NAGA Premiere “Thanatou” from Void Cult Rising; Album out Nov. 15

Posted in audiObelisk on October 30th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

naga

Business is getting nastier in Napoli. Since Italy’s NAGA released their self-titled debut EP in 2013, their trajectory has consistently been a downward spiral — atmospherically speaking, not in terms of the quality of their output — into an inflicted and charred morass of grim post-sludge. As was manifest on 2014’s HEN (review here) and its 2016 Lay Bare Recordings-issued follow-up, Inanimate, the trio have only grown darker as they’ve moved forward into this realm of intended extremity, and their latest manifestation, the six-song/44-minute Spikerot release, Void Cult Rising, takes cues from spacious black metal on opener “Only a God Can’t Save Us” and uses them as a foundation from which to conjure post-metallic ambience in pieces like “Melete” and “Thanatou” — the latter serving as their “Stones from the Sky”-moment; can’t be post-metal without one — while keeping the bite in the screaming vocals of guitarist Lorenzo De Stefano. Through a lumbering churner like “Bedim the Sun” and higher-register-tension-into-utter-noise-wash of the penultimate “Pyre,” NAGA demonstrate the willfulness of their creativity and the purpose of their aesthetic evolution, the progressive mindset that’s brought them to the near-lightless place they now reside.

Void Cult Rising is the kind of album that reviewers plaster with hyperbolic warnings about not being “for the faint of heart,” and while I’ll spare you that — adding as I do that I hope this post finds you in good health generally; thanks for reading — it’s nonetheless true that anything so extreme is going to be all the more select in who can approach it on its own merits. If you can’t get down with vocal scathe, you might not find your place in NAGA‘s void cult — which, given the progression of the 14-minuteNAGA Void Cult Rising title-track that closes, seems all the more like their very own incarnation of Amenra‘s “church of Ra” — and that seems just fine by the band. Clearly their exploration is about more than locking in maximum audience appreciation or they’d be a pop band. As it stands, Void Cult Rising is the most outwardly heavy and the most intentionally brutal thing they’ve done, as De Stefano, bassist Emanuele and drummer Dario — all three of whom have been on board since the debut EP — find sense in what to so many no doubt sounds like pure chaos. It isn’t, in fact, chaotic. It’s thought out, rife with expressive drive and uncompromising force.

As they move through the last march and noise-soaked abrasion of the title-track, with the song finally tearing itself apart past 11 minutes in en route to a long fadeout of static and feedback and other residual sounds, NAGA come across like they’re letting go into the void in question, but even giving that impression is a purposeful drive on the part of the band. Void Cult Rising is full of these kinds of realizations, and whichever end to which a given song might tip the balance of their aesthetic between post-metal, black metal, doom or sludge, the fact remains that all of it feeds into the central identity that becomes NAGA‘s own by the time they’re done. A third album, traditionally, is where a band finds the path that they’ll continue to talk as they go forward (those that do), and NAGA could certainly do a lot worse in terms of direction, but they don’t at all seem like they’re finished pushing themselves into new territory either, and that’s just as much a part of who they are as any individual riff, scream or crash presented here. They may be cohesive and sure of what they’re doing, but they by no means come across as settled or ready to settle. No. They’ll try to outdo this, and given the places Void Cult Rising seems willing to go, they just might do it.

You can watch/listen to the premiere of “Thanatou” below, followed by a quote from De Stefano about the song and more PR wire background, including the preorder link for Void Cult Rising, which is out Nov. 15 on Spikerot Records.

Enjoy:

NAGA, “Thanatou” official track premiere

Singer/guitarist Lorenzo De Stefano on “Thanatou”:

“‘Thanatou’ is part of the climax of Void Cult Rising and represents together with ‘Melete’ one of its most intense passages. In general the album is a meditation on death (melete thanatou for the ancient Greeks) given by a series of events in our lives that have left a mark in this regard and therefore inspired most of my lyrics. ‘Thanatou’ wants to depict a soliloquy of a dying man forced to be silent, he can hear his beloved ones around him but can’t express what he feels because of a sensory dulling, and he let himself go in a consideration on the human finitude, on his own life, in the inability to rely on any transcendence whatsoever. Toward the end there’s a quote from a Eugenio Montale verse that I’ve always loved: ‘Yet it remains that something has happened, perhaps nothing that is everything,’ which summarize in just a few words what I think remains of our lives from an atheistic point of view: the memory, nothing compared to eternity and yet for us all that matters.”

