Dust Lovers Premiere “End Title: Film Noir” Video; Announce Name Change & Album Reissue

Posted in Bootleg Theater on June 13th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

dust lovers

Somehow, it seems appropriate that The Texas Chainsaw Dust Lovers would do some chopping. What the cinema-obsessed aggro heavy rocking Parisian four-piece have lobbed off, however, is a goodly portion of their moniker. On June 24, they’ll issue their 2017 album — their third — Film Noir, on vinyl through Besta Records, and presumably that will make the name change official: they’re just Dust Lovers now. Doesn’t matter if it comes from a Texas chainsaw or anywhere else.

Why the change? Why not? Plus, it seems like Dust Lovers — the lineup of guitarist/vocalist Clément Collot, guitarist Nagui Méhany, drummer Christophe Hogommat and bassist Étienne Collot — are looking to be taken a little more seriously, and the long moniker was a little goofy. In addition to the forthcoming LP of Film Noir, they’ll head out to play Hellfest in their home country later this month, so it’s easy to argue it’s already working, and with Ennio Morricone, Elvis, Kyuss and other influences in dust lovers film noirtheir material, there’s nothing to pull the listener out of the moment when listening. Dust Lovers is a pretty cool name. You can see why they’d want to roll with it.

And as for Film Noir, it originally came out last October and runs a pretty wide stylistic gamut while featuring a central plotline just the same. There’s the spiritual “Come by the River” and the ringing tones of and big hooks of “Let it Bleed” as well as the surf-gone-heavy party rock — finger snaps and all — of “Martyr with a Plan” ahead of the Queens of the Stone Age-style push in “California sur Marne,” but at the finale, Film Noir closes with its title-track, “End Title: Film Noir,” and takes a more brooding approach, grinning through a lounge-style subdued groove while holding a tension of something more fiendish beneath.

The video — copping stylistic influence from Tarantino, Italian horror, and, yes, classic film noir — for the song does likewise. Directed by Collot, it’s a murderous tale of maybe-revenge with deep-hued colors and enough faux blood to officially qualify as at least one bucket, if not multiple buckets. Looks like a good time was had during its making.

You can see the premiere of “End Title: Film Noir” below and once again, that Film Noir reissue is out June 24. Wait a minute! That’s the same day they’re at Hellfest! You’d almost swear these things were planned out ahead of time.

Take yourself to film school:

Dust Lovers, “Film Noir” official video premiere

Dust Lovers on “End Title: Film Noir”:

The song “End Title: Film Noir” was thought and crafted like a movie’s end credits. Like at the end of a flick, when the audience take their breath again, while digesting what they just saw. We did this video like we make a video, it was crafted like a short movie. As usual, our vocalist Clément Collot directed the whole thing alongside a proper video team for two days. (French director) Godard once said “to make a movie, you need a woman and a gun.” That’s what we did, taking our cue from giallo movies and Italian horror movies à la Dario Argento.

DUST LOVERS (new name!) – New video « Film Noir » taken off their third album « Film Noir » released Oct. 20th, 2017. The album is reissued on vinyl via Besta Records on June 24th. The band will be playing at Hellfest on the Valley Stage, Sunday 24th June.

FILM NOIR-
Directed by Clem Colt
Music by Dust Lovers
Recorded by Sylvain Biguet and Chris Hogommat
Mix by Chris Hogommat
Mastering by Brent Asbury
2018 / HUURG!! FILMS / BESTA RECORDS

Dust Lovers are:
Clément Collot – Guitar & Vocals
Nagui Méhany – Guitar & Harmonica
Christophe Hogommat – Drums
Étienne Collot – Bass

Dust Lovers on Thee Facebooks

Dust Lovers on Bandcamp

Besta Records on Thee Facebooks

Tags: , , , , , ,

Abrahma Recording New Album Next Month

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 13th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

abrahma

It seems like a really long time since Abrahma released their second album, Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird (review here), but the truth is it’s only three years. That record, also their second for Small Stone behind 2012’s Through the Dusty Paths of Our Lives (review here), also followed its predecessor by three years, so actually the pace is pretty consistent. Maybe it just feels like a long time to me because I’ve been talking about their third album since Oct. 2016. Maybe I just can’t fucking do math. I don’t know. Point is: hasn’t actually been that long.

