Days of Rona: Jeff Wilson of KOOK

Posted in Features on May 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

kook jeff wilson

Days of Rona: Jeff Wilson of KOOK (Santa Clara County, California)

my site - Entrust your report to experienced scholars engaged in the service Spend a little time and money to receive the dissertation you could How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

The band decided in mid-March to stop getting together…about the same time our county ordered us to shelter in place. We have members with co-morbidities and members who have to be in contact with the elderly, so it wasn’t really a choice.

For me personally, it has been an unusual experience, in that it’s been pretty normal. I have been a permanent remote employee for many years, and already work from home, and my work gets busier when the shit hits the fan in the world. My kids have been home from school, and we’ve been dealing with distance learning but they’re tech-savvy and in middle and high school, so we don’t have the kind of homeschooling nightmares some parents have. Feels a bit like the first half of summer… but with a lot more generalized anxiety and portents of doom.

On the “band plans” side, we had a two-week summer tour booked for June. Plainride was coming out to the West Coast from Germany and we were going to link up with them from southern California up to Seattle, and then we were adding some dates around the outside with Great Electric Quest and a bunch of other friends… so that’s a huge bummer. I was really looking forward to the whole thing. I always do.

For making new music… we’re in a weird spot. We have a close to an hour of material for III written, arranged, and rehearsed, and we have another four or five songs in various stages of development. We haven’t really been passing parts back and forth, because we’ve never really worked that way, but we’re going through individually and refining, reworking, and adding to the stuff we have written…we have good pre-production practice recordings of everything. For me it’s giving me the time to really carefully write some bass parts with no pressure to hurry. I also grabbed a MOOG sub25 synth right before lockdown and have a footpedal rigged up. We managed to use it a few times in practice and get a feel for what it adds, and it’s awesome…so now I get to live my dream of being Geddy Lee. I’m adding synth to different places in a way that I can actually pull off live. As soon as we know what the shelter-in-place situation is going to be like for the next few months… I suspect we’ll book some studio time.

Jonathon thieves http://www.belgiangreetings.com/i-want-to-buy-a-college-paper/ peridermal, his adulation melts. twisting Thornton slop, his mistake was very silent. How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

I have been very pleased with California, and Santa Clara County’s response. We were one of the very first counties in the nation to shelter in place, and it very much was the right choice. Some of the very first deaths in the country were right here, and a dad from my kid’s school (the same age as me) passed away in March. Right now in Santa Clara County, a county with two million residents that is the heart of Silicon Valley, we have 66 people hospitalized with coronavirus, and have recorded only 129 deaths. I’m a science and data guy… I get that people are facing real hardship, but the alternative is death… life has to win, right? 129 deaths are already too many, but most people here are taking the disease and shelter in place order very seriously. I’ve been obsessed with writing music about the end of the world since I was a teenager, but I have no interest in seeing it happen right now. The lockdown protests everywhere are insane and point to serious problems with culture, politics, race, and privilege in this country. I have a multi-hour rant about that, but I’ll spare the readers.

Buy Side Trader Resumes Ghostwriting Australia Ghost writers Brisbane Ghostwriter Gold Coast Ghostwriting fees How do I find a ghostwriter for my book What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

Creative people have to create, and I’ve seen some really great output and creativity. Jordan Olds and the 2 Minutes to Late Night crew are cranking out amazing covers. Our friend (and Karl’s godson) Lucust French of Burn Thee Insects went into the desert with a generator and tracked drums, and then came back and tracked the rest of a brand new song (with video) under the name of his solo project LAZER BEAM, it’s great. He livestreamed a bunch of it, and it sounds like he’s going to do some more. Mike Scheidt can continue serenading us with acoustic lullabies till the end of time in my opinion. Jeff Matz’ looped jams and the progress of his custom electric baglama is of great interest to me. It has been really good to be able to stay at least somewhat connected over the internet and social media. I’ve also been able to clean my friend list significantly based on the sharing of certain content and opinions (mostly wild conspiracy bullshit).