Italian Blackened Doom monster NAGA is ready to make their comeback in November with a new obscure effort called ‘Void Cult Rising’ following up the fortunate ‘Hen’ and ‘Inanimate’. Deeply grounded in the sulphurean atmosphere of their land, their aim is to deliver the biggest amount of distortion, heaviness and nihilism to your ears. No concept, no bullshits, no happiness, just sound anger and frustration to exorcise and reflect the greyness and despair of contemporary world.

Using the words of frontman Lorenzo De Stefano”Void Cult Rising is a meditation on death from a personal perspective, like for example losing someone dear, but also a global one like the end of all things”.

The Naples-based three-piece pick up where they left off, shaping a masterpiece of grief and nihilism.

Void Cult Rising will be coming out November 15th via Spikerot Records and is now available for pre-order RIGHT HERE

NAGA is:
Lorenzo – (Vocals and guitar)
Emanuele – (Bass)
Dario – (Drums)

NAGA on Thee Facebooks

NAGA on Bandcamp

NAGA on Instagram

Spikerot Records website

Tags: , , , ,

Zolfo Sign to Spikerot Records; Delusion of Negation out Jan. 2020

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 28th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

I’m not entirely sure what Italian sludgers Zolfo are going for in titling their album Delusion of Negation, in terms of what that means or is intended to signify, but hey, I like phonetics, so what the hell. The full-length will serve as their debut, and it’s been newly announced that countryman imprint Spikerot Records will stand behind the release. That’s a good vote of confidence for the five-piece, who issued the Phosphene/Floaters two-tracker in 2017 that you can hear below and with it offered no shortage of brutalist riffing. It won’t take you long to get where they’re coming from, but that hardly makes the experience less enjoyable, you know, as much as it’s meant to be enjoyable in the first place.

Pummel pummel pummel and whatnot.

No real details on the record yet, but the announcement of the January release through Spikerot arrived thusly from the PR wire:

zolfo spikerot

Doom Metal unit ZOLFO sign to Spikerot Records!

New album “Delusion Of Negation” to be released in January 2020

Italy’s Doom underworld is somewhat fervent environment lately and ZOLFO has rightfully earned a place in such realm.

Spikerot Records is stoked to announce the signing of the Apulian Sludge/Doom-mongers for the release of their debut album ‘Delusion Of Negation’, due in January 2020. As the monicker suggests – it’s the Italian for “Sulfur” – the band evokes a smoking creature that will utterly please fans of Ufomammut, Yob and Bongzilla alike. Huge riffs and loud amps proceed hand in hand with the slow-paced yet unmerciful drumming while the vocal delivery is harsh as hell, non-human at times.

The band has stated:
“Our firstborn represents for us an essential point of balance between the many artistic and musical entities that dwell within the band’s core, brought into our sound by each member’s previous experiences. ‘Delusion Of Negation’ is a warning for the future that urges us to experiment and evolve what we are. It’s not everyday you find insiders with the same passion and dedication as our friends at Spikerot Records, and for this reason releasing our first work with them is going to be truly gratifying.”

While waiting for this beast of an album, you can listen to a couple of older songs on their Bandcamp profile, a great foretaste of what’s to come!

ZOLFO is:
Dave – Vocals
Nicolò – Guitars
Fabrizio – Guitars
Saverio – Bass
Piero – Drums

www.facebook.com/ZolfoDoom
www.instagram.com/zolfodoom
zolfo.bandcamp.com/releases
www.facebook.com/spikerotrecords
www.spikerot.com

Zolfo, Phosphene/Floaters (2017)

Tags: , , , , ,

Premiere: Chron Goblin & Isaak Stream Split Tape in Full

Posted in audiObelisk on September 6th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

chron goblin

isaak

Today, Sept. 6, marks the arrival of the new split tape from Canadian and Italian outfits Chron Goblin and Isaak. Issued name-your-price through Spikerot Records in a soon-to-be-gone limited edition of only 100 tapes, the offering features one track from each band, each representing something different from them. To wit, Chron Goblin are about to put out their fourth album, Here Before (track premiere here), on Sept. 27 through Grand Hand Records. Isaak, meanwhile, were last heard from with 2015’s Sermonize (review here) on Heavy Psych Sounds. The Chron Goblin track, “Signs,” however, was recorded in 2015 at the same session as their third album, Backwater (review here). The Isaak song, “Taste,” was tracked at the end of last year. So the split arises from some pretty complex circumstances. For one band, it represents a chance to showcase something older as they move onto something newer, and for the other, it marks a return after a few years’ absence from the studio, a kind of refresher for their audience and a reminder of what they do as a group. It’s a fair amount of context to pack into an eight-minute release.

