Review & Lyric Video Premiere: Pale Divine, Consequence of Time

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Reviews on June 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Pale Divine Consequence of Time

[Click play above to see the premiere of Pale Divine’s lyric video for ‘Saints of Fire.’ Consequence of Time is out June 26 and available to preorder from Cruz Del Sur: CD preorder, LP preorder w/ poster & download, digital release June 19.]

Even among American traditionalist doom — which as a whole is underrated — there aren’t many who reach the same echelons in that regard as  We are always in touch. Using our website, you get a bunch of opportunities from choosing the best Phd Thesis Digital Libraryer to the non-stop customer Pale Divine. Also their debut release for  http://www.internet-influence.co.uk/need-help-for-assignment/, - dissertation help service. Ranked #1 by 10,000 plus clients; for 25 years our certified resume writers have been developing Cruz Del Sur Music argument in critical thinking - Answers When youre writing a research essay you are data in order to come to some sort of conclusion about a Consequence of Time is their sixth full-length, and as it arrives just two years after 2018’s self-titled LP (review here), it also marks the quickest time differential the Chesapeake-region group — Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware — have ever had between two offerings.  Where to order custom research papers? Take a look here, the http://geomedia.co.uk/research-paper-analysis-example/ writing site will do your assignment from scratch on time. Pale Divine, the record, was notable for marking the first appearance of  Business School. Trust Academy?s current mission statement affirms the Business and Secretarial Outline For Writing A Research Paper School?s belief that with the Ron “Fezz” McGinnis on bass and backing vocals, who brought the five-string acumen he’d demonstrated in Looking for writers who can write high quality ebook? Contact 3Leaps Content Writing Company. We are offering low cost Paper Writing Service Cheap. Admiral Browning and countless others to the classic-style rolling riffs and searing leads of guitarist english essay writing services 2014 (Volume 1) [Gabrielle Glancy] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. As the title implies, this book showcases the Greg Diener (also vocals) and the ever-steady, never-flashy, always-efficient drumming of  Content Writing Companies In Lucknow - professional scholars, quality services, fast delivery and other benefits can be found in our custom writing service Darin McCloskey. On the eight-song/42-minute  http://www.ps-carservice.com/a-cadaverous-dissertation/: Academic proofreading. Are you an international or native English student who needs to improve your essays? Contact me for proofreading... Consequence of Time, there is another significant change in the band’s makeup.

Even as they were releasing the self-titled,  Place a 'write my essay' order and get online academic help from cheap essay writing service. 24/7 Non-plagiarized visit here from per Pale Divine announced the addition of  Bio writing can be quite a challenge to cope on your own. That is why you might want to get some assistance from professional enter sites. Dana Ortt on guitar and vocals alongside  AUTOBIOGRAPHY/Cv Writing Service New Zealand Do you need help writing your autobiography? Would you like to surprise a loved-one by arranging for their memoirs Diener, a shift that was essentially a merging between  We at Homework Help Hotlines deploy a very scientific approach to help you learn how you can write perfect assignments. Pale Divine and the  Professional essay paper editing can benefit to your grades and future career. When someone asks of the benefits our Steps In Creating A Business Plan can grant him Ortt-led  Why http://cheapessaywritings24.com/buy-research-papers-online/ Online? Sometimes it happens that you find yourself in a drastic situation when your essay is due tomorrow or even today. Obviously, if Beelzefuzz, in which  Diener and McCloskey had both been members. The end result is that between DienerOrtt and McGinnisPale Divine now have three vocalists capable of carrying a song on their own, whether it’s Diener‘s metal-tinged proclamations, Ortt‘s bizarro-prog otherworldliness, complemented by his nuance of guitar tone, or McGinnis with his lower register bluesy take. Unsurprisingly, Consequence of Time is easily the most diverse album Pale Divine have ever made, and perhaps also the richest in terms of its general approach, since the influences especially of its two guitarists are readily on display, whether it’s in the Beelzefuzzian chug and dreamstate lumber of “Phantasmagoria” or in Diener‘s veritable clinic on how to shred a solo and still give a sense of soul in the process.

