Brume Sign to Magnetic Eye Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 26th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

Brume will enter the studio next month to record their second full-length, Rabbits, for release on Magnetic Eye Records. They’ll be working with none other than Billy Frickin’ Anderson — whose CV I’d list even in part but frankly it’s exhausting to think about all the good records he’s helmed, up to and including Brume‘s 2017 debut, Rooster (review here) — on the effort, which also follows their first incursion to Europe, something that one highly doubts will be a one-time-only event. A Fall release would put them right in line for festival season. Just saying.

But of course there’s a lot that needs to happen A-to-B on that one, perhaps most pivotally actually making the album. And “late 2019” can turn into “early 2020” before you know it. I just get excited about these things and about cool bands doing cool stuff, like signing to labels and making new albums and touring. Always a good time.

Cheers to Brume and Magnetic Eye on the partnership and here’s looking forward to the album when it’s ready to roll.

Announcements from band and label follow:

brume magnetic eye

BRUME – Magnetic Eye Records

We are thrilled to announce our signing to Magnetic Eye Records! We head to the studio with Billy ( Everything Hz ) to record ‘Rabbits’ in April and will see a late 2019 release. We have been eyeing up MER and its insane roster for quite some time and honestly couldn’t imagine a more fitting family of stoner metal misfits for Brume to be a part of.

Let’s party 2019!

Says Magnetic Eye: BRUME brings its melodic drone-doom approach to MER after having released several records, toured the US and Europe, and played festivals from Austria to London. Their San Francisco aesthetic brings a welcome West Coast infusion to the label, and this April sees them entering the studio with distortion guru Billy Anderson to embark on recording their forthcoming label outing… which we cannot wait to share with you.

Brume
Susie: Vocals/Bass
Jamie: Guitar/Vocals
Jordan: Drums

https://www.brumeband.com/
https://brumesf.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/brumeband/
http://brume.bigcartel.com/
http://store.merhq.com
http://magneticeyerecords.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MagneticEyeRecords

Brume, “Man-Made” official video

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Witch Ripper & Brume Stream Split MMXIX in its Entirety

Posted in audiObelisk, Bootleg Theater on March 14th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

brume

witch ripper

So, first things first: Witch Ripper and Brume release their Split MMXIX this Friday, March 15, through DHU Records. Second, with Witch Ripper working with Matt Bayles and Brume working with Billy Frickin’ Anderson on production, it should come as no surprise that the thing sounds awesome. From the opening High on Fire-through-a-meat-grinder churn of the early going in Witch Ripper‘s 13-minute-long “1985” and the melancholy creep that follows before they build back up to the last apex, to the fallout symptoms at the end of “Man-Made” (you’ll see it in the video) to the timeless and familiar strains of “In the Pines” as rendered through Brume‘s melodic lurch and longing, Split MMXIX is of course more than the sum of those behind the board, behemoths of the monolithic — or was that monoliths of the behemoth? — as they are, it’s also the result of two bands working each on their own level to affect that consuming sonic largesse. “1985” was recorded when Witch Ripper tracked their 2018 debut, Homestead, while Brume‘s “Man-Made” and “In the Pines” are older and newer recordings, respectively, brought to bear with the sense of lumber one has come to expect from the San Francisco three-piece.

With its extended runtime, the opener consumes the entirety of side A of the vinyl and puts it to good use. Tones are weighted and the initial plod is given duly guttural vocal accompaniment for about the first half of the track, and as it hits the midpoint, “1985” breaks to a stretch of quiet, classically metallic guitar, dramatic and atmospheric and a stark turn from the grit preceding, but not entirely out of place — or at least not anymore than it’s intended to be. Clean-sung lines top as the bass and drums casually work their brume witch ripper split mmxixway back in and Witch Ripper push forward on a subtle build for the next couple minutes, a tolling bell seeming to signal the shift into the grander instrumental solo section that pays off the track in epic metal fashion. The band note below that “1985” was taken off the album because it was too long, and listening to it, one tends to believe them. It is long, but that only seems to make it all the more worthy of the showcase it has here alongside the work of Brume, who follow their 2017 debut, Rooster (review here), with these two tracks showcasing their evolving personality.