Fortunately, in listening to “Signs” and “Taste,” there’s plenty to dig into for those who’d otherwise, you know, just want to listen to some previously unheard material. Chron Goblin begin with a bit of amp noise and are all-go, soon enough launching into a Roadsaw-style verse that careens through a gang-shout hook en route to a winding slowdown and bluesy solo in thechron goblin isaak split second half. The key moment is when everything but the bass drops out and the nod takes full shape before dropping out to complete the efficient 4:25. Done. Flip tape. Chron Goblin are in and out of “Signs” with an assurance of songwriting that leaves little to wonder why they’d dig up the track four years after the fact and still find it relevant enough to release: because quality songcraft is always relevant.

Isaak‘s answer back in “Taste” by building up over the first minute-plus to finally unleashing a forceful pummel of a riff met with likewise burly vocals. They’ve never wanted for brashness, and “Taste” is no exception to this as the low-end takes central position tonally and they cycle through the verse again as though coming back out of the corner for round two. The tension they manifest turns in the third minute to a more straightforward pop of snare and seems to run a little more forward rather than circular, but the let’s-kick-ass-and-worry-about-the-rest-later vibe remains consistent. They too finish clean. Surprisingly so for having seemed to throw so much sonic mud around, but maybe after a few years it’s just a sense of relief to be back with new material at all. I won’t speculate as to what their plans are without knowing, but Isaak certainly sound like they still have plenty more to say, as they did on their last record too.

And for Chron Goblin, there’s already the advantage of knowing the direction they’d take after recording “Signs,” so yeah, it’s a bit of a different situation from one band to the other, but the bottom line is it’s two tracks of hard-edged heavy rock and roll marked out by zero pretense and an efficient delivery, pressed up to a limited tape that will likely sell out before it even lands on the merch table, so yeah, there’s really no way to lose here. Bonus to anyone who listens to the stream on a Walkman.

Credits follow. Enjoy the tracks:

Link to the store here:
http://bit.ly/ChronGoblin_Isaak

Chron Goblin – Signs
Recorded and mixed by Adam Pike at Toadhouse Studios in Portland, OR in February, 2015
Mastered by Stephan Hawkes at Interlace Audio

Chron Goblin are:
Josh Sandulak
Devin Purdy
Richard Hepp
Brett Whittingham

Isaak – Taste
Recorded and Mixed by Mattia Cominotto at Greenfog Studio in Genoa in December 2018
Mastered by Andrea De Bernardi at Eleven Mastering

Isaak are:
Giacomo Boeddu
Francesco Raimondi
Davide Foccis
Gabriele Carta

Chron Goblin on Thee Facebooks

Chron Goblin on Instagram

Chron Goblin on Bandcamp

Isaak on Thee Facebooks

Isaak on Instagram

Isaak on Bandcamp

Spikerot Records on Thee Facebooks

Spikerot Records on Instagram

Spikerot Records website

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Chron Goblin & Isaak to Release Split Tape this Week

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 2nd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

So Isaak haven’t released anything since 2015’s Sermonize (review here) and Chron Goblin are putting out their new record, Here Before (discussed here) at the end of September. Isaak are in Italy. Chron Goblin in Canada. These seem like two bands in very different situations, and yet this week they’ll team up for a cassette split that’s also the first tape ever to come out through Spikerot Records. You know what? I’d check that out. I like a tape, I like a split, and I’d like to know how these two bands got hooked up in the first place, so yeah, I’ll give this one a listen when the time comes. Why the hell not? Do the circumstances even matter? Of course not. The riffs matter.

Release is coming up quick, so keep an eye out for it. I’ll also be interested to see if it leads to more from Isaak anytime soon, as their last outing was a banger.

Here’s Spikerot‘s post about the tape:

chron goblin isaak

Chron Goblin Vs Isaak. Split Tape through Spikerot Records

Spikerot has been all about Vinyls and CDs so far, but cassettes have dignity too, so why not?

