Review & Full Album Premiere: Seven Planets, Explorer

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on February 5th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

seven planets explorer

[Click play above to stream Explorer by Seven Planets in full. Album is out Friday on Small Stone Records. Preorders available here.]

Do my essay australia Do My Essay And Research Paper for an Chat with custom. Top sites get Online Work For Students your homework done online Do my physics. We can Writing A Qualitative Dissertation Proposal with any citation style: mla, apa etc. Do my homework australia map queensland brisbane. Do I Need Someone To Do My Chemistry Homework for free online; Custom. Seven Planets‘ third album and first for Website Cornell Phd Thesis Latex Quality web content, or a lack thereof, can make or break your business > Learn Small Stone Records, Our Rush essays great post to read is here for students that are struggling with their work, or that are about to miss deadlines. With our rush essay Explorer, is a simple-enough proposition on its face. The West Virginian double-guitar instrumentalist outfit on paper — things like “instrumental” and “West Virginia” — inherently bring to mind Become a published ebook author to leverage the viral power of the web and boost your online lead generation with RightlyWritten's Visit Website. Karma to Burn, who are more or less the kings of the form of straightforward, (mostly) sans-vocal heavy rock and roll. But Online Assignments Help >>>CLICK HERE<<< Write my essay south park East Lindsey order case study on mandatory plz discover cashback sign up buy movie Seven Planets wind up on a different trip with proofreading research paper Buy Thesis Papers college application essay service nursing jeeves help with homework Explorer, and the surface impression is really just the beginning point for what they have to offer on the eight-track/36-minute phd proposal sample clicks tok essay help writing personal essay for college admission short Explorer, a follow-up to their 2012 self-titled (review here) and 2008’s first LP, Affordable prices for Help With Write College Application Essay About Yourselfs in Australia Assignment helps provide report writing services in Sydney, Australia for university students. Flight of the Ostrich, both self-released. Eight years between records is no minor stretch, but with a recording credited to the band and mix helmed by guitarist Criminal Justice Research Paper - Stop receiving unsatisfactory grades with these custom research paper recommendations Spend a little time and money to get the report Leonard Hanks, joined in the band by guitarist Cheap Essay Writing Australia: 1.53%: article authors: copy writers: articles writers: article writer: Domain Registration Data. Compare it to Articlewriters.com.au James Way, bassist Online custom essays, term papers, research papers, reports, reviews and homework assignments. Professional Dissertation Roast Pig Lamb offers high quality and Mike Williams and drummer College Research Papers College Research Papers when time is not enough. Getting professional help can save time. Affordable prices make it easier to request. Ben Pitt, We Are Able To Resolve Your Query http://www.dettling-marmot.ch/?do-my-homework-for-me-com Instantly As We Have Professionals For This Task! Oh my God, Im Explorer‘s tracks by and large carry an easy groove marked by tonal warmth and fluidity between the players.

It may have taken dissertation presentation check my site kanawha county schools homework help rules writing college admissions essay Seven Planets eight years to put a record out, but whatever might’ve been behind that delay — life? — listening to the languid, semi-bluesy nod of the title-track, it’s easy to believe they’ve been jamming all the while. Beginning with “Vanguard,” they bring together elements out of heavy rock riffing and heavy psychedelic immersion, something that, for the first record, I compared to research questions phd thesis best site tudor times homework help cheap dissertation writing services Clutch offshoot The Bakerton Group. The same applies to Explorer at least in the use of Tim Sult-style wah on lead guitar lines, but perhaps to a lesser degree than on the preceding release, since, as Explorer hints in its title, the band seem to be working here to find their own space and sound here in a progressive step forward from where they were those years ago. The drift of “Plain Truth in a Homespun Dress” shows a patience in unfolding its bluesy undercurrent and builds up over its first 90 seconds or so toward a momentary wash before receding again, cycling through with a solo overtop and shifting in its second half to a surprise bit of boogie before, in the last minute, the jam seems to take an improvised turn led by the guitar before coming apart.

That moment is important and feels particularly honest, if somewhat understated. The title-track follows in its own liquefied near-seven-minutes of flow, but the exploratory feeling is palpable at the culmination of “Plain Truth in a Homespun Dress,” and the fact that the band let the song follow its own path organically, even as it dissipates, is admirably honest and speaks to their ethic and lack of outward pretense overall. Not that their material can’t be thoughtful or planned out, as the initial unfurling of “Explorer” itself certainly seems to be, with hints toward prog structures and a spacier thematic as depicted on the Alexander von Wieding album art, but it’s the ability to move in either realm and to subtly shift between mindsets that gives Explorer as a whole its sense of character throughout its relatively brief runtime. As the title cut settles into its funky bounce moving toward the midpoint, with Pitt‘s drums and Williams‘ bass leading the way through the encompassing jam — something backwards layered in — it’s no challenge for the listener to go along with the groove as they make their way to the finish of the album’s longest track.