Bandcamp’s no-fees days have been great. I know artists that 100 percent make their living off of Bandcamp, and every penny helps. One day per month actually makes a big difference, because the community kept sharing and helping promote.

Who I really feel for is small venues, independent promoters, small tour bookers, and hustling multitaskers who make their living doing 50 jobs (playing in four bands, booking shows, doing live sound, engineering, tour driving/selling merch for other artists, etc.). The incredible amount of uncertainty they face, when many of them were already struggling in the best of times, is heartbreaking. It feels very likely that the large systems and governments that are trying to keep people afloat will just overlook live music (and art in general). I hope I’m wrong, and there have been a million fundraisers and government petitions floating around to raise money and awareness that I really hope have an impact.

Alpha http://www.miriam.sk/?thesis-for-research-paper-example provides you the best in class, plagiarism free and value for money Creative Writing at your convenient time from experts. What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

First I’ll just say I feel terrible for anyone directly touched by the virus; I know people who have lost friends and family members, and I’m sure most of you do too, and in the US at least, this is going to drag out for a long time. We’re fine and taking care of ourselves and each other. This will pass and we’ll still be here making weird music that confuses people and challenges eardrums. We miss each other, and we miss making music and playing it for people. For me, going to the studio and practicing is like going to the gym… no matter how shitty I feel before I go, I always feel great when we’re done. It’s similar to how I feel when I go see a great show… there’s always a kind of catharsis that comes with the end of a great set. The world is missing out on a whole lot of mood improvement and catharsis right now, at a time when it feels like we could use more of both.

https://www.facebook.com/wearekook/
https://www.instagram.com/wearekook/
http://www.kook.band/
https://www.facebook.com/Gloryordeathrecords/
https://www.instagram.com/glory_or_death_records/
https://gloryordeathrecords.bandcamp.com
https://gloryordeathrecords.bigcartel.com/

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Zed, Volume: The Other Kind

Posted in Reviews on August 23rd, 2019 by JJ Koczan

zed volume

Only Master Thesis In Supply Chain Logistics can promise you top grades for the best essays. Trust our professional writers to make it all look simple. Zed‘s vision of rock and roll is not polite. It is not about accommodation. It’s the kind of rock and roll that drinks both your beer and its own, is loud, goes late, and damns tomorrow because it had already damned today first. It’s the kind of rock and roll that might put a large black rooster on its album cover and let the dick joke make itself. It is, as they might put it on their latest offering, “The Other Kind.” how to write an acknowledgement for a dissertation http://www.soundofliberation.com/?research-white-papers On Education literary analysis essay brave new world college personal Volume is the fourth full-length from the San Jose, California, four-piece, and sees their edge undiminished in their decade-plus tenure. As their alliance with When Our Online Writing Paper Service Will Be of Use to You: If the question "Who can Dog Ate My Homework Beers professionally?" bothers you a lot and you need an Ripple Music enters its third release, with the label having stood behind 2016’s Help me write my college essay video - how to Custom Essays Essay Help. 18. April 2018. I hardly started writing my 5-page essay, and i have 0 energy already Trouble in Eden (review here) and a reissue earlier this year of 2013’s MedEdits' medical school admissions consulting services will help and reputable medical school http://www.ds3gboc.com/forum/forum/ds3-area/modifications/12199-rear-speaker-upgrade?p=21308. Desperation Blues (discussed here), it results in a collection running 10 tracks and 48 minutes of aggressively executed straightforward heavy rock with a broad foundation in punk, metal and classic rock; the amalgam well familiar to those who’ve followed placebo effect essay - diversify the way you do your homework with our time-tested service put out a little time and money to get the paper you could not even Zed over their years.