We’re proud to be releasing our first tape ever under the banner of international Stoner Rock with two previously unreleased tracks from Canadian boogie facepunchers Chron Goblin and Italian riffalicious gang Isaak. Those who know each band’s signature sound will not be disappointed, both tracks are sheer energy, pairing melody with groove and distortion for a fresh interpretation of heavy music.

RELEASE DATE: September 6th

TRACKLIST
SIDE A: Chron Goblin – Signs
SIDE B: Isaak – Taste

Artwork by SoloMacello

Chron Goblin are:
Vocals: Josh Sandulak
Guitar: Devin ‘Darty’ Purdy
Bass: Richard Hepp
Drums: Brett Whittingham

Isaak are:
Vocals – Giacomo H Boeddu
Bass – Gabriele Carta
Drums/Vocals – Davide Fox Foccis
Guitars – Francesco Raimondi

https://www.facebook.com/ChronGoblin/
https://www.instagram.com/chrongoblin/
https://chrongoblin.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/isaakband
https://www.instagram.com/isaakmusic/
https://isaakmusic.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/spikerotrecords/
https://www.instagram.com/spikerotrecords/
www.spikerot.com

Chron Goblin, Here Before (2019)

Isaak, Sermonize (2015)

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

NAGA Announce New Album Void Cult Rising on Spikerot Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 28th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Void Cult Rising is the third full-length from Italy’s screamy post-metal lurchers NAGA and it’ll be released in November through Spikerot Records following three years behind Inanimate, which came out on Lay Bare Recordings. I didn’t get to write about that album, because I suck at this, but it’s available as a name-your-price download now, so that’s convenient, and if you happen to be unfamiliar with the band — possible — makes a likewise rousing and grim introduction, what with the plod and the atmosphere and whatnot. I’m gonna be telling you how to live your life all day today — it’s just that kind of day, sorry — but if you’ve got headphones handy and don’t care about blowing out your ears, do it up right.

The announcement came down the PR wire, like announcements do:

naga spikerot

Blackened Doom Metal trio NAGA sign with Spikerot Records!

New album to be unleashed in November 2019

Spikerot Records is thrilled to announce the signing of the Italian Blackened Doom monster NAGA. The Naples-based three-piece is deeply grounded in the sulphurean atmosphere of their land and known to deliver a great amount of distortion, heaviness and nihilism. The band’s new album will be the third full-length after the fortunate ‘Hen’ and ‘Inanimate’ and it’s due to be unleashed in November 2019 under the name of ‘Void Cult Rising’.

“It is surely our most elaborate album to date” says NAGA’s frontman Lorenzo De Stefano. “Its development took longer than usual due to personal issues that have been affecting us in the last three years. Despite all this we find the final output fully satisfying, it’s the album where we dared the most and tried to find diverse solutions compared to our previous works, both on a musical and songwriting level, things that are leading us towards new territories”.

From a lyrical point of view “Void Cult Rising is a meditation on death from a personal perspective, like for example losing someone dear, but also a global one like the end of all things”.

About joining the Spikerot roster, De Stefano adds “We are so happy to start working with Spikerot Records, hence with our lifelong friend Davide. They’re an ambitious label and it’s been our first and last choice since the end of the recording sessions”.

NAGA pick up where they left off. Expect a masterpiece of grief and nihilism, a true bliss for fans of Tryptikon, Unearthly Trance, Craft and Amenra.

Watch out for many more news, details and album tunes to follow in the days ahead!

NAGA is:
Lorenzo – (Vocals and guitar)
Emanuele – (Bass)
Dario – (Drums)

www.facebook.com/nagadoom
www.nagadoom.bandcamp.com
www.instagram.com/nagadoom666
www.spikerot.com

NAGA, Inanimate (2016)

Tags: , , , ,

Review & Full Album Stream: Zippo, Ode to Maximum Reissue

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on October 15th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

zippo ode to maximum

[Click play above to listen to Zippo’s Ode to Maximum in its entirety. The full remaster with bonus tracks is out Nov. 2 on Spikerot Records.]

We live in an age where albums come out twice all the time. A band records on their own and does a self-release, digital or sometimes physical, and then later on at some point that record is picked up by a label for wider distribution and/or a physical pressing. The difference with Zippo‘s Ode to Maximum is that it’s happening 12 years later. Probably fair, then to call the Spikerot Records vinyl version of the then-five-piece Italian outfit’s debut full-length a reissue, what with the Tony Reed remaster, new cover art, bonus tracks and all, but its core desert rocking approach and forays into psychedelia on “Night Jam” and “Crazy Forest” lend a sonic reach to the grounded material surrounding.