“Man-Made” — the video below directed by the band’s own Jordan Perkins-Lewis — seems to rumble out its start in answer to “1985” back on the A side, but obviously that’s just coincidence of tone; it’s an older song recorded before the band knew it would be on this split. The impact of its riffing is well met by the nuclear test footage sped up to match the rhythm of the strumming guitar, and over the eight minutes, “Man-Made” evolves into a maddened beast before, like “1985” before it, dropping to mellow but tense guitar. The difference is “Man-Made” resumes its previous heading and caps with its central riff in the forward position and feedback leading the way via fadeout into “In the Pines,” written by Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter and given generational breadth through a particularly tortured performance by Nirvana on MTV Unplugged. Brume make it sound massive, thereby demonstrating not only the malleability of the song itself, but their own reach as they move beyond their debut into this release and whatever might come after.

Below, you’ll find all three tracks on Split MMXIX presented across three different YouTube clips. Not how these kinds of things usually work, but go with it. Witch Ripper have a creepy spider to go with “1985,” while Brume have a static image for “In the Pines” and the aforementioned bomb-dropper clip for “Man-Made.” One way or the other, it all makes sense atmospherically with the release itself, which is unapologetic in its heft and worthy of whatever volume you can give it.

Comment from the bands and more follows the videos.

Please enjoy:

Witch Ripper, “1985”

Brume, “Man-Made” official video premiere

Brume, “In the Pines”

Witch Ripper on “1985”:

Recorded during the “Homestead” sessions by Matt Bayles (Isis, Mastodon, Minus the Bear) it was cut from the full length because frankly, it was too damn long to fit on the vinyl. Luckily we found a home for the song as our side of a killer split with San Francisco doom weirdos Brume. The song “1985” is one of our most ambitions creations yet. At 13 minutes strong the song moves from grunge inspired doom riffs to a psychedelic clean bridge and huge musical soaring outro. It’s got a lot. Lyrically it’s about knowing that you love music, not knowing how long you can do it for but not wanting to give up that dream. Something that I think we can all relate too.

Brume on “Man-Made” & “In the Pines”:

Brume’s two tracks on the split are a celebration of the SF Trio’s second home, the Pacific Northwest and bring to light recordings old and new. “Man-Made” is the first track the band worked with producer Billy Anderson (Neurosis/Sleep) and was recorded in Portland while on their first West Coast tour in 2015. “In the pines” is the most recent track recorded with Billy (also in Portland), some three years after. The cover was pulled together for a show in Seattle, paying homage to both Nirvana and Leadbelly. What better way to release these tracks than with label mates Witch Ripper from Seattle?

Brume/Witch Ripper Split MMXIX

Side Witch Ripper
A1. 1985

Side Brume
B1. Man-made
B2. In the Pines

Pre orders go live Friday January 25th at 7PM CET

Official release date March 15th

The Brume/Witch Ripper Split will be released on 3 different limited edition color vinyl options

DHU Exclusive: Limited to 90 copies
Witch Ripper Edition: Limited to 100 copies
Brume Edition: Limited to 100 copies

Brume
Susie: Vocals/Bass
Jamie: Guitar/Vocals
Jordan: Drums

Witch Ripper
Curtis Parker: Vocals/Guitar
Joe Eck: Drums
Brian Kim: Bass
Coltan Anderson: Guitar

Brume website

Brume on Bandcamp

Brume on Thee Facebooks

Brume BigCartel store

Witch Ripper on Bandcamp

Witch Ripper on Thee Facebooks

Witch Ripper on Instagram

DHU Records on Thee Facebooks

DHU Records on Instagram

DHU Records on Twitter

DHU Records on Bandcamp

DHU Records BigCartel store

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Sweet Chariot Premiere “Miles Away” from Lean into the Breeze

Posted in audiObelisk on March 11th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

sweet chariot (photo by Charlie Karr)

Oakland, California, doesn’t quite have the tech-industry gloss of its across-the-Bay kin city of San Francisco, but even that wouldn’t account for rambling sunset serenity of Sweet Chariot‘s second record, Lean into the Breeze. The album, which is due out April 15 through Who Can You Trust? Records and available to preorder now, comes across with a vibe extracted from the smoother end of the heavy ’70s as shades of Southern rock are held over from the band’s 2014 self-released, self-titled debut in cuts like “Wicked Night” and the later, well-harmonized “Over and Over,” the affect bringing to my East Coast ears an echo of a decidedly more Californian, less regretful, The Brought Low, similarly unafraid to touch on twang when so inclined, as on “Let it Start” or “My Front Pages,” but less strictly heavy rock even in the decidedly guitar-led “Miles Away” or “Can’t You See the Wind.” Vocals are shared between guitarists Eric Shea (also Hot Lunch) and Chris Guthridge (Ride the Blinds) while the rhythm section of bassist Doran Shelley (Nik Turner’s Hawkwind) and drummer Chris Labreche (Planes of Satori) provide the fluidity of groove to match the shifts of mood along the way, from “Billy Bliss” working on its night moves to the melancholic closing pair of “Night Light” and “Nothing Seems to Matter,” which touches on some of that wistful Southern nostalgia without going the full-Skynyrd. Something there seems to cry out for a grand piano, but the vocal arrangement is right on and Guthridge‘s winding lead lines certainly get the point across.