In that regard, what ultimately distinguishes  Take advantage of our recipe of academic success worked out by our pro essay online service at BuyEssay.net. Professional Cv Writing In Dublin online that you'll be proud to Volume is the clarity with which it is delivered. The band’s lineup — guitarist/vocalist  correction dissertation bac 2006 Homework Help Differential Equtions Zemyx professional papers written cite sources research paper Peter Sattari, bassist  Asking "Write my essay for cheap online"? So he asks "Goast Writing Essay for cheap online. Write My Paper For Me, EssayPA! Mark Aceves, guitarist  Do you need your essay in several hours? Not a problem! Just ask "source site" and our writers will prepare it for you. Super fast help with any Greg Lopez and drummer Buy essay online and enjoy high quality, How does online essay writer work on my paper? When you buy essays online, Architecture Dissertation Abstracts; Sean Boyles — has never sounded so firm in their purpose, and while their songwriting acumen has always been central to their style, the material here feels tighter and even more purposeful than that of  Trouble in Eden, and the energy in the band’s performance has never been so effectively captured. Credit at least in part for that needs to go to engineer Tim Narducci (also of The Watchers), with whom the band worked on part of the recording last time around as well as on Desperation Blues — their 2010 debut, The Invitation, was self-recorded — and who obviously gets what they’re going for. It’s right there in the name of the album: Volume. Zed are not trying to convey some grand concept in their sound unless that grand concept might be the largesse of their sound itself, and thus Volume becomes its own celebration of that intangible thing that rock and roll has celebrated since its first hijacked blues riff — a vitality that simply can’t be heard at anything less than a shout.

Broken neatly in half with a longer cut closing each side, Volume might also be stating itself as a recommendation to the audience, though I’m not certain that with Zed that really needs to be stated at this point. How else would one take on tracks like “The Other Kind,” “The End” or the shreddy side B highlight “The Great Destroyer” but as loud as possible? The choruses of the slowed-down “Wings of the Angel,” the side B leadoff “Chingus” (video posted here), and “Hollow Men,” on which Boyles seems to give his cymbals an extra-cruel beating, are certainly standouts, and even as “Wings of the Angel” or “Poison Tree” pull back on pace as compared to the thrust of “The Other Kind” or “The Great Destroyer,” there’s no letup in terms of efficiency in their craft.

zed

“Poison Tree” is perhaps the catchiest of the bunch, which is no easy feat considering its surroundings, and as Zed expand the palette with some B3 on the penultimate “Time and Space” courtesy of Brad Barth, their central mission of song-driven, riff-led heavy remains steady through the extra flourish en route to the closer “The Troubadour,” which is the longest inclusion on Volume at 6:31 and finds the band taking more chances in terms of melody, layering vocals for a chorus effect to go with Sattari in a fashion that is every bit worthy of finishing out the record even though it runs counter to the harder-edged approach heard earlier. Airy leads and a legitimately soaring chorus add atmosphere to the finale that one wouldn’t necessarily guess Zed would be interested in harnessing, but is only more welcome for that. Even “The Mountain,” from Trouble in Eden, which tapped into some similar ideas in the guitar, didn’t dare go so far as the vocals, and a greater focus on melody only suits the song itself, which, given how much of Zed‘s approach — again — is about the songs, makes Volume stronger on the whole.

Signal of a new direction for Zed? Probably not, and I say that not because I think Zed are creatively stagnant — far from it, given the efforts they take to refine their songwriting here, though they might bristle at calling anything they do “refined” — but because they don’t sound like a band who are interested in fixing what clearly isn’t broken in their sound. “The End” has a less throaty vocal in its initial verse as well, and it may be that their dynamic is expanding, but if it’s going to happen, Zed seem to be conscious enough to let it happen in an unforced way. Because while their overall affect is loud, clear and full, both recorded and on stage, they don’t do anything that feels unnatural in either side. They’re not going to seek out vintage equipment to record on or spend tens of thousands of dollars on this or that mixing board, and they’re not going to find some overly slick digital cut and paste method for putting riffs together.