The band is currently a four-piece with Alessandro Sergente on guitar, but in 2006, Sergente was joined by fellow guitarist Silvio Spina and bassist Tonino Bosco (Paolo Garofalo handles bass now), as well as vocalist Davide Straccione and drummer Federico Sergente, both of whom remain with Zippo now. Based in Pescara on the Adriatic Coast, they’ve done three albums since Ode to Maximum in the form of 2009’s The Road to Knowledge (discussed here), 2011’s Maktub and 2016’s After Us (discussed here), and each time branched out someplace new from where they started with the original 10 tracks of Ode to Maximum, which from the Lowrider-style wah of “Forgotten Season” to the suitably named thick-toned stomper “The Elephant March” and the careening “Tukay’s Fury” that precedes, basks in the glory days of the heavy rock movement that started a decade before it was made.

It was the MySpace era, but Zippo concerned themselves more with the doings of Kyuss and certainly offshoot project Slo Burn, whose “July” is covered as one of the bonus tracks here, recorded in 2014, in the early and mid ’90s. With a raw-ish production and a mix that puts the bass as the foundation of songs like “Kid in the Desert,” however otherwise led by the riffs they may be, Zippo tapped early into what have since become some of the most enduring aspects of the original Californian desert rock movement — and we’ll throw some Sweden in there for Lowrider, too — while putting their own inevitable stamp on the approach with a sense of rhythmic quirk, gutted-out vocals and diverse songwriting.

Beginning with the intro “Alpha” and ending with the complementary “Omega,” Ode to Maximum unfurls a self-aware sonic blend of chunky-style riffing on “Tsunami Dust” with the fervent rumble establishing itself beneath the two guitars and Straccione‘s vocals. A departure into a playfully-malevolent break brings some element of Faith No More to the proceedings, but as “Tsunami Dust” moves into highlight cut “S.N.A.P.R.S.T.,” the jazzy interlude and aggro finish in the latter already has some context hinting toward its arrival. Clearly Zippo were never just about mimicry of the Californian scene, and the rest of Ode to Maximum bears that out.

zippo (Photo by Marco Rocconi)

Originally a 45-minute outing — the bonus tracks push that to 55 on the remaster — Ode to Maximum has a linear fluidity that speaks to the time of its release, when CD was still the dominant physical media, if in decline with the increasing reach of the digital sphere. The handclaps in “Forgotten Season,” either natural or keyboard — something about them is awfully consistent sounding — vocal layering and manic lead guitar are nonetheless standout factors emblematic of the manner in which songs are distinguished throughout. In addition to the new CD release, though, Spikerot has a 2LP version of the album, and one imagines the same distinguishing factors help establish a breadth as Zippo move from one song and one side to the next.

I won’t claim to know where the sides split, but “Night Jam” is a serene departure from “Forgotten Season,” and “Kid in the Desert” renews the quirked-up post-Kyuss thrust ahead of “Crazy Forest,” which is the longest cut on the album at eight minutes, and if that’s side B, then it’s a solid one. “Crazy Forest” taps into progressive nuance to go along with its standout nodder fuzz riff — something of a foreshadow for the seven-minute “The Elephant March” still to come — and ends with an almost hypnotic rhythm before a last-second shove leads the way into “Tukay’s Fury.”

As it’s sandwiched between the two longest tracks, it would make sense that it’s the shortest (non-intro/outro) piece at 3:22, with starts and stops in the verses shifting into a high-gear hook with a high-energy delivery the whole way through until finally the thing seems to crash to its finish and directly into the start of “The Elephant March,” which is obviously intended as the apex of the record. And so it is. Big riffs get bigger as it courses through its second half, finishing at about six minutes in so the last minute can be consumed by a swell of insect noise, either flies or bees. Kind of a curious choice with “Omega” still to follow and lead the way out of the album as a whole, but it was 2006. Times were crazy. “Omega” fluidly answers “Alpha” with a minute or so of riffing and some sustained ringout that fades to a finish, leaving just “Night Jam #2” — heavier, proggier, more plotted — and the aforementioned Slo Burn redux to cap.

