Review & Track Premiere: Fuzz Evil, High on You

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 7th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

fuzz evil high on you

[Click play above to stream ‘High on You’ from Fuzz Evil’s new album of the same name. It’s out Sept. 14 and Fuzz Evil begin a West Coast tour that night. Click here for the poster with dates.]

Not every underground band can make a professional, commercial-style production work, but Fuzz Evil do. The Sierra Vista, Arizona, three-piece recorded their second album, High on You, with Paul Fig (Alice in Chains, Deftones, Fireball Ministry, and many others) at Studio 606, which is owned by Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters, and the material accordingly sounds not only ironed out in its sound, crisp and clear, but still weighted in tone and groove, but like someone was actively pushing the band to outdo themselves on each take. To wit, the self-aware start-stops and melodic turns of “The Strut” late in the record are air-tight, as drummer Orgo Martinez swaps toms out for crash-cymbal timekeeping in the verses and chorus, which is among several standout hooks on the ultra-manageable seven-song/34-minute release.

That runtime further speaks to an element of professionalism on the part of the band — Martinez as well as brothers Wayne Rudell (guitar/vocals) and Joey Rudell (bass/vocals) — who’ve made the decision to leave their audience wanting more rather than overwhelm with a glut of material, though recording time may have also had something to do with it as they had two days at Studio 606 to bust through all the songs and nail at least the basic tracks before doing overdubs back with Fig, but if that crunch shows itself at all in the songs, it’s in a sense of urgency in the material, whether it’s the speedy second cut “You Can Take Her Away,” which seems to reference Clutch‘s “Spleen Merchant” at the outset before unfolding another memorable hook, this one multi-tiered with Joey backing Wayne‘s lead vocals and an effective guitar solo in the second half of a purposeful three-and-a-half-minute run.

But that’s only after “Get it Together” hints at harmonies between the Rudells in an initial audience-engagement of funk-tinged swing drums, and a building verse that shifts easily into the soaring chorus. The impression that Fuzz Evil are stepping up their game even from what it was on their 2016 self-titled debut (review here) is immediate and resonant, and with fuzz-drenched riffs and leads, a thick and steady groove and an energetic delivery, the three-piece use “Get it Together” to set the tone for everything that follows. Tempos are fluid but by and large not too slow or fast — they kick into a couple speedy parts now and then, mostly to make a point, but maintain fervent control over the rush — and the overarching feel remains welcoming as “You Can Take Her Away” transitions smoothly into the slowdown of “Ribbons and Kills.”

fuzz evil

Spacious with a somewhat darker feel, “Ribbons and Kills” flows with the bass at its foundation and the creeping vocal line overtop. In some ways it’s a direct contrast to “You Can Take Her Away” before it, but that’s the point, and the two do sit well next to each other ahead of the centerpiece “If You Know,” which sets forth its riff at the start and picks up patiently from there. Finding a middle pace between Fuzz Evil‘s faster and slower speeds, its nod is a central factor in its success, and it helps keep the momentum going that the band has thus far built, giving High on You all the more of a full-album feel that, as they move deeper into the second half of the record, nothing diminishes. Further, it emphasizes the point of Fuzz Evil‘s songwriting, which is what serves as the heart of High on You. That’s not to diminish any aspect of their performance or the energy with which they play, but that energy is clearly directed in service to the songs themselves, which given the quality of their output here is probably how it should be anyhow.

“If You Know” caps with more soloing and a return to the chorus for good measure and gives way to “The Strut,” which may or may not be about the same fancy-walking individual as the KISS song — it’s easy to see the Fuzz Evil as potential fans, with their shared penchant for hooks and classic-style structures — and is one of the shorter pieces at just 3:33. It’s noteworthy for that since they pair it with the 6:31 title-track immediately following, which is the longest piece and uses its time wisely in a slower doomly crawl and open vocal with Wayne‘s voice over open space between drum thuds and far-back low end. The chorus of “High on You” is worth naming the record after, and while one might think they’d make up the difference in runtime with a jam or something like that, they don’t really. There’s a noisy solo in the second half, but by and large, “High on You” is longer because it’s that much slower than what surrounds.