Analog production, sometimes used as an excuse for crappy sound, becomes part of the character throughout Lean into the Breeze. The breeze, by the way, is warm. sweet chariot lean into the breezeAnd so are the melodies. There’s a switch in who’s singing lead between “Wicked Night” and “My Front Pages,” which follow opener “Best I Had” — notice the use of past tense; immediate call to something bygone and remembered fondly — that expands the scope of the album as a whole and brings a via-’90s-college-rock vibe to the established classic pattern, but the songs are and remain central as the 10-track/36-minute long-player stretches out into the start-stop swag of “Miles Away” and the genuinely sweet melodies of “Billy Bliss” and “Let it Start,” the move from side A to side B flowing easily like, well, the warm breeze, I guess. Organ shows up and finds welcome on “Can’t You See the Wind,” and “Over and Over” pushes into a more complex arrangement of vocals to preface the closer still to come, but before they get there, Sweet Chariot dip into the three-minute “Night Light,” ahead of “Nothing Seems to Matter,” pulling back on the (relatively) grander feel of the tracks surrounding for a stretch of minimalist sentimentality no less effectively conveyed than anything in either “Over and Over” or the closer still to come. They end with the line “Nothing seems to matter anymore,” which taken in kind with “Best I Had” gives a decent impression of the point of view from which at least a good portion of Lean into the Breeze is working.

Sentiment suits Sweet Chariot, however, and with Shea and Guthridge sharing vocals, the band are that much more able to bring forward a classic but not necessarily backward or reactionary feel. Ahead of the release, I’m happy to be able to host “Miles Away” as a track premiere, and you’ll find it on the player below, followed by the vinyl info from the label.

Please enjoy:

Taken from the SWEET CHARIOT – Lean Into The Breeze LP | WHO-38

Release Date: April 15th
(** Pre-orders shipping two weeks earlier **)

Pre-orders at: https://whocanyoutrustrec.bigcartel.com/product/sweet-chariot-lean-into-the-breeze-lp

Edition of 500 copies on black vinyl.
(The first 100 copies include a free Sweet Chariot logo sticker!)

Sweet Chariot comprises singer/guitarist Eric Shea (Hot Lunch, Mover) and Planes Of Satori drummer Chris Labreche – both from the bygone band Parchman Farm. They also landed bass player Doran Shelley, a former member of The Cramps and Nik Turner’s Hawkwind. Ride The Blinds’ frontman Chris Guthridge completes the band with shared singing duties and top-shelf lead guitar playing.

Sweet Chariot on Thee Facebooks

Sweet Chariot on Soundcloud

Who Can You Trust? Records on Thee Facebooks

Who Can You Trust? Records website

Who Can You Trust? Records on Bandcamp

Who Can You Trust? Records BigCartel store

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Sweet Chariot to Release Lean into the Breeze April 15

Posted in Whathaveyou on March 4th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

sweet chariot (photo by Charlie Karr)

There’s still a bit of slide to be had on songs like “Billy Bliss” and the organ in closer “Nothing Seems to Matter” definitely gives a sense of revival, but it’s more of the Creedence Clearwater-type than anything in danger of being preachy, unless you count warm vintage tones and classic-styled rock and roll as proselytizing. Arguments to be made either way, I suppose, but Sweet Chariot make a convincing case for the glories of melodies past with their second album, Lean into the Breeze. Due out April 15 through Who Can You Trust? Records, which continues to know a thing or 10 about what to look for in vintage-minded acts, the 10-track/36-minute offering is a wholesome, grand funky good time, less about who can sound more like it’s 1972 than who can remember what made those bands want to sound like that in the first place. It’s a vibe you can’t screw with and one you probably won’t want to.

One track posted from it so far, and it’s streaming at the bottom of this post, so you might get some sense of where they’re coming from with it, so have fun. I hear they might have more audio coming next Monday. Swing low.

Info from the PR wire:

sweet chariot lean into the breeze

SWEET CHARIOT – Lean Into The Breeze LP (Out April 15th / 2019)

Sweet Chariot is a San Francisco and Oakland based band with members who prefer old gear and cold beer. Their timeless rock ‘n’ roll is a blend of pickled pub rock and greasy biker boogie trimmed in the smoky tones of West Coast canyon-twang.