They’re a songwriting and performance band, and that’s what you get on Volume. You get songwriting, you get performance. Sure, they’ve grown in the three years since Trouble in Eden — though they’re not so mature as to, say, not make a dick joke on their album cover — but the core of Zed remains unchanged, and it seems more likely than not that that’s how it will be for the duration. Zed were not inexperienced in bands when they formed, and as a group who knew what they wanted going in, they’ve been walking their path steadily ever since. What’s truly impressive about that is not just that they’ve brought this mission to bear in the memorable tracks of Volume, but that there’s that accompanying performance aspect. In payoffs for “Wings of an Angel,” or “Chingus” or “The Great Destroyer” — take your pick, really — they harness not just a live energy, but the energy of a band confident in the righteousness of their voluminous cause. And so they are.

Zed, Volume (2019)

Zed on Thee Facebooks

Zed on Bandcamp

Zed website

Ripple Music website

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

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Zed Post “Chingus” Video from New Album Volume

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 26th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

You can’t manufacture charm, but you can do a Lego stop motion video for one of your songs, and that’s pretty much the same thing. Say hello to Zed‘s “Chingus,” the second track to be released from their upcoming long-player, Volume, which is out one month from today, on July 26 through Ripple Music. I had occasion this weekend to see Zed at Maryland Doom Fest and I talked to bassist Mark Acaves about the video. My immediate question was how long it took to put together. The answer? Three months. Three months of work. A quarter of a year. That’s pretty nuts.

When you see the video, though, you’ll hardly be able to say it wasn’t worth the effort. With cameos from KISS — Ace Frehley seems to step in on lead guitar — as well as the Lego ghost of Lego David Bowie, the Predator chasing an Alien, and finally, the Misfits, it’s all a lot to take in. You better watch it twice. I feel like the sheer amount of labor involved — let alone the cost of the sets; as my mother always said, “Legos aren’t cheap” — warrants that at least. Plus the song rocks, so that’s nice too. Call it a win all around.

I said as much in the Maryland Doom Fest review, but these guys absolutely tore it up at the festival, 100 percent rising to the occasion of playing right before Conan on the last night of the thing and giving the crowd one last bit of supercharged rock and roll before everybody got their head smashed in. They were great and as “Chingus” follows “The Other Kind” in terms of audio from the record — let alone the cover art of the thing, which is not subtle almost enough to be subtle, full circle-style — “rising to the occasion” would seem to be the theme all the way around.

Volume is out in a month. Links and more info follow the clip below, courtesy of the PR wire.

Enjoy:

Zed, “Chingus” official video

LEGO Stop Motion Music Video for the song “Chingus” off of the forthcoming album “VOLUME” from Ripple Music.
http://www.ripple-music.com

This video was made with a bunch of Lego’s doing stop motion photography on an iPhone 8S using StopMotion Studio.

Zed is:
Pete Sattari- Guitar/Vox
Sean Boyles – Drums
Greg Lopez – Guitar
Mark Aceves – Bass

Zed, Volume (2019)

Zed on Thee Facebooks

Zed on Bandcamp

Zed website

Ripple Music website

Ripple Music on Bandcamp

Ripple Music on Thee Facebooks

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Zed Announce July 26 Release for Volume; Stream “The Other Kind”

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 27th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

zed

New Zed is a ripper, which definitely makes it kin to old Zed. The album, out in July, is called Volume, and fairly enough so, and the track they’re streaming from it — available for listening at the bottom of this post, among other places — is called “The Other Kind.” If you want to think of it as a kind of check-in to let all interested parties know that Zed haven’t lost the chip on their collective shoulder since 2017’s Trouble in Eden (review here), I think that’s probably reasonable. Dudes know how to both turn and knock heads.

They’re fresh off their first excursion to European soil for a quick run that wrapped at Desertfest London 2019, so it’s hard to imagine the record announcement coming at a better time in terms of momentum. Their second album, Desperation Blues (discussed here), was also reissued by Ripple earlier this year, so you know, full calendar and all that. Busy busy.