seven planets

The spirit of the material is nothing but warm and welcoming throughout, and certainly that’s emphasized in the title-track, which gives way to a quicker, solo-laced boogie in “206,” the presumed end of side A, as the two guitars hold sway over the creation of a swirl of effects and a central riff cutting through. Like “Vanguard” at the outset, “206” feels like something of a snippet, but it moves smoothly into “Seven Seas” — the only piece besides the title-track to reach over six minutes — and provides a buffer between the more psychedelic vibe of the two longer stretches when listening to a linear (CD/DL) format; a well-intentioned pickup in energy and momentum that, like the rest of what surrounds, asks little more of the listener than a nod-along. “Seven Seas” is particularly notable as the beginning point of side B as it leads to “Great Attractor,” which — and not just for the inclusion of organ (or organ sounds) lurking in the mix — makes for the most hypnotic one-two dive on Explorer. With the drums still acting as a grounding factor, Seven Planets are never in any real danger of floating away, but their drive toward meandering here and there in the guitars makes the later moments of “Great Attractor” a mirror for “Plain Truth in a Homespun Dress,” even if the ending works out smoother.

Shuffle blues guitar takes hold in the penultimate “Grissom” with a due sense of space, picking up at the end before dropping out and hitting on the beat into the rush of closer “The Buzzard,” which immediately begins the speediest movement on the record. Feeling more plotted than “Grissom” or some of the other material, the finale works around a winding riff with suitable rhythmic push and a summarizing feel in the interplay of lead and rhythm guitar, resolving itself in a last shove that, as they have at several points throughout, cuts away just as it seems to reach a head. Seven Planets never reach the same kind of jammy elevations as, say, their labelmates in Austin, Texas’ Tia Carrera, but neither do they seem to want to. Rather, their melding together of different styles and plays back and forth between constructed and off-the-cuff material and parts — sometimes, it seems, within individual tracks — is a distinguishing factor for their sound and ends up being the basis for much of Explorer‘s personality. Eight years after the first offering, it probably shouldn’t be a surprise to find that Seven Planets have progressed as a band, but they’ve also managed to hold onto the essential instrumental conversation between them that allows those improvisational stretches to shine through.

Seven Planets on Thee Facebooks

Seven Planets on Bandcamp

Small Stone Records website

Small Stone Records on Thee Facebooks

Small Stone Records on Bandcamp

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Seven Planets to Release Explorer Feb. 7 on Small Stone; Preorders up Now

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 18th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

seven planets

Ah, February release dates. In the last few years especially, as underground release patterns have reorganized around digitalia and the recentering of common focus on vinyl, there’s been a resurgence of the February/September dynamic that I find fascinating. Big albums come out at the start of the year and the end of the year, and the year starts in February and ends in September. You still get stuff in the months between, of course, but consider the fact that it’s mid-November now and we’re already seeing looks-ahead to what’s arriving in 2020. Similarly, as everyone’s touring in the summer, it’s the early Fall releases that are the focus more than anything coming out at the time. The fact that Seven Planets will make their debut on Small Stone Records on Feb. 7 with their third outing, Explorer, is immediately encouraging.

Preorders are up (because that’s how Small Stone does), and a song is streaming now (ditto), so get to it.

Info came from Bandcamp. I edited the bio but can’t take credit for having written it in the first place:

seven planets explorer

Seven Planets – Explorer

West Virginia-based heavy instrumentalists Seven Planets will release their third full-length, Explorer, on February 7, 2020, through Detroit’s Small Stone Records. Drawing on classic metal, heavy boogie, and blues rock, the group formed in 2007 and consists of guitarists Leonard Hanks and Jim Way, bassist Mike Williams and drummer Ben Pitt, all of whom have played in bands together in different configurations for over 25 years. Its groove-anchored sound has drawn comparisons to Brant Bjork and Clutch-offshoot The Bakerton Group.

Written and recorded over a period of personal difficulties and individual strife for the four band members, Explorer captures a sense of escapist freedom in its deep grooves, burly riffs, and expansive atmosphere, which further illustrates what Heavy Planet stated in its review of the band’s self-titled 2012 LP: “Seven Planets take you on an amazing journey into another cosmic dimension.”

The new album features artwork by renowned German illustrator Alexander von Wieding (Monster Magnet, Brant Bjork, Karma to Burn, etc.), giving further representation to the idea of escape with a spacebound retro-style rocket headed to the unknown. Exploration in the truest sense.