And in that time, I don’t even know how many players founding guitarist/vocalist Sebastien Bismuth has been through. At least one full lineup, and I think another one minus a guitarist? In any case, today’s news that Abrahma will record their third long-player — which had the tentative title In Time for the Last Rays of Light when it was first announced but may or may not be called something else by now — will be recorded next month at Orgone Studios in Bedfordshire, UK, with Jaime Gomez Arellano (Orange Goblin, Ghost, Paradise Lost, etc.) at the helm would seem to indicate that the current five-piece incarnation of the band will be the one captured on tape. Fair enough, and here’s looking forward to what comes out of the session, since while it hasn’t actually been that long since their last one, I’ve still been anxious for new Abrahma for three years running.

The band sent the following down the PR wire:

ABRAHMA LOGO

Long time without news from us… But after many up and down we’re delighted to announce that our third album Will finally be recorded in July with Jaime Gomez Arellano at Orgone Studios.

This new album Will contain 7 songs and some surprises…

It took 3 years to give birth to this album and we really hope you’ll enjoy the fruit of this long work…

Stay tuned for more info….

Tracklisting:
– Lost.Forever.
– Lucidly Adrift
– Eclipse Of the Sane pt.1: Isolation Ghost
– Last Epistle
– Wander in Sedation
– Eclipse of the Sane part.2: Fiddler of the bottle
– There Bears the fruit of Deceit

Sébastien Bismuth – Vocals, Guitars
Florian Leguillon – Guitars, Vocals
Benjamin Carel – Guitars, Synths & Effects
Romain Hauduc – Bass, Vocals
Baptiste Keriel – Drums, Vocals

www.abrahmamusic.net
www.facebook.com/ABRAHMAMUSIC
www.twitter.com/ABRAHMAMUSIC

Abrahma, Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird (2015)

Tags: , , , , ,

Demande à la Poussière Premiere “L’Univers”; Self-Titled Debut Due Fall 2018

Posted in audiObelisk on June 11th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

demande a la poussiere

Parisian trio Demande à la Poussière are set to make their self-titled debut early this Fall on Argonauta Records. The project is new. Really new. As in, I-think-the-track-premiere-below-might-be-their-first-public-audio new. They were founded last year by members of The Great Old Ones, Würm and Nerv, among others, and when one considers the pedigree as well as the span of influences at work within it, it’s hardly a surprise the group’s first single from the album, “L’Univers,” is both so cohesive in its churn and so difficult to place in terms of genre. Hearty proportions of black metal, doom and noisy post-metallic churn make their way into the five-minute cut, and the three-down-from-five-piece of guitarists Jeff Grimal and Edgard Chevallier (the latter also programming) and vocalist Krys Fruit-Denhez call to mind a more charred version of German one-man outfit Owl in their rhythm and inescapable extremity.

As the leadoff of the eight-song/43-minute outing, “L’Univers” is charged with setting the grim but not overblown atmosphere upon which the rest of what follows ultimately builds. The band vary the balance throughout on songs like “Le Lendemain” and the marching groove of “L’Unique Certitude” and the near-apocalyptic “Condamnes,” with a consistency of tone and a malleable sound that keeps songwriting at the center while also allowing them to move outward into an ambient bleakness. The later cut “Accroche” teases some minimalism in its quiet stretches, soon enough giving way to explosive heft, and by the time they get down to closer “Drone” — which, yes, lives up to its name — Demande à la Poussière have found a cosmic place as rich in sound as it is in a sense of terror. Even then, Demande à la Poussière refuse to let go of their darkened sensibilities, the rage driving the creation, and what “L’Univers” starts only grows more virulent along the way.

Naturally, that’s the whole idea, and “L’Univers,” in its shove and its underlying current of noise, is indicative of much of what follows. As such, it’s all the more my pleasure to be able to host the premiere below. Demande à la Poussière‘s signing to Argonauta was just announced last month, but the record is done and in the can, so the early Fall release seems like a perfectly reasonable expectation at this point. I’ll hope to have more as we get closer to the actual drop date, but until then, you can listen to “L’univers” on the player here, with a quote from the band and more background info beneath that.

Please enjoy:

Demande à la Poussière, “L’Univers”

Demande à la Poussière on “L’Univers”:

“L’Univers” is the title that opens the album and that will undoubtedly herald a deluge of heaviness and disillusioned feelings. Pessimism as an engine for aggressiveness and reconstruction.

DEMANDE À LA POUSSIÈRE is a Blackened Post-core band founded in 2017 whose members come from experienced Black Metal, Hardcore and Indus scenes. Members are: Jeff (vocals and guitar – The Great Old Ones / Spectrale), Edgard Chevallier (machine – ex Würm / Gloomy Hellium Bath), Vincent Baglin (Moshi-Moshi-battery), Krys (chant-Nerv / Omrade), Jiu (Bass -ex No return), the band quickly records a first album at Lower tones Place Studio in September 2017. The band has diverse influences to offer a unique style. Combining heaviness Sludge / Doom, the blackness of Black Metal, the intensity of Post Hardcore tinged post rock atmosphere. This music is impacting, encompassing and intense. The name of the band is taken from a book by John Fante, but there is no connection to see it as the deep darkness of the music leads to other feelings.