It bears underscoring just how significant of a turn Consequence of Time is for Pale Divine. The band mark their 25th anniversary in 2020, having begun with McCloskey and Diener in 1995 before releasing their first demo a couple years later. It seems to me not just a marked change in terms of the band’s sound that welcoming Ortt has enacted, but a genuinely admirable openness on the part of Diener. Yes, there’s “sharing the spotlight,” as much as such a thing exists in a genre where one might be inclined in the first sentence of a review to point out how underrated it is, but more than that, to have the ability after some 20 years of having the band as a vehicle for his songwriting to be able to adjust the entire process in such a way is staggering.

pale divine

Ortt doesn’t just sing backup on Consequence of Time, and he makes a mark in terms of the overall style of riffs and tones as well on songs like “Broken Martyr,” “Satan in Starlight,” and even the Diener-led opener “Tyrants/Pawns (Easy Prey).” It’s a rare band and a rare player who would allow that kind of shift to take place at any point, let alone after 20 years, and Pale Divine are unquestionably stronger for it. The patience in the 10-minute unfolding of the 10-minute title-track alone is proof of the subtle level on which the change can be felt, a melding of purpose between what Beelzefuzz were by their finish and the roots-doom mindset that Pale Divine have always portrayed so well.

Perhaps it’s sharing vocal duties that has allowed Diener‘s guitar to shine all the more, but his leads soar throughout Consequence of Time in striking fashion, and with McGinnis‘ bass and McCloskey‘s drums behind, there’s never any risk of the band losing their trajectory whatsoever. As the title-track approaches the halfway mark, Diener and Ortt share vocals against a stark and largely quiet backdrop ahead of the next classic metal lead (it might be Ortt‘s, I can’t be sure), but that moment sums up the incredible, throw-the-doors-open spirit of Consequence of Time. Ortt takes the fore later, and Diener rejoins and the two guitars lock purposes in solos and riffs to close out, but in that moment, not only the change of the band’s sound, but the creative spirit that drove that change are palpable. The risk and the reward both are right there for the listener to absorb.

The subsequent closing pair “No Escape” and “Saints of Fire” would seem to be an epilogue of sorts, or at least a movement unto themselves after the title-track, but their purpose isn’t lost for existing in the shadow of the 10-minute cut preceding. In the speedy “No Escape,” Diener fronts, and they trade for “Saints of Fire,” and it’s a last-minute showcase of the multifaceted nature of who Pale Divine are in 2020 and what they can accomplish as a group in this new form. “No Escape” gallops in brash form and is probably the most fun I’ve ever heard Pale Divine have on a record, and “Saints of Fire” pushes in its second half into a quirky dark gorgeousness that feels like pure inheritance from Beelzefuzz put to righteous use. Pale Divine, the power-trio turned four-piece after 20-some years, march their way out of Consequence of Time and into an unknowable future as a stronger, more versatile and more vibrant unit.

The band they were is still very much present in their sound, and they remain as sonically committed to doom as they’ve ever been, but the foundation of influence has expanded and their craft is all the more affecting and progressive for it. Between the quick turnaround, the new label and the new construction, Pale Divine move into their second quarter-century with an almost impossible feeling of potential, and one can only look forward to what they might yet accomplish as they move on from here. 25 years on and reaching new heights. That is a special band, and yes, vastly underrated. They may stay that way and they may not, but one way or the other, Consequence of Time will stand as one of 2020’s foremost offerings in doom, and deservedly so.

Pale Divine on Thee Facebooks

Pale Divine website

Cruz del Sur Music website

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Days of Rona: Andy Martin of Clamfight

Posted in Features on May 26th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

clamfight-andy-martin

Days of Rona: Andy Martin of Clamfight (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

As a band we currently have about half of our fourth record recorded. We were in the studio the weekend of March 13th which is pretty much when shit hit the fan in the Philly/New Jersey area so it seemed like every time I checked my phone between takes there’d be another set new of restrictions or some new horrifying statistic coming out of NYC or Italy. Since then it’s been no practice, but we talk every day and Sean’s been writing a lot.

