel. The whole album is like that. I don’t know if I’d call it a “lost classic” — shit, it’s on YouTube, and Heavy Psych Sounds reissued it on vinyl last year — but more like a landmark that has some moss grown on it and could use some more recognition than it’s gotten to this point.

One can hear the threads of Kyuss filtered through an early Dozer influence on “Northern Light,” but there’s something looser that Fernandez brings to the riffing on Sgt. Sunshine and that Lundberg brings to the drums and Hallgren to the bass. The swagger in the intro to lungs shows it, or the Hendrix-style liquefaction of the penultimate “Sad Song.” It’s part of Sgt. Sunshine‘s dynamic that they sound like they’re going to lose control of the whole thing and then they don’t. Not every band can work like that naturally, but especially to do so on their first record makes it all the more a standout. With its silly cover art and veering into Spanish lyrics on “Rio Rojo” and going full-on heavy psych jam-out on the mostly instrumental closer “Culebra,” they genuinely played into giving the impression that anything could happen next, and not knowing where they might be headed only made the album more exciting, both within itself and in terms of what were then their future prospects. Of course, they’d go on to release a second album, Black Hole, in 2007, and a third, III (review here), in 2013, so we know where they’d ultimately end up direction-wise, first playing to a more straightforward sound and then bringing back some of the natural vibing present on the self-titled, but they continue to remain an undervalued act even within heavy rock circles as they head into the impending release of a fourth full-length, titled Plataformas, that seems like it’s going to be a digital self-release. Hopefully more to come on that.

In the meantime, enjoy Sgt. Sunshine‘s Sgt. Sunshine, and thanks for reading.

As of tomorrow, we’re two weeks away from The Obelisk All-Dayer, Aug. 20 at Saint Vitus Bar in Brooklyn (BUY YOUR TICKETS). I’m starting to get nervous, and excited, and getting all of those something-cool-is-about-to-happen feelings in my stomach. I hope people show up. I hope bands show up. I hope the food shows up. Fingers crossed all around.

Better week this week. Just kind of plugging along. Long. Not sleeping particularly well, but some good records came in this week and that helps everything. Everything. Music still sounds good. Food still tastes good. That’s the update.

Next week’s already packed. Starting Monday I’ll be counting down to the aforementioned The Obelisk All-Dayer, Aug. 20 at Saint Vitus Bar in Brooklyn, featuring each band individually and basically talking about how and why they all fucking rule so hard. Also look out for streams from Howling GiantAugustine AzulThe Sweet Heat and maybe more. I wouldn’t mind reviewing the new Ahkmed or Dunsmuir either, but we’ll see if I get there.

I’ve also started planning the next Quarterly Review for the end of next month. Plenty of backlog to work from.

Please have a great and safe weekend. Thanks for reading this week, and please check out the All-Dayer, the forum and radio stream.

The Obelisk All-Dayer

The Obelisk Forum

The Obelisk Radio

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BoneHawk & Kingnomad, The Second Coming of Heavy — Chapter Three: Carousers and Revelers

Posted in Reviews on August 1st, 2016 by H.P. Taskmaster

the-second-coming-of-heavy-chapter-three-bonehawk-kingnomad

It would seem that as Ripple Music‘s split series presses forward in number it’s doing likewise in sound. As well it should. The Second Coming of Heavy — Chapter Three once again brings together two acts on a single LP, two bands in the earlier stages of their career but who each seem to be working toward making a stylistic mark.

Topped off as were the prior editions (and reportedly all those still to come) with artwork by Joseph Rudell and Carrie Olaje, this next installment in the ambitiously-titled run pairs Michigan heavy rockers BoneHawk and Swedish semi-cultist harmonizing newcomers Kingnomad, who represent the biggest geographic leap The Second Coming of Heavy has yet taken — they’re the first non-US band to be featured — and a coinciding stylistic shift, nestling as they do into a storytelling laid back fuzz never quite given to boogie rock, but definitely taking some cues from that scene as well as garage doom, finding a place between the two almost immediately and residing there comfortably until the jammy trip-out on closer “The Suicide King.” For them, this represents the first physical release they’ve had since getting together, and for BoneHawk, their four songs here provide a follow-up to their well-received 2014 debut LP, Albino Rhino, of which Ripple also did a pressing earlier this year.