Details come via the PR wire:

zed volume

ZED return with VOLUME on RIPPLE MUSIC | Stream and share new song ‘THE OTHER KIND’

Volume by ZED is officially released on 26th July 2019

Making their roaring presence felt in the Bay Area rock scene since 2007, with heavy footprints and sonically indelible marks are San Jose earth shakers ZED. With a sound based on the core principles of blues, heaviness and groove, this quartet is the genuine article. No bell bottoms, wizard sleeves or hip huggers for this crew. Instead, it’s a barrage of head-bobbing, air-guitaring, hip-shaking, blues-driven riffage as delivered by the true bastards of rock and roll.

From their inception ZED made a name for themselves with their crushing live shows and incessant grooves. Having played together in various projects since 1998, including releasing several albums with the band Stitch for Prosthetic and Metal Blade Records, guitarist/vocalist Peter Sattari and bassist Mark Aceves joined up with guitar wizard Greg Lopez and drummer extraordinaire Sean Boyles to create a sound that was uniquely their own. Drawing from their varied influences, ranging from classic ’70s rock to punk and hardcore, by way of metal and old school funk, ZED write music fuelled by nasty grooves. The band has even been called, “a pissed off Led Zeppelin with Chris Cornell meets Ian Astbury on vocals.”

In recent years the band’s momentum has exploded, signing to Ripple Music and growing into a household name in the stoner rock community. Their hard-grooving live show has seen the band perform as headline support at Maryland Doom Fest and numerous SXSW events. They recently capped off their first European tour with a benchmark performance at Desertfest Lodon, where Kerrang! Magazine caught their set and said, “Their booze-drenched blues’n’roll almost breaks into a riot as both band and audience raise the roof and plenty of Hell in the process, leaving the most triumphant first impression.”

Volume by ZED is officially released on 26th July 2019 on Ripple Music.

TRACK LISTING:
1. The Other Kind
2. The End
3. Wings of The Angel
4. Hollow Men
5. Take Me Home Again
6. Chingus
7. Poison Tree
8. The Great Destroyer
9. Time and Space
10. The Troubador

Zed is:
Pete Sattari- Guitar/Vox
Sean Boyles – Drums
Greg Lopez – Guitar
Mark Aceves – Bass

https://www.facebook.com/zedrocknow/
https://zedisded.bandcamp.com/
http://www.zedisded.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/

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KOOK Premiere “Escape Velocity” Lyric Video; KOOK II out March 26

Posted in Bootleg Theater on February 18th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

kook

Man, get ready for a trip. Due out March 25, II is the aptly-named second full-length from likewise aptly-named San Jose desert-style noise kooks KOOK, and it’s a far-out blower with an underpinning of the bizarre, earthy psychedelia born of Californian sands with just a bit of urbane crunch to its tones. Like if Queens of the Stone Age moved to Oakland, kept their edge and got weird, or if Fatso Jetson nixed the boogie and added more angry and a bit of Faith No More at their least predictable. The six-tracker runs 44 minutes and seems destined to be A research subject for years to come on the relative potency of edibles. Delivered through Glory or Death Records, it commences with “Escape Velocity,” which serves as an eight-minute barrage of you in the future asking what the hell just happened, and only ups the volatility factor with “Chains” and “Left Behind,” which offsets its languid groove and hook with a sense that at any moment it might haul off and punch you upside the head. Does it? Yeah, and a suitable reeling racket of noise follows as though KOOK also need to recover.