Sean has been killing it with new material but I’ve been pretty creatively blocked for most of lock down. I wrote a novel in 2019, some friends have read it and given me great feedback but I haven’t been able to get moving on the second draft at all.

Ken from Eternal Black roped Erik from Thunderbird Divine and I into his Swarm of Flies project, and that seems to have finally gotten me moving and creating again, which is great. Now that I feel like I can write again I’m going to attack some new Clamfight stuff Sean has sent me and hopefully get on with the second draft of the novel.

Personally, I lost my job pretty quickly and that stung but I’ve been lucky enough to land with a new company and I’m back where I belong, digging holes in farm fields.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

The city of Philadelphia gave the bars St Patty’s Day weekend, and I wonder how many fewer cases our area would have had if they clamped down quicker. It was so bizarre being in the recording studio and reading about what was unfolding in New York and coming home to my neighborhood in South Philly and seeing the bars on Two Street packed. Since that first stumble I’ve got to give the city a lot of credit, they’ve handled it pretty well. Who knows though, Philly has a pretty terrible public transportation system and that may have saved more lives than the lockdown.

Parks have remained open and fishing has been allowed which has been a great way of retaining my sanity but otherwise we’re pretty similar to NJ and NY, masks in stores, with most businesses that aren’t grocery stores and Home Depot closed.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

I think the response by the music community has been pretty great. Live-streams, people digging out show footage, putting out demos (Clamfight will hopefully be doing something similar soon), it’s all been gravy. As for the future of what live music looks like, I’m unfortunately less optimistic. I almost get cranky when I see people advertising shows later in the summer or even the fall, because I think the broader federal response in the US has been so criminally inept that live music, bars, restaurants, etc aren’t coming back any time soon. It just won’t be safe. Setting aside the question of how many venues even survive this, unless there’s a vaccine, playing a show or attending one is going to be a real act of a faith in the people around you. Are they being smart and safe? Would they even know if they were a carrier? That’s kind of where I’m at with the live music, it may happen, but it’s going to be a real question of who is actually willing to show up from bands or the audience.
That said, would I play a show in the woods with a generator? Yes, yes I would.

Personally, I’ve been all over the place in terms of my mood. I’ve had days where I’ve spent hours fly fishing and then made a big dinner with my girlfriend and then settle in with some wine and watched a movie, and days like that feel like vacation. And then there’s the days when I’m missing my family, or all my close friends in the UK, and those days can be crushing.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

Because there’s been comparatively little Clamfight for me recently, I’ll explain it from the fishing and archaeology side of things.

For eight years I’ve been a part of the Ness of Brodgar excavations in Orkney. It’s changed my life and joining the team has far and away been the best thing I’ve ever done. For obvious reasons, the Ness and a lot of other research excavations won’t be happening this year. On a personal level it’s a heart breaker, because the dig team is a second family to me and I don’t know when I’ll see them again, but missing a season can have huge repercussions for the dig itself. I know times are tight, but if you’re an archaeology or history buff and have a few bucks to spare it’d be worth checking to see if there’s any digs or research projects you’d like to support because without those visitor dollars, they’re all going to be hurting.

I’ve really rediscovered my love of fly fishing during lock down, and besides giving me something to do it’s restored my faith in humanity a bit during this age of performative shiftiness and a total lack of leadership from the Federal government.

Fisherman can be really chatty, but there’s been a real shift in that chatter recently. There‘a been several times during this thing where I’ve been in the middle of the creek and either another fisherman, or a retired guy getting his steps in will stop on the bank and we’ll talk. Not just the simple “catching any?” chatter, but fifteen or twenty minute conversations, that segue from fishing to health and the state of the world pretty quickly. And these conversations always end with the same two words, “stay safe.” Usually accompanied by a big open palm wave from a retired union guy with a hand like a side of beef. I don’t know what it is about these conversations but that level of openness between strangers really makes me feel better and give me hope that maybe, just maybe, we’ll come out a little better on the other side of this thing.