It gives the album a somewhat moodier feel, and thereby all the more breadth of expression, and turns to the closer “Are You in or Out” with an introduction from the drums before the swaying guitar line enters and gives the listener the center around which the finale will work. Sure enough, “Are You in or Out” brings one last vital surge from the band, with the title line repeated in such a way as to seem to ask the audience if it’s gotten on board with what Fuzz Evil put together in the tracks prior. They have, of course, made a solid argument for themselves, and while listeners will ultimately have to decide on their own whether they are in or out, there’s no denying Fuzz Evil lay it on the line in asking. Just as likely, though, the question is directed inward. It is no minor commitment in time, finance or effort to put together an album like High on You, so it could well be that “Are You in or Out” is the band talking itself into pushing forward with what they thought would lead them to make the best album possible. Whether that’s the case or not, their choice was correct. They’re in.

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Fuzz Evil to Enter Studio to Record New Album High on You

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 23rd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Fuzz Evil, since making their first appearance in 2014 by sharing a split release with fellow Arizonans Chiefs (review here), have kept a steady clip of releases. They’re not Hawkwind-prolific, but they’ve managed to keep forward momentum on their side with a string of outings including a digital single (streamed here) in 2015, their 2016 self-titled full-length debut (review here), a couple of lyric videos for the tracks from that (posted here and here), and most recently, their taking part in Ripple Music‘s ongoing series, The Second Coming of Heavy, sharing the Chapter Seven LP (review here) with Switchblade Jesus. They’ve also toured with Dandy Brown from Hermano, thrown the Borderlands Fuzz Fiesta, and generally kept a solid presence in the forefront of their audience’s minds.

The news? They’re keeping it up. Next week they hit the studio to begin recording their second full-length, which they’ve given the title High on You. The three-piece will work with producer Paul Figueroa and a release is expected later this year. Since the self-titled came out on now-defunct Battleground Records, that may or may not make Fuzz Evil free agents, but I can’t imagine it’ll be too long before an announcement is made in that regard. Maybe like six minutes after the record is done, if I had to guess.

In the meantime, they sent the following down the PR wire:

fuzz evil

Fuzz Evil will be heading into the studio next week to record their fourth release, titled ‘High on You.’ Fuzz Evil have teamed up with producer Paul Figueroa (Alice in Chains, Slipknot) to record their new seven track record at David Grohl’s Studio 606.

Says guitarist/vocalist Wayne Rudell: “We are all very proud of these songs. They have been a journey for us. To be able to record these specific songs on such a legendary counsel is exciting and humbling. This is the first album Orgo Martinez our new drummer wrote and played on. I feel that these songs are the most dynamic we have written. I feel the band has really matured since the Chiefs split back in 2014. There is a slight departure from what we have done before. This album we did a lot of exploring. We also decided to carry over ‘If Know You’ from the Ripple split.”

The album is expected to be released in mid to late 2018.

‘High on You’ tracklisting:
The Strut
You Can Take Here Away
High On You
Get It Together
If You Know
Ribbons and Kills
Are you In or Out

Fuzz Evil is:
Wayne Rudell – guitar/vocals
Joey Rudell – bass/vocals
Orgo Martinez – drums

https://www.facebook.com/FuzzEvil/
https://fuzzevil.bandcamp.com/

Fuzz Evil, The Second Coming of Heavy Chapter Seven (Split with Switchblade Jesus) (2017)

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Fuzz Evil Post “Black Dread” Video; Tour with Dandy Brown Starts this Weekend

Posted in Bootleg Theater on April 10th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

fuzz evil

Ah, the public domain. Someday the greedy, soulless, oligarchical bastards who run our lives will take away that most human of notions — that something created and put into a public sphere belongs, after a time, to that sphere more than to its creator — because royalty checks, but while we’ve still got it, it’s nice to see it being put to good use. “Black Dread” is the second DIY video from Fuzz Evil‘s 2016 Battleground Records self-titled debut (review here) to cull its footage from such sources behind a lyric clip that surfaced in Nov. for “Killing the Sun” (posted here), and it uses creative editing to give a psychedelic impression from old educational cartoons filled with gloriously outdated science about atoms, space and the threat of nuclear annihilation. My mother tells stories about being told to “duck and cover” if the bomb got dropped. I’d say it was a horrifying time to be alive, but when wasn’t?