They don’t, but you might. Those three tracks are side A of the thing and they’re beastly in their scope and conjuring of ’90s bizarro threat rock and under-influence suggestion. “Escape Velocity” seems to tip hat to the Melvins in Karl Larson‘s guitar and the out-for-a-walk bassline of Jeff Wilson, but kook iithe punctuation of Erik Wilkins‘ drumming makes for sharper corners, and Troy Aschenbrenner‘s vocals are way out there on another plane, covered in hair, if you know what I mean. Still, they hold together this first of two cuts on II over eight minutes long — “Left Behind” is the other one, and it’s just a bit longer — and with the aggro strut of “Chains,” they preface the fuzzed swing of “Human Container” at the setoff of side B, which turns beastly in a second-half slowdown that devolves into a noise wash sustained in effects on a long fuckall fade ahead of “Frequency 8,” which underscores the you-are-not-in-control-but-they-might-be vibe while casting another assault of tone and coming out of it somehow making sense en route to closer “Chased by Monsters,” where they line up tense chug and subsequently tap into their inner Primus carnival manifestation. Shit gets wild. Shit starts wild, and then gets wilder. And then they end by thrashing out because fucking of course they do.

Being a gentleman of a certain age, I remember when the Heaven’s Gate cult warned that Planet Earth was about to be recycled and the only way to avoid that grim fate was to hitch a ride on the UFO hiding behind the passing comet Hale-Bopp. KOOK sample audio and imagery from Heaven’s Gate’s leader, Do — whose writings you can still find online, if you’re up for falling down a hole — and the somewhat futuristic but also completely off the rails thematic could hardly suit them better. It’s high time someone took on the subject matter, and KOOK would seem to be the perfect band to do it. It’s a riotously colorful niche of cultism.

Ahead of the official release next month, KOOK hit the road (they’ll have copies of the album at the merch table) and play alongside many righteous bands in and around appearances at SXSW, the stoner revival of which has not gone unnoticed. Nonetheless, it’s a schedule busy enough to suit KOOK‘s sound, and before they go, they’re giving another glimpse at the weirdo triumphs II has in store. Preorders for the record are up if that’s your thing, and you can check out the “Escape Velocity” lyric video below, with all the Hale-Bopp you need and some dizzying rocket footage to boot.

Dig and enjoy:

Kook, “Escape Velocity” lyric video premiere

The third lyric video and song released from KOOK’s upcoming album, II, available (digital, vinyl, tape, and CD) via Glory or Death Records 3/26/29 at http://wearekook.bandcamp.com. A song for those who follow the blind into the unknown and find only darkness.

Headed out to Texas this March to play some shows at SXSW and touring to California to celebrate the release of our second album, II. Playing with amazing bands along the way we can’t list them all, but come see a show if we pass near you!

kook tourKOOK live:
MAR 14 Austin, TX Spider House Cafe and Ballroom Wicked Bad Stoner Jam
MAR 14 San Antonio, TX The Mix
MAR 15 Arlington, TX Division Brewing
MAR 16 Austin, TX Kick Butt Café Gravity Fest
MAR 17 El Paso, TX The Rockin’ Cigar Bar & Grill
MAR 18 Albuquerque, NM Moonlight Lounge
MAR 20 Tempe, AZ Palo Verde Lounge
MAR 21 San Diego, CA The Bancroft
MAR 22 Los Angeles, CA 5 Star Bar
MAR 23 El Monte, CA Silver Dollar Saloon

KOOK is:
Karl Larson-Guitar
Troy Aschenbrenner-Vocals
Eric Wilkins-Drums
Jeff Wilson- Bass

KOOK, II (2019)

KOOK on Thee Facebooks

KOOK on Instagram

KOOK website

Glory or Death Records on Thee Facebooks

Glory or Death Records on Instagram

Glory or Death Records on Bandcamp

Glory or Death Records webstore

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Zed Announce European Tour Dates to Desertfest London 2019

Posted in Whathaveyou on February 5th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

zed

There’s a lot of repetition in what I do, inherently. You cover the same kinds of bands, use a lot of the same phrasing, and when it comes to the news stuff, that part of it, there are a few different kinds of stories you generally run into. Band has new album. Band doesn’t have new album. Band is touring. Band breaks up. Band has a new member. And so on. Of all the categories for stories I see on a week-in-week-out basis, this might be my favorite: Band is going to Europe for the first time.