So that’s what I’ve got for you gang. We are clearly a very long way from the end of this thing, so stay safe.

www.facebook.com/Clamfight
https://www.instagram.com/clamfight/
https://clamfight.bandcamp.com/

Tags: , , , ,

Days of Rona: Shayne Reed of Almost Honest

Posted in Features on May 22nd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

Shayne Reed of Almost Honest

Days of Rona: Shayne Reed of Almost Honest (New Cumberland, Pennsylvania)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

As a band we have been taking the time to learn new skills. Some of us having been learning new scales, how to play banjo and overall just improve ourselves musically. For me personally I have been reading a lot which I hope will give me inspiration for lyrics. I have also been practicing my vocals and messing with different pedal combinations. Our plans have all been cancelled just like everyone else. We had a New England/Canada tour get cancelled along with our June tour. We were also supposed to start recording our new album in March. I will say that this has given us more time to work on the songs we were going to record. I think that once we are able to finally get back into the studio they will be the best they can be.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

At first I think in our area they were handling it very well. Even though we had to keep apart I felt like there was a unity and people knew what they had to do for the betterment of others. Now I feel like people are sick of being inside so in my area you have seen a lot of defiance and I fear that it will only get worse. At the time writing this we are still on full lockdown until June 4th. I’ve started seeing more and more people go out without a mask. Where I am that is required. It is going to be very interesting to see how people around here start reacting by June.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

They have responded with compassion and hard work. People have been collaborating on music, buying merch, doing live streams, offering free services, and so much more. I don’t know what the future holds for the music industry or live concerts but I at least know that I will be surrounded by great people. I personally am ok. I have been working from home and spending more time with my family. It has been very hard to get inspired during this time but I have been reading a lot of books and hiking which is helping.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

I am lucky enough to be in a band with people I can call my best friends. They are both hard working and I know that this time off is only going to improve the album we are going to record. I don’t think anyone in this band is used to there new normal but it does make us appreciate what we had and we are itching to get back on the road. We don’t want to rush it because we want to be responsible but as soon as it is safe to do so we are taking our van, hitting the pavement and playing our favorite cities. This has been a journey and though unfortunately I think it is far from over I have learned a lot. I am very lucky to be in the band I am in. I am also lucky to have the fans we have. People are still streaming our music through all of this and have continued to throw their support behind us. There is nothing more humbling than people supporting your music. We will all get through this together and once it is safe to do so we will see you on the road.

https://www.almosthonestofficial.com/
https://www.facebook.com/AlmostHonestOfficial/
https://www.instagram.com/almost_honest_pa/
https://almosthonestpa.bandcamp.com/
https://open.spotify.com/artist/65vNU7jxsZhy5B2W57cA6O
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuSry0azmLaXA8uyiwYQs7w

Tags: , , ,

Days of Rona: Darin McCloskey of Pale Divine

Posted in Features on May 19th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

pale divine darin mccloskey

Days of Rona: Darin McCloskey of Pale Divine (West Chester, Pennsylvania)

How have you been dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

Well as a band, like many others it has us on hiatus; practice, gigs and writing as a group came to an abrupt halt. That being said we had just finished recording our new album ‘Consequence of Time’, and are currently positioning ourselves to introduce the album. We’re hoping that we can get out and play live here in the near future. As an individual I can honestly say that it hasn’t had that much of an effect on me personally. I’m a homebody and with an “essential worker status” my routine has primarily stayed intact. I really feel for the people whose life has been upended by the pandemic.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From thegovernment response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

That’s a difficult question to answer. I think that the response should directly relate to the overall numbers of cases asymptomatic, symptomatic, deaths, age ranges and regions. Trouble with this is the numbers have been all over the place depending on the source. Pennsylvania recently had to reduce the death toll by a little over 200 due to corrections between probable and confirmed cases. I can understand that people fear the unknown, I just hope it doesn’t cripple us as a society. I would like everyone to enjoy living rather than concentrating on what could possibly kill you. I think a balance is what we all need…but that’s just me. You should be able to be concerned, take precautions but not let it consume you.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

I think the music community shines in situations like these. Not only does it give them time for creativity, it also shines a light on their personable nature. I see bands reaching out, live streaming, simply talking about life in general. I’ve seen some drawing attention to people and establishments in need. I personally enjoy the time spent with my wife, my dogs and record collection. That being said it will be great playing live again and going to some concerts. Fingers crossed that it will be soon.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, orpersonally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