The two bands share little in common tonally or conceptually apart from a basic affinity for riffs, but those who’ve followed The Second Coming of Heavy through its first two chapters with Geezer and Borracho (review here) and Supervoid and Red Desert (review here) should come into this matchup with fairly open expectations. Thus far, Ripple has done well in finding complementary but still distinct acts.

Prior to this, BoneHawk issued a Spring 2016  7″ honoring Thin Lizzy, and right at the start of their first track on side A, “The Scout,” that vibe comes through in the dual guitars Matt Helt (also vocals) and Chad Houts (also backing vocals), who are joined in the immediate bounce and shuffle by bassist Taylor Wallace and drummer/backing vocalist Jay Rylander, though their tones are of course thicker and more purposefully fuzzed, and they owe perhaps more of their raucous, party-style vibe to Red Fang. That’s an easy tag these days for upbeat heavy rock bands, and I think Red Fang‘s reach is still expanding, but it’s by no means the end of the story for BoneHawk, who cast their identity in the classic rock interplay of guitar and remind of the also-predatory-fowl-minded Virginian troupe Freedom Hawk on second cut “Fire in the Sky,” which slows the roll from the opener a bit in order to bask in a smooth nod that comes not at the expense of a hook, but rather to enhance it.

bonehawk kingnomad

In terms of tempo, they play this back and forth twice, and in doing so demonstrate a clear attention to presentation that I would imagine extends to their live show as well. Either way, “Los Vientos” — driven by Rylander‘s creative drumming — revives the forward momentum of the opener while stepping away a bit from the party vibe of the opener, the energy of which is maintained through pacing but not necessarily mood. “Aurora,” their six-minute finale, starts with an introductory bassline from Wallace and digs into a fluidity marked by toy piano flourish in its chorus and and a funky groove in the second half that gives way to double-guitar freakery deftly brought back to earth before the ending fade.

An aesthetic shift is quick to perceive as Kingnomad‘s “Lucifer is Dead” lurches to life with warm-toned fuzz, laid back roll and vocals one might be tempted to call shoegazing were they not so intricately harmonized. They craft a hook around the title-line, and the song, which the band — guitarist/vocalist Mr. Jay, bassist Maximilian, guitarist Marcus and drummer Mr. N — has stated was the first thing they wrote together, explores these textures somewhere between Dead Meadow and the eerie melodicism of Ghost, but brings something rawer to it as well in the shuffling second half of the track and on the trippier fuzz of “Sibylline Oracles” as well.

More developed in terms of the two guitars working together, “Sibylline Oracles” also brings in an organ and ends with acoustic strum, so the growing reach of the band becomes evident barely 10 minutes into their half of the split, which can only serve them well going forward. “God of Stone and Sand” revels in its spacious tonality and imbues a classic stoner riff with a sense of individualized personality thanks to more harmonies in the vocals, while “The Suicide King,” as noted, steps back to let a jammier, more psychedelic feel take hold. Like BoneHawk before them, Kingnomad have crafted an easy flow to their portion of the LP, and much to their credit as a new band, they don’t give into the cliche of having “The Suicide King” set up for a linear build, showing patience and a will to let their songs go where they want to go.

Easy to get why Ripple would include both bands as they seek to expand the definition of the “heavy” whose coming they’re heralding, and as The Second Coming of Heavy — Chapter Three rounds out, one looks forward even more to the next collection for the increase in scope this one represents. This second coming — and I’ve quibbled about the numerology in each of these reviews so far, so you’ll pardon me if I skip it this time — is only growing more multifaceted, like heavy rock itself.

BoneHawk & Kingnomad, The Second Coming of Heavy — Chapter Three (2016)

BoneHawk on Thee Facebooks

BoneHawk on Bandcamp

Kingnomad on Thee Facebooks

Kingnomad on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

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