Lean Into The Breeze is the band’s second album, but it’s their first for Who Can You Trust? Records. These songs were tracked and mixed on a vintage Tascam 388 analog eight track by producer and recording artist Walker Phillips. Though the band’s eponymous debut flirted with ‘70s inspired California country rock, this album finds the foursome dialing down the Gram Parsons and turning up Graham Parker. Lean Into The Breeze is still rooted in rustic tones, but the songwriting comes from a more modern take on British pub rock, jangly guitar pop and hard throttled boogie jams.

Influenced by such bygone bands as Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Grease Band, The Byrds and Big Star, Sweet Chariot also found themselves inspired by Teenage Fanclub, GospelbeacH, Shannon And The Clams, Endless Boogie, and Chris Robinson, who along with Isaiah Mitchell, jumped up onstage with the band last year. Sweet Chariot has also shared stages with NRBQ, Mother Hips, The Flamin’ Groovies, New Riders Of The Purple Sage, Jesse Dayton, Beachwood Sparks, Allah-Las and the late, great Pegi Young.

Sweet Chariot comprises singer/guitarist Eric Shea (Hot Lunch, Mover) and Planes Of Satori drummer Chris Labreche – both from the bygone band Parchman Farm. They also landed bass player Doran Shelley, a former member of The Cramps and Nik Turner’s Hawkwind. Ride The Blinds’ frontman Chris Guthridge completes the band with shared singing duties and top-shelf lead guitar playing.

https://www.facebook.com/SweetChariotRides/
https://soundcloud.com/sheabones
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Who-Can-You-Trust-Records/187406787966906
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Witch Ripper and Brume to Release Split MMXIX March 15

Posted in Whathaveyou on January 15th, 2019 by JJ Koczan

brume

witch ripper

Nobody here loses. Two bands and a label team up, everybody gets circa-100 copies to sell, and everyone helps each other promote it. What Brume, Witch Ripper and DHU Records have going with the Split MMXIX is basically the idea behind doing a split in the first place. Two bands are showcased with the promotional help from an imprint and everybody gets to put out something new. The fact that Seattle four-piece Witch Ripper take up their whole side with their “1985” opus is a bonus, as is Brume‘s side B take on “In the Pines,” the Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter track known to an entire generation as “Where Did You Sleep Last Night” as covered by Nirvana once upon a time on MTV Unplugged. Hard to argue with the pick, frankly.

The release is out March 15 and the preorders start Jan. 25. I wouldn’t be surprised if the pressing sold out on preorders alone, but whether or not the thing actually makes it to its release date, everyone still wins.

From the PR wire:

brume witch ripper split mmxix

Brume/Witch Ripper Split MMXIX (DHU023) Pre order + release date

San Francisco’s Doom Trio Brume have teamed up with Seattle’s Stoner Metal misfits Witch Ripper to bring you a split of unforgiving heaviness to ring in the New Year of Heavy MMXIX

Witch Ripper open the gates on Side A with a mind melting 13+ min track called “1985”. A track that was recorded during their magnificent debut “Homestead” recording session released last year, so you know you will be swept up once again in their punishing assault!

On Side B Brume grace us with a song recorded between the debut “Donkey” and follow up full length “Rooster”, a relentless 8+min Doom anthem called “Man-made” which starts as slow as you know them to be, then bursts into a mid paced groove that will have you banging your head uncontrollably before sending you out into oblivion as they quiet down before the last storm. And, to top it off, Brume does a cover of the classic Leadbelly song “In the Pines” or “Where Did You Sleep Last Night” (also covered by Nirvana and Mark Lanegan respectively) in their own traditional Doomed way, so get ready!

Presented here is the cover artwork, done by the incredible photographer Katrin Albert

Brume/Witch Ripper Split MMXIX

Side Witch Ripper
A1. 1985

Side Brume
B1. Man-made
B2. In the Pines

Pre orders go live Friday January 25th at 7PM CET

Official release date March 15th

The Brume/Witch Ripper Split will be released on 3 different limited edition color vinyl options

DHU Exclusive: Limited to 90 copies
Witch Ripper Edition: Limited to 100 copies
Brume Edition: Limited to 100 copies