Krys Fruit-denhez : Vocals
Jeff Grimal : Guitars
Edgard Chevallier : Guitars, Programming

Demande à la Poussière on Thee Facebooks

Argonauta Records website

Tags: , , , , ,

Domadora Announce June 29 Release for Lacuna

Posted in Whathaveyou on May 30th, 2018 by JJ Koczan

domadora

Last heard from with their 2016 sophomore outing, The Violent Mystical Sukuma (discussed here), Parisian heavy psychedelic three-or-four-piece Domadora have set a June 29 issue date for their new album, Lacuna. No audio from it as yet, but one imagines that can’t be far off, and given the sonic adventurousness that showed itself through their material their last time out, I’d expect the forthcoming four-track long-player to do a healthy bit of wandering. One would hope so, at least.

The PR wire has art and details and whatnots for the digging, so have at it:

domadora lacuna

DOMADORA announce the release of their third album “Lacuna” this June 29th.

France’s premium psychedelic jammers DOMADORA return with their long-awaited third full-length “Lacuna” this June 29th.

“Lacuna” commonly refers to the “empty space” or “void” from which everything takes shape. The void is at the beginning of everything: matter and time, light, sound and art. It is the starting point of the artwork. It just takes the scratching a match of creativity inside the void to generate an idea, a note, a melody… and feelings as well as emotions are born. So how is an idea born? Where does it come from? A Big Bang. Music is a way to reach mind elevation. DOMADORA’s music intends to put the willing listener into a state of trance and reach a state of elevation.

“Lacuna” is different from DOMADORA’s two previous albums and recorded far from the auditoriums of “Tibetan Monk” (2013) and “The Violent Mystical Sukuma” (2016). Domadora is convinced that context directly influences the intuitions and colours of improvised music. That’s the reason why the band has made the choice to record this album on an isolated farm in western France. Therefore, a very strong human experience and geographical isolation are on the list of ingredients of this album.

“Lacuna” was recorded and mixed by Brice Chandler, and mastered by Kent Stump in Crystal Clear Sound Wo Fat studios in Dallas, Texas.

TRACK LISTING:
1. Lacuna Jam
2. Gengis Khan
3. Vacuum Density
4. Tierra Last Homage

Artwork by Antoine d’Agata

The influences of Domadora are more in musical trends : free, uninhibited and daring to make music. Of course, you’re gonna easily think rock of the late 60’s and top 70 – but also to proto punk, the freedom of the area, or the heavy rock jam born in the desert. You can also find an influence in some classic pieces including the way to live a journey through successive wave intensities – from Pink Floyd to Fatso Jetson passing Led Zeppelin and Beethoven.

DOMADORA is
Organ – Angel Hidalgo Paterna
Drums – Karim Bouazza
Bass – Gui Omm
Guitars – Belwil

https://www.facebook.com/DomadoraBand
https://twitter.com/domadoraband
http://www.domadora.fr/
https://domadora.bandcamp.com/

Domadora, The Violent Mystical Sukuma (2016)

Tags: , , , , ,

Frank Sabbath, Are You Waiting?: Where There’s a Will, There’s a Weird

Posted in Reviews on November 24th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

Frank Sabbath Are You Waiting

It’s a hell of a question, if you think about it. Well, are you waiting? And if so, for what? The implication would seem to be that French weirdo rock trio Frank Sabbath is directly addressing their audience, but even then, it’s pretty open as to what they could be asking. Are we waiting for the three-piece themselves? Are we waiting for Are You Waiting?, which is their third album behind last year’s Telluric Wanderers (discussed here) and their 2015 self-titled debut (review here)? Or is it a question about the question itself, as in, what are we waiting for? And if so, what’s the answer? Shouldn’t we just dive in, to the four-song/34-minute long-player and just about everything else?

Are they asking about the way we’re living our lives, or is it like when you’re at the grocery store and you can’t tell if someone is actually on the checkout line or if they’re just mesmerized by the slew of magazine covers and candybars left there to be impulse purchases. Excuse me, are you waiting? To some degree or other, aren’t we all?