Anyhoozle, the song “Black Dread,” the title of which refers to one of Aegon Targaryen’s dragons in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire — Balerion, if you’re wondering — may or may not have anything to do with the structure of atoms or humanity’s thanatos drive, but it was one of my favorite tracks on Fuzz Evil‘s Fuzz Evil, so I’m happy for the chance to revisit it. More laid back than the bulk of the record, which found the trio of guitarist/vocalist Wayne Rudell, bassist Joseph Rudell and drummer Marlin Tuttle (the latter since replaced by Daniel Graves) dug into the crisp execution of sans-frills fuzz rockers like “Good Medicine” and “My Fuzz,” it was both the longest track at nearly seven minutes and the finale of that sub-half-hour outing, leaving the audience with a dreamier impression and perhaps a sign of sonic expansion and progression to come from the Arizona-based three-piece, whose desert vibes were writ large one way or another over each groove and the laid back, unpretentious atmosphere of the record as a whole.

Fuzz Evil, it just so happens, head out this coming weekend on a run to support the self-titled, going alongside Hermano‘s Dandy Brown and his band for shows in the Southern Californian desert and in Phoenix and their hometown of Sierra Vista, AZ. You can find those dates included under the video for “Black Dread” below, which it’s my pleasure to host for your streaming enjoyment.

So please, enjoy:

Fuzz Evil, “Black Dread” official video

Music by: Fuzz Evil
Edited by: Joseph Rudell of Fuzz evil

Music written, recorded, and owned by Fuzz Evil
All Footage from The archive.org and in the public domain.

Footage from:
–“Principles of Electricity” – Published 1945 – Usage Public Domain
–“Duck and Cover” by Archer Productions, Inc. – Published 1951 – Usage Public Domain
— “Drug Addiction” by Encyclopaedia Britannica Films, Inc. – Published 1951 – Usage Public Domain
— “A is for Atom” by Sutherland (John) Productions – Published 1953 – Usage Public Domain

Fuzz Evil live w/ Dandy Brown:
Saturday – 4/15 – San Diego, CA – Tower Bar
Monday – 4/17 – Riverside, CA
Tuesday – 4/18 – Joshua Tree, CA – The Beatnik Lounge
Wednesday – 4/19 – Palm Desert, CA – The Red Barn
Thursday – 4/20 – Pheonix, AZ – Yucca Tap Room
Friday – 4/21 – Sierra Vista, AZ – The Horned Toad

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Fuzz Evil on YouTube

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LP order page at Battleground Records

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Fuzz Evil Begin Lyric Video Series with “Killing the Sun”

Posted in Bootleg Theater on November 2nd, 2016 by JJ Koczan

fuzz evil

A righteous hook is never a bad place to start, and Arizona heavy rock trio Fuzz Evil certainly have that working in their favor as they begin a new series of lyric videos from their self-titled debut (review here). My understanding is that it’s their intent to create a clip to coincide with each of the six tracks on the album, which came out on Battleground Records at the end of September, and they begin with the catchy and uptempo “Killing the Sun.” Among the cuts surrounding, it’s one of the more purely desert rock in theme and execution, and it finds the Sierra Vista three-piece neck-deep in the classic-style chemistry shared between the lineup of guitarist/vocalist Wayne Rudell, bassist Joey Rudell and drummer Marlin Tuttle, since replaced by Daniel Graves.

Joey Rudell took on the responsibility for putting together the lyric video himself, snagging an awesome public domain space cartoon from archive.org and setting the text to it with some creative, rhythmic editing and a retro font to keep the look consistent. The Rudells have shown a genuine DIY streak over the last couple years, in Fuzz Evil and their other outfit, Powered Wig Machine, as well as in their helming the Borderland Fuzz Fiesta festival, so to find them diving into a task of promoting their first Fuzz Evil album with what will (theoretically at this point; sometimes plans change) basically result in a video for each track seems about consistent to their general operating modus. If you haven’t yet been introduced to the LP, the clip is a charming means of accomplishing that, and if nothing else, think of it as an excuse to pay another visit to a cool track from the record. Not that you really need one, but still.