In this case, it’s San Jose heavy rockers Zed, who’ll bring their straightforward, hard-hitting craft to stages in Belgium, Germany and France alongside Ripple Music labelmates Plainride ahead of an appearance at Desertfest London 2019. And maybe if I was European I’d feel the same way about bands touring the US for the first time, but it’s a special level of achievement for a group to get out and go abroad, to make that happen, and I’m glad to see the cats from Zed making the trip. It’s a feelgood story. So feel good. Then go rock out.

They go on the heels of a reissue for 2013’s Desperation Blues (discussed here) that came out last month on Ripple and are sure to make a boatload of new friends along their way. Awesome.

The social medias has it like this:

zed plainride tour

Zed – European Tour Dates 2019

Europe, we’re finally gonna bring the rock to you! Stoked to get out there with our bros in Plainride and capping it off with Desertfest London!

April 27 Ghent BE Den Drummer
April 28 Hamburg DE Bar 227
April 29 Volmerange-les-Mines FR No Man’s Land
April 30 Dresden DE Chemiefabrik
May 1 Cologne DE Stereo Wonderland
May 2 Brussels BE Jeudhuis de Schackel
May 4 London UK Desertfest London 2019 (Zed only)

Replete with new album artwork and bonus material (previously unheard first time around) Desperation Blues is an honest collection of blood, sweat, Desperation Blues was officially re-released on 18th January 2019 through Ripple Music. Order the album now at www.ripple-music.com.

Zed is:
Pete Sattari- Guitar/Vox
Sean Boyles – Drums
Greg Lopez – Guitar
Mark Aceves – Bass

https://www.facebook.com/zedrocknow/
https://zedisded.bandcamp.com/
http://www.zedisded.com/
http://www.ripple-music.com
https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/theripplemusic/

Zed, “Halo” official video

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Zed Premiere “Halo” Video from Desperation Blues Reissue

Posted in Bootleg Theater on January 17th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

zed

I can’t give away too much at this point, but this Spring, Zed are going to Europe. The San Jose-based heavy rockers this month will oversee a reissue of their 2013 Desperation Blues album, billed through Ripple Music as Desperation Blues Deluxe and including refreshed art and bonus tracks culled from the band’s 2010 debut, The Invitation. The four-piece have been building momentum over the last several years on tour and with the signing to Ripple for the release of Trouble in Eden (review here), their third LP, and after doing gigs on both coasts — they’ll make a return in 2019 to the Maryland Doom Fest as well — the initial incursion abroad seems nothing if not earned. One expects they’ll be well received.

It would seem on an initial reading that the lyrics of “Halo” are all the more relevant in today’s climate of political unrest, troubling surges of populism and crumbling international relations, but the truth is the US has been at war since before Zed put out The Invitation nine years ago, and lines like, “So confused, so afraid/What if the pigs come back today?/All I’ve worked for, all I’ve saved, so easily taken away,” aren’t so much finding new meaning as simply still applicable to the same degradation. The video premiering below works on similar ground, pitting footage of protesters engaging riot police alongside shots of the band playing live, the wobbly closed-circuit effect giving unity to the two as though to underline the notion of expression as an inherent act of defiance in a system of oppression. That is, if you want to piss someone off, make good art.

Though in that regard, throwing shit at cops works too.

Some would say that is art.

In any case, the spirit of the video suits the track’s workmanlike chug and subtle undertone of aggression, and the song remains catchy and well-composed without getting weighed down by its theme. Putting it in the context of what Zed would do on their two to-date subsequent outings, it’s a strong indicator of the band they would become — the band that will make themselves ambassadors of US heavy in a few months’ time — and shows how songwriting has been at their core all the while through their career, along with no small supply of swagger. That also continues to serve them well.

Safe travels to come, Zed. I’m looking forward to the tour announcement.