Brume
Susie: Vocals/Bass
Jamie: Guitar/Vocals
Jordan: Drums

Witch Ripper
Curtis Parker: Vocals/Guitar
Joe Eck: Drums
Brian Kim: Bass
Coltan Anderson: Guitar

https://www.brumeband.com/
https://brumesf.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/brumeband/
http://brume.bigcartel.com/

https://witchripper.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/Witchripper/
https://www.instagram.com/witch_ripper/

https://www.facebook.com/DHURecords/
https://www.instagram.com/dhu_records/
https://twitter.com/dhu_records
https://darkhedonisticunionrecords.bandcamp.com/
darkhedonisticunionrecords.bigcartel.com/

Brume, Rooster (2017)

Witch Ripper, Homestead (2018)

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Quarterly Review: Rotor, Electric Octopus, Randall Dunn, Graven, Near Dusk, Svuco, Stonus, Acolytes of Moros, Lime Eyelid, Tombtoker

Posted in Reviews on December 13th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

quarterly-review

I’ve been doing this for a while, the whole Quarterly Review thing. Not just talking about the last two weeks — though that also feels like a while to be doing it — but over the last few years. And in so doing I have a couple running gags kind of with myself. One obvious one is the “(immediate points)” for bands who put their longest song first on their album. There is no point system. There will be no tally at the end. I don’t grade records. It’s just a way of noting a decision I almost always find to be particularly bold.

Another is the use of “penultimate.” I don’t even know how this happened, but I use that word all the time in these reviews, way, way more than I might in day-to-day life. Somehow I’m always talking about the second-to-last song. Keep an eye out today, I’m sure it’ll be in there.

Indeed, I bring it up because today is the penultimate day of this extended Quarterly Review. We’ll finish out with the last 10 records tomorrow, and no doubt by the end of it I’ll be doling out more “(immediate points)” and talking about the “apex of the penultimate cut” or whatever else it is I do. Hard not to repeat yourself when you’re writing about 100 records. Or, you know, one.

Quarterly Review #81-90:

Rotor, Sechs

rotor sechs

Long-running Berlin instrumentalists Rotor issue Sechs, their aptly-titled sixth album, as their second for Noisolution after 2015’s Fünf (review here), and in so doing blend the best impulses from where they started with where they’ve ended up. Fünf, not without its moments of heavy psych drift, was a deeply progressive album, and Sechs is likewise, but it also brings in a more natural, warmer production sound like some of their earlier material, so that songs like “Vor der Hern” or “Allmacht” come across as nuanced but welcoming all the same. “Allmacht” is a highlight for its classic prog elements, but that’s not to discount the centerpiece “Abfahrt!,” with its raucous second half or the nine-minute penultimate cut “Druckverband,” which finds Rotor pushing themselves to new heights some 20 years on from their beginnings. Or anything else, for that matter, because it’s all brilliant. And that, basically, is how you know you’re listening to Rotor.

Rotor on Thee Facebooks

Noisolution website

 

Electric Octopus, Line Standing

electric octopus line standing

Next-level naturalism from Belfast trio Electric Octopus means that not only does the digital-only-otherwise-it’d-be-a-box-set Line Standing top four and a half hours, but those four and a half hours bring the listener into the studio with the band — guitarist Tyrell Black, bassist/keyboardist Dale Hughes and drummer Guy Hetherington — as they talk between jams, goof around and discuss what they just played in quick interludes. Complementing cuts like 35-minute opener “Iliudi,” the 38-minute “Line Standing 23336,” the 24-minute “Room Move” and the three-minute funk-reggae vibe of “Inspired by a Chicken,” the chatter gives Line Standing an even more organic vibe not by trying to capture a live feel, like what they’d do on stage — they have plenty of live albums for that — but by bringing the listener into the studio while they pick up their instruments and improvise their way through whatever it is that’s coming next, which is something that everyone seems to find out together. It’s not always smooth, but neither should it be. This is pure sonic exploration — and not a little of it.

Electric Octopus on Thee Facebooks

Electric Octopus on Bandcamp

 

Randall Dunn, Beloved

randall dunn beloved

Randall Dunn, through his production work, collaborations with Sunn O))), founding Master Musicians of Bukkake, etc., is no stranger to experimentalism, and his first solo album, Beloved (on Figureight), finds him evoking cinematic landscapes one at a time in ambient tracks that range from minimalist to consuming by sheer will. His range as a composer means that “Mexico City” shimmers with a near-overwhelming post-Vangelis splendor while “Lava Rock and Amber” is barren enough to make each strike of the piano keys feel like a lifeline before the synth horror takes hold near the end. Dunn brings in several guest vocalists for spots on “Something About that Night” and closer “A True Home,” but there’s hardly a lack of human presence throughout the material anyway, as the nine-minute centerpiece “Theoria : Aleph” resonates with the creative drive that made it. Not by any means a record that’s going to be for everyone, Beloved casts a sound that’s impeccably broad.