Credits and links follow the video below.

Enjoy:

Fuzz Evil, “Killing the Sun” lyric video

Credits:
Song From: Fuzz Evil 2016 release “Fuzz Evil”
Written, and owned by Fuzz Evil

Footage: “from Destination Earth”
Downloaded from https://archive.org/
by Sutherland (John) Productions
Published 1956
Usage Public Domain
Sponsor American Petroleum Institute
Audio/Visual Sd, C

Edited by: Joseph Rudell

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LP order page at Battleground Records

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Fuzz Evil, Fuzz Evil: The Good Medicine (Plus Full Album Stream)

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on September 30th, 2016 by JJ Koczan

fuzz-evil-fuzz-evil

[Click play above to stream Fuzz Evil’s self-titled debut in its entirety. Album is out today, Sept. 30, on Battleground Records.]

If Arizona trio Fuzz Evil‘s debut album feels like it’s been a long time coming, it hasn’t. The band based in Sierra Vista — near Mexico, but I don’t know if it qualifies as a “border town” — only formed in 2014, and it’s much to the credit of the impression they’ve made thus far that their first full-length hits with such a measure of anticipation.

Released on Battleground Records, Fuzz Evil‘s Fuzz Evil follows behind two prior short outings: a late-2014 split with Chiefs (review here) that marked their first release, and a single, “Born of Iron” (streamed here), that hit in the middle of last year. Both of those showed considerable promise on the part of the band in pushing forth unpretentious desert-minded heavy rock, straightforward in construction and based around an easy flowing songwriting process putting the brotherly pair of guitarist/vocalist Wayne Rudell and bassist Joey Rudell — also both of Powered Wig Machine and organizers of the Borderland Fuzz Fiesta — at the fore in tone and presentation.

Fuzz Evil, the album, marks the farewell of drummer Marlin Tuttle, who has since been replaced by Daniel Graves (also Powered Wig Machine), and the band’s original lineup goes out much the way it came in: on a foundation of quality songs incorporating influences without being overly indebted to them.

I don’t think they’re the kind of band looking to set the world on fire, but the spirit behind the material across the manageable six-track/29-minute span here is genuine, and for as little as Fuzz Evil ask in indulgences of the listener — maybe a couple jammy minutes at the end of closer “Black Dread”; still not much in the grander scheme of existence — what they deliver far outweighs. Six-string wizard Arthur Seay of House of Broken Promises and Unida puts in a guest spot on lead guitar for opener “Good Medicine,” but even his blazing fret work becomes another part of the total impression the band makes, as does the later organ work of Brian Gold, who also recorded, mixed and mastered the collection at Primrose Studio.

One might say the same of the production itself, since from the sound of the crash-in cymbals of “Good Medicine,” Fuzz Evil have a rawness of sound that persists even as they expand outward from the album’s first four tracks into the longer and jammier final two. By the time “Good Medicine” has seen fit to give way to the subsequent “My Fuzz” — some charming self-awareness paired with a strutting riff — it’s even harder to ignore in light of the band’s name how much Rudell‘s guitar tone actually has in common with old Celtic Frost or even circa-1984 Saint Vitus in its bite, playing to both the “fuzz” and the “evil.”

fuzz-evil

Whether that’s on purpose or not, I wouldn’t speculate, but as “My Fuzz” proffers one of the record’s best hooks, it adds depth to the proceedings overall, and speaks at very least to the band’s ability to evoke a varied response. I could be way off any actual influences, in other words, but “Killing the Sun,” which is more post-Queens of the Stone Age in its construction, has some of that underlying darkness too, bolstered by the fact that the vocals are pushed down in the mix under the guitar and bass.

Remembering this is Fuzz Evil‘s first album, and that it’s short, the momentum the Rudells and Tuttle build across the first four tracks is all the more impressive for its flow from one to the next, “My Fuzz” collapsing into the start of “Killing the Sun,” or “Bring Them Through” picking up on the beat from there with a more forward melody in its hook and a mid-paced tempo that does well in setting up the expansion that begins with “Odin Has Fallen” and continues into closer “Black Dread,” the latter also the longest song on Fuzz Evil at just over seven minutes.