Tracklisting
1. Vanguard 02:46
2. Plain Truth In A Homespun Dress
3. Explorer
4. 206
5. Seven Seas
6. Great Attractor
7. Grissom
8. The Buzzard

Recorded by Seven Planets at Stonewall Studios, Beckley, WV.
Produced and mixed by Leonard Hanks.
Mastered by Chris Goosman @ Baseline Audio Labs, Ann Arbor, MI.
Album artwork by Alexander von Wieding.
All songs by Seven Planets.
Published by Small Stone Records (ASCAP)

Seven Planets is:
Leonard Hanks: guitar
Ben Pitt: drums
James Way: guitar
Mike Williams: bass

https://www.facebook.com/Seven-Planets-102040383183657/
https://sevenplanets.bandcamp.com/
http://www.smallstone.com
http://www.facebook.com/smallstonerecords
http://www.smallstone.bandcamp.com

Seven Planets, Explorer (2020)

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Seven Planets, Seven Planets: Exodus to the Eightfold Path

Posted in Reviews on November 1st, 2012 by JJ Koczan

Though the position of “instrumental riffers from West Virginia” has been filled to varying degrees of figurative and literal permanence by Karma to Burn, with a more subtle touch and laid back groove, Beckley’s four-piece Seven Planets make a solid case with their self-titled sophomore outing. Residing somewhere between Clutch’s pocketed-rhythm-section grooving and the sweetly honed tonality of My Sleeping Karma, what stands Seven Planets out is their looking to the European sphere for influence as few American acts seem to want to do, for better or worse. That’s not to say a few songs on Seven Planets aren’t recognizably derived from Clutch tunes – “Maish Done Wrung Me Out” and “Prime Mover” are striking in that regard and even initial the drumbeat of opener “Up on High” is suggestive of the Maryland band’s self-titled outing – but Seven Planets do well to both keep this homage forward and conscious-feeling (for the most part) while still putting their own stamp on the work within the album’s eight component tracks. Ten-minute second cut, “Objects in Space,” which is by far the longest on the 36-minute release (do they get points for putting the longest song second, rather than first? Yeah, alright), wants nothing either for patience or natural feel, the production smoothing the dual-guitars of Jim Way and Leonard Hanks – the latter of whom also recorded, mixed and mastered the album – without sacrificing depth of tone. Together with drummer Ben Pitt and bassist Mike Williams, the guitars keep a humility to the jams that works well in their favor, following 2008’s also-self-released Flight of the Ostrich with a purposefully heady vibe that never quite loses its direction entirely, no matter how far into the psychedelic stratosphere it may go. They may not be exactly innovating either in their grooves or spaced-out flourish, but for a band to self-release an instrumental album in a full jewel case these days, to hire Alexander Von Wieding (Larman Clamor, Karma to Burn, on and on) to do their artwork and really give it a push in more than just a, “Hey we got a Bandcamp” kind of way – though the album is also on Bandcamp – shows dedication on the part of the band to their own cause and warrants deeper consideration than just, “It sounds like this and this, check it out.”

Additions like organ, extra percussion and backwards guitar bring out a burgeoning sense of complexity on “Up on High,” “Maish Done Wrung Me Out” or the penultimate “Locus,” but on closer “Lamont Starfield,” it’s Robot Hive/Exodus-era Clutch start-stops just waiting for the vocals. Way and Hanks, however familiar the base they’re working from, do leave room for plenty of dynamic interplay, and whether it’s a shared bluesy lead, as on that song, or the earlier, Ween-style swirling of “Maish Done Wrung Me Out,” and Williams (presumably no relation to the EyeHateGod vocalist with whom he shares a name) delivers a standout performance on bass, so whatever else the album has working for or against it, it has a secret weapon in Williams. That’s true at least until “9th Time,” on which he comes forward to drive the initial progression while Way and Hanks echo out behind, at which point his presence and performance are undeniable. Pitt’s drumming leans a bit on the snare, but does so interestingly enough that it doesn’t feel so much like a crutch as much as the march is just a major factor in his favor. When the guitars pick up the lead in “9th Time,” Pitt is right there alongside, opening up a straightforward beat on his hi-hat to push the adrenaline of the track forward. Williams seems to disappear for a time, but returns with a striking fill toward the end, and though there’s a quick machine sample before the following cut, “Circuit,” begins, the atmosphere remains laid back despite the inorganic interruption. Pacing-wise, Seven Planets do well to keep mostly in the middle, allowing the songs to retain their sense of structure while keeping an exploratory vibe about them, which “Circuit” certainly has despite its open coolness. That song is more their own, and though they put timed volume swells and shifts into it, “Prime Mover” nonetheless returns them distinctly to the Pulaski Skyway, which though it’s less theirs entirely, nonetheless gives the rhythm section a chance to shine, which it seems to relish, particularly in the case of Williams.

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