The answers aren’t exactly forthcoming throughout Are You Waiting?, but the immediate affect the question has lingers and would seem to play directly into the band’s intention to shake their listeners out of a comfort zone. With a parabolic structure of two six-minute tracks — opener “Goat” (6:40) and closer “Sasume” (6:00) — bookending two longer jammers in “Lazarus” (11:25) and “Take the Lead” (10:09), the record sets itself up for mirrored-style vinyl sides, but works with a linear flow as well, each piece seeming to offer something of its own to the overarching freaked-out entirety.

The expectation going into Are You Waiting?, which arrives in a handmade CD sleeve under the banner of the band’s own Bermuda Cruise Records imprint, shouldn’t necessarily be that Frank Sabbath — who continue to have very much picked the correct moniker — will never lock into a solid groove together and rock out because they’re too busy being oddballs. Apart perhaps from “Sasume,” the abundant and maybe-Japanese lyrics of which seem like a questionable choice at best, politically and in terms of the raw sonic outcome, there’s very little on Are You Waiting? to evoke that check-us-out-we’re-weird, post-Mr. Bungle performative sort of experimentalism. It’s more about sonic quirk.

Despite “Sasume” and despite the fact that “Lazarus” and “Take the Lead” both have lyrics, it’s probably fair to say the album is mostly instrumental, since that’s where the bulk of its impression is made, and as they start off “Goat” with an immediate freakout before guitarist Jude Mas, bassist Guillaume Jankowski and drummer Baptiste Reig tap into a kind of uptempo, low-end-driven surf rock, the spirit is immersive in its blend of grunge skronk and offkilter rhythmic turns. Maybe more immersive than one might think, in fact. Subtly, Mas and Jankowski set a theme of interplay between the guitar and bass that will continue into “Lazarus” and be most effectively put to use in “Take the Lead,” and this happens with a bit of subterfuge via the overarching groove being propelled by Reig‘s drums, which by the time they get to the opener’s fifth minute is practically space rock in its thrust.

frank sabbath (photo robin levet)

They cap that launch with another freakout to mirror that at the start, and it’s not until a couple minutes into the fuzz-drenched “Lazarus” that the first lyrics on Are You Waiting? arrive, following nuanced lead guitar work and a corresponding fluidity of bass that in tone and in terms of what Jankowski does to complement the work of Mas and Reig both, qualifies as being of the “must-hear” variety. They slow down at about three minutes in to make room for the verse over a heavy psychedelic drift, but are soon enough on their way again, and though they might seem to meander, I’m not at all convinced Frank Sabbath don’t have an underlying plan at work in their extended solos and instrumental stretches, making their work progressive rather than haphazard or merely the manifestation of jams put to tape.

“Take the Lead” further demonstrates this idea with a fluidity that not only makes it a highlight of Are You Waiting?, but sets Frank Sabbath apart from the bulk of European heavy psych in terms of their chemistry and the approach they undertake, which seems as much inspired by Samsara Blues Experiment as Zappa himself. But it’s ultimately the patience of the execution itself that one finds most encouraging when it comes to the basic listening experience, and that makes the goof-off rush of “Sasume” something of an atmospheric crash landing as it rounds out the LP.

This is obviously by design, and I’m not going to hold their having a fun against Frank Sabbath or anyone else for that matter — at least not most of the time — but there’s something about the way the Japanese language is used in “Sasume” that comes through more like someone doing an impression of old samurai movies than actually speaking the language. Lyrics are spoken, seemingly back and forth between the band members, while beneath they do lock into a more than solid groove, once more held together by the bass and drums as the guitar goes off where it will. “Sasume” rolls out a stoner rock-style instrumental hook and spends the final two of its six minutes first in a layered guitar solo and then with a late inclusion of keys/organ that signals a rhythmic turn into the last big push that ends.

It is the nature of experimentation that sometimes ideas work and sometimes they don’t, and while I’m not prepared to call “Sasume” a dud for the effect its increased pace has on the final statement the album makes overall, it feels nearly like an element of minstrelsy is at play, and even if that’s born of an appreciation for the Japanese language and culture, it’s almost too easy to read it into another context. Still, and again, Frank Sabbath acquit themselves well throughout Are You Waiting?, and while we may never get the response directly to that question, the sense by the time the record is done is that the trio have only just started to really explore the heights their chemistry might attain and the reaches they might yet conjure as songwriters.

In that sense, yes, we are waiting, but they’ve certainly provided plenty to chew on in the meantime in their most realized work to-date.