Randall Dunn on Thee Facebooks

Figureight on Bandcamp

 

Graven, Heirs of Discord

Graven Heirs of Discord

Heirs of Discord, indeed. With guitarist/vocalist Peter Maturi and drummer Chris Csar from the much-missed Swarm of the Lotus and bassist Teddy Patterson of Burnt by the Sun and Human Remains in the up-and-down-the-Eastern-Seaboard lineup with vocalist Jason Borowy, there’s no shortage of discord to go around. Deathly extremity and a pervasive grinding sensibility is conveyed with tones that absolutely crush and a groove that, while not shy with the blastbeats on “I Dreamt You Were Dead” — or the bonus track Human Remains cover “Human,” for that matter — is no less comfortable locked in the nod of the nine-minute “Thieves of Rotted Ilk.” It reportedly took Graven over a year to make the six-song/28-minute LP at various studios (including one two towns over from where I grew up in my beloved Garden State), and one only hopes the no-doubt daunting nature of that task doesn’t dissuade Graven from a follow-up, because whether it’s the angular starts and stops of “Backwards to Oblivion” or the initial assault of “A Failed Mask,” they bring a stylistic nuance to extreme metal that goes beyond the often dry showcase of technical prowess the style can sometimes be. However long it might take to put together, a sophomore outing feels well justified.

Graven on Thee Facebooks

Graven on Bandcamp

 

Near Dusk, Near Dusk

Near Dusk Near Dusk

The cleverly-titled “Humboldt Pie” finds them dipping into bluesier fare with some psychedelic effect on guitarist Matthew Orloff‘s vocals, and “We are the Buffalo” has a distinct spaciousness, but the core of Denver trio Near Dusk‘s self-released, self-titled debut is in straightforward heavy rock, and Orloff, bassist Kellen McInerney and drummer Jon Orloff sound well schooled in the ways of following the riff. “That Bastard” chugs out behind a vocal echo and the six-minute opener and longest track (immediate points) “No More” introduces the steady factor that is McInerney‘s bass behind some initial guitar noodling that leads to the first of many rolling grooves to come on the seven-track/34-minute outing. The bass again gets to shine in the subsequent “Sweet Home,” setting up the final push for a moment before being joined by the drums and guitar, and the low-end tone is right on, though by the time they close out with “Furnace Creek,” all three of them seem to tease some jammier sensibilities. Near Dusk allow themselves room to develop their approach and perspective, but establish a strong root of songwriting to serve as their foundation as they move forward.

Near Dusk on Thee Facebooks

Near Dusk on Bandcamp

 

Svuco, El Gran Mito de SanSaru

svuco El Gran Mito de SanSaru

At least some of the material on Svuco‘s debut long-player, El Gran Mito de SanSaru, dates back a few years. The release includes what was the title-track of their 2015 Mizaru EP as well as the title-track of 2016’s Kikazaru, as well as a number of tracks that also featured on the Iwazaru EP shortly before the album actually arrived. Still, taken in this form and with these recordings, the Granada-based four-piece unfurl a varied 13-song full-length that’s crisp in its production and smoothly constructed to hit hard but with a sense of tonal presence that speaks to a heavy rock influence. That is, there might be a current of noise rock to the ’90s-style chug of “Llorarás,” but “Fuzzia” still has room for organ and acoustic guitar along with its central riff. Later cuts like “Nobogo,” the layered-vocals of “El Color del Sol,” and the almost-industrial pulsations (conveyed through organic instrumentation) of “El Dios del Nuevo Mundo” branch out, but there’s an underlying identity taking shape all the while.

Svuco on Thee Facebooks

Svuco on Bandcamp

 

Stonus, Lunar Eclipse

Stonus Lunar Eclipse

Welcoming in its tone and bordering on cosmic in its atmosphere, Lunar Eclipse is the second EP from Cyprus-based troupe Stonus, and for the sprawl of its eight-minute title-track alone, it showcases distinct potential on the part of the band. Intro and outro tracks help set up a flow, but as “Aspirin” and “Spiritual Realities” fuzz their way toward “Lunar Eclipse” itself, it’s hardly like Stonus need the help. The tempo of “Aspirin” tells the tale, taking desert rock to three-quarters speed for an extra laid back vibe, still pushed along by the drums, but chill, chill, chill as it goes. “Spiritual Realities” is a little more tripped out in its lumber, and its vocals are more forward in the mix, but once again, “Lunar Eclipse” is nothing but a joy to behold from front to back, and in large part it defines the short release that shares its name. They close out with the minute of experimentalism on “Euphoric Misery” and only make one hope they don’t lost those impulses by the time they get around to a full-length, because they’ll only help them further distinguish themselves.