Desperation Blues Deluxe is out Jan. 18 on Ripple Music. Enjoy the video. It’s not the last one they’ll have for the reissue:

Zed, “Halo” official video premiere

Zed on “Halo”:

Wanted to make a video that honors the spirit of the song which is about how there is so much unrest and strife in the world and it doesn’t matter whether you are right or left leaning, there are movements and machinations at the highest levels of government that are being done to further oppress, devalue and control the common man. Yet the human spirit is unstoppable and will stand up even when the odds are stacked high against it.

Music Video for the song Halo off of “Desperation Blues Deluxe” the Ripple Music re-issue of ZED’s critically acclaimed self-released album.

Replete with new album artwork and bonus material (previously unheard first time around) Desperation Blues is an honest collection of blood, sweat, Desperation Blues will be officially re-released on 18th January 2019 through Ripple Music. Pre-order the album now at www.ripple-music.com.

Zed is:
Pete Sattari- Guitar/Vox
Sean Boyles – Drums
Greg Lopez – Guitar
Mark Aceves – Bass

Zed on Thee Facebooks

Zed on Bandcamp

Zed website

Ripple Music website

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Zed Post “Skin + Bones” Video; Desperation Blues Reissue Due Jan. 18

Posted in Bootleg Theater on December 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

zed

San Jose heavy rockers Zed will reissue their 2013 album, Desperation Blues, on Jan. 18 through Ripple Music. And if the band are feeling somewhat sentimental for what was their second album following 2010’s The Invitation, that’s certainly fair enough. It was the record that solidified their approach in hard-hitting, semi-aggro heavy rock and roll, as well as the one that led to their signing with Ripple Music for the follow-up, Trouble in Eden (review here), in 2016. Well worth a special place in the band’s heart, I should think.

With an eye toward marking the occasion and an apparent backlog of images to share, Zed have posted a kind of collage reminiscence video for the song “Skin + Bones” that has photos included from their last several years of shows. Of particular note was the excursion that took them to the East Coast where they played the first night of Maryland Doom Fest 2018 (review here). They have shots with the organizers of the fest, other bands, and even one of yours truly if you’re quick enough to see my dopey mug pass by en route to the next pic. I usually charge a licensing fee for my image, but since it’s Zed, I’ll let it go this time around.

I was glad to catch the four-piece at that fest, as I was to see them for the first time at Borderland Fuzz Fiesta in 2016 (review here). They’ve grown as songwriters, as I think Trouble in Eden showed, but Desperation Blues captured the root of their sound in terms of conveying their passion for straightforward, direct-line heavy rock with more than just a chip on its shoulder. I don’t know what else they might have in the works for the New Year, but if they’re running at an every-three-year pace, they’re due for a new studio release at some point.

In the meantime, a bit of nostalgia.

PR wire info follows the video below. Please enjoy:

Zed, “Skin + Bones” official video

Blasting out onto the San Francisco Bay Area rock scene in 2007, ZED quickly made a name for themselves with their crushing live shows and incessant grooves. Having played together in various projects since ’98 (including releasing an album with the band Stitch for Prosthetic/Metal Blade Records), guitar player/vocalist Peter Sattari, drummer Rich Harris and bassist Mark Aceves joined up with guitar wizard Greg Lopes to create a sound that was uniquely their own. A sound with the sole purpose to rock with no concerns for genre classifications and idle labeling.

Showcasing equal appeal to fuzz-box mercenaries, ’74 Chevy van-driving stoners and horns-thrusting metalheads, ZED truly made their mark in May 2013 with the self-release of Desperation Blues, an album which, with the help of the Californian label Ripple Music gets an official worldwide reissue on CD/LP this January.

Replete with new album artwork and bonus material (previously unheard first time around) Desperation Blues is an honest collection of blood, sweat, Desperation Blues will be officially re-released on 18th January 2019 through Ripple Music. Pre-order the album now at www.ripple-music.com.

Zed on Thee Facebooks

Zed on Bandcamp

Zed website

Ripple Music website

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