Not that Fuzz Evil are going completely off the rails or anything — they keep a consistent sense of craftsmanship — but they space out some wah on “Odin Has Fallen” and in the second half of the track, Wayne drawls out his vocals in a way that reminds of Electric Wizard‘s Jus Oborn, albeit in a much different context. That track finishes with a crash and organ at the beginning of “Black Dread” immediately provides a signal that the palette has expanded.

The aforementioned prior single “Born of Iron” demonstrated a jammier side of Fuzz Evil‘s style, and with its fluid lead work, effects flourish, keys, and languid rhythmic motion, “Black Dread” seems to be building on similar impulses. By its midsection, it’s conjuring howling psychedelia and is locked into the instrumental jam that will carry through its remaining three minutes, each member of the trio playing their part in a final exhibition of the chemistry they’ve established to this point.

Like most of the record before it, “Black Dread” is smooth and will be accessible for the already converted, but the manner in which it adds to the earlier and more straight-ahead material isn’t to be understated. Especially for a debut, it’s a pivotal turn, and one well made. With a few surprises in its overall sound, roughness, songwriting and front-to-back push, Fuzz Evil‘s first expands on the work they have done in setting it up through their singles and sets in motion a creative progression that could continue in any number of directions. It’s reassuring to hear a relatively new band with such a clear idea of who and what they want to be.

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Fuzz Evil to Release Self-Titled Debut Sept. 30

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 12th, 2016 by JJ Koczan

fuzz evil

I’m an easy sell on the prospect of Fuzz Evil‘s debut album. Having been lucky enough to see the trio in their native Arizona this past February, I’ll say they left zero doubt they were up to the task of their first full-length, and the newly-streaming “Killing the Sun” from their upcoming self-titled would seem to back that opinion thoroughly. They’ve got a couple choice guests involved as well — anytime Arthur Seay shows up, it’s a party — and Fuzz Evil‘s Fuzz Evil will be out via respected purveyor Battleground Records on Sept. 30.

If you’ve been paying attention or have seen the new release calendar on the forum, you already know that Sept. 30 is arguably the most crowded release date of the year. No coincidence as it’s when print mags will be starting to get their year-end lists in for consideration. Nonetheless, Fuzz Evil boldly throw their hat in the ring with Brant Bjork, Truckfighters, Alcest, Holy Serpent and Langfinger, as well as probably six or seven others still to come. I look forward to hearing what they’ve come up with for the album as a whole.

West Coast tour dates and the album announcement, from the PR wire:

fuzz evil self-titled

FUZZ EVIL to release debut album on Battleground Records | Embark on US West Coast Tour this October

Fuzz Evil is released on 30th September 2016

Formed in Arizona’s Sierra Vista in 2014, Fuzz Evil is a riff propelled power trio founded by brothers Wayne and Joseph Rudell of heavy desert stoners Powered Wig Machine.

With two singles currently to their name – last year’s ‘Born Of Iron’ and 2014’s 7” split with fellow Arizonans, Chiefs – this September sees the official release of their self-titled debut on the Washington-based label Battleground Records.

Joined by newest member and fellow Powered Wig Machinist Daniel Graves on drums, Fuzz Evil serves up a thunderous blast of rock ‘n’ roll reverie indebted to the likes of MC5, The Stooges, Clutch and Black Sabbath. Recorded, mixed and mastered at Primrose Studio by Brian Gold, from the opening crunch of ‘Good Medicine’ (featuring Unida/House Of Broken Promises’ Arthur Seay) to the progressively harbingered ‘Black Dread’, the album flows like the diaries of a cosmic nomad. Swirling and psychedelically enhanced with storylines spun from the mind’s eye of vocalist Wayne Rudell and his obsession with comic books, science fiction and cult cinema.

Fuzz Evil also embark on US West Coast Tour this October in support of the new album, which will receive an official release on 30th September via Battleground Records. For the full list of dates take a look below.