Stonus on Thee Faceboks

Stonus on Bandcamp

 

Acolytes of Moros, The Wellspring

acolytes of moros the wellspring

Seven years on from playing their first show, Swedish doomers Acolytes of Moros present their first full-length, The Wellspring (CD on Nine Records), and if that might stand as an indication of their pacing overall, it would certainly apply to the album itself. Presented as four extended tracks with an interlude/instrumental near seven minutes dividing the two halves, it’s a rawly-produced take on doom-death traditionalism with an emphasis on the first part of that equation. Calling it “morose” feels too easy given the band’s moniker, but they’re nothing if not self-aware, and the miseries they portray in “Quotidian” and the 14-minute “A Yen to Relinquish and Evanesce” border on the dramatic without ever really tipping too far in that direction, coming through as much in the grueling riffs as in the vocal declarations and willfully repetitive rhythms. It’s a slog and it’s supposed to be, but Acolytes of Moros eschew the sometimes lush presentation of their genre in favor of a barebones take that loses none of its emotional impact for that.

Acolytes of Moros on Thee Facebooks

Nine Records website

 

Lime Eyelid, Week of Wonders

lime eyelid week of wonders

As regards recording narratives, it’s hard to beat the image of Traveling Circle drummer Josh Schultz recording Lime Eyelid‘s debut album, Week of Wonders (as in, The Wonder Weeks?), alone in his kitchen. The resulting limited LP is comprised mostly of numbered instrumental experiments in drone and languid groove, save for “I Saw Waves,” which brings to mind some of Six Organs of Admittance‘s far-out earlier fare, but psychedelia holds a prominent sway and if you ever want a lesson in doing something new with familiar elements, look no further than the watery guitar line of “1” or “3,” with its Earth groove gone processional. The 12-minute soundscape of “4” follows as Schultz moves deeper into the realms of cosmic minimalism — that big, mostly empty, galaxy — but “5” somehow sounds even more piped in from outer space, and closer “6” rounds out with swells of high-pitched volume that seem to be speaking their own language in tone. Pretty vast reaches for a record to hit, having been recorded in the kitchen. One awaits further adventures in the follow-up.

Lime Eyelid on Soundcloud

Lime Eyelid on YouTube

 

Tombtoker, Coffin Texts

tombtoker coffin texts

I don’t know if the band’s moniker refers to one who actually tokes tombs or who tokes in tombs, but neither would surprise me. The Baltimorean five-piece Tombtoker unveil their 20-minute debut EP, Coffin Texts (on Seeing Red, tapes through Metal Swarm), with a melding of doom, sludge and metallic extremity that is righteous in its riffs and malevolent in its purposes. That is to say, they mean harm. “Warfare Revolution” and “Robo Cujo” demonstrate that plainly ahead of the centerpiece “Stenchsquatch” with its oh-you’re-gonna-have-to-play-that-at-all-the-shows lurching midsection of death, while the subsequent “Blood Freak” taps Eyehategoddy swing and closer/shortest track “Globster” (3:21) bludgeons its own riffs before a bit of Slayer-style ping ride late adds even more of that metal-for-metal feel. I’d call it promising, but maybe “foreboding” is a better word. Whether they’re smoking your corpse or just smoking near your corpse, Tombtoker bring a welcome sense of chaos to extreme sludge that hearkens to the genre’s original, unhinged appeal.

Tombtoker on Thee Facebooks

Seeing Red Records on Bandcamp

Metal Swarm website

 

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Dzjenghis Khan Self-Titled Reissue Due Feb. 15

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 12th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

dzjenghis khan

If you need to read any further into this post than the phrase ‘originally released by Motorwolf,’ then congratulations on the homework you’re about to do. And I mean that, because if you’ve never explored the output of that should-be-legendary Dutch imprint and the studio that shares its name and the kingly freaks behind it, well, again, congratulations. Enjoy your new life.