I can’t complain about my situation, to do so would make light of the hardships so many are going through right now. As for “New Normal,” I truly hope that in the future this will be no one’s new normal. There needs to be precautions until we know the true scope of this virus. I just hope that we can soon move forward and enjoy life again. Life is to be lived, but for now stay safe and keep your eye on the prize.

https://www.facebook.com/serpentspath/
http://www.paledivineband.com/
cruzdelsurmusic.com
facebook.com/cruzdelsurmusic
cruzdelsurmusic.bandcamp.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Witch Hazel Change Name to SpellBook; Sign to Cruz Del Sur for Magick & Mischief Release

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 6th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Bands change their name all the time when they’re starting out. That’s not weird or out of the ordinary. What might raise an eyebrow or two here is that SpellBook — though newly signed to Cruz Del Sur as part of the label’s continuing doom binge — were a band for 13 years operating under their now-discarded moniker, Witch Hazel. It was just last year they released the album Otherworldly (review here) under that banner, and that was their third record. Some acts don’t get to one before they scrap the name and start over. Witch Hazel had three.

Why the radical reboot? I’m curious for sure. Apparently it’s been in consideration for some time, as the PR wire explains, but even so, it’s striking that after being together for so long already, they would shift in such a way. One wonders how the new record — titled Magick and Mischief and due in September — might differ in sound from Otherworldly, and to just how many levels their new era might extend.

Here’s news:

spellbook

SpellBook (formerly Witch Hazel) Signs With Cruz Del Sur Music

Cruz Del Sur Music is proud to announce the signing of York, Pennsylvania vintage proto-metal purveyors SpellBook. The band’s debut album, Magick & Mischief, is due for release in September.

Originally formed in 2007 under the name of WITCH HAZEL by lead singer Nate Tyson and drummer Nicholas Zinn, WITCH HAZEL had three self-released albums to their credit, Forsaken Remedies (2012), Nocturnity (2015) and Otherwordly (2018). The band, rounded out by guitarist Andy Craven and bassist Seibert Lowe, nearly changed their name before the release of Otherwordly, but decided to make the switch to SpellBook when its current formation started writing the material that would become Magick & Mischief.

“Eleven years named one thing wasn’t easy to get past, but we realized to take this to the next step it was necessary,” says Zinn. “We liked the idea of having the song ‘The SpellBook’ from ‘Forsaken Remedies’ being the representing name that ties the past, present and future together. We’re very proud of our past, though, and plan to still play some WITCH HAZEL songs live, especially those from Otherworldly.”

SpellBook was brought to Cruz Del Sur Music directly by the label’s A&R rep and WHILE HEAVEN WEPT main man Tom Phillips who reveals how he was “tipped off” about the band: “A good friend of mine Mike Smith pulled me aside to suggest I check out this band WITCH HAZEL he recently had included as part of a tour package… more or less raving about how good they were…and boy, was he right! In an age where we’ve seen a number of retro-inspired acts rising in popularity that ultimately come across as stale or reeking of gimmicks, WH ticked all the right boxes for even MY jaded ears; equal parts BLACK SABBATH, DEEP PURPLE, B.O.C., ALICE COOPER, and THIN LIZZY – songs so well-crafted and capably performed that I immediately reached out to Enrico saying “We NEED to sign this band immediately!” – because Magick & Mischief totally blows away the already awesome Otherwordly in every possible way!”

Zinn describes Magick & Mischief as the band’s “most dynamic offering yet.” From proto-metal jaunts such as “Wands To The Sky” and “Ominous Skies”, to the epic doom rocker “Not Long For This World” and already-crowd favorite “Amulet”, it’s easy to see why SpellBook is eager to hit the road in support of the album.