Frank Sabbath, Are You Waiting? (2017)

Frank Sabbath on Thee Facebooks

Frank Sabbath on Bandcamp

Bermuda Cruise Records website

Tags: , , , , , ,

Lark Self-Titled EP Due out Oct. 31; New Teaser Streaming

Posted in Whathaveyou on October 5th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

lark

Newcomer modern progressive metal duo Lark is comprised of Raphaël and Zacharie Mizzi, former members of Sail in Between and Bright Curse, respectively. Their self-released, self-titled debut EP is due out on Halloween, and though listening to opener “Hailstorm” it seems easy enough to figure out the release — yeah, it’s got some of that post-Baroness winding proggy riffing, multiple vocal layers, etc. — by the time they get into the subsequent “Red Eye,” that pretty much goes out the window. The second track takes on a much more metallic feel, with growled and deathly vocals and a harsher vibe all the way around.

Between “Decay,” “Too Far Gone” and “Heavy,” which follow, Lark never quite get back to that kind of intensity again on the EP, but no question that on first listen it’s a jarring shift that makes it much harder to predict where they might end up in a given track — and likewise on any future release. Pretty awesome and unexpected turn.

The EP is out Oct. 31 and they have a teaser posted for it now, which came down the PR wire along with the following info:

lark lark

LARK to release debut EP on Halloween

Progressive sludge/stoner metal band LARK are set to release their debut, self-titled album on October 31st 2017. The band features former members of BRIGHT CURSE and SAIL IN BETWEEN.

Lark is the overdue collaboration of two French brothers, Raph, former guitarist and lead singer of Sail In Between and former bassist of Angher Incorporated and Zach, former drummer of Bright Curse. The elder resides in their native south of France, while the younger moved to London in 2009 to explore the UK music scene.

Zach evolved in the Stoner, Psyche and Hard Rock tones in recent years while Raph followed his love for Hardcore and Prog, but their tastes meet in a Rock and Metal avalanche of riffs, grooves and all that is heavy. They shared a vision of music that combines massive and textured sound with the groove of their early metal influence.

The two brothers rapidly found ways around the distance between them and started their first creative collaboration at the beginning of 2017. The EP came to life thanks to the help of Robin Mariat of Grey Matter Studio (Lyon, Fr), Chris Painter of Red Roof Sounds (London, Uk), Marco of Marc&Cheese (London, Uk) and Jake Read of Living Room Studios (London, Uk).

The band is set to release their first EP “Lark’’, a new blend of metal inspired by Mastodon, Opeth, Gojira, Black Peaks, Russian Circles and more this fall. The D day is set for Halloween 2017 when their extensive network of VIPs will meet and celebrate at a location not yet disclosed.

facebook.com/LarkBandOfficial/
instagram.com/lark_band/

Lark, Lark teaser trailer

Tags: , , , , ,

Quarterly Review: Nibiru, The Ditch and the Delta, Cyanna Mercury, Surya Kris Peters, Golden Bats, Blind Hen, The Black Wizards, Low Flying Hawks, Brother Sister Hex, Cold Insight

Posted in Reviews on September 28th, 2017 by JJ Koczan

the obelisk quarterly review

Ready for round three of the Fall 2017 Quarterly Review? I hope so, because it’s a doozy. Things get pretty weird and pretty rockin’ in this batch, and at the risk of being completely honest, I much prefer it that way. It’s a varied group — maybe the most diverse in terms of sound throughout the entire week, though there’s stiff competition still to come — and as we hit the 30th review, that brings us to the halfway point of the Quarterly Review itself, which if all keeps proceeding according to plan will wrap up on Monday with a grand total of 60 done. Let’s hope no pianos fall on my head between now and then, literally or figuratively. Onward.

Quarterly Review #21-30:

Nibiru, Qaal Babalon

nibiru qaal babalon

The fourth full-length from Italian sludge ritualists Nibiru, Qaal Babalon (on Argonauta) is an encompassing, 57-minute grind comprised of four extended tracks, the longest of which is opener (immediate points) “Oroch” at 19:07 – a song whose depths run dark and cruel and which, even when the tempo pushes upward from its initial slow crawl, still feels massively slow. Still, the spirit behind “Oroch” as well as the following and much faster “Faboan” (10:51), the buzzsaw noise cutting avant insanity of “Bahal Gah” (16:40) and full-drone rite of “Oxex” (11:05) is less directly about the punishment itself than about the exploration enacted thereby. That is, Nibiru aren’t just heavy for heaviness’ own sake and they’re not just assaulting their listenership without reason. Though I won’t take away from its raw sonic impact, Qaal Babalon’s greatest asset is its atmospheric impression and the experimentalism it brings to bear, which moves Nibiru into a terrifying place sound-wise that they seem to have all to themselves.