Fuzz Evil:
Wayne Rudell – Vocals/Guitar
Joseph Rudell – Bass Guitar
Daniel Graves – Drums

Arthur Seay (House Of Broken Promises/Unida) – Lead Guitar on ‘Good Medicine’
Marlin Tuttle – Drums
Brian Gold – Keys

Fuzz Evil Live:
1/10 – Silver Dollar Saloon – El Monte, CA
2/10 – Golden Bull – Oakland, CA
3/10 – TBC – San Jose, CA
4/10 – Starlite Lounge – Sacremento, CA
6/10 – Kenton Club – Portland, OR
7/10 – Valley’s – Tacoma, WA
8/10 – Tim’s – Seattle, WA
9/10 – Sam Bonds – Eugene, OR

Artist: Fuzz Evil
Title: Fuzz Evil
Release Date: 30th September 2016
Label: Battleground Records
Formats: Vinyl/CD/Digital
All songs written by Fuzz Evil
Recorded/Mixed/Mastered by Brian Gold at Primrose Studio, Sierra Vista, Arizona

Artwork by Joseph Rudell & Carrie Olaje of Ghosttown Graphic Art – facebook.com/ghosttowngraphicart

https://www.facebook.com/FuzzEvil/
https://fuzzevil.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/battlegroundrecords/
https://battlegroundrecords.bandcamp.com/

Fuzz Evil, “Killing the Sun”

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Fuzz Evil Premiere Non-Album Exclusive Track “Born of Iron”

Posted in audiObelisk on July 7th, 2015 by JJ Koczan

fuzz evil

When Fuzz Evil‘s debut album arrives early in 2016, “Born of Iron” probably won’t be on it. That’s the whole idea. The Arizona three-piece made their debut late last year via a split 7″ with Chiefs (streamed here), and as much as the trio of guitarist/vocalist Wayne Rudell, bassist/vocalist Joey Rudell and drummer Marlin Tuttle have done to support that single, between touring alongside Switchblade Jesus earlier this year and founding and overseeing the inaugural Borderlands Fuzz Fiesta in Tucson, one imagines their full-length will hit with some fanfare. You might say it’s starting early with the premiere below of “Born of Iron.”

The six-minute fuzzblaster, as I said, isn’t intended for Fuzz Evil‘s LP, which will be released on Battleground Records, but from what I understand, the recording is complete. Album’s in the can. “Born of Iron,” with its easy rolling groove, weighted nod and last-minute wah overload, was cut at the same session, and a celebration of their two-year anniversary as a band and as a precursor to any concrete word about the full-length — up to and including its title, which has yet to be revealed — the Rudells (who both also play in Powered Wig Machine) and Tuttle, have decided to give the song away. In addition to the premiere on the player below, it will also be available as a name-your-price download through their Bandcamp, where one can also pick up the aforementioned split with Chiefs.

If you happen to be in that part of the universe, Fuzz Evil will be supporting Acid King at this year’s Southwest Terror Fest the weekend of Oct. 15-18 in Tucson, and no doubt more shows will surface between now and then as well. “Born of Iron” is up for digging in below, and underneath that, Wayne Rudell offers some comment on the first two years of Fuzz Evil and what the trio have been through in that time.

Please enjoy:

Wayne Rudell on Fuzz Evil’s second anniversary:

“I can’t believe it has been two years. It really has been a non-stop party with Fuzz Evil. We have such a great chemistry and we have been writing a lot of music. The band really hit the ground running from the start and a lot a lot of great opportunities opened up for us. We got picked up by Battleground Records, who put out our 7” split with Chiefs. Shortly after that, we shared the stage with Fu Manchu, Crobot,The Truckfighters. Nick Turner’s Hawkwind, Witch Mountain, Lord Dying, Jucifer, Midnight Ghost Train, Electric Citizen, Black Pussy,and Mothership. That’s a pretty surreal list of great artists to have performed with in the short period of time Fuzz Evil has been around. We like to stay pretty busy and have some pretty cool things on the horizon. We are really looking forward to playing Southwest Terror Fest this year with Acid King. I have always been a big fan of their stuff and am thankful for the the opportunity to play with such a talented band. I can’t reveal too much yet, but I can tell you Fuzz Evil will be making an appearance at this year’s Borderland Fuzz Fiesta. We are gonna try and get the new record out in time for the festival, but if it isn’t in the cards, you can expect it definitely around Spring 2016.”