“We’re a unique band and we’re proud of that,” closes Zinn. “There is no formula; there are no rules. We write what feels good and we are tapped into a creative high right now, already writing for the next album. However, the release of Magick & Mischief in September is priority number one and we’re excited for everyone to hear it. It’s rewarding this label is taking us on and recognizes the potential. We’re thrilled!”.

facebook.com/spellbookband/
https://witchhazeldoom.bandcamp.com/
cruzdelsurmusic.com
facebook.com/cruzdelsurmusic
cruzdelsurmusic.bandcamp.com

Witch Hazel, Otherworldly (2019)

Tags: , , , ,

Days of Rona: David Wheeler of OutsideInside

Posted in Features on April 21st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

outsideinside-david-wheeler

Days of Rona: David Wheeler of OutsideInside (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

Mostly we’re just trying to stay in touch via text and support each other. I actually tested positive for covid-19 and was laid up for a few weeks dealing with that. The symptoms of the first week were pretty mild with fever, coughing and chills kicking in for the second week. Even after the symptoms ended I spent another solid week battling fatigue, but thankfully am now completely recovered. Needless to say I’m just now beginning to think about anything music related. So far all I’ve managed to do is learn “Adam’s Apple” by Aerosmith on guitar.

Luckily, the release show for Outsideinside’s new LP took place on March 6, about a week before all of the shit hit the fan so we managed to sneak it in. My other band Limousine Beach had to delay a mixing session for an LP we’re working on and had to cancel a handful of local and out of town shows we were really looking forward to, but we’ll take it all in stride. The most important thing is to flatten this curve. Luckily none of the other people I make music with have gotten [sick].

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

All non-life sustaining businesses are closed here in Pittsburgh and social distancing is in full effect.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Obviously it’s been financially devastating to anyone who makes a living as a performer, working in a venue or as a sound engineer etc. As is the case in disasters, people are working toward creative solutions. For example, my wife Susan Pedrazzi and her friend Elizabeth Sanchez have started a creative collective called Together___Apart that highlights individual artists and features stickers, tote bags, and t-shirts for sale with proceeds benefiting local performers and gig workers (https://instagram.com/together______apart).

Musicians have also found alternative ways to continue performing via livestream and are blasting out home recordings. Aside from music, I was blown away by the support I received from my friends, (as well as strangers in some cases) while I was sick. It just goes to show you that you see the best of people in times like these. There is real work to do to keep everyone’s head above water, and people are finding ways to accomplish that.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation as a band, personally, or anything?

Mostly, as someone who is recovering from a “mild” case of covid-19, I just want to say you do not want it and you do not want your friends and/or family to get it. It’s pretty brutal even if you’re a relatively healthy individual. Let’s do right by each other and stay away.

https://www.facebook.com/outsideinside1/
https://open.spotify.com/artist/1Nb2f7ORXPcKchOjqFqauG
https://www.facebook.com/rockfreaksrecords/
http://www.rockfreaks.de/

Tags: , , , , , ,

Days of Rona: William Miller of The Age of Truth

Posted in Features on April 16th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

Bill Miller of The Age of Truth

Days of Rona: William Miller of The Age of Truth (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

The band text thread is constantly going all day now instead of just at night and I would guess we are doing a fair bit more drinking than usual, I know I am. On March 16th Philadelphia restricted all non-essential businesses so that has shut down Retro City Studios where we were at the tail end of recording our next album. Mike D. was scheduled to be back in there that week to finish up his guitar work. When we got the text from Joe Boldizar saying the studio was shut down. We were expecting it, but it was still deflating. Especially as we are all really excited about this record. Thankfully, all of us are healthy.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

As of March 23rd the governor issued a “Stay at Home” order which is keeping everyone in their residence unless they are travelling for select reasons. They are suggesting less than 10 people at gatherings, social distancing and enforcing the closure of non-essential businesses. Schools are closed so my little girl has been home from kindergarten for the last two and a half weeks. It’s all so strange for us, but she has been pretty close to rock solid the entire time.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

Around my neighborhood everyone is staying home and keeping their distance from each other when we pass in the street. It has a surreal feeling to it all, but most everyone gets it and is just doing what they think is best for all of us. The worst part is the kids not getting to play with each other. In music just seeing the festivals have to cancel is the most heartbreaking part. You know how much work gets put into making them happen and to have to shut that down after all the time scheduling, logistics, and the money spent. I can only imagine how terrible making that decision has to feel. All the tours too, so sorry for everybody that is going through that. On the bright side, you know some great art is going to come out of this experience. Shakespeare wrote King Lear under quarantine so maybe one of us will create greatness from nothing.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

We just saw the largest unemployment report in the country’s history on Thursday and this week will be even worse so people are struggling, especially creative people. We have projects that could use talented people, things like a logo and artwork for our record so send us some ideas. We are definitely hiring (contact@theageoftruth.net).