Nibiru on Thee Facebooks

Argonauta Records website

 

The Ditch and the Delta, Hives in Decline

the-ditch-and-the-delta-hives-in-decline

Hailing from the unlikely heavy hotbed of Salt Lake City, Utah – though where better for a counterculture to emerge? – sludge rocking trio The Ditch and the Delta made their debut earlier in 2017 with the seven-song Hives in Decline via Battleground Records before being picked up by Prosthetic for this reissue. Comprised of bassist/vocalist Kory Quist (see also: Making Fuck), guitarist/vocalist Elliot Secrist and drummer Charles Bogus, the three-piece pummel handily throughout early cuts like opener and longest track (immediate points) “Hives in Decline” “Fuck on Asphalt” and the nodding “Sleeping Dogs,” but with the instrumental interlude “Dry Land,” they tap into post-Across Tundras heavy Americana and in that brief two-minute stretch deeply affect the mood of the release overall. They’re back to angular noise rock turns soon enough on “Till Body Quits” and the Remission-era-Mastodon-style “Mud” before alternating between lurching crush and airier prog/post-rock on closer “Dread Spectacle,” but by then the secret’s out of their underlying complexity, and rather than offset the sense of drive in the prior cuts, one finds them only enhanced by the later unfolding. Intense, and very much in the process of sorting through these impulses, but loaded with potential.

The Ditch and the Delta on Thee Facebooks

The Ditch and the Delta at Prosthetic Records

 

Cyanna Mercury, Archetypes

Cyanna-Mercury-Archetypes

From Greek dialogue in “Hermes” to the Nick Cave-style piano balladry of “Apollo” to the organ-and-handclaps Mediterranean pop underscoring “Lilith”’s boogie and the spoken verses and explosive hook of “Snake” ahead of moody closer “There will be a Time,” Cyanna Mercury’s debut long-player, Archetypes, seems to leave no sonic stone unturned. The Athens-based five-piece hone a thoroughly progressive approach across the 10-track/40-minute (plus a CD bonus track) outing, touching on heavy psych in opener “Horse Dark as Night” and injecting a darker theatricality into centerpiece “Ode to the Absent Father” and the later “Nothing We Can Do,” but refusing to relegate themselves ultimately to one sound or another. Elements of folk, heavy rock, psychedelia, classic prog, pop and more besides show themselves across what’s a legitimate head-trip of a record, and though it’s hard to get a grip on where Cyanna Mercury are ultimately headed with this sonic brew already so potent and already so much their own, they seem to be completely in control of how it all plays out in arrangement and songwriting, and they work quickly to earn the listener’s trust via a resonant overarching flow that renders Archetypes truly immersive. Will fly under most radar, but a stunningly creative debut.

Cyanna Mercury on Thee Facebooks

Cyanna Mercury on Bandcamp

 

Surya Kris Peters, 2nd Chances

surya-kris-peters-second-chances

Numerically-titled three-song EP 2nd Chances is – since we’re going by the numbers – the third release of 2017 from Surya Kris Peters, behind the synth-driven Dream Exit EP digitally-issued this past summer and January’s Holy Holy Holy (review here) full-length. With it, Samsara Blues Experiment frontman Christian Peters further expands the contextual breadth of his solo work, revisiting songs from his prior outfit Terraplane in the Mellotron-infused melancholy of “Smalltown Blues” and the quick, folkish rambling instrumental “Dark Euphoria” while also covering Jefferson Airplane’s “Come up the Years” between. All told, it’s only 10 minutes long, but Peters brings a particularly progressive psychedelic folk vibe to the tracks, and from the shimmering guitar lead that takes hold in “Come up the Years” and the intimate feel of “Smalltown Blues” despite an arrangement of keys, vocals, multiple layers of guitar and effects, an emotional and sonic resonance is still very much achieved. One never wants to guess what Peters will do next, but if he had a full-length of this kind of thing out at some point, you wouldn’t be likely to find me complaining.

Surya Kris Peters on Soundcloud

Electric Magic Records on Bandcamp

 

Golden Bats, Residual Dread

golden-bats-residual-dread

An underlying mournfulness pervades Golden BatsResidual Dread, or maybe that’s just the Brisbane-based solo-project of multi-instrumentalist/vocalist/engineer Geordie Stafford living up to the title chosen for the album on “Nothing.” Elsewhere, Residual Dread takes on guitar-as-keyboard plotted soloing in 11-minute closer “The Crows Build a Fire” and find a place between black metal and doomly roll, and add piano to tapped Godflesh-style programming on opener “Trouble in the Sewers” and bring organ to the relative bounce of “Eye Juices” as far-back echoing shouts provide the vocal presence. Setting elements against each other would seem to be a core aspect of Stafford’s intent, and the feel on Residual Dread is more about the smashing them together and seeing what happens than trying to gently meld one idea from two or three. That lends a raw, experimentalist sensibility to the lumber of “Outer Body” and “Into the Silver Valley” that serves them well, like a Large Hadron Collider driven by riffs and thickness of tone.