Though recorded later, “July” is a pretty fitting conclusion for Ode to Maximum, and the treatment they give it — again, the bass — does right by the original while allowing Zippo to make their mark on it as well. The album preceding functions in much the same way, portraying a band working their way toward an understanding of who they are as a group and what they want to bring to the tenets of their chosen genre. They’ve gone on to answer that question with subsequent albums, so in a way it’s like cheating to listen to Ode to Maximum and know the future, but a debut release is a special moment for a band that doesn’t come again, and this look back gives Zippo a chance to emphasize how far they’ve come since as well as the clarity of mission with which they started out.

Zippo, “Tsunami Dust” official video

Zippo on Thee Facebooks

Zippo on Instagram

Zippo on YouTube

Spikerot Records on Thee Facebooks

Spikerot Records on Instagram

Tags: , , , , ,

Zippo to Reissue Ode to Maximum Nov. 2 with Bonus Tracks

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 28th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

zippo (Photo by Marco Rocconi)

Zippo‘s debut album, Ode to Maximum, originally came out 12 years ago as a self-release. Time for a reissue? Yeah, definitely. The Italian heavy rockers will put Ode to Maximum back out on Nov. 2 via Spikerot Records as their first release through the imprint as their 2016 long-player, After Us (discussed here), was on Apocalyptic Witchcraft. The first record has been given new art — see it below, also in your most colorful nightmares — and a remaster by none other than Tony Reed of Mos Generator. It will also feature two bonus cuts, one of which is a cover of Slo Burn‘s “July,” which, if it’s not already stuck in your head just by reading the title, I humbly submit you’ve probably never heard the song. I’m gonna be walking around the rest of the day going “Joo-li-hi.” There are worse fates.

The PR wire brings details and a link for preorders. Have at it:

zippo ode to maximum

ZIPPO – Ode to Maximum / Reissue 2018

Since 2004 Zippo have led the pack of the Italian Stoner Rock and Heavy Psych movement. Zippo have always been about the music, which is actually very hard to define as they include elements of Prog Rock, Psych, Stoner, Sludge, Doom, Noise and even Post-Metal.

Zippo thrive on creating different sounds and challenging people to use their very heart and soul to fully experience the band’s musical vision. A winning philosophy has seen Zippo release four critically acclaimed albums: Ode To Maximum (Self-released, 2006), The Road To Knowledge (Subsound Records, 2009), Maktub (Subsound Records, 2011) and After Us (Apocalyptic Witchcraft, 2016). Spikerot Records will take care of the re-issue of the band’s classic Ode To Maximum both on CD and Vinyl, giving it a new life after many years gone sold-out, with a completely new artwork by Davide Mancini (Dartworks.com) and tracks remastered by Tony Dallas Reed (Mos Generator, Stone Axe), including two bonus tracks.

There is one thing you can say about Zippo’s albums – They all sound different to each other. Zippo always push the boundaries of what is musically possible, which has seen them classed as one of Italy’s finest Heavy Rock bands currently out there. Zippo have played Live all over Europe to rapturous applause from fans and critics alike, being described as one of the coolest, loudest and dangerous bands you are ever likely to witness live.

release date: 02/11/2018
label: SPIKEROT RECORDS
catalog number: SPK004
FORMAT: CD DIGIPAK / 2xLP / DIGITAL

Preorders: https://www.spikerot.com/ricerca?controller=search&order=product.position.desc&s=maximum

TRACKLIST
1. Alpha
2. Tsunami Dust
3. S.N.A.P.R.S.T.
4. Forgotten Season
5. Night Jam
6. Kid In The Desert
7. Crazy Forest
8. Tukay’s Fury
9. The Elephant March
10. Omega
BONUS TRACKS:
11. Night Jam #2
12. July (Slo Burn Cover)

CURRENT LINE UP
Davide Straccione – Vocals
Alessandro Sergente – Guitars
Paolo Garofalo – Bass
Federico Sergente – Drums

ODE TO MAXIMUM LINEUP
Davide Straccione – Vocals
Alessandro Sergente – Guitars
Silvio Spina – Guitars
Tonino Bosco – Bass
Federico Sergente – Drums

http://www.facebook.com/zippomusic
https://www.instagram.com/zippomusicofficial
https://www.youtube.com/user/ZippoMusicOfficial
https://www.facebook.com/spikerotrecords/
https://www.instagram.com/spikerotrecords/

Zippo, Ode to Maximum (2006)

Tags: , , , , ,