The currently untitled Fuzz Evil full-length will be released by Battleground Records in early 2016 on 180 gram colored vinyl and digital. More details to come. Fuzz Evil/Chiefs split 7″ available at www.battlegroundrnr.com.

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Powered Wig Machine Stream Vinyl-Only Bonus Track “Highish Noon”

Posted in audiObelisk on March 13th, 2015 by JJ Koczan

powered wig machine

This week marks the vinyl release of Arizona outfit Powered Wig Machine‘s sophomore full-length, Supa-Collider. Initially self-released, the LP version of Supa-Collider (review here) arrives courtesy of AZ kingpins Battleground Records, and boasts the vinyl-only bonus track “Highish Noon.” Fitting the cover artwork by Rudy Flores and bassist Joseph Rudell, the 300-copy pressing comes in translucent green with black and orange splatter, 180g housed in a gatefold with a download. And as if overseeing the release of this beast weren’t enough, Joseph Rudell and his brother, guitarist/vocalist Wayne Rudell also organized and executed the powered wig machine supa-collider vinylrecent Borderlands Fuzz Fiesta with Wo Fat, Mos Generator, Fireball Ministry, etc., which by the accounts that I saw was a badass time.

Joined in the band by guitarist Dusty Hinkle, drummer Daniel Graves and keyboardist/guitarist Brian Gold, the Rudells stood at the helm of Supa-Collider‘s rolling grooves and bluesy feel, casting off desert-based expectation in favor of thicker tone and meatier vibing. The results were well met to say the least, and the fuzz and organ fluidity of “At the Helm of Hades” and big-stage-ready blues-jam starts and stops of “Mother Rocker” established a course for the album that was classic and accessible but also modern and based around a well-developed songwriting process. I’m not sure if “Highish Noon” was recorded at the same time as the rest of Supa-Collider or later, but it’s in line with the rest of the band’s material in being catchy as well, switching on a dime from winding heavy riffery to airy psych jamming and back again before kicking into wah-soaked layered-solo righteousness and arriving, finally, in powered wig machine supa-collider vinyl covera swaying groove that seems to be asking what would’ve happened if Clutch wrote “Dragonaut” instead of Sleep. It’s an issue worth exploring.

And it’s a lot of ground to cover in a little under five minutes, but Powered Wig Machine hold it together smoothly, which (like the rest of the album) bodes well for their third outing, for which word of intent has begun to surface. In the meantime, having just shared a stage with Uriah HeepPowered Wig Machine will hook up with the touring Ape Machine at JR’s Bar in Sierra Vista on March 17 for a St. Patrick’s Day special with Ghetto Blaster. Info on that one is here.

I have the pleasure today of hosting “Highish Noon” for streaming in honor of the Supa-Collider vinyl release on Battleground. Please find it on the player below, followed by more info on the LP from the PR wire:

Battleground Records has confirmed the label’s impending ninth release, announcing the deluxe vinyl version of the gnarly Supa-Collider, the second full-length from fuzz/stoner rock champs, POWERED WIG MACHINE.

In March of 2014, POWERED WIG MACHINE took it to the next level with the monstrous follow-up to Bearded Goddess, delivering the fantastic jams of their sophomore album, Supa-Collider. The band’s dexterous diversity and empowering tactics shine brighter than the blazing sun which ignites their desert surroundings on the album, putting the listener on cruise control into the furthest reaches of the planet and beyond, the tunes infiltrated with a slight flux of sci-fi otherworldliness. Self-recorded by the band and mixed by Brian Gold at Primrose Studio in Sierra Vista, mastered by Chris Goosman at Baseline Audio, and bearing artwork by Joseph Rudell and Rudy Flores, PWM independently released Supa-Collider digitally and on CD last year, yet the beast has yet to be unleashed in its primal vinyl form… until now.

One year after its initial release, Battleground Records will issue Supa-Collider on high-quality wax, the record pressed on 180-gram translucent green vinyl with orange and black splatters, limited to 300 copies and housed in a deluxe gatefold package. In addition to the original seven tracks, this new edition will also include a new LP-only bonus track, “Highish Noon”, with all eight tunes available for free high-quality digital download included in the parcel.

Supa-Collider at Battleground Records

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