Golden Bats on Thee Facebooks

Haemorrhage Records webstore

 

Blind Hen, Life

blind-hen-life

In its first two minutes, Blind Hen’s “As a Monster” moves from electronica-style Euro dance rock to heavy-riffed progressive metal. Then it turns back. This is just the start of the Finnish four-piece’s four-track/21-minute Life EP, and “Titanic” follows stylistic suit with an even more intense thrust early before moving into psychedelia in its second half with an underlying tension in its beat to contrast the melodic wash overtop. The chugging “The Maze” is more guitar-led and straightforward, but even there, Blind Hen find room for nuance in their vocal arrangement, also bringing in acoustics amid the multiple layers of singing, and with a sample at the outset, closer “Catch” moves once again toward the danceability of the earlier fare, if in a via-Mr.Bungle rhythmic restlessness rather than the fusion beatmaking. Weird, weird, weird. What draws Life together is the fact that Blind Hen cross this aesthetic swath with stuck-in-your-head choruses as a constant, essentially giving the audience something to grasp onto while they go wherever they want in terms of sound. It is appreciated to say the least, and shows the band to be all the more attuned to their craft, even when they seem at their most unhinged.

Blind Hen on Thee Facebooks

Blind Hen on Bandcamp

 

The Black Wizards, What the Fuzz!

the-black-wizards-what-the-fuzz

If you’ve got 68 minutes, Portuguese four-piece The Black Wizards are ready to have a heavy blues shindig on their second 2LP full-length, What the Fuzz!, and I do believe we’re all invited. The nine-song outing emphasizes the vocals of guitarist Joana Brito, who emerges on post-intro opener “Freaks and Geeks” with a prominent kind of trilling in her voice of the sort Parker Griggs brings to Radio Moscow that holds for the duration as a steady presence. Joined by guitarist Paulo Ferreira, bassist/acoustic guitarist B and drummer/backing vocalist Helena Peixoto, Brito leads the way through the fuzzy rollout of the nine-minute “The Story of an Hopeless Drummer” (sic), stepping back to let the guitar/bass have a righteously nodding moment late in the track, but holds firm in a forward position on the short, twanging “Just Not Today” as well as the early going of the prior subdued-blues-smoker highlight “Floating Blues.” “Build Your Home,” “I Don’t Wanna Die” and the particularly-classic-sounding “Fire” revive the classic heavy rock spirit of “Freaks and Geeks,” and 16-minute finale “Everything is Good Until Trouble Comes” uses its extra runtime for a satisfying and patient execution with an expanded arrangement including choral vocals, organ and additional guitar effects. You might be boogied out by the time they’re done, but as The Black Wizards crash through their big finish, they sound like their party’s just getting started.

The Black Wizards on Thee Facebooks

The Black Wizards on Bandcamp

 

Low Flying Hawks, Genkaku

low-flying-hawks-genkaku

One might expect that with all the Melvins affiliation going on in the second Magnetic Eye Records full-length from L.A. duo Low Flying Hawks, Genkaku would sound, you know, more like the Melvins, but despite working with bassist Trevor Dunn, drummer Dale Crover and producer Toshi Kasai, and despite bringing in Buzz Osbourne for guest vocal spots on eight-minute opener/longest track (immediate points) “Smile” and side B leadoff “Space Wizard,” initials-only multi-instrumentalists EHA and AAL follow their 2016 debut, Kofuku (review here), with a sound even more their own, balancing between thick riffy rollout and post-rock atmospherics. Of course, they weird out a bit on “Smile” and the lumberingly spacious “Uncool” and “Virgin Witch,” but whether it’s the later mournfulness of “Hallucination” or “Twilight” toying with noisy fuckall while seeming to mock heavy rocker burl ahead of the melodic payoff in closer “Sinister Waves,” there’s more EHA and AAL in Low Flying Hawks than the prominent pedigree of their collaborators might lead you to believe. All the better for what becomes a richly satisfying 43-minute listen rife with depth, patience, and yes, personality.