Most importantly, the only way we get through this is together. Look out for each other sisters and brothers.

http://www.theageoftruth.net
https://theageoftruth.bandcamp.com/
http://www.facebook.com/theageoftruth
https://www.instagram.com/theageoftruth/
http://www.reverbnation.com/theageoftruth

Tags: , , , , , ,

Days of Rona: Patrick Forrest of Eye Flys

Posted in Features on April 14th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The statistics of COVID-19 change with every news cycle, and with growing numbers, stay-at-home isolation and a near-universal disruption to society on a global scale, it is ever more important to consider the human aspect of this coronavirus. Amid the sad surrealism of living through social distancing, quarantines and bans on gatherings of groups of any size, creative professionals — artists, musicians, promoters, club owners, techs, producers, and more — are seeing an effect like nothing witnessed in the last century, and as humanity as a whole deals with this calamity, some perspective on who, what, where, when and how we’re all getting through is a needed reminder of why we’re doing so in the first place.

Thus, Days of Rona, in some attempt to help document the state of things as they are now, both so help can be asked for and given where needed, and so that when this is over it can be remembered.

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

eye flys patrick forrest

Days of Rona: Patrick Forrest of Eye Flys (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

How are you dealing with this crisis as a band? Have you had to rework plans at all? How is everyone’s health so far?

As a band, Eye Flys has had a few things happen because of this crisis. Our planned Euro tour with Full of Hell and Primitive Man was cancelled, which included an appearance at Roadburn Festival. Our touring was limited as it was this year already because of prior obligations, so it definitely hurt us. Future short touring plans we were squeezing in for early summer are in question right now also. Not sure how it will play out, or when we’ll be able to get out again. Our LP Tub of Lard was released just before that tour was to happen, and at the beginning of the subsequent lockdown. So that effected our LP release also. As far as personally, we are all doing okay in lockdown in our homes right now, and are safe with our significant others/loved ones.

What are the quarantine/isolation rules where you are?

There is a “Shelter in Place” and order for “non-essential” businesses to close, social distancing, and to stay inside unless you need to go out in Philadelphia. Locally, people here are starting to take it more seriously I think maybe, but not everyone unfortunately. There are still people hanging in parks and stuff like it’s another day off. Everyone needs to take this more seriously and stay the fuck inside if we want to help. Me and my girlfriend are safe and healthy in my small West Philly apartment right now with my five cats. I have a porch here, so we try to give each other space and time to do other things to stay occupied. I’ve been trying to stay busy with music, playing drums and skateboarding. Take walks close by if it’s safe, etc.

How have you seen the virus affecting the community around you and in music?

I’m a union stagehand in Philadelphia so, the impact has been tremendous. I typically work in the field of events, concerts/rock shows, A/V, etc. I have a house job at a local venue here that was gearing up for its busiest season ever. Things started to slowly get cancelled and around the 13th of March, then all the work for us literally vaporized overnight. I’m very fortunate to have a union job and organization in place to help me, and able to collect unemployment and keep health benefits. I am worried about the effects it will have on the industry when we do come out of this. Will it hit the ground running and be crazy busy to make up for lost time? Will people be too unsure to come out to events? It is effecting music for sure. People’s ability to tour, record, or just play music together, and write. The one positive I see is musicians at home using this time to stay in and focus on writing and creating. So maybe when this is all over we’ll have a ton of new great music to check out.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything?

STAY THE FUCK INSIDE.

https://www.facebook.com/EyeFlys/
https://www.instagram.com/eye_flys/
https://eyeflys.bandcamp.com/
http://www.thrilljockey.com/
https://www.facebook.com/ThrillJockey
https://instagram.com/thrilljockey
http://thrilljockeyrecords.bandcamp.com/

Tags: , , , , , ,