Dzjenghis Khan‘s self-titled debut came out in 2007 on that imprint as well as Leafhound Records and they also had a live tape called Prehistoric Rock with an awesome shredding T-Rex on the cover out through the likewise venerable German imprint Who Can You Trust? Records, so they weren’t exactly short on righteous associations. The thread continues with a reissue of the self-titled due early next year on Heavy Psych Sounds, which has likewise proved its reissue mettle with the likes of Sgt. Sunshine, Brant friggin’ Bjork and others.

Preorders are up now:

dzjenghis khan dzjenghis khan

Heavy Psych Sounds Records & Booking is really proud to start the presale of a great reissue *** DZJENGHIS KHAN – s/t ***

HPS 089

Grab your copy here:

https://www.heavypsychsounds.com/shop.htm#HPS089

or

https://heavypsychsoundsrecords.bandcamp.com/album/dzjenghis-khan-dzjenghis-khan-presale

RELEASE DATE: FEBRUARY 15th, 2019

One of the most important psych – acid rock albums of the new millenium. The Dzjenghis Khan self-titled debut album was released in 2007 by the dutch indipendent label Motorwolf. The San Francisco based band Dzjenghis Khan featured bassist Carson Binks (also in Wild Eyes and Saviours), drummer Tommy Tomson and guitarist Lane Rider. This record reflects the musical scene of that era and it’s still a raw acid rock pearl !!!

Heavy Psych Sounds Records is so proud to bring back to the current audience a piece of real acid rock. Dzjenghis Khan was one of the first bands to bring back the “psych sound”, in a time where there was not real audience, we can say they’ve been pioneers after the pioneers!

The album is composed by 10 killer tracks, the sound is dirty, fuzzy and raw. The atmosphere is nearly lo-fi but the riffing melt your face.

AVAILABLE IN:
20 LTD TEST PRESS VINYL
300 CLEAR BLUE VINYL
STANDARD VERSION IN TRANSPARENT ORANGE VINYL
DIGIPAK
DIGITAL

TRACKLIST
Snake Bite
Wildcat
The Widow
No Time For Love
Avenue A
Against The Wall
Black Saint
End Of The Line
Rosie
Sister Dorien

DZJENGHIS KHAN
Binksebus Eruptum – Bass
Tommy Tomson – Drums
Lane Rider – Guitar

https://www.facebook.com/Dzjenghis-Khan-129699693737982/
https://www.facebook.com/HEAVYPSYCHSOUNDS
http://www.heavypsychsounds.com
https://heavypsychsoundsrecords.bandcamp.com

Dzjenghis Khan, “Evil World”

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Brume Headed to Europe This Weekend; Playing with High on Fire and More

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 9th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

BRUME

San Francisco three-piece Brume hit the UK last Spring in time to play Desertfest London 2017 and toured with Gurt on that trip, so I guess everyone got along well enough since they’re doing it again. Not Desertfest, the touring part. This time it’ll be a couple shows in the Netherlands together and one at The Black Heart — which is a great place to hang out, so long as you don’t try to bring your baby — in addition to Brume appearing at a fest in Austria and playing a gig in Budapest alongside fellow Bay Area denizens High on Fire, which sounds like an utter blast. Oh, and Elephant Tree are on that Black Heart show too, so all the better. If you get to talk to them, please send my best.

Brume released their debut full-length, Rooster (review here), last year through Doom Stew and DHU Records. Dates and a couple quotes from the band follow here for your perusal:

brume european tour poster

BRUME // EUROPEAN TOUR // AUGUST // 2018

It’s tour season and we’re hitting the bricks. Austria, Budapest, Netherlands, UK. Here we come…

Susie: “Music is life. Europeans understand that better than anybody else in the world. We can’t wait to be reunited.”

Jamie: “We are crazy excited about Europe. We’ve played out a lot this year but this these dates will be the cherry on the cake and a chance to try out some new material. Getting back on stage with Gurt is always the most fun too, London will be a PARTY.”

Brume European tour:
11 – Aug / Sauzipf Rocks Festival Dobriach, Austria
12 – Aug / Durer Kert Budapest, Hungary w/ High on Fire
16 – Aug / Studio de Veste Leiden, Netherlands*
17 – Aug / Butchers Tears Amsterdam, Netherlands*
18 – Aug / The Black Heart London, UK* w/ Elephant Tree
* Dates with Gurt

Brume are:
Susie McMullin – Vocals/Bass
Jordan Perkins-Lewis – Drums
Jamie McCathie – Guitar

https://www.brumeband.com/
https://brumesf.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/brumeband/
http://brume.bigcartel.com/
https://www.doomstew.com/
http://darkhedonisticunionrecords.bigcartel.com/

Brume, European tour trailer

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