Low Flying Hawks on Thee Facebooks

Magnetic Eye Records on Bandcamp

 

Brother Sister Hex, End Times

brother-sister-hex-end-times

Coherent songwriting rests at the core of what Denver’s Brother Sister Hex bring to their five-song third EP, End Times, which darkens up Queens of the Stone Age-circa-Songs for the Deaf vibing on its title-track (also a bit of Kyuss’ “El Rodeo” in there for good measure) before delving into more ambient fare on the centerpiece “Confessions.” Vocalist/guitarist Colfax Mingo demonstrates SubRosa-style vocal command there, but the context is more rock-based, uptempo and straightforward as she, guitarist Patrick Huddleson, bassist Drew Hicks and guest-drummer Jordan Palmer (Plastic Daggers) meld traditionalist structures with atmospheric moodiness. Opener “Hey” offers a suitable greeting through hook and groove, and the shuffle of “Sweet and Sleazy” and the rumbling fuzz (Hicks makes it a highlight) of closer “News Feed” wraps with another grunge-style QOTSA melody efficiently drawn, shouting the question “what have we done?” as it thuds into its second half. Uh, you’ve made a professional-sounding, excellently-constructed EP that shows you’re more than ready to embark on a debut full-length, permanent drummer or no. So yeah, get on that.

Brother Sister Hex on Thee Facebooks

Brother Sister Hex on Bandcamp

 

Cold Insight, Further Nowhere

cold-insight-further-nowhere

As progressive as it is brutal, Further Nowhere is ostensibly the debut release from Paris’ Cold Insight. The material seems to date back at least to 2013, if not earlier than that, when band-spearhead Sébastien Pierre (also of Enshine, Fractal Gates, and others) first issued what’s now tagged as a “pre-production album” version, but it’s hardly as though the lush, growling, melodeathly doom sounds dated. With sonic likenesses throughout to bands like Amorphis, Dark Tranquility and Paradise Lost, Cold Insight – on which Pierre, who also did the artwork, is joined by drummer Christian Netzell while Jari Lindholm adds lead guitar – hit on a very particular, very European style, and not an unfamiliar one as displayed in the righteously driving “Distance,” but the find-the-beauty-in-darkness spirit behind “Close Your Eyes” and songs like “Even Dies a Sun” and the more uptempo later piece “I Will Rise” help ensure that the formidable 12-song/66-minute run of Further Nowhere never gets too bogged down in its melancholy. It may have been a while in the making, and one hopes a follow-up won’t take as long to arrive, but the precise execution Pierre hones in these songs and the depths to which he can bring a willing audience are a fitting payoff for the years of work that went into their construction.

Cold Insight on Thee Facebooks

Cold Insight on Bandcamp

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Frank Sabbath to Release Are You Waiting? Oct. 2; New Song Streaming

Posted in Whathaveyou on September 22nd, 2017 by JJ Koczan

This one’s coming up quickly, so keep an eye out. French trio Frank Sabbath released their second album, Telluric Wanderers (discussed here), last year through Argonauta as the follow-up to their 2015 self-titled debut (review here), and even after two later-2016 sessions-type offerings posted on their Bandcamp, it would seem the Paris/Montpellier troupe are unwilling to let 2017 pass without a proper full-length, so on Oct. 2 they’ll drop Are You Waiting?, of which they’re giving a first taste now in the off-the-wall “Sasume.”

Crazed is nothing new as regards a general status for these guys, but I feel like this might even be a different level in that regard. Not sure how I feel about those maybe-Japanese vocals, but it’s weird, and the bass tone is inarguable, so there are definitely elements working in its favor.

Are You Waitingwill be Frank Sabbath‘s first record through their new label, Bermuda Cruise, and you can see more info about it below, courtesy of the PR wire, as well as hear “Sasume” if you’re feeling particularly brave:

frank-sabbath-are-you-waiting

Frank Sabbath is proud to reveal the cover and first extract from their new album, Are You Waiting?

With their third album Are You Waiting? the French psychedelic jokesters Frank Sabbath present a concentrate of their composition style in four songs, ranging from high energy psychedelic rock, to progressive doom-laden melodies, and trippy atmospheric soundscapes.

The first track off the album, “Sasume,” album premiere is a japanese infused psychedelic tune, reminding the seemingly forgotten times where humor did belong in rock music.

Are You Waiting? will be released on CD and digital format by the new associative label Bermuda Cruise, which is focusing on psychedelic, experimental and improvised music. The date of release for the album is set to October 2nd.

Frank Sabbath is:
Guillaume Jankowski : Bass
Baptiste Reig : Drums, vocals
Jude Mas : Guitare électrique, vocals
Léo Minart : Sound engineer, tapist

https://www.facebook.com/franksabbath.band/
https://franksabbath.bandcamp.com/
http://bermudacruise.fr/

Frank Sabbath, “Sasume”

Tags: